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Office: Health Research and Policy - HRP Redwood Building, Room T152F
Mail Code: 94305-5405
Phone: Misty Mazzara (650) 723-5456
Email: hrpadmissions@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://med.stanford.edu/hrp.html

Courses offered by the Department of Health Research and Policy are listed under the subject code HRP on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Department of Health Research and Policy has two principal areas of scholarly interest:

  1. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of illness and impairment in human populations. Epidemiology training provides analytic tools for clinical and translational research, including studies of disease etiology, prevention, and therapy.
  2. Health Policy/Health Services Research is concerned with many aspects of health policy analysis in the public and private sectors.

Graduate Programs in Health Research and Policy

The programs in Epidemiology and the programs in Health Policy are housed in the Department of Health Research and Policy. These programs offer master's degrees and doctoral degrees in Epidemiology and Clinical Research and in Health Policy.  

For additional information, send email to hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

The department offers a Master of Science in Health Policy and a Master of Science in Epidemiology & Clinical Research.

Master of Science in Health Policy

University requirements for the M.S. degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The master's degree program in Health Policy seeks to train students in the quantitative analysis of issues in health and medical care. The program is based upon an individual development plan, and includes both course work and completion of a master's project under the direction of a program core faculty member. The typical student in the program is a physician who has completed residency training and is preparing for a research career; the program also admits Stanford medical students and others with a strong background in health policy analysis. The core faculty interests include outcomes research, health economics, health care organization, health care access, implementation science, quality of care, decision analysis, clinical guidelines, and assessment of patient preferences and quality of life.

To receive the degree, students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of issues in health policy and the quantitative skills necessary for research in this area. Students must take at least 45 units of course work and write a University thesis. The course work requirements are:

Required Courses:

Units
HRP 261Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data3
HRP 262Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression, Prediction, Survival Analysis3
HRP 391Health Law: Finance and Insurance3
HRP 392Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4
Required for students funded by NIH training grants:
MED 255The Responsible Conduct of Research1
OR
MED 255CThe Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers1

 Concentration Requirements:

Units
Choose 1 of the following Concentration Courses:
HRP 218Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation2
HRP 252Outcomes Analysis4
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 263Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health3

Thesis Units: 

Units
At least 12 units of thesis units:
HRP 399Graduate Research12-15

Pre-approved electives include:

Additional approved elective courses to complete the program total of at least 45 units. Other electives, consistent with the student's individual development plan, may be approved by the student's faculty adviser and the program director.

Units
HRP 206Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis3
HRP 214Scientific Writing2-3
HRP 219Evaluating Technologies for Diagnosis, Prediction and Screening3
HRP 223Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS2
HRP 229Spectrum Scholars Seminar1
HRP 234Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health4
HRP 249Topics in Health Economics I2-5
HRP 254Quality & Safety in U.S. Healthcare3
HRP 251Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials3
HRP 258Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research3
HRP 259Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology3
HRP 264Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference1
GSBGEN 551Innovation and Management in Health Care2
MED 129Health Care Systems Around the World4
MED 236Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health3
MED 273Biodesign for Digital Health3
PEDS 202APractical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis3
PEDS 202BPractical Applications for Qualitative Data Analysis3
STATS 216Introduction to Statistical Learning3
STATS 266Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies2-3

For additional information on course requirements and admissions process, please see our department website.

Please address inquiries to the HRP Education Program Manager at 650-723-5456 or hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

Master of Science in Epidemiology and Clinical Research

University requirements for the M.S. degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The Graduate Program in Epidemiology offers instruction and interdisciplinary research opportunities leading to the M.S. degree in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of illness and impairment in human populations. Epidemiologic methods are used by clinical investigators and by other scientists who conduct observational and experimental research on the identification, prevention, and treatment of human disorders.

Core and affiliated faculty come from the Department of Health Research and Policy and other Stanford University departments. The program has particular strengths in cancer epidemiology, cardiovascular disease epidemiology, epidemiologic methods, genetic epidemiology, global health, infectious disease epidemiology, musculoskeletal disease epidemiology, neuroepidemiology, and reproductive epidemiology and women's health.  Students can select an optional concentration in global health or infectious diseases.

The mission of the Stanford University School of Medicine is to be a premier research-intensive medical school that improves health through leadership, diversity, and collaborative discoveries and innovation in patient care, education and research. The Graduate Program in Epidemiology fosters this mission through the training of physician investigators in techniques of clinical research. The department also welcomes students from other disciplines who would benefit from formal training in epidemiologic methods. The master's degree in Epidemiology and Clinical Research provides students with the skills essential to patient-oriented clinical research, including epidemiologic methods and statistical analysis.

For undergraduates at Stanford University, the program offers a coterminal M.S. in Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Coterminal students have the opportunity to pursue epidemiological research at the intersection of public health, disease treatment, and disease prevention.  Additional information on our coterminal M.S. program can be found on our department website.

To receive the M.S. degree, students are expected to obtain a grounding in epidemiologic methods and applied biostatistics and to demonstrate research skills through the completion of a thesis. The master's degree program is typically completed in two years (four to six quarters).

Students must complete at least 45 units of approved course work as well as a master's thesis which is usually based on original research related to clinical epidemiology.

REQUIRED COURSES:

Epidemiologic methods:

Units
HRP 225Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies3
HRP 226Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods3
HRP 251Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials3

Biostatistics:

Units
HRP 259Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology3
HRP 261Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data3
HRP 262Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression, Prediction, Survival Analysis3

Research seminar:

Units
HRP 236Epidemiology Research Seminar (at least 3 units)1

Research:

Units
HRP 399Graduate Research (at least 12 units)12

Research conduct:

Units
MED 255The Responsible Conduct of Research1
OR
MED 255CThe Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers1

Other approved selective and elective courses to complete the program total of at least 45 units.

Pre-approved Electives

Units
HRP 206Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis3
HRP 212Cross Cultural Medicine3
HRP 214Scientific Writing2-3
HRP 216Analytical and Practical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Research2-3
HRP 218Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation2
HRP 219Evaluating Technologies for Diagnosis, Prediction and Screening3
HRP 223Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS2
HRP 231Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases3
HRP 234Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health4
HRP 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
HRP 237Practical Approaches to Global Health Research3
HRP 238Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health2-3
HRP 239Statistical Methods for Group Comparisons and Causal Inference3
HRP 244Developing Measurement Tools for Health Research2
HRP 249Topics in Health Economics I2-5
HRP 252Outcomes Analysis4
HRP 254Quality & Safety in U.S. Healthcare3
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 263Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health3
HRP 264Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference1
HRP 265Advanced Methods for Meta-Analysis2
HRP 267Life Course Epidemiology2
HRP 292Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies2-3
HRP 391Health Law: Finance and Insurance3
HRP 392Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4

Any graduate level HRP courses with primary focus on epidemiology or health services content or methods can be taken as electives, if approved by the student's epidemiology advisor.

Notes:

  • HRP 251 is recommended but not required for coterminal students and students in designated tracks.  
  • Students are assigned a methodology mentor from the Division of Epidemiology and they also select a research mentor, who may be from another department. For physicians, the research mentor is often a faculty member from the department of the student's clinical specialty.
  • See the Division of Epidemiology web site for additional information regarding our program and admissions process.
  • Address inquiries to the HRP Education Program Manager at 650-723-5456 or hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

Coterminal Master of Science in Epidemiology and Clinical Research

The coterminal master's degree is available only to current Stanford undergraduates. The M.S. entails a minimum of 45 units of course work but can require more depending upon the courses chosen and the previous training of the student; a minimum of 12 units must be applied towards the master’s thesis.

The coterminal Master of Science program follows the same program requirements as the Master of Science (academic), except that the student is not required to take the course in Clinical Trials. Students who desire to concentrate in a specific area can participate in one of the track areas (Infectious Diseases, Global Health), although this is not required. To pursue a research project, the student must make arrangements with program faculty. Coterminal students are enrolled full-time and courses are taken on campus. Graduates of this program are prepared to contribute creatively to basic or applied projects in epidemiology and clinical research.  The department anticipates that many go on to Ph.D. programs, M.D. degrees, or to pursue careers in public health, pharma or biotech.

Coterminal students must have at least one quarter of overlap in the undergraduate and graduate career prior to conferring their undergraduate degree. See the "Coterminal Degrees" section of this bulletin for additional details. See also the Registrar's coterminal degrees pages.

Funding Sources

Access to financial aid and other options for coterminal students depends on the number of units and quarters as a registered student at Stanford. Coterminal students have full access to undergraduate sources of financial aid until their twelfth quarter or four years of study. Coterminal students who have completed 180 units are eligible for University fellowships and assistantships. However, many federal and private fellowships and assistantships are awarded only to students who have received the bachelor’s degree. Even after the conferral of the bachelor’s degree, there is no guarantee that a coterminal student be awarded financial support via a RA-ship, TA-ship, or fellowship.

Coterms may choose to obtain their bachelor's degree early after completion of requirements. However, all classes after conferral of the degree may only be counted towards the graduate degree. Part of the strategy that allows coterms maximal flexibility in their course of study is their dual status as both undergraduate and graduate student.

For additional information on the application process, see the department's coterminal page. Address inquiries to the HRP Education Program Manager at 650-723-5456 or hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken during or after the first quarter of the sophomore year are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career; the timing of the first graduate quarter is not a factor. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Ph.D. in Epidemiology and Clinical Research

Overview

The field of epidemiology is poised to undergo major changes, and this Ph.D. program offers a cutting-edge curriculum that reflects this shift. Driven by technological advancements, the availability of very large datasets, and the omics revolution, epidemiology is moving toward what some have called Big Epidemiology, where epidemiologists partner with other scientists to study vast amounts of data. Thus, this program will train epidemiologists and clinical researchers to be savvy in technology, computing, data mining, bioinformatics, and genomics. The curriculum capitalizes on Stanford’s unique strengths in these disciplines.

After matriculating, students will meet with their academic advisers to plan out an individually tailored curriculum.  Students who matriculate with prior training in epidemiology and statistics may replace introductory core courses with more advanced courses, subject to approval. Beyond core course requirements, students select electives that delve deeper into a particular area of specialization of their choosing. Innovative online learning approaches will help meet the needs of physician-students, who will also be busy with clinical duties.

Students will take core courses in epidemiology and biostatistics. In addition to these core courses, Ph.D. students must additionally take 3 “big epidemiology” elective courses in three key areas:

  1. an advanced quantitative course (encompassing statistics, computer science, or economics)
  2. a big data course
  3. a genetics/genomics/bioinformatics course

Degree Requirements

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Ph.D. students must complete a minimum of 135 units (as per University requirements), including 45 course units exclusive of HRP 236 Epidemiology Research Seminar, HRP 299 Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy, and HRP 399 Graduate Research .

Units
Epidemiologic methods sequence
HRP 225Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies3
HRP 226Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods3
HRP 251Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials (Required of students in the clinical research concentration: other doctoral students may opt to replace HRP251 with an alternate epidemiology course.)3
Biostatistics sequence
HRP 259Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology3
HRP/STATS 261Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data3
HRP 262Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression, Prediction, Survival Analysis3
“Big Epidemiology” elective course
Take one of the following advanced quantitative courses3-4
Any 200-level STATS course (other than STATS 260)
Theory of Probability
Analytical and Practical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Research
Outcomes Analysis
Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care
Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis
Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies
Big data course
Take one of the following big data courses3-4
Data Driven Medicine
Mining Massive Data Sets
Data Mining and Analysis
Machine Learning
Big Data and Causal Inference
Genetics/genomics/bioinformatics course
Take one of the following genetics/genomics/bioinformatics courses3-4
Translational Bioinformatics
Introduction to Statistical Genetics
Biology, Health and Big Data
Principles of Pharmacogenomics
The Human Genome Source Code
Genomics and Personalized Medicine
Statistical and Machine Learning Methods for Genomics
Statistical and Machine Learning Methods for Genomics
Other core courses/requirements
MED 255The Responsible Conduct of Research1
Electives
Take electives chosen in consultation with the academic adviser to total 135 units.64-71
Total Units Required135

Additional Requirements

  1. Attendance at one meeting of the Human Subjects Panel (Institutional Review Board).

  2. Attendance at one meeting of the GCRC Protocol Review Committee.

  3. R Proficiency: students must show proficiency in the computing language R or must take an approved course in R.

  4. Attendance at the twice monthly Epidemiology and Clinical Research PhD workshops.

  5. Doctoral students fulfill the remaining University unit requirements through doctoral dissertation work.

Advising

Academic advising by our faculty is a critical component of our graduate students' education.  

All matriculating students will be assigned a faculty adviser from the group of core faculty to help them design their academic program.  

The program adheres to the advising guidelines and responsibilities listed by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and in the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures manual.  

See the department's website for additional information on degree requirements and admissions process. Address inquiries to the HRP Education Program Manager at 650-723-5456 or hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

Ph.D. in Health Policy

Stanford Health Policy, through the Department of Health Research and Policy at the Stanford University School of Medicine, offers a Ph.D. program which promises to educate students to be scholarly leaders in the field of health policy, and to be highly knowledgeable about the theoretical and empirical approaches that can be applied in the development of improvements in health policy and the health care system. The curriculum offers courses across a wide range of health policy areas including health economics, health insurance and government program operation, health financing, international health policy and economic development, cost-effectiveness analysis and the evaluation of new technologies, relevant statistical and methodological approaches, and health policy issues related to public health concerns such as obesity and chronic disease.

In addition to taking a set of core courses, students are expected to complete course work in one of two tracks:

  • Health Economics: including the economic behavior of individuals, providers, insurers, and governments and how their actions affect health and medical care.
  • Decision Sciences: with quantitative techniques to assess the effectiveness and value of medical treatments and for decision making about medical care at the individual and/or collective level.

Requirements

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

More complete program requirement details are listed on the program website and in the program handbook (link on program website).

Additional requirements:

First Year

  • Completion of first-year course work with minimum grades of 'B-' and an overall/average GPA of a B (3.0).
  • Individual development plan (IDP) meeting with primary adviser within the first quarter.
  • Meeting with adviser(s) on a regular basis, to be determined with adviser(s).
  • Completion of course work in the responsible conduct of research.

Second Year

  • Completion of second-year course work with minimum grades of 'B-' and an overall/average GPA of a B (3.0).
  • Final course work (for both first and second year) must total at least 75 units for both core and track specific courses.
  • Individual development plan (IDP) meeting with primary adviser before the end of Autumn Quarter.
  • Meeting with adviser(s) on a regular basis, to be determined with adviser(s).
  • Completion of second-year paper and funding proposal as part of the second-year tutorial.
  • Taking and passing the Written Qualifying Exam.

Third and Fourth Years

  • Advancement to Ph.D. Candidacy (see below).
  • Taking and passing the department Ph.D. Oral Exam (see below).
  • Individual development plan (IDP) meeting with primary adviser before the end of Autumn Quarter.
  • Meeting with adviser(s) on a regular basis, to be determined with adviser(s).

Course Work

The minimum number of units required for a Ph.D. degree at Stanford (satisfied both through coursework and research units) is 135.

Complete course work in one of the following two tracks.

Health Economics Track

Units
Statistical Data Analysis, Econometrics, and Causal Inference
Required - one year sequence in econometrics:
ECON 270Intermediate Econometrics I2-5
ECON 271Intermediate Econometrics II2-5
ECON 272Intermediate Econometrics III2-5
OR
MGTECON 603Econometric Methods I4
MGTECON 604Econometric Methods II3
MGTECON 605Econometric Methods III3
Micro-Economics
Required - one year sequence in microeconomics:
ECON 202Microeconomics I2-5
ECON 203Microeconomics II2-5
ECON 204Microeconomics III2-5
Or equivalent: GSBGEN 675 or MGTECON 600 can be substituted for ECON 202 and/or MGTECON 601 can be substituted for ECON 203.
Discipline-Specific Courses
Required:
HRP 249Topics in Health Economics I2-5
HRP 257Advanced Topics in the Economics of Health and Medical Care2
Choose 4 courses in the following 4 fields in economics:
Development Economics
Public Finance
Labor Economics
Industrial Organization
Health Policy
Required:
HRP 252Outcomes Analysis4
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 392Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4
Choose 3 additional health-related courses such as:
HRP 391Health Law: Finance and Insurance3
LAW 3002Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care3
LAW 3009Health Law: Improving Public Health3
Practice of Research
Required:
First-year core tutorial (HRP 201A, HRP 201B, and HRP 201C)
Second-year core tutorial (HRP 800)
Health Economics Seminar
Research in Progress Seminar
MED 255The Responsible Conduct of Research1

Decision Science Track

Units
Statistical Data Analysis, Econometrics, and Casual Inference
Required: at least two quarters of one of the two following sequences:
ECON 270Intermediate Econometrics I2-5
ECON 271Intermediate Econometrics II2-5
ECON 272Intermediate Econometrics III2-5
Or
MGTECON 603Econometric Methods I4
MGTECON 604Econometric Methods II3
MGTECON 605Econometric Methods III3
Micro-Economics
Required, at least one quarter:
GSBGEN 675Microeconomic Theory3
Or
MGTECON 600Microeconomic Analysis I4
MGTECON 601Microeconomic Analysis II3
Or
ECON 202NMicroeconomics I For Non-Economics PhDs2-5
ECON 203NMicroeconomics II For Non-Economics PhDs2-5
Or
ECON 202Microeconomics I2-5
ECON 203Microeconomics II2-5
Discipline-Specific Courses
Required:
HRP 263Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health3
HRP 206Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis3
Choose 4 methods courses such as:
MS&E 201Dynamic Systems3-4
MS&E 211Introduction to Optimization3-4
MS&E 223Simulation3
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 263Healthcare Operations Management3
Health Policy
Required:
HRP 252Outcomes Analysis4
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 392Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4
Choose 3 additional health-related courses such as:
HRP 391Health Law: Finance and Insurance3
LAW 3002Health Law: Quality and Safety of Care3
LAW 3009Health Law: Improving Public Health3
Practice of Research
Required:
First-year core tutorial (HRP 201A, HRP 201B, HRP 201C)
Second-year core tutorial (HRP 800)
Research in Progress Seminar
MED 255The Responsible Conduct of Research1

GPA/Grade Requirement

Failure to meet grade/GPA requirements (i.e., minimum grade of 'B-' in all courses and an overall minimum GPA of 3.0, equivalent to a grade of 'B') means the student is out of compliance with program requirements. In this case, the executive committee may ask the candidate to leave the program or may require other corrective courses of action, including, but not limited to, retaking a course. If progress remains unsatisfactory, the committee may ask the candidate to leave the program.

Ph.D. Candidacy Requirements

  • Approval by adviser(s).
  • Satisfactory completion of course work and program requirements in first two years.
  • Submission, and approval by adviser, of the second-year paper by the second-year student.
  • Passing of the Written Qualifying Exam.
  • Submission of PhD Candidacy form
  • It is the responsibility of the student to initiate the required paperwork and committee meetings required by Stanford University.

Written Qualifying Exam

As part of their advancement to Ph.D. candidacy (as listed above), students must take and pass the Written Qualifying Exam. This is offered approximately two weeks after the end of Spring Quarter in the students' second year.

Oral Exam

  • In accordance with the Stanford University Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures (GAP) manual, students must take and pass an Oral Examination as part of the Ph.D. degree requirements.
  • The Oral Examination (colloquially known as the "proposal defense") will be focused mainly on the student's dissertation proposal.  As well as examining feasibility and understanding of the dissertation proposal, it tests the candidate’s command of the field of study. 
  • Students are required to take the Oral Exam after passing their Written Qualifying Exam, and when the adviser believes that the student is ready, however exam must be taken and passed no later than the end of Spring Quarter of the student's third year.

Further details regarding the Written and Oral Exam can be found on the Explore Degrees website, Stanford GAP manual, and our program website and handbook (link on program website).

Ph.D. Dissertation

  • Students must present a Ph.D. dissertation that is the result of independent investigation and that constitutes a contribution to knowledge in health services research and health policy.
  • Students must select a primary dissertation adviser and at least two additional faculty members to serve on the dissertation committee.
  • A presentation of a prospectus outlining the proposed research to the committee is required.
  • Receipt of written approval from the dissertation committee chair.
  • Submission of a final draft of the work signed by all members of the dissertation committee.

Further details regarding dissertation requirements can be found on the Explore Degrees websiteStanford GAP manual, and our program website and handbook (link on program website).

Final Presentation

  • Final presentation is required for graduation.
  • The final presentation is a summary of the work accomplished on the PhD research and should occur while the student is still matriculated, during the regular academic quarter.

Advising

Academic advising by our faculty is a critical component of our graduate students' education.

All matriculating students will be assigned a faculty adviser from the group of core faculty to help them design their academic program. Before or shortly after the time that they advance to candidacy for the degree, students are expected to identify a group of at least three thesis advisers (also known as the dissertation reading committee), including a primary thesis adviser.  The thesis advisers are selected by the student on the basis of expertise relevant to the thesis project, and may or may not include the originally assigned faculty adviser.

advisers will meet with students within the first quarter of each year to discuss students' Individual Development Plan(s) (IDPs).  Additionally, students will meet with their adviser(s) on a regular basis throughout each year to discuss course selection, development of research projects, and career plans.

Academic progress and student completion of program requirements and milestones are monitored by the program staff and directors and also discussed at quarterly meetings of all PhD advisers.

Requirements and milestones, as well as more detailed descriptions of the program's expectations of advisers and students, are listed in the Student Handbook, found on the program website.  

Additionally, the program adheres to the advising guidelines and responsibilities listed by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and in the Graduate Academic Policies and procedures manual.

See the department's website for additional information on degree requirements, advising, program milestones, and admissions processes. Address inquiries to the HRP Education Program Manager at 650-723-5456 or hrpadmissions@stanford.edu.

Graduate Advising Expectations

The Department of Health Research and Policy is committed to providing academic advising in support of graduate student scholarly and professional development. When most effective, this advising relationship entails collaborative and sustained engagement by both the adviser and the advisee. As a best practice, advising expectations should be periodically discussed and reviewed to ensure mutual understanding. Both the adviser and the advisee are expected to maintain professionalism and integrity.

Faculty advisers guide students in key areas such as selecting courses, designing and conducting research, developing of teaching pedagogy, navigating policies and degree requirements, and exploring academic opportunities and professional pathways.

Graduate students are active contributors to the advising relationship, proactively seeking academic and professional guidance and taking responsibility for informing themselves of policies and degree requirements for their graduate program.

HRP programs adhere to the advising guidelines and responsibilities listed by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and in the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures manual.  

For a statement of University policy on graduate advising, see the "Graduate Advising" section of this bulletin.

Health Research and Policy

Chair: Laurence Baker

Professors: Laurence Baker, Mark Cullen, Steven Goodman, Victor Henderson, Mark Hlatky, John Ioannidis, Abby King, Yvonne Maldonado, Michelle Mello, Julie Parsonnet

Associate Professor: Kate Bundorf, Allison Kurian, Lorene Nelson, Michelle Odden, Kristin Sainani

Associate Professor (Clinical): Rita Popat

Assistant Professors: Lisa Goldman-Rosas, Maria Polyakova, Maya Rossin-Slater, Julia Simard

Emeriti: (Professors) Dan Bloch, John Farquhar, Victor Fuchs, Jennifer Kelsey, Alice Whittemore

Courtesy Professors: Jay Bhattacharya, Suzan Carmichael, Glenn Chertow, Manisha Desai, Mary Goldstein, Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, Paul Heidenreich, Ann Hsing, Erik Ingelsson, Daniel Kessler, Mary Leonard, Ying Lu, Stephen Luby, Alex Macario, Doug Owens, Latha Palaniappan, Thomas Robinson, Joshua Salomon, Gary Shaw, Marcia Stefanick

Courtesy Associate Professors: Themistocles Assimes, Eran Bendavid, Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert, Angelle (Desiree) LaBeaud, Jennifer Lee, Grant Miller, David Rehkopf, Lee Sanders, Jason Wang

Courtesy Assistant Professor: Marcella Alsan, Jason Andrews, Michael Baiocchi, Sanjay Basu, David Chan, Suzann Pershing, Eric Sun

Senior Lecturer: Irene Corso

Lecturer: Corinna Haberland

Adjunct Professor: Gary Friedman, Paul-Andre Genest, Jeroen Jansen, Eugene Lewit

Health Services Research

Director: Kate Bundorf (Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy)

Core Faculty and Academic Teaching Staff: Laurence Baker (Professor, Health Research and Policy), Kate Bundorf (Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy), Irene Corso (Sr Lecturer, Health Research and Policy), Corinna Haberland (Lecturer, Health Research and Policy), Mark Hlatky (Professor, Health Research and Policy, Medicine), Michelle Mello (Professor, Law, and Health Research and Policy), Maria Polyakova (Assistant Professor, Health Research and Policy), Maya Rossin-Slater (Assistant Professor, Health Research and Policy)

Affiliated Faculty and Staff by Department:

Anesthesiology, Perioperative, and Pain Medicine: Alex Macario (Professor), Eric Sun (Assistant Professor)

Law: Daniel Kessler (Professor)

Medicine: Marcella Alsan (Assistant Professor), Eran Bendavid (Associate Professor), Jay Bhattacharya (Professor), David Chan (Assistant Professor), Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert (Associate Professor), Mary Goldstein (Professor), Paul Heidenreich (Professor), Grant Miller (Associate Professor), Doug Owens (Professor), Joshua Salomon (Professor), Jason Wang (Associate Professor)

Ophthalmology: Suzann Pershing (Assistant Professor)

Epidemiology

Director: Steven Goodman (Professor, Medicine, and Health Research and Policy)

Core Faculty and Academic Teaching Staff: Mark Cullen (Professor, Medicine, Health Research and Policy, and Biomedical Data Science), Lisa Goldman-Rosas (Assistant Professor Health Research and Policy, and Medicine), Steven Goodman (Professor, Medicine, and Health Research and Policy), Victor Henderson (Professor, Health Research and Policy, Neurology and Neurological Sciences), John Ioannidis (Professor, Medicine, and Health Research and Policy), Abby King (Professor, Health Research and Policy, and Medicine), Allison Kurian (Associate Professor, Medicine, and Health Research and Policy), Yvonne Maldonado (Professor, Pediatrics, and of Health Research and Policy), Lorene Nelson (Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy), Michelle Odden (Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy), Julie Parsonnet (Professor, Medicine, and Health Research and Policy), Rita Popat (Clinical Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy), Kristin Sainani (Associate Professor, Health Research and Policy), Julia Simard (Assistant Professor, Health Research and Policy)

Affiliated Faculty and Staff by Department:

Biomedical Data Science: Ying Lu (Professor)

Medicine: Jason Andrews (Assistant Professor), Themistocles Assimes (Associate Professor), Michael Baiocchi (Assistant Professor), Sanjay Basu (Assistant Professor), Glenn Chertow (Professor), Ann Hsing (Professor), Erik Ingelsson (Professor), Jennifer Lee (Associate Professor), Mary Leonard (Professor), Stephen Luby (Professor), Latha Palaniappan (Professor), David Rehkopf (Associate Professor), Thomas Robinson (Professor), Marcia Stefanick (Professor)

Pediatrics: Suzan Carmichael (Professor), Bonnie Halpern-Felsher (Professor), Angelle (Desiree) LaBeaud (Associate Professor), Lee Sanders (Associate Professor), Gary Shaw (Professor)

Courses

HRP 28SI. Alternative Spring Break: Prevention, Treatment, and Policy Perspectives on Alzheimer's Disease. 1 Unit.

Examines four aspects of Alzheimer's disease. Goal is to give participants a clearer sense of the struggle that patients actually feel and experience during the progression of the disease. Also explores difficulties and issues that many relatives face in assuming the responsibility of full-time caregiver for an Alzheirmers patient. Addresses ethical considerations on genetic testing, should these advances be embraced or should we be wary of the knowledge they may bring? Finally, explores the notion of service through engaged scholarship by exposing oneself to cutting-edge discoveries as researchers attempt to unravel the puzzle.

HRP 89Q. Introduction to Cross Cultural Issues in Medicine. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to social factors that impact health care delivery, such as ethnicity, immigration, language barriers, and patient service expectations. Focus is on developing a framework to understand culturally unique and non-English speaking populations in the health care system.

HRP 199. Undergraduate Research. 1-18 Unit.

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HRP 201A. Health Policy PhD Core Seminar I--First Year. 1-2 Unit.

Seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study. 2 unit registration requires written responses to assigned reading questions.
Same as: MED 215A

HRP 201B. Health Policy PhD Core Seminar II--First Year. 1-2 Unit.

Second in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Same as: MED 215B

HRP 201C. Health Policy PhD Core Seminar III--First Year. 1-2 Unit.

Third in a three-quarter seminar series is the core tutorial for first-year Health Policy and Health Services Research graduate students. Major themes in fields of study including health insurance, healthcare financing and delivery, health systems and reform and disparities in the US and globally, health and economic development, health law and policy, resource allocation, efficiency and equity, healthcare quality, measurement and the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. Blocks of session led by Stanford expert faculty in particular fields of study.
Same as: MED 215C

HRP 206. Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis. 3 Units.

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Same as: CHPR 206, MED 206, STATS 211

HRP 207. Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research I. 2 Units.

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines.

HRP 208. Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II. 2 Units.

Primarily for medical students in the Health Services and Policy Research scholarly concentration; continuation of 207. Topics include health economics, statistics, decision analysis, study design, quality measurement, cost benefit and effectiveness analysis, and evidence based guidelines. Recommended: 207.

HRP 209. Health Law: The FDA. 2-3 Units.

(Same as LAW 3003) Open to law and medical students; other graduate students by consent of instructor. The FDA's regulatory authority over drugs, biologics, medical devices, and dietary supplements. The nature of the pharmaceutical, biotech, medical device, and nutritional supplement industries.

HRP 211. Law and the Biosciences: Neuroscience. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 3006) Legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in neuroscience, including effects upon law and society through improvements in predicting illnesses and behaviors, reading minds through neuroimaging, understanding responsibility and consciousness, treating criminal behavior, and cognitive enhancement.

HRP 212. Cross Cultural Medicine. 3 Units.

Developing interviewing and behavioral skills needed to facilitate culturally relevant health care across all population groups. Discussions focus on explicit and implicit cultural influences operating in formal and informal medical contexts.

HRP 213. Writing in the Sciences. 2-3 Units.

Primarily for medical students in the Clinical Research Scholarly concentration; open to graduate students except Epidemiology graduate students. Development of research questions and plans for statistical analysis. Study design, sample size and power calculations, and statistical analysis of study data. Analytic methods to carry out statistical power and sample size calculations. Prerequisites: 225, and 258 or 259, or consent of instructor.

HRP 214. Scientific Writing. 2-3 Units.

Step-by-step through the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. How to write effectively, concisely, and clearly in preparation of an actual scientific manuscript. Students are encouraged to bring a manuscript on which they are currently working to develop and polish throughout the course. Please note 3-units students will additionally write and revise a manuscript.

HRP 215. Scientific Writing for Basic and Translational Scientists. 2-3 Units.

Teaches students in the basic sciences how to write clearly, concisely, and effectively. Focuses on the process of writing and publishing a scientific manuscript. 3 unit option requires work on a manuscript. Not intended for epidemiology graduate students.

HRP 216. Analytical and Practical Issues in the Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Research. 2-3 Units.

Topics include: advanced aspects of study design and data analyses; evaluating confounding and interaction; modeling continuous characteristics of exposure; building prediction models; methods of summarizing literature and quantifying effect sizes (meta-analysis); handling missing data; and propensity score methods. 3 units requires a data analysis project. Prerequisites: 258 or 261, or consent of instructor.

HRP 218. Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation. 2 Units.

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Same as: CHPR 212, MED 212

HRP 219. Evaluating Technologies for Diagnosis, Prediction and Screening. 3 Units.

New technologies designed to monitor and improve health outcomes are constantly emerging, but most fail in the clinic and in the marketplace because relatively few are supported by reliable, reproducible evidence that they produce a health benefit. This course covers the designs and methods that should be used to evaluate technologies to diagnose patients, predict prognosis or other health events, or screen for disease. These technologies can include devices, statistical prediction rules, biomarkers, gene panels, algorithms, imaging, or any information used to predict a future or a previously unknown health state. Specific topics to be covered include the phases of test development, how to frame a proper evaluation question, measures of test accuracy, Bayes theorem, internal and external validation, prediction evaluation criteria, decision analysis, net-utility, ROC curves, c-statistics, net reclassification index, decision curves and reporting standards. Examples of technology assessments and original methods papers are used. Software used in the course is R or Stata. Open to graduate students with a solid understanding of introductory biostatistics, epidemiologic and clinical research study design, and of medical conditions and related technologies required. Basic understanding of Stata or R is also required. Undergraduates may enroll with consent of instructor.

HRP 221. Law and the Biosciences: Genetics. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 3004) Open to all law or medical students; other graduate students by consent of the instructor. Focus is on ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in our knowledge of human genetics. Includes forensic uses of genetics, genetic testing, widespread whole genome sequencing, the consequences of genetics for human reproduction, and the ethics of genomic biobanks for research. Research paper required.

HRP 222A. Advising Congress on Health Policy. 1 Unit.

(Same as LAW 413L) Focus on conducting research on national health policy problems for the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission, or MedPAC. Students work in teams with lawyers and PhD economists from MedPAC, resident and fellow physicians from Stanford Hospital, and other students from throughout the University on exanding the healthcare workforce through reform of states' scope of practice regulation or designing antitrust policy to achieve the benefits of coordination and avoid the costs of consolidation. Application required.

HRP 223. Introduction to Data Management and Analysis in SAS. 2 Units.

Provides hands-on introduction to basic data management and analysis techniques using SAS. Data management topics include: Introduction to SAS and SAS syntax, importing data, creating and reading SAS datasets, data cleaning and validation, creating new variables, and combining data sets. Analysis techniques include: basic descriptive statistics (e.g., means, frequency) and bivariate procedures for continuous and categorical variables (e.g., t-tests, chi-squares).

HRP 224. Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health. 3 Units.

Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Global & Planetary Health is a new Collaboratory workshop for students/fellows to design/develop innovative social ventures/solutions addressing key challenges in public health and the environment, in support of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs 2030). SE Lab is open to students/fellows across Stanford and combines design thinking exercises, short lectures & case studies, workshops, small group teamwork, presentations, guest speakers, and faculty, practitioner and peer feedback to support/advance development of your ideas/plans. Join SE Lab with an idea or simply the desire to join a team. Enrollment limited to 32. Instructor's permission required.
Same as: MED 224, PUBLPOL 224

HRP 225. Design and Conduct of Clinical and Epidemiologic Studies. 3 Units.

Intermediate-level. The skills to design, carry out, and interpret epidemiologic studies, particularly of chronic diseases. Topics: epidemiologic concepts, sources of data, cohort studies, case-control studies, cross-sectional studies, sampling, measures of association, estimating sample size, and sources of bias. Prerequisite: A basic/introductory course in statistics or consent of instructor.

HRP 226. Intermediate Epidemiologic and Clinical Research Methods. 3 Units.

The principles of study design, measurement, confounding, effect modification, and strategies for minimizing bias in clinical and epidemiologic studies. Prerequisite: 225 or consent of instructor.

HRP 228. Genetic Epidemiology. 2 Units.

Provides framework for physicians, epidemiologists, and other scientists to interpret the literature and incorporate genetic information into human disease research. Topics include: common genetic measures, approaches to finding disease genes, study design and analysis issues, genome-wide association studies, meta-analysis of genetic studies, genetic risk prediction, and applications of new genomic technologies. Includes reading seminal papers in genetic epidemiology.

HRP 229. Spectrum Scholars Seminar. 1 Unit.

Preference to trainees awarded Stanford internal KL2, TL1 grants. Focus is on students and junior faculty who have received a Spectrum KL2 or TL1 Award. Discussions include progress and challenges involved in starting and conducting clinical research, current courses, time management and resources; support from peers; education and professional development. All scholars are required to attend a weekly seminar series meeting throughout the year that will cover an array of cross-cutting methodological topics with published examples of implementation. Prerequisite: Awarded a Spectrum KL2, TL1 Grant or Spectrum UL1.

HRP 230. Cancer Epidemiology. 2-3 Units.

Descriptive epidemiology and sources of incidence/mortality data; the biological basis of carcinogenesis and its implications for epidemiologic research; methodological issues relevant to cancer research; causal inference; major environmental risk factors; genetic susceptibility; cancer control; examples of current research; and critique of the literature. 3 units requires paper or project. Prerequisite: 225, or consent of instructor.

HRP 231. Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases. 3 Units.

Principles of the transmission of the infectious agents (viruses, bacteria, rickettsiae, mycoplasma, fungi, and protozoan and helminth parasites). The role of vectors, reservoirs, and environmental factors. Pathogen and host characteristics that determine the spectrum of infection and disease. Endemicity, outbreaks, and epidemics of selected infectious diseases. Principles of control and surveillance.

HRP 234. Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health. 4 Units.

This course teaches engineering, operations research and modeling techniques to improve public health programs and systems. Students will engage in in-depth study of disease detection and control strategies from a "systems science" perspective, which involves the use of common engineering, operations research, and mathematical modeling techniques such as optimization, queuing theory, Markov and Kermack-McKendrick models, and microsimulation. Lectures and problem sets will focus on applying these techniques to classical public health dilemmas such as how to optimize screening programs, reduce waiting times for healthcare services, solve resource allocation problems, and compare macro-scale disease control strategies that cannot be easily evaluated through randomized trials. Readings will complement the lectures and problem sets by offering critical perspectives from the public health history, sociology, and epidemiology. In-depth case studies from non-governmental organizations, departments of public health, and international agencies will drive the course. Prerequisites: A course in introductory statistics, and a course in multivariable calculus including ordinarily differential equations. Open to upper-division undergraduate students and graduate students. Human Biology majors enroll in HUMBIO 154A. Prerequisite: MATH 51 or CME 100 and Human Biology Core or BIO 141 or BIOHOPK 174H.
Same as: HUMBIO 154A, MED 254

HRP 235. Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems. 3-4 Units.

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAIDS (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 78 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Same as: AFRICAST 135, AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HUMBIO 26, MED 235

HRP 236. Epidemiology Research Seminar. 1 Unit.

Weekly forum for ongoing epidemiologic research by faculty, staff, guests, and students, emphasizing research issues relevant to disease causation, prevention, and treatment. May be repeated for credit.

HRP 237. Practical Approaches to Global Health Research. 3 Units.

(Formerly IPS 290) How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Same as: INTLPOL 290, MED 226

HRP 238. Genes and Environment in Disease Causation: Implications for Medicine and Public Health. 2-3 Units.

The historical, contemporary, and future research and practice among genetics, epidemiology, clinical medicine, and public health as a source of insight for medicine and public health. Genetic and environmental contributions to multifactorial diseases; multidisciplinary approach to enhancing detection and diagnosis. The impact of the Human Genome Project on analysis of cardiovascular and neurological diseases, and cancer. Ethical and social issues in the use of genetic information. Prerequisite:Human Biology core or BIO 82 or consent of instructor. This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: HUMBIO 159

HRP 239. Statistical Methods for Group Comparisons and Causal Inference. 3 Units.

See http://rogosateaching.com/stat209/. Critical examination of statistical methods in social science and life sciences applications, especially for cause and effect determinations. Topics: mediating and moderating variables, potential outcomes framework, encouragement designs, multilevel models, heterogeneous treatment effects, matching and propensity score methods, analysis of covariance, instrumental variables, compliance, path analysis and graphical models, group comparisons with longitudinal data. Prerequisite: intermediate-level statistical methods.
Same as: EDUC 260A, STATS 209

HRP 243. Health Policy Seminar: Health Care Delivery. 1 Unit.

This seminar course is intended to introduce students to the role of policy in the delivery of healthcare in the United States. Speakers will include a mix of Stanford faculty and experts in health care financing delivery from around the bay area. There are no assignments and lunch is provided.

HRP 244. Developing Measurement Tools for Health Research. 2 Units.

The focus of this course is on providing the skills necessary to develop, validate and administer both qualitative and quantitative measures and instruments. Topics will include creating valid measures, ensuring the measures used address and apply to the research questions, design and samples; determining when to use standardized measures or develop new ones; instrument validation techniques; factor analysis; and survey administration, including determining the most effective way of administering measures (e.g., online, paper-and-pencil, ACASI) and the best way to design the survey.

HRP 245. Intensive Course in Clinical Research. 2 Units.

The Intensive Course in Clinical Research (ICCR) is a one-week immersion course designed for new or aspiring clinical investigators, medical students, residents, graduate students, fellows and junior faculty interested in pursuing careers in clinical and transnational research. Students spend five days and four evenings immersed in all aspects of research study design and performance. The format combined didactic with intense group/team activities focused on practical issues in clinical research design - from selection of a researchable study question through actual writing of a research proposal. Lectures and panel discussions are presented by an accomplished faculty of Stanford clinical researchers and key leaders from the Stanford community. Every presentation includes a discussion of relevant issues. The course is supported by over 40 faculty and fellows from across the School of Medicine.

HRP 246. Seminar in Healthcare Quality and Safety. 1 Unit.

Primarily for medical students in the Quality and Safety Scholarly Concentration. Almost everyone will be a patient at some point in their lives. It is estimated that over 98,000 patients die in US hospitals each year due to medical errors and recent articles suggest that medical errors are the third leading cause of death in the US. Patient safety is the foundation of high-quality health care, which has become a critical issue in health policy discussions. This course will provide an overview of the quality & patient safety movement, the array of measurement techniques and issues, and perspectives of quality improvement efforts under the current policy landscape.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 246

HRP 247. Epidemic Intelligence: How to Identify, Investigate and Interrupt Outbreaks of Disease. 4 Units.

We will cover: the components of public health systems in the US; principles of outbreak investigation and disease surveillance; different types of study design for field investigation; visualization and interpretation of public health data, including identification and prevention of biases; and implementation of disease control by public health authorities. Students will meet with leaders of health departments of the state and the county and will be responsible for devising and conducting their own investigation of a health problem. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 57. HRP students must enroll in HRP 247.
Same as: HUMBIO 57

HRP 249. Topics in Health Economics I. 2-5 Units.

Course will cover various topics in health economics, from theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics will include public financing and public policy in health care and health insurance; demand and supply of health insurance and healthcare; physicians' incentives; patient decision-making; competition policy in healthcare markets, intellectual property in the context of pharmaceutical drugs and medical technology; other aspects of interaction between public and private sectors in healthcare and health insurance markets. Key emphasis on recent work and empirical methods and modelling. Prerequisites: Micro and Econometrics first year sequences (or equivalent). Curricular prerequisites (if applicable): First year graduate Microeconomics and Econometrics sequences (or equivalent).
Same as: ECON 249, MED 249

HRP 251. Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials. 3 Units.

The rationale for phases 1-3 clinical trials, the recruitment of subjects, techniques for randomization, data collection and endpoints, interim monitoring, and reporting of results. Emphasis is on the theoretical underpinnings of clinical research and the practical aspects of conducting clinical trials.

HRP 252. Outcomes Analysis. 4 Units.

Methods of conducting empirical studies which use large existing medical, survey, and other databases to ask both clinical and policy questions. Econometric and statistical models used to conduct medical outcomes research. How research is conducted on medical and health economics questions when a randomized trial is impossible. Problem sets emphasize hands-on data analysis and application of methods, including re-analyses of well-known studies. Prerequisites: one or more courses in probability, and statistics or biostatistics.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 251, MED 252

HRP 253. Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the role of epidemiology in cancer etiology, prevvention, and control. We will discuss descriptive epidemiology, including cancer trends and patterns, natural history, and biologic characteristics as well as etiology of selected cancers. the influence of environmental and genetic factors and their interplay on the development of cancer are discussed as well as methodologic issues related to investigations of these studies. Principles and problems involved in cancer prevention and screening are covered. Student evaluation is based on a brief presentation and a paper on the descriptive epidemiology of a selected cancer, and participation in class discussions.

HRP 254. Quality & Safety in U.S. Healthcare. 3 Units.

The course will provide an in-depth examination of the quality & patient safety movement in the US healthcare system, the array of quality measurement techniques and issues, and perspectives of quality and safety improvement efforts under the current policy landscape.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 254

HRP 255. Observational Studies. 2-3 Units.

This course will cover statistical methods for the design and analysis of observational studies. Topics for the course will include the potential outcomes framework for causal inference; randomized experiments; methods for controlling for observed confounders in observational studies; sensitivity analysis for hidden bias; instrumental variables; tests of hidden bias; coherence; and design of observational studies.
Same as: STATS 355

HRP 256. Economics of Health and Medical Care. 5 Units.

Institutional, theoretical, and empirical analysis of the problems of health and medical care. Topics: demand for medical care and medical insurance; institutions in the health sector; economics of information applied to the market for health insurance and for health care; measurement and valuation of health; competition in health care delivery. Graduate students with research interests should take ECON 249. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and either ECON 102A or STATS 116 or the equivalent. Recommended: ECON 51.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 156, BIOMEDIN 256, ECON 126

HRP 257. Advanced Topics in the Economics of Health and Medical Care. 2 Units.

Emphasis is on research studies in health economics. Seminar style course focuses on Health Economics. To be taken with HRP 256. Students will be expected to read and present papers to the group and discuss concepts with faculty. Restricted to second year PhD students in economics & economics-related disciplines.
Same as: MED 265

HRP 258. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research. 3 Units.

Open to medical and graduate students; required of medical students in the Clinical Research Scholarly Concentration. Tools to evaluate medical literature. Topics include random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and survival analysis.

HRP 259. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology. 3 Units.

Topics: random variables, expectation, variance, probability distributions, the central limit theorem, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals. Correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and nonparametric tests. Introduction to least squares and maximum likelihood estimation. Emphasis is on medical applications.

HRP 261. Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data. 3 Units.

Methods for analyzing data from case-control and cross-sectional studies: the 2x2 table, chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, odds ratios, Mantel-Haenzel methods, stratification, tests for matched data, logistic regression, conditional logistic regression. Emphasis is on data analysis in SAS. Special topics: cross-fold validation and bootstrap inference.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 233, STATS 261

HRP 262. Intermediate Biostatistics: Regression, Prediction, Survival Analysis. 3 Units.

Methods for analyzing longitudinal data. Topics include Kaplan-Meier methods, Cox regression, hazard ratios, time-dependent variables, longitudinal data structures, profile plots, missing data, modeling change, MANOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA, GEE, and mixed models. Emphasis is on practical applications. Prerequisites: basic ANOVA and linear regression.
Same as: STATS 262

HRP 263. Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health. 3 Units.

Advanced methods currently used in published model-based cost-effectiveness analyses in medicine and public health, both theory and technical applications. Topics include: Markov and microsimulation models, model calibration and evaluation, and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Prerequisites: a course in probability, a course in statistics or biostatistics, a course on cost-effectiveness such as HRP 392, a course in economics, and familiarity with decision modeling software such as TreeAge.
Same as: MED 263

HRP 264. Foundations of Statistical and Scientific Inference. 1 Unit.

The course will consist of readings and discussion of foundational papers and book sections in the domains of statistical and scientific inference. Topics to be covered include philosophy of science, interpretations of probability, Bayesian and frequentist approaches to statistical inference and current controversies about the proper use of p-values and research reproducibility. nnRecommended preparation: At least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology. Intended for second year Masters students, of PhD students with as least 1 year of preceding graduate training.

HRP 265. Advanced Methods for Meta-Analysis. 2 Units.

Meta-analysis is a method to quantitatively combine information from multiple studies; this combination is also called "research synthesis." Historically, it has been used to combine studies with a similar design, such as randomized controlled trials or observational studies examining similar interventions or exposures. However, evidence about a given relationship is often provided by many studies with different designs, or studies that can be "fit together" to create an evidence base. This can only be done with advanced meta-analytic methods. The course will cover advanced methods for research synthesis, including multivariate meta-analysis for multiple outcomes, generalized evidence synthesis of multiple study designs, and network meta-analysis for multiple interventions. These techniques are being increasingly used in evidence-based medicine, health technology assessments and policy making. Recommended preparation: HRP 206, and at least 2 quarters of biostatistics and one of epidemiology, including clinical research design. Familiarity with logistic and linear regression modeling required.

HRP 267. Life Course Epidemiology. 2 Units.

The focus of this course is on understanding the evidence for how exposure at multiple levels and at multiple ages influences an individual's health at any given time. The course emphasizes the primary theories used to examine life course determinants of health and how these theories both facilitate and impede research. A secondary focus is on understanding the methodological challenges to studying health from a life course perspective, as well as how knowledge of life course determinants of health can inform interventions to improve health from a population perspective.

HRP 268. Genetics and Reproductive Technologies. 2 Units.

(Same as LAW 568) Examines the complex interrelationship among legal, political, ethical, and social issues shaping the intersection of genetics, reproductive technologies and reproductive rights. Issues discussed may included, but are not limited to: the commercialization and sale of reproductive materials like sperm, ovum, and surrogacy services; genetic technologies, prenatal genetic screening, and diagnostic testing of offspring; criminalization of reproductive decision-making such as sex-selection and genetic enhancement; stem cells, cloning, and abortion; DNA databanks and collection of genetic information; in vitro fertilization and other emerging reproductive technologies.

HRP 271. Preparation and Practice: Scientific Communication and Media. 1-2 Unit.

Through tailored lecture, case study, and a practical final project, academic and professional leaders will help you gain insight into the science communications and media industry and the skills necessary to succeed within the various positions and levels available within it.nnAnticipated Learning Outcomes ¿nTo assist interdisciplinary graduate students, medical students, residents and fellows in all levels of training to develop and hone the communication skills necessary for post-training and internship success in a science communications/media field;nTo provide an understanding of the scope of career opportunities within the science communications sector, focusing on the development, organization, and management issues specific to it;nTo provide a forum for interacting with alumni, faculty, and other practitioners from a variety of fields and organizations who may assist candidates with defining and meeting their own professional goals;nTo increase awareness of industry terminology and theories, combined with hands-on experience with techniques and methodologies most useful for credential development on the job market;nTo develop and hone expertise in the areas of: publishing, editing, workflow, ethics, trends, principles of effective scholarly/news writing, interviewing techniques, and media/website management.

HRP 272. The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research. 3 Units.

The Science of Community Engagement in Health Research course will focus on how the science of community engagement can be applied to diverse health-related research topics across the translational spectrum with the ultimate goal of high quality research that transforms human health and addresses health disparities. The course will provide historical context, theoretical frameworks, foundational skills in diverse community engagement methodologies, and tools for examining the effectiveness of various engagement strategies aimed. Specifically, the course will cover: 1) Historical context for community engagement in health-related research; 2) Evolution of community engagement as a science; 3) Theoretical frameworks for various community engagement approaches; 4) Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR); 5) Community engagement strategies for different stages of translational research; and 6) Evaluation of various engagement strategies; and 7) Ethics of community engagement. Students will gain practical experience in various community engagement tools and strategies to help guide the development of a community engagement plan responsive to community needs. Challenges and benefits of establishing community partnerships will be highlighted by real-world examples. nThe course will include lectures; interactive student-led presentations and guided exercises; class discussions among invited speakers, students and instructors; individual and group assignments; and organized small-group and experiential activities. Course readings will demonstrate the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary community engagement approaches and will illustrate how to conduct innovative community-engaged research. nThe Science of Community Engagement course is intended to reach students with diverse research interests, including clinical research, community health, health research and policy, epidemiology, prevention research, environmental health, etc.

HRP 273. Essentials of Clinical Research at Stanford. 1 Unit.

The course will consist of an introduction to the fundamentals of clinical research at Stanford, including the science of clinical research (design and analysis) and logistics (GCP, data management, regulatory). Material will be covered in approximately 4-6 3 hour sessions per quarter.

HRP 274. Design for Service Innovation. 4 Units.

(Same as OIT 343/01) Open to graduate students from all schools and departments. An experiential project course in which students work in multidisciplinary teams to design new services to address the needs of medically patients. Project teams partner with "safety net" hospitals and clinics to find better ways to deliver care to the low income and uninsured patients these institutions serve. Students learn proven innovation processes from experienced GSB, d. school, and SoM faculty, interface with students from across the university, and have the opportunity to see their ideas translated into improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare in the real world. Prerequisite: admission to the course is by application only. Applications available at http://DesignForService.stanford.edu. Applications must be submitted by November 16, 2011.
Same as: BIOE 372, MED 274

HRP 275. Population Health Research. 3 Units.

This course provides hands-on experience for students wishing to undertake health-related research using registry data covering the population of Denmark. Students will be instructed in basic R-programming, which they will use to analyze anonmyized Danish data (prior experience with R not required). Students will become familiar with the Danish data and develop a detailed original research proposal on a health-related topic addressable within the Danish data. Most students should be able to complete their proposed research in independent studies after successful completion of this course. nPrerequisites: HRP 259 or comparable introductory course in statistics. Special permission from the instructor required without prerequisites.

HRP 280. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

First quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on taking the medical history. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, pediatrics, nutrition, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: SPANLANG 121M

HRP 281. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

Second quarter of three-quarter series.Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, reproductive health, emergency medicine, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: SPANLANG 122M

HRP 282. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

Third quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on different specialties and medical conditions. Topics include anatomy, diagnostic procedures, HIV, diabetes, hypertension, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: SPANLANG 123M

HRP 283. Health Services Research Core Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentation of research in progress and tutorials in the field of health services research.

HRP 290. Advanced Medical Spanish. 2 Units.

Enrollment limited to medical students. Designed to further develop linguistic skills, covering all medical specialties according to student needs. Sessions also include topics on patient education and diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, TB, and CVDs.

HRP 292. Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies. 2-3 Units.

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, and instrumental variables. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: HRP 261 and 262 or STAT 209 ( HRP 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/.
Same as: CHPR 290, EDUC 260B, STATS 266

HRP 295. Advanced Topics in Epidemiologic and Clinical Research. 2 Units.

Topics include alternative study designs, causal inference methods, instrumental variables, time-varying confounding, registry-based research, missing data, and repeated events. Weekly readings and discussions will consider how these methods apply to numerous substantive areas including pharmacoepidemiology, reproductive and perinatal epidemiology, and many areas of chronic disease epidemiology. Prerequisite: HRP 225 and HRP 226 or permission of instructor.

HRP 296. Current Topics in Bioethics. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 596) Explores the ethical, legal, and public policy issues arising from recent advances in biomedicine and the biosciences. Approaches to bioethical reasoning including casuistry, social justice, resource allocation, and individual rights in areas such as refusal of treatment conception. Topics include: the use of forensic genetics in criminal law, neuroscience and national security, race and ethnicity in genetic research,k experimentation on human subjects and prisoners, privacy of medical and genetic information in the information age, synthetic biology, and do-it-yourself medical and genetic testing. No prior knowledge in science, medicine, philosophy or related disciplines is required.

HRP 299. Directed Reading in Health Research and Policy. 1-18 Unit.

Epidemiology, health services research, preventive medicine, medical genetics, public health, economics of medical care, occupational or environmental medicine, international health, or related fields. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HRP 370. Medical Scholars Research. 4-18 Units.

Provides an opportunity for student and faculty interaction, as well as academic credit and financial support, to medical students who undertake original research. Enrollment is limited to students with approved projects.

HRP 391. Health Law: Finance and Insurance. 3 Units.

(SAME AS LAW 3001, MGTECON 331) This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. We will discuss the Affordable Care Act , health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), the approval process and IP protection for pharmaceuticals, and antitrust policy. We may discuss obesity and wellness, regulation of fraud and abuse, and medical malpractice. The syllabus for this course can be found at https://syllabus.stanford.edu. Elements used in grading: Participation, attendance, class presentation, and final exam.
Same as: PUBLPOL 231

HRP 392. Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care. 4 Units.

For graduate students. How to do cost/benefit analysis when the output is difficult or impossible to measure. How do M.B.A. analytic tools apply in health services? Literature on the principles of cost/benefit analysis applied to health care. Critical review of actual studies. Emphasis is on the art of practical application.
Same as: BIOMEDIN 432

HRP 399. Graduate Research. 1-18 Unit.

Investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

HRP 800. Second Year Health Policy PHD Tutorial. 3 Units.

The goal of the second year tutorial is to provide PHD students with advanced training in health policy research and to assist them in successfully developing research proposals.

HRP 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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HRP 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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