Catalog Navigation
Contacts
Office: Building 240, Room 102
Mail Code: 94305- 2006
Phone: (650) 723-4438
Email: slavic@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://slavic.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures are listed on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site under the subject codes SLAVIC (Slavic Studies), and SLAVLANG (Slavic Language).

The department supports coordinated study of Russian language, literature, literary and cultural history, theory, and criticism. The department's programs may also be combined with the programs in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, Jewish Studies, Film Studies, Drama, International Relations, Stanford's Overseas Studies, and the Special Languages Program. The department is a part of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

A full undergraduate program provides a choice of several tracks leading to a B.A. (with a major or a minor) or to a B.A. with Honors. The department offers a full graduate program leading to an M.A. in Russian and a Ph.D. in Slavic Languages and Literatures. Stanford undergraduates are eligible to apply to the department for a coterminal B.A./M.A. degree. Students in the department's Ph.D. program are required to choose among minor programs in other national literatures, linguistics, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Jewish Studies, art and music history, theater, or film studies; or they may design their own minor or choose the related field option.

The department runs a colloquium series, which brings distinguished speakers to Stanford; organizes international conferences and symposia; and since 1987 maintains a continuing publication series, Stanford Slavic Studies. Along with the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies, the department offers qualified undergraduates summer grants (on a competitive basis) for intensive Russian language instruction in accredited programs in Russia and the U.S.

Improving cultural understanding is a critical part of the department's mission, and the department offers a full range of courses at all levels devoted to Russian literature, music and visual arts that do not require specialized knowledge, as well as advanced research seminars for graduate students. The Slavic theme house, Slavianskii Dom, serves as an undergraduate residence for many students in the program and hosts program-related activities.  The undergraduate program has attracted students seeking careers in journalism, business, international relations, law, medicine, and human rights, as well as academia. Russian is still the lingua franca over the vast territory of the former Soviet Union, and a good command of this language offers a gateway to Eurasia's diverse cultures, ethnicities, economies, and religions.

Stanford students of Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies benefit from unmatched faculty resources. Green Library and the Hoover Institution libraries and archives hold world-renowned Russian and East European collections, which undergraduates and graduate students use in their research. Department students master a difficult language and a rich and challenging literature, and are rewarded by gaining entry into a unique, powerful, and diverse civilization that defined major trends in the past century and plays an increasingly significant role in the world today.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The mission of the undergraduate program in Slavic Language and Literatures is to expose students to a variety of perspectives on Russian language, history, culture, literature, and philosophical thought. The program offers three tracks. Courses in the Russian Language and Literature track focus on the linguistic and philological study of literature, as well as the history of Russian literature. The Russian Studies track guides students through a comprehensive interdisciplinary study of Russian literature and culture in historic context. The Russian and Philosophy track provides students with a background in the Russian language and literary tradition with emphasis on philosophical thought.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  • oral proficiency in Russian or another Slavic language beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities.
  • writing proficiency in Russian or another Slavic language beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities.
  • close reading skills of authentic texts in Russian or another Slavic language.
  • the ability to develop effective and nuanced lines of interpretation.

Slavic Theme House

Slavianskii Dom, at 650 Mayfield Avenue, is an undergraduate residence that offers opportunities for students to expand their knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia. Assignment is made through the regular undergraduate housing draw.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the master's program is to further develop knowledge and skills in Slavic Languages and Literatures and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through completion of courses, in the primary field as well as related areas, and experience with independent work and specialization.

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in Slavic Languages and Literatures. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to make original contributions to the knowledge of Slavic Languages and Literatures and to interpret and present the results of their research.

Bachelor of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The major tracks in Russian Language and Literature and Russian Studies are declared on Axess and appear on the transcript but not on the diploma. The degree option in Russian and Philosophy is not declared on Axess and does not appear on the transcript or the diploma.

Writing in the Major

Undergraduates are required by the University to pass at least one writing-intensive course in their field of concentration in order to graduate. Majors in any Slavic track may satisfy the writing requirement in 2018-19 by taking and passing SLAVIC 146 The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky for 5 units and a letter grade.

Russian Language and Literature

The Russian Language and Literature field of study is designed for those students who wish to gain command of the Russian language and to study the nation's literary tradition. Emphasis is placed on the linguistic and philological study of literature, as well as the history of Russian literature and related media in the broader context of Russian culture. This major also welcomes students with an interest in Russian and Slavic linguistics.

Majors who concentrate in Russian Language and Literature must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites

Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree with a Russian Language and Literature field of study must complete an additional 56 units according to the following distribution:

Russian Language

A minimum of three courses from:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

Russian Literature

12 units from the Russian Literature major core classes, defined as follows:

Units
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky Must be taken for 5 units and a letter grade to count towards the WIM1-5

Take one of the following courses:

Units
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
SLAVIC 187Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries2-4

And take SLAVIC 147,148, or 188. 

Units
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5

Electives

Students must take at least 32 units of electives. These courses are chosen in consultation with the department's chair of undergraduate studies. With department consent, work in related academic fields may be applied toward the degree requirements. Students who have completed a Thinking Matters or PWR course instructed by Slavic faculty, with a grade of 'B' or better may count up to 5 units towards elective courses required for the major, and students who have completed the SLE sequence may count up to 10 units.

Capstone

Students must designate a 300-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course or complete a substantial (20-30 page) independent writing project, advised by a Slavic Faculty member before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion is evaluated by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies based on work submitted for the capstone course.

Language Assessment

All Slavic Languages and Literature majors must complete an oral and written language assessment two quarters prior to their graduation. This is coordinated with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Undergraduate Student Affairs Officer.

Russian Studies

The Russian Studies major is for students who want to obtain command of the Russian language and to pursue a broad, interdisciplinary study of Russian literature and culture in historical context. Emphasis is on the relation of the Russian literary tradition to other arts, including film, as well as the disciplines that have enriched the historical understanding of Russian literature: history, anthropology, art history, political science, and sociology. Majors in the Russian Studies must earn a GPA of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites

Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree in Russian Studies must complete an additional 56 units according to the following distribution.

Russian Language

A minimum of three courses from:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

19th-Century Russian Literature and History

A minimum of 8 units chosen from the following or the equivalent; students must choose one course from Slavic and one course from History.  To fulfill the WIM take SLAVIC 146 for 5 units and a letter grade :

Units
One of the following:
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment 11-5
or SLAVIC 146 The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky
A pre-revolutionary Russian history course.1-5

20th-Century Russian Literature and History

A minimum of 8 units chosen from the following or the equivalent; students must choose from Slavic 147 or Slavic 148 and and one course from History.

Units
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution1-5

Electives

Students must take 32 additional units of course work in Russian language, literature, history, or other fields, chosen in consultation with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies. Students who have completed Thinking Matters or PWR courses instructed by Slavic faculty, with a grade of 'B' or better may count these 5 units towards elective courses required for the major, and students who have completed the SLE sequence may count up to ten units.

Capstone

Students must designate a 300-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course or complete a substantial (20-30 page) independent writing. Before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion are evaluated by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies based on work submitted for the capstone course.

Language Assessment

All Slavic Languages and Literature majors must complete an oral and written language assessment two quarters prior to their graduation. This is coordinated with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the undergraduate student services officer.

Russian and Philosophy

The Russian and Philosophy option offers students the opportunity to gain a command of the Russian language and literary tradition, while gaining a background in philosophical thought, broadly construed. They take courses alongside students in other departments participating in the program in Philosophical and Literary Thought, administered through the DLCL. This option is not declared on Axess, thus it does not it appear on the transcript or diploma. Majors who concentrate in Russian and Philosophy must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites

Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree with a concentration in Russian and Philosophy must complete an additional 67 units according to the following distribution:

Russian Language

A minimum of three courses from:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

Russian Literature

A minimum of 16 units of Russian literature, including SLAVIC 145, 146, and 147, or 148.  To fulfill the WIM take SLAVIC 146 for 5 units and a letter grade :

Units
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky1-5
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5

Electives

At least 12 units of electives in Russian language and literature, chosen in consultation with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Philosophy and Literature Gateway Course

Units
SLAVIC 181Philosophy and Literature3-5

Philosophy Writing in the Major

Units
PHIL 80Mind, Matter, and Meaning (prerequisite: introductory philosophy course)5

Philosophy Core

12 units of the following:

A course in the PHIL 170 series (value theory)4
A course in the PHIL 180 series (theories of the mind, language, action)4
A course in PHIL 100-139 series (history of philosophy)4

Related Course

An upper-division course of special relevance to philosophy and literature. Major may choose from:

ENGLISH 163DShakespeare: The Ethical Challenge3-5
FRENCH/ITALIAN 286Poetry and Philosophy3-5
PHIL 194ZCapstone: Misanthropy and Literature4
COMPLIT 253Hannah Arendt: Facing Totalitarianism3-5

Language Assessment

All Slavic Languages and Literature majors must complete an oral and written language assessment two quarters prior to their graduation. This is coordinated with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Undergraduate Student Affairs Officer.

Capstone Seminar

One capstone seminar must be taken in the student's senior year. This year's capstone seminar is:

Units
COMPLIT 199Senior Seminar5

Honors Program

Students majoring in any DLCL department (i.e., Comparative Literature, French and Italian, German Studies, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures) who have an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above and who maintain a 3.5 (GPA) in their major courses, are eligible to participate in the DLCL's honors program.

Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis adviser from among their home department's regular faculty, in their junior year, preferably by March 1 but no later than May 1. During Spring Quarter of the junior year, a student interested in the honors program should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of their home department to submit a thesis proposal (2-5 pages), DLCL Honors application, and an outline of planned course work for their senior year.

Honors theses vary considerably in length as a function of their topic, historical scope, and methodology. They may make use of previous work developed in seminars and courses, but display an enhanced comparative or theoretical scope. Quality rather than quantity is the key criterion. Honors theses range from 40 to 90 pages not including bibliography and notes. Consult the DLCL Honors Handbook for more details on declaring and completing the thesis.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the DLCL program hosted by Bing Honors College. This DLCL Honors College is designed to help students develop their projects and is offered at the end of the summer.  Applications must be submitted through the Bing program. For more information, view the Bing Honors web site.

Enrollment: A minimum of 10 units total, described below, and a completed thesis is required. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15, of the terminal year. If an essay is found deserving of a grade of 'A-' or better by the thesis adviser, honors are granted at the time of graduation.

  1. Spring Quarter of the junior year (optional): DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units S/NC, under the primary thesis adviser. Drafting or revision of the thesis proposal. The proposal is reviewed by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Director of the department and will be approved or returned for submission.
  2. Autumn Quarter of the senior year (required): DLCL 189A Honors Thesis Seminar, 4 units S/NC, taught by a DLCL appointed faculty member. Course focuses on researching and writing the honors thesis.
  3. Winter Quarter of the senior year (required): DLCL 189B Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units letter grade, under the primary thesis adviser. Focus is on writing under guidance of primary adviser.  The letter grade will determine if an honor is granted or not.
  4. Spring Quarter of the senior year (option; mandatory if not taken during junior year): DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units S/NC, under the primary thesis adviser. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser and student services officer no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15 of the terminal year.
  5. Spring Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 199 Honors Thesis Oral Presentation, 1 unit S/NC.  Enroll with primary thesis adviser.

The honors thesis in the DLCL embodies Stanford's excellence in course work and research. It is simultaneously one element of the student’s intellectual legacy and part of the University's official history. The faculty considers the honors thesis to be far more than a final paper; rather, it is the product of solid research that contributes to conversations taking place within a larger scholarly community and representative of the intellectual vitality of the discipline. For all of these reasons, DLCL honors theses will be visible to future scholars researching similar questions through full online access through the Stanford Digital Repository (SDR) and may be used as course materials for future Stanford honors preparatory courses. For similar purposes, a printed copy may also be kept in DLCL spaces. The DLCL has adopted an opt-out practice. Students who wish to limit the availability or formats in which the thesis may be shared may do so by filling out the appropriate form with the DLCL student affairs officer.

Joint Major Program in Slavic Languages and Literatures and Computer Science

The joint major program (JMP), authorized by the Academic Senate for a pilot period of six years beginning in 2014-15, permits students to major in both Computer Science and one of ten Humanities majors. See the "Joint Major Program" section of this bulletin for a description of University requirements for the JMP. See also the Undergraduate Advising and Research JMP web site and its associated FAQs.

Students completing the JMP receive a B.A.S. (Bachelor of Arts and Science).

Because the JMP is new and experimental, changes to procedures may occur; students are advised to check the relevant section of the bulletin periodically.

Slavic Languages and Literatures Major Requirements in the Joint Major Program

The major tracks in Russian Language and Literature and Russian Language, Culture, and History are declared on Axess and appear on the transcript but not on the diploma.

  1. Senior year, the student enrolls in a 2 unit independent study SLAVIC 199 Individual Work for Undergraduates with a DLCL faculty member. The faculty member advising this project must sign off on this description. In order to have it approved as their capstone Slavic Languages and Literatures and Computer Science project, the student must submit a description of their project to the Chair of Undergraduate Studies in Slavic Languages and Literatures.

  2. Students must take the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) two quarters prior to degree conferral. Students should contact the undergraduate student affairs officer for the major to begin the process.

  3. The remaining units needed to reach 46 units could be completed through elective courses taken in Slavic, or in other departments, as approved by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

  4. Structured Liberal Education courses.

  5. Thinking Matters courses approved by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies may also be counted toward the electives.

  6. Subject to approval by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, courses from other fields may count if they contribute to the student's language skills, the ability to interpret literature and other cultural material, or the capacity to analyze societies.

Writing in the Major

Undergraduates are required by the University to pass at least one writing intensive course in their field of concentration in order to graduate. Majors in any Slavic track may satisfy the writing requirement in 2018-19 by passing SLAVIC 146 The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky.

Russian Language and Literature

The Russian Language and Literature field of study is designed for those students who wish to gain command of the Russian language and to study the nation's literary tradition. Emphasis is placed on the linguistic and philological study of literature, as well as the history of Russian literature and related media in the broader context of Russian culture. This major also welcomes students with an interest in Russian and Slavic linguistics.

Majors who concentrate in Russian Language and Literature must earn a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites

Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A.S. degree with a Russian Language and Literature field of study must complete an additional 46 units according to the following distribution:

Russian Language

A minimum of three courses from:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

Russian Literature

12 units from the Russian Literature major core classes, defined as follows:

Units
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky (must be taken for 5 units and a letter grade to count towards the WIM)1-5

Take one of the following courses:

Units
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
SLAVIC 187Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries2-4

And take Slavic 147, 148, or 188.

Units
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5

Electives

Students must take at least 22 units of electives. These courses are chosen in consultation with the department's chair of undergraduate studies. With department consent, work in related academic fields may be applied toward the degree requirements. Students who have completed a Thinking Matters or PWR course instructed by Slavic Languages and Literatures faculty, with a grade of 'B' or better may count up to 5 units towards elective courses required for the major, and students who have completed the SLE sequence may count up to 10 units.

Capstone

Students must designate a 300-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course or complete a substantial (20-30 page) independent writing project, advised by a Slavic Languages and Literatures faculty member. Before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion are evaluated by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies based on work submitted for the capstone course.

Language Assessment

All Slavic Languages and Literature majors must complete an oral and written language assessment two quarters prior to their graduation. This is coordinated with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the undergraduate student services officer.

Russian Studies

The Russian Studies major is for students who want to obtain command of the Russian language and to pursue a broad, interdisciplinary study of Russian literature and culture in historical context. Emphasis is on the relation of the Russian literary tradition to other arts, including film, as well as the disciplines that have enriched the historical understanding of Russian literature: history, anthropology, art history, political science, and sociology. Majors in the Russian Studies must earn a GPA of 2.0 (C) or better in order to receive credit toward the major.

Prerequisites

Completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the Language Center placement examination.

Degree Requirements

Candidates for the B.A.S. degree with a Russian Language, Culture, and History field of study must complete an additional 46 units according to the following distribution.

Russian Language

A minimum of three courses:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

19th-Century Russian Literature and History

A minimum of 8 units chosen from the following or the equivalent; students must choose one course from Slavic and one course from History.

Units
One of the following:
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment5
or SLAVIC 146 The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky
A pre-revolutionary Russian history course.5

20th-Century Russian Literature and History

A minimum of 10 units chosen from the following or the equivalent; students must choose from SLAVIC 147 or 148.

Units
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5

Electives

Students must take 22 additional units of course work in Russian language, literature, history, or other fields, chosen in consultation with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies. Students who have completed  Thinking Matters or PWR courses instructed by Slavic faculty, with a grade of 'B' or better may count these 5 units towards elective courses required for the major, and students who have completed the SLE sequence may count up to ten units.

Capstone

Students must designate a 300-level course taken in their junior or senior year as a capstone course or complete a substantial (20-30 page) independent writing. Before graduation, skills in writing, textual analysis, and discussion are evaluated by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies based on work submitted for the capstone course.

Language Assessment

All Slavic Languages and Literature majors must complete an oral and written language assessment two quarters prior to their graduation. This is coordinated with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the undergraduate student affairs officer.

Honors Program

Students have the option to complete the honors program for Computer Science and Slavic,  by completing an honors thesis that is partially or fully integrated with Computer Science; such a thesis would fulfill both the capstone and honors requirements for this degree. Students also have the option to complete the honors program for Slavic only; such a thesis would not fulfill the capstone requirement for this degree. 

Slavic Languages and Literature majors with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above, and who maintain a 3.5 (GPA) in major courses, are eligible to participate in the DLCL's honors program. Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis adviser from among their home department's regular faculty, in their junior year, preferably by March 1, but no later than May 1. During Spring Quarter of the junior year, a student interested in the honors program should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of their home department to submit a thesis proposal (2-5 pages), DLCL Honors application and an outline of planned course work for their senior year.

Honors papers vary considerably in length as a function of their topic, historical scope, and methodology. They may make use of previous work developed in seminars and courses, but display an enhanced comparative or theoretical scope. Quality rather than quantity is the key criterion. Honors theses range from 40-90 pages not including bibliography and notes. Please consult the DLCL Honors Handbook for more details on declaring and completing the honors thesis.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the honors college hosted by Bing Honors College and coordinated by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. The honors college is offered at the end of the summer, during the weeks directly preceding the start of the academic year, and is designed to help students develop their honors thesis projects. Applications must be submitted through the Bing program. For more information, view the Bing Honors website.

Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year. If an essay is found deserving of a grade of 'A-' or better by the thesis adviser, honors are granted at the time of graduation.

Declaring a Joint Major Program

To declare the joint major, students must first declare each major through Axess, and then submit the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program. The Major-Minor and Multiple Major Course Approval Form is required for graduation for students with a joint major.

Dropping a Joint Major Program

To drop the joint major, students must submit the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program. Students may also consult the Student Services Center with questions concerning dropping the joint major.

Transcript and Diploma

Students completing a joint major graduate with a B.A.S. degree. The two majors are identified on one diploma separated by a hyphen. There will be a notation indicating that the student has completed a "Joint Major."  The two majors are identified on the transcript with a notation indicating that the student has completed a "Joint Major."

Minors in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers one subplan in Russian Language, another subplan in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture. There is a third option of Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies.

The minors are designed for students who, while pursuing a major in another program, seek a comprehensive introduction to Russian culture through Russian language courses, a combination of minimal proficiency in Russian and courses in the history of Russian culture, or a multidisciplinary introduction to Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies. Students who have chosen one of the minor programs in Russian may use 5 units from a Thinking Matters or PWR course taught by a Slavic faculty member towards their electives with permission from their adviser. Up to 5 units may count from SLE towards all Slavic Languages and Literatures minors.

Russian Language Subplan

Prerequisites

The minor option in Russian Language requires completion of second year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the results of the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree with a minor option in Russian Language must complete a minimum of 6 courses at 3 units or more and total 24 units of Russian language and literature courses according to the following distribution:

At least three Russian language courses chosen from the below:

Units
SLAVLANG 111Third-Year Russian, First Quarter4
SLAVLANG 112Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter4
SLAVLANG 113Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter4
SLAVLANG 177Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 179Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3
SLAVLANG 178Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 181Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter3
SLAVLANG 182Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter3
SLAVLANG 183Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter3

The remaining units should be chosen from Slavic Department courses including: 

Units
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky1-5
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5
SLAVIC 187Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries1-5

Or, with the approval of the department's Chair of Undergraduate Studies, courses in history, politics, linguistics, or other relevant programs.

Russian Language, Literature, and Culture Subplan

Prerequisites

The minor option in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture requires completion of first year Russian, or the equivalent, as determined by the results of the Language Center placement examination.

Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree with the minor option in Russian Language, Literature, and Culture must complete a minimum of 6 courses at 3 units or more and total 28 units according to the following distribution:

A minimum of 12 units of courses on literature and culture including: SLAVIC 145, 146, 147, and 148:

Units
Option 1:
Two courses from:
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment3-5
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky1-5
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5
Option 2:
One course from SLAVIC 145, 146, 147, and 148:
SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky1-5
SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution2-5
and one course from SLAVIC 187 and 188:
SLAVIC 187Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries1-5

The rest of the units should be chosen from courses offered by the Slavic Department, or, with the approval of the chair of Undergraduate Studies, relevant courses in other departments.  

Minor in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies

The minor in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies offers students the opportunity to choose courses offered by the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (subject code REES) in various departments for their minor.

Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. degree with the minor option in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies must complete a minimum of 6 courses at 3 units or more and total 28 units according to the following distribution:

  1. Two core courses: one on Russia and one on Eastern Europe or Eurasia, to be chosen by the student from an annual list of qualifying courses issued by CREEES for their M.A. students.
  2. At least four additional REES courses, totaling at least 20 units.
  3. The student's core and additional courses must include 9 units of course work in the Slavic Department, either literature courses or Russian language in the third year or above. Courses must be distributed among at least three disciplines, such as Slavic, History, Political Science, Anthropology, Art and Art History, Economics, Religious Studies, and Sociology. The Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies determines which courses qualify for the minor.
  4. A capstone experience in CREEES, including, but not limited to, one of the following:
    1. a departmental seminar course for advanced undergraduates.
    2. directed reading and research with a Stanford faculty member or a CREEES-approved resident or visiting scholar.
    3. participation in the Stanford Overseas Studies Program in Berlin.

Foreign Language

The Slavic/REES minor has no language requirement, but students are strongly encouraged to attain working competence in Russian or another relevant language. Courses at the third-year level or above in Russian or another language of Central Asia, the Caucasus, or Eastern Europe may be counted towards the Slavic/REES minor, up to a maximum of 3 units per academic quarter, 9 units total.

Additional Information

Courses taken at Stanford overseas campuses may count towards the REES minor, with the approval of the Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies; at least three courses for the minor must be taken in residence at Stanford.

Students interested in pursuing the Slavic/REES minor should consult the Slavic Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Minor in Modern Languages

Faculty Director: Dan Edelstein

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor that draws upon courses in literature and language within the division's departments and elsewhere in the University.  The minor in Modern Languages is offered to students who want to supplement the course work in their major with course work in modern languages and literatures.   Students declare the Minor in Modern Languages through Axess.  Appropriate courses offered through BOSP may count toward this minor by emailing denisew1@stanford.edu. 

Students are required to complete 6 courses taken with a letter grade.  The courses must be 3 units or more in any field qualify for the minor by meeting the following requirements:

Units
A minimum of 16 units (4 courses and 8 units per language) at the intermediate level (second year) or beyond, not including conversational, oral communication, business, or medical language courses in two languages other than English all Modern languages offered at Stanford can qualify. 16
At least two additional courses of 3 units or more, one in each modern language being studied in the minor. These courses must be taught by Academic Council members or other senior members of Stanford faculty.6-10

It is recommended that students study, work, or intern abroad for at least eight weeks at a location where one of the languages is spoken. Course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. Advanced Placement credit and transfer credit cannot be applied to this minor. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. By University policy, no more than 36 units may be required in this minor.

Coterminal Master's Program in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The department allows a limited number of undergraduates to work for the coterminal M.A. degree in Slavic Languages and Literatures with a concentration in Russian. In addition to University requirements for the B.A. degree, the student must:

  1. Submit an application for admission by January 31 of the senior year. Applicants must meet the same general standards as those seeking admission to an M.A. program. Applicants must submit: an application for admission; a written statement of purpose; a transcript; and three letters of recommendation, at least two of which should be from members of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures faculty.
  2. Meet all requirements for both the B.A. and M.A. degrees. Applicants must complete 15 full-time quarters (or the equivalent), or three full-time quarters after completing 180 units, for a total of 225 units. During the senior year they may, with the consent of the instructors, register for as many as two graduate courses. In the final year of study, they must complete at least three graduate-level courses.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken during or after the first quarter of the sophomore year are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career; the timing of the first graduate quarter is not a factor. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Master of Arts in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers a Master of Arts degree only to students concurrently enrolled in other Stanford degree programs.

University requirements for the M.A. degree are discussed in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Admission

The requirements for admission to the master's degree program in Russian are:

  1. A B.A. (or its equivalent) from an accredited college or university.
  2. A command of the Russian language sufficient to permit the student to do satisfactory graduate work.
  3. A familiarity with Russian literature sufficient to permit the student to perform adequately in courses at the graduate level.

The applicant's previous academic training in Russian language and literature normally serves as an indication of competence. Accordingly, the department does not ordinarily consider applications from students who have not had at least three years of college Russian and some undergraduate training in Russian literature of the 19th and 20th centuries. Before registering for the first quarter's work in the department, entering graduate students are required to take placement examinations in Russian. Students who fail to perform satisfactorily on such examinations must register for remedial courses in the areas in which they are deficient. Course work in third-year Russian and below carries no credit toward the M.A. degree.

Course Requirements

Candidates for the M.A. should plan course work that ensures adequate preparation for the M.A. final examination at the end of the third quarter of work. Course work should be planned in consultation with the graduate adviser, whose approval of the overall course load is required.

Candidates for the M.A. must complete a program of 45 units, of which 36 units must be selected from courses given by the department.

The Qualifying Paper

The Qualifying paper represents a complete article-length research paper (6,000-9,000 words). The Qualifying paper must be submitted to the thesis adviser no later than the eighth week of the final quarter of registration.

Final Examination

A final examination may substitute for the Qualifying paper requirement. The final examination requires a student to demonstrate in a written examination:

  1. command of the phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology of contemporary standard Russian sufficient to teach beginning and intermediate courses at the college level
  2. an ability to read contemporary Standard Russian sufficiently to assist students studying contemporary Russian poetry or literary prose
  3. sufficient familiarity with Russian literature of either the 19th or 20th century to successfully handle survey courses dealing with the chosen period of specialization.

The examination should be taken at the end of the final quarter of required course work.

Doctor of Philosophy in Slavic Languages and Literatures

University requirements for the Ph.D. are discussed in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program in Slavic Languages and Literatures are expected to fulfill the following requirements while meeting the program's deadlines in the course of their progress toward the degree:

  1. Course Work, Breadth Requirements, and Overall Scheduling

    In consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies, students are expected to take 10 units of credit each quarter of their first year, 10 units each funded summer, and 10 units each quarter thereafter. They are expected to reach 135 units and attain TGR status in the Spring of their fourth year. All courses counted towards the 135-unit requirement for the Ph.D. must be at the graduate level. Excess course work can be taken at the undergraduate level, but not used towards the Ph.D. requirements. Students should take all courses for letter grades, when the option is available. Entering graduate students must enroll in DLCL 369 Introduction to the Profession of Literary Studies. For the Ph.D. degree, students are free to select course work to suit their individual program of study. However, candidates must do so in consultation with their adviser (Chair of Graduate Studies or principal dissertation adviser) and are held responsible for all of the areas covered by the general examinations regardless of whether they have registered for the department's offerings in a given field. For this reason, it is strongly recommended that before taking Ph.D. examinations, students complete seminar-level work directly related to the following broad areas:
    1. Russian poetry
    2. the Russian novel
    3. 20th-century Russian literature
    4. 19th-century Russian literature (the Age of Pushkin and after)
    5. 18th-century Russian literature (the early 1700's to the Age of Pushkin)
    6. medieval Russian literature
    7. a monograph course on a major Russian author
    8. theory of literature relevant to the major field

The candidate must have demonstrated commitment to graduate studies by completing a minimum of 21 content courses (not counting Summer Quarter) with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or better in order to complete the requirements of the degree program. These must include 14 seminars in the Slavic Languages and Literatures Department. Unless they have taken such courses elsewhere, students are expected to take the departmental course on medieval literature, 18th-century literature, and Old Church Slavonic. They must also enroll in the 1 unit SLAVIC 300B, a professionalization workshop, during their first quarter of enrollment.

  1. Minor or Related Fields

    During the course of study, students must develop substantial expertise in a field contiguous to the area of specialization. A candidate may elect to present a full minor or, in consultation with the graduate adviser, develop a special program in a related field, preferably no later than the second quarter of enrollment.
    1. Related Field—A student is required to complete a sequence of basic courses in a chosen discipline outside the department of Slavic Languages and Literatures. The choice of patterns is one of the following:
      1. a sequence of three courses in another literature, selected in consultation with the adviser, or
      2. three basic courses in comparative literature chosen in consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies (CGS), or
      3. a sequence of three courses in another department selected in consultation with the CGS.
    2. Minor—Students electing a minor fulfill the Ph.D. minor requirements established by that department. Students considering minors should consult with their adviser, the CGS, the Chair of Slavic Languages and Literatures, and the Chair of the minor department.
  2. Admission to Candidacy

    Admission to candidacy is an important decision grounded in an overall assessment of a student’s ability to successfully complete the Ph.D. program. Per University policy, students are expected to complete department qualifying procedures and apply for candidacy by the end of the second year in residence. In reviewing a student for admission to candidacy, the faculty considers a student’s academic progress including but not limited to: advanced language proficiency, course work, performance on the Qualifying paper, and successful completion of teaching and research assistantships. Additionally, a student must have completed at least one class with each of four Slavic Languages and Literatures department faculty members prior to consideration for candidacy. In addition to successful completion of department prerequisites, a student is only admitted to candidacy if the faculty makes the judgment that the student has the potential to successfully complete the requirements of the degree program. Candidacy is determined by faculty vote. Failure to advance to candidacy results in dismissal of the student from the doctoral program. Candidacy is valid for five years and students are required to maintain active candidacy through conferral of the doctoral degree. All requirements for the degree must be completed before candidacy expires. The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures conducts regular reviews of each student’s academic performance, both prior to and following successful admission to candidacy. Failure to make satisfactory progress to degree may result in dismissal from the doctoral program. Additional information about University candidacy policy is available in the Bulletin and GAP.
  3. Qualifying Paper

    The candidate must submit a complete draft of a qualifying paper approved by the thesis adviser. The qualifying paper represents a complete article-length research paper (6,000-9,000 words). The deadline for the qualifying paper approval is the eighth week of the sixth quarter of registration. Failure to meet these requirements results in termination of enrollment from the Ph.D. program. Following such termination, the student who has fulfilled all of the M.A. requirements may be given the opportunity to take the M.A. written examination in the history of Russian literature. If successful, the student is then awarded the terminal M.A. degree. In exceptional cases, the written examination requirement may be waived at the discretion of the Chair of Graduate Studies and the Chair of the department.
  4. Proficiency Test

    Administered to all entering graduate students, this test determines whether the student's knowledge of Russian language and literature falls below the department's standard (Advanced Low on the OPI test). Students who fail are required to complete appropriate courses in the first year of graduate study. Courses required to meet the language proficiency are not counted towards the Course Work requirement of the Ph.D. degree.
  5. Foreign Languages

    A candidate must demonstrate reading knowledge of French or German, plus another language useful for the student's area of concentration, by passing written examinations, or receiving a grade of 'A-' or better in a qualifying class with consent of the CGS. The reading examination in one of these languages must be passed by the end of the first year of study. The reading examination in the second language must be passed by the end of the second year of study.
  6. Examinations

    A candidate must pass the departmental general qualifying examinations. The comprehensive exam covers the history of Russian literature from the medieval period through the twenty-first century and is divided into six chronological sections. Two of these are taken early in the fourth quarter of enrollment and the remainder are taken in the seventh quarter of enrollment (preferably a day or two before the beginning of academic instruction). One section of the comprehensive exam is taken orally in Russian. The hour-long departmental oral qualifying examination follows no later than four weeks after completion of the comprehensive exams. The oral examination committee consists of four faculty members and may include one member representing the student's minor or related field; the rest must be drawn from among the Slavic Languages and Literatures faculty. The student makes a 20-minute presentation, following an academic conference format, and based possibly on the student's qualifying paper. Each examiner questions the student on the presentation and related topics in the history of Russian literature and the minor related field. Following the departmental examinations, a candidate must pass a University oral examination, consisting of a defense of a doctoral dissertation prospectus and covering content relevant to the area of study, rationale for the proposed investigation, and strategy to be employed in the dissertation research. The prospectus defense is expected to be scheduled no later than the beginning of the tenth quarter of registration. Note: Ph.D. examinations are scheduled by the graduate student in consultation with the CGS.
  7. Teaching

    Students are required to complete five quarters of teaching within the funding period, including three quarters of first-year Russian and at least one quarter as a teaching assistant of literature for a faculty member, usually in the survey courses in translation SLAVIC 145, 146, 147, and 148:
    1. Units
      SLAVIC 145Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment1-5
      SLAVIC 146The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky1-5
      SLAVIC 147Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution1-5
    2. Students are required to take in preparation for teaching: DLCL 301: The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages.
  8. Yearly Review

    The faculty must provide students with timely and constructive feedback on their progress toward the Ph.D. In order to evaluate students' progress and to identify potential problem areas, the department's faculty reviews the academic progress of each student at the end of the academic year. The yearly reviews are primarily intended to identify developing problems that could impede progress. In most cases, students are simply given constructive feedback, but if more serious concerns warrant, a student may be placed on probation with specific guidelines for addressing the problems detected. Possible outcomes of the yearly review include:

    1. continuation of the student in good standing

    2. placing the student on probation, with specific guidelines for the period on probation and the steps to be taken in order to be returned to good standing.

      1. For students on probation at this point (or at any other subsequent points), possible outcomes of a review include:

        1. restoration to good standing

        2. continued probation, again with guidelines for necessary remedial steps

        3. termination from the program. Students leaving the program at the end of the first or second year are usually allowed to complete the requirements to receive an M.A. degree, if this does not involve additional residency or financial support.

  9. Continuation

    Continuation in the Ph.D. program is contingent on fulfilling the following criteria: for first-year students, a high quality of performance in course work (decided by department evaluation); for second-year students, satisfactory academic progress and approval of the Qualifying paper as described above. The principal conditions for continued registration of a graduate student are the timely and satisfactory completion of the University, department, and program requirements for the degree, and fulfillment of minimum progress requirements. Failure to meet these requirements results in corrective measures, which may include a written warning, academic probation, and/or release from the program.

Ph.D. Minor in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The department offers a Ph.D. Minor in Slavic Languages and Literatures.  The requirement for the Ph.D. minor is completion of 25 units of graduate course work in Slavic Literature and Culture classes.  Interested students should consult the Chair of Graduate Studies.

Graduate Advising Expectations

The Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures is committed to providing academic advising in support of graduate student scholarly and professional development. When most effective, this advising relationship entails collaborative and sustained engagement by both the adviser and the advisee. As a best practice, advising expectations should be periodically discussed and reviewed to ensure mutual understanding. Both the adviser and the advisee are expected to maintain professionalism and integrity.

Faculty advisers guide students in key areas such as selecting courses, designing and conducting research, developing of teaching pedagogy, navigating policies and degree requirements, and exploring academic opportunities and professional pathways.

Graduate students are active contributors to the advising relationship, proactively seeking academic and professional guidance and taking responsibility for informing themselves of policies and degree requirements for their graduate program.

For a statement of University policy on graduate advising, see the "Graduate Advising" section of this bulletin.

Faculty in Slavic Languages and Literatures

Emeriti: Gregory Freidin, Richard D. Schupbach

Director: Gabriella Safran

Chair of Graduate Studies: Monika Greenleaf

Chair of Undergraduate Studies: Nariman Skakov

Professors: Lazar Fleishman, Gabriella Safran

Associate Professor: Monika Greenleaf 

Assistant Professors: Nariman Skakov, Yuliya Ilchuk 

Lecturer: Nicholas Mayhew (Mellon Fellow)

Courtesy Professor: Nancy Ruttenburg

Overseas Studies Courses in Slavic Languages and Literatures

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Slavic Languages & Literatures Courses

SLAVIC 15N. "My Life Had Stood - A Loaded Gun": Dostoevsky, Dickinson, and the Question of Freedom.. 3-5 Units.

As far apart as Dickinson and Dostoevsky are in terms of national contexts, gendered possibilities of life, and their choice of minimalist or maximalist forms, their experiences of constriction and freedom bore significant similarities. Dostoevsky penned his vow to love life on the day that he was manacled as a political prisoner and marched off to thirteen years of forced labor and exile in Siberia. He exploded back on the Petersburg literary scene in the early 1860's with three block-busters, <em>Notes from the Underground</em>, <em>Memoirs from the House of the Dead</em>, and <em>Crime and Punishment</em>, establishing himself forever as Russia's most controversial explorer of the violence of human thought. In these same years Emily Dickinson was sequestering herself in her family's Amherst house for the remainder of her life, yet she announced her rebel's credo in these enigmatic lines: <em>"My Life Had Stood, a Loaded Gun</em> - until the Day..." In this class we will explore the idea that Emily Dickinson and Fyodor Dostoevsky may be seen as original shifters of modern literary art and philosophy. We will unpack the agonizing relationship of freedom, action, and language that both authors explore. Classes will be organized around presentations, debates in pairs, the exploration of "scandalous scenes," and finally a symposium in which students will present and contribute to each other's paper projects. There are no prerequisites for this course apart from a desire to read poems and novels closely and in tandem.

SLAVIC 36. Dangerous Ideas. 1 Unit.

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like religious tolerance, voting rights, and wilderness preservation play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Same as: ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 21X

SLAVIC 70N. Socialism vs. Capitalism: Russian and American Writers' Responses. 3-4 Units.

The turn of the 20th century was marked with turbulent political events and heated discussions about the future of Russian and American societies. Many writers and intellectuals responded to the burning issues of social justice, inequality, egalitarianism, and exploitation associated with capitalism and socialism. Through close reading, critical thinking, and analytical writing, we will engage in the critical discussions of class struggle, individual interest versus collective values, race, and social equality, and identify points of convergence and divergence between the two systems. To what extent was the opposition between capitalism and socialism fueled by the artistic vision of the great Russian and American writers? What were these thinkers' ideal of society and what impact did it have on shaping emerging socialism? Readings for the class include the fundamental works of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, Jack London, W.E.B. Du Bois and Sholem Aleichem. As a field trip, we will visit Jack London State Historic Park in the Northern California. The course will culminate in a digital mapping project visualizing intellectual connections between ideas and writers.

SLAVIC 77Q. Russia's Weird Classic: Nikolai Gogol. 3-4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. An investigation of the works and life of Nikolai Gogol, the most eccentric of Russian authors and the founder of what is dubbed Fantastic Realism. Our investigation will be based on close reading of works written in various genres and created in various stages of Gogol's literary career. Taught in English.

SLAVIC 103. The Putin Phenomenon: Culture and Politics in Recent Russian History. 3-5 Units.

A man who likes to ride horses shirtless. An autocrat who has shaped contemporary Russia and won't let go of the reins. A conniver who interferes in international democratic processes toward his own nefarious ends.nMore than a politician or an individual, "Putin" has become a catch-all that stands in for Russia as a whole. In this course, we'll attempt to separate the man from the myth and to understand the historical and cultural context behind Putin's policies. In the process, we will strive better to grasp contemporary Russian society as a complex and culturally rich environment, not just an oppressed land under the thumb of one man.nIn the course of our analysis, we will examine literary and cultural artifacts and expressive works that engage with political, social, and universal human problems in a Russian and post-Soviet context, interpreting and critiquing those cultural objects with an eye to aesthetic methods and qualities and also how they reflect historical and cultural elements of Russia over a 25-year period. Cultural products to be addressed include literature and film (and one graphic novel) from the Perestroika period through the present day. We will also read President Putin's autobiography, First Person, and several of his speeches, using techniques of literary analysis to parse the particular story about Russia that he aims to convey to Russians. By examining and exploring a range of cultural objects from Russia's recent history, we seek to understand the forces that contributed to social and political change over those years, the effect those changes had on ordinary (and extraordinary) Russians, and how those effects take on meaningful aesthetic form through creative expression.
Same as: COMPLIT 103

SLAVIC 113. LGBTQ in Russia: A Legal History. 3-5 Units.

Russian politicians who support the country's law against so-called "gay propaganda" have repeatedly defended the restriction of LGBTQ rights. They claim that sexual minorities are antonymous to Russian "traditional values"', and some have even suggested that homosexuality should be re-criminalized altogether. This course explores the place of sexual minorities within Russian "tradition" by tracing laws regulating sex from the medieval period to the present day.
Same as: REES 214, SLAVIC 213

SLAVIC 118N. Other People's Words: Folklore and Literature. 4 Units.

What happens when you collect and use other people's words? This class considers folklore and literature based on it, focusing on the theme of objects that come to life and threaten their makers or owners (including Russian fairy tales and Nikolai Gogol's stories, the Golem legend and Michael Chabon's Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, and Ovid's and Shaw's Pygmalion). We read essays by Jacob Grimm, Roman Jakobson, and others, to understand what folklore can mean and how the oral and the written can interact. Students collect living folklore from a group of their choosing. This course fulfills the second-level Writing and Rhetoric Requirement (Write-2) and emphasizes oral and multimedia presentation.Prerequisite: PWR 1.

SLAVIC 121. Ukraine at a Crossroads. 1-5 Unit.

Literally meaning "borderland," Ukraine has embodied in-betweenness in all possible ways. What is the mission of Ukraine in Europe and in Eurasia? How can Ukraine become an agent of democracy, stability, and unity? What does Ukraine's case of multiple identities and loyalties offer to our understanding of the global crisis of national identity? In this course, we will consider the historical permeability of Ukraine's territorial, cultural, and ethnic borders as an opportunity to explore the multiple dimensions of its relations with its neighbors. In addition to studying historical and literary, and cinematic texts, we discuss nationalism, global capitalism, memory politics, and propaganda in order to understand post-Euromaidan society. All required texts are in English. No knowledge of Ukrainian is required. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: SLAVIC 221

SLAVIC 129. Russian Versification: History and Theory. 1-5 Unit.

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 129 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 329

SLAVIC 145. Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment. 1-5 Unit.

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 145 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 345

SLAVIC 146. The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. 1-5 Unit.

Connections of philosophy and science to literary form in "War and Peace," "Brothers Karamazov," Chekhov stories: alternative shapes of time, perception, significant action. Taught in English. Note: To be eligible for WAYS/WIM credit, you must take SLAVIC 146 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 346

SLAVIC 147. Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution. 1-5 Unit.

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: SLAVIC 347

SLAVIC 165. City Myth: Soviet and Post-Soviet Sites of Memory. 1-5 Unit.

How does memory work in Soviet and post-Soviet space? How do cities create and transform memory? This course uncovers the layers of cultural history in four Russian and Ukrainian cities: Kyiv, Odesa, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. All four cities were imagined as utopian projects and all underwent transformation and destruction in the 20th century; their earlier layers exist only in literary texts and films. Readings combine literary and critical theory (Benjamin, Foucault, Barthes, Lotman) with fiction and films (Akhmatova, Andrukhovych, Babel, Bitov, Bulgakov, Bunin, Paradzhanov, Sokurov, Trifonov, Zhabotinsky, Vertov, Zeldovich) that display the ongoing collective memory work on the Soviet legacy. Students will create cartographic projects with Google Maps, Earth and Tour Builder, and HyperCities that visualize the urban palimpsest of cities undergoing major transformations.
Same as: SLAVIC 365

SLAVIC 169. Folklore Theory and Slavic Folklore. 1-5 Unit.

Why do educated elites care about popular or folk culture, and how do they use it? An intellectual history of two centuries of folklore theory, with examples drawn from Eastern European (Slavic and Jewish) lore; students collect other folklore themselves and analyze it. Separate section for Russian readers.
Same as: SLAVIC 369

SLAVIC 179. Literature from Medieval Rus' and Early Modern Russia. 1-5 Unit.

This course offers a survey of the culture of the East Slavs from the 9th to the 17th centuries. The emphasis will be on written literature, visual arts, and religion. Most of the texts that the East Slavs had produced during the time period were influenced and borrowed from Byzantium therefore we will examine the regional variations in the adopted culture of early Rus', as well as its response to Mongol Rule, the impact on culture of political consolidation around Moscow beginning in the 15th century, and the responses to "Westernization" in the 15th-17th centuries. We will pay special attention to stylistics, poetics, and language transformation through reading of texts in the original Old Russian language. Knowledge of Old-Church Slavonic is required.
Same as: SLAVIC 379

SLAVIC 181. Philosophy and Literature. 3-5 Units.

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Same as: CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81

SLAVIC 185. Cinemato-graph. 1-5 Unit.

The term cinematography, which literally means "inscribing motion," tends to lose the "graphic" part in modern use. However, several influential film-makers not only practiced the art of "inscribing motion" but also wrote texts discussing the aesthetic premises of cinematographic art. This course explores theories of cinema as propagated by the following film-makers: Vertov, Eisenstein, Godard, Bresson, Antonioni, Pasolini, Tarkovsky, Greenaway, and Lynch. Selected key texts will be supplemented by screenings of classic films, indicative of each director's work. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: FILMSTUD 131, FILMSTUD 331, SLAVIC 285

SLAVIC 187. Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries. 1-5 Unit.

A survey of Russian poetry from Lomonosov to Vladinmir Solov'ev. Close reading of lyrical poems. Prerequisite: 3rd Year Russian Language.
Same as: SLAVIC 387

SLAVIC 199. Individual Work for Undergraduates. 1-5 Unit.

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLAVIC 213. LGBTQ in Russia: A Legal History. 3-5 Units.

Russian politicians who support the country's law against so-called "gay propaganda" have repeatedly defended the restriction of LGBTQ rights. They claim that sexual minorities are antonymous to Russian "traditional values"', and some have even suggested that homosexuality should be re-criminalized altogether. This course explores the place of sexual minorities within Russian "tradition" by tracing laws regulating sex from the medieval period to the present day.
Same as: REES 214, SLAVIC 113

SLAVIC 221. Ukraine at a Crossroads. 1-5 Unit.

Literally meaning "borderland," Ukraine has embodied in-betweenness in all possible ways. What is the mission of Ukraine in Europe and in Eurasia? How can Ukraine become an agent of democracy, stability, and unity? What does Ukraine's case of multiple identities and loyalties offer to our understanding of the global crisis of national identity? In this course, we will consider the historical permeability of Ukraine's territorial, cultural, and ethnic borders as an opportunity to explore the multiple dimensions of its relations with its neighbors. In addition to studying historical and literary, and cinematic texts, we discuss nationalism, global capitalism, memory politics, and propaganda in order to understand post-Euromaidan society. All required texts are in English. No knowledge of Ukrainian is required. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: SLAVIC 121

SLAVIC 223. Russian Formalism. 1-5 Unit.

By reading key texts written by Russian Formalists, who comprised one of the foundational movements of literary theory, we will trace how these thinkers of art and literature problematized the role and importance of form in their writing. We will investigate their systemic views of narrative, artistic evolution, filmic image and the function of ideology in arts. Texts will be read in English.
Same as: DLCL 240

SLAVIC 224. The Russian Postmodern Text. 1-5 Unit.

What is the place of postmodernism in Russia? The course aims to answer the question by engaging with theories of postmodernity (Baudrillard, Barthes, Derrida) and through close reading of several gems of Russian postmodern literature and art: Sasha Sokolov's "School for Fools" and "Palisandria," Vladimir Sorokin's "Norma" and "Blue Lard," and Dmitrii Prigov's selected poems. Texts read in Russian.

SLAVIC 228. Russian Nationalism: Literature and Ideas. 1-5 Unit.

Russia is huge and linguistically and religiously diverse. Yet the ideology of nationalism --the idea that culturally unified groups should rule their own territories-- took root in Russia in the early 19th century and is powerful today. What made this happen? Political thinkers, writers, and other artists have argued for the superiority of the Russian nation. Meanwhile, the tsarist, Soviet, and post-Soviet governments have worked to reconcile the ideology of nationalism with the realities of the administration of a diverse state. This course examines the roots of nationalism itself and the paradox of Russian nationalism, looking at literary and political writers including Dostoevsky, Stalin, and Solzhenitsyn.
Same as: REES 328, SLAVIC 328

SLAVIC 251. Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory. 3-5 Units.

In-depth engagement with a range of Dostoevsky's genres: early works (epistolary novella Poor Folk and experimental Double), major novels (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot), less-read shorter works ("A Faint Heart," "Bobok," and "The Meek One"), and genre-bending House of the Dead and Diary of a Writer. Course applies recent theory of autobiography, performance, repetition and narrative gaps, to Dostoevsky's transformations of genre, philosophical and dramatic discourse, and narrative performance. Slavic students read primary texts in Russian, other participants in translation. Course conducted in English. For graduate students; undergraduates with advanced linguistic and critical competence may enroll with consent of instructor.
Same as: COMPLIT 219

SLAVIC 285. Cinemato-graph. 1-5 Unit.

The term cinematography, which literally means "inscribing motion," tends to lose the "graphic" part in modern use. However, several influential film-makers not only practiced the art of "inscribing motion" but also wrote texts discussing the aesthetic premises of cinematographic art. This course explores theories of cinema as propagated by the following film-makers: Vertov, Eisenstein, Godard, Bresson, Antonioni, Pasolini, Tarkovsky, Greenaway, and Lynch. Selected key texts will be supplemented by screenings of classic films, indicative of each director's work. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: FILMSTUD 131, FILMSTUD 331, SLAVIC 185

SLAVIC 300B. Research Tools and Professionalization Workshop. 1 Unit.

This course introduces graduate students in Slavic Studies to library, archival, and web resources for research, grant opportunities, publication strategies, and professional timelines. Open to PhD students in the Slavic Department and other departments and to MA students in CREEES. NOTE: Those wishing to enroll, please contact Prof. Safran to obtain the course's meeting time and location.

SLAVIC 311. Introduction to Old Church Slavic. 2-4 Units.

The first written language of the Slavic people. Grammar. Primarily a skills course, with attention to the historical context of Old Church Slavic.

SLAVIC 327. Boris Pasternak and the Poetry of the Russian Avant-garde. 1-5 Unit.

An emphasis is made on close reading of the poetry of Boris Pasternak, Marina Tsvetaeva and Vladimir Mayakovsky. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: 3rd Year Russian Language.

SLAVIC 328. Russian Nationalism: Literature and Ideas. 1-5 Unit.

Russia is huge and linguistically and religiously diverse. Yet the ideology of nationalism --the idea that culturally unified groups should rule their own territories-- took root in Russia in the early 19th century and is powerful today. What made this happen? Political thinkers, writers, and other artists have argued for the superiority of the Russian nation. Meanwhile, the tsarist, Soviet, and post-Soviet governments have worked to reconcile the ideology of nationalism with the realities of the administration of a diverse state. This course examines the roots of nationalism itself and the paradox of Russian nationalism, looking at literary and political writers including Dostoevsky, Stalin, and Solzhenitsyn.
Same as: REES 328, SLAVIC 228

SLAVIC 329. Russian Versification: History and Theory. 1-5 Unit.

A survey of metric forms, rhyming principles and stanzaic patterns in the Russian poetry of the 18th - 21st centuries. Taught in Russian. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 129 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 129

SLAVIC 345. Survey of Russian Literature: The Age of Experiment. 1-5 Unit.

This course discusses the transition from predominantly poetic to predominantly prosaic creativity in the Russian literature of the first half of the 19th century Russian literature and the birth of the great Russian novel. It covers three major Russian writers “-- Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov and Nikolai Gogol -- and examines the changes in the Russian literary scene affected by their work. An emphasis is placed on close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary techniques employed in them. Taught in English. NOTE: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take SLAVIC 145 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 145

SLAVIC 346. The Great Russian Novel: Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. 1-5 Unit.

Connections of philosophy and science to literary form in "War and Peace," "Brothers Karamazov," Chekhov stories: alternative shapes of time, perception, significant action. Taught in English. Note: To be eligible for WAYS/WIM credit, you must take SLAVIC 146 for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: SLAVIC 146

SLAVIC 347. Modern Russian Literature and Culture: The Age of War and Revolution. 1-5 Unit.

The Age of Revolution: Readings in Russian Modernist Prose of the 1920-30s: What makes Russian modernist prose special? Or is there anything special about Russian modernist prose? This course aims to answer these questions through close readings of works by Babel, Mandelstam, Zoshchenko, Platonov, Olesha and Bulgakov. Aesthetic issues such as hero, plot, and narrative devices will be addressed with the aid of contemporaneous literary theory (Shklovsky, Tynianov, Eikhenbaum, Bakhtin). Novels and theory will be read in English. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: SLAVIC 147

SLAVIC 365. City Myth: Soviet and Post-Soviet Sites of Memory. 1-5 Unit.

How does memory work in Soviet and post-Soviet space? How do cities create and transform memory? This course uncovers the layers of cultural history in four Russian and Ukrainian cities: Kyiv, Odesa, Moscow, and St. Petersburg. All four cities were imagined as utopian projects and all underwent transformation and destruction in the 20th century; their earlier layers exist only in literary texts and films. Readings combine literary and critical theory (Benjamin, Foucault, Barthes, Lotman) with fiction and films (Akhmatova, Andrukhovych, Babel, Bitov, Bulgakov, Bunin, Paradzhanov, Sokurov, Trifonov, Zhabotinsky, Vertov, Zeldovich) that display the ongoing collective memory work on the Soviet legacy. Students will create cartographic projects with Google Maps, Earth and Tour Builder, and HyperCities that visualize the urban palimpsest of cities undergoing major transformations.
Same as: SLAVIC 165

SLAVIC 369. Folklore Theory and Slavic Folklore. 1-5 Unit.

Why do educated elites care about popular or folk culture, and how do they use it? An intellectual history of two centuries of folklore theory, with examples drawn from Eastern European (Slavic and Jewish) lore; students collect other folklore themselves and analyze it. Separate section for Russian readers.
Same as: SLAVIC 169

SLAVIC 379. Literature from Medieval Rus' and Early Modern Russia. 1-5 Unit.

This course offers a survey of the culture of the East Slavs from the 9th to the 17th centuries. The emphasis will be on written literature, visual arts, and religion. Most of the texts that the East Slavs had produced during the time period were influenced and borrowed from Byzantium therefore we will examine the regional variations in the adopted culture of early Rus', as well as its response to Mongol Rule, the impact on culture of political consolidation around Moscow beginning in the 15th century, and the responses to "Westernization" in the 15th-17th centuries. We will pay special attention to stylistics, poetics, and language transformation through reading of texts in the original Old Russian language. Knowledge of Old-Church Slavonic is required.
Same as: SLAVIC 179

SLAVIC 387. Russian Poetry of the 18th and 19th Centuries. 1-5 Unit.

A survey of Russian poetry from Lomonosov to Vladinmir Solov'ev. Close reading of lyrical poems. Prerequisite: 3rd Year Russian Language.
Same as: SLAVIC 187

SLAVIC 399. INDIVIDUAL WORK. 1-15 Unit.

Open to Russian majors or students working on special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLAVIC 680. Curricular Practical Training. 1-3 Unit.

CPT course required for international students completing degree. Prerequisite: Slavic Languages and Literatures Ph.D. candidate.

SLAVIC 801. TGR PROJECT. 0 Units.

.

SLAVIC 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

.

Slavic Language Courses

SLAVLANG 1. First-Year Russian, First Quarter. 5 Units.

Functionally-based communicative approach, including essential Russian grammar. Discussions of Russian culture and the Russian view of reality.

SLAVLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Russian, Part 1. 5 Units.

First quarter of the two-quarter accelerated sequence. For students with little or no prior experience studying Russian. Students acquire beginning proficiency in Russian at an accelerated pace through intensive studying of basic Russian grammar and functional vocabulary. The course emphasis is put on practice in speaking, reading, and writing Russian with special insight into Russian culture. Completion of 2A fulfills the University Language Requirement.

SLAVLANG 2. First-Year Russian, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 1. Functionally-based communicative approach, including essential Russian grammar. Discussions of Russian culture and the Russian view of reality. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 1.

SLAVLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Russian, part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 1A. Completes the first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. Students develop first-year proficiency in Russian at an accelerated pace through intensive studying of basic Russian grammar and functional vocabulary and active language use. The course emphasis is put on practice in speaking, reading, and writing Russian through diverse materials and appropriate cultural contexts. The course fulfills the University foreign language requirement. nPrerequisite: SLAVLANG 1A or consent of instructor.

SLAVLANG 3. First-Year Russian, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 2. Functionally-based communicative approach, including essential Russian grammar. Discussions of Russian culture and the Russian view of reality. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 2.

SLAVLANG 5. Russian for Native Speakers, First Quarter. 2 Units.

Self-paced.Reading and writing skills and communicating in formal and informal settings. Does not fulfill the University foreign language requirement.

SLAVLANG 6. Russian for Native Speakers, Second Quarter. 2 Units.

Self-paced. Reading and writing skills and communicating in formal and informal settings. Does not fulfill the University foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: SLAVLANG 5.

SLAVLANG 7. Russian for Native Speakers, Third Quarter. 2 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 6. Self-paced. Reading and writing skills and communicating in formal and informal settings. Does not fulfill the University foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: SLAVLANG 6.

SLAVLANG 10. Old Church Slavonic. 2 Units.

The first written language of the Slavic people. Grammar. Primarily a skills course, with attention to the historical context of Old Church Slavic.

SLAVLANG 51. Second-Year Russian, First Quarter. 5 Units.

Proficiency development at the intermediate level, including more difficult grammar such as numbers, verb conjugation, and aspect. Vocabulary, speaking skills. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SLAVLANG 3.

SLAVLANG 52. Second-Year Russian, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of 51. Proficiency development at the intermediate level, including mMore difficult grammar such as numbers, verb conjugation, and aspect. Vocabulary, speaking skills. Prerequisite: placement test or 51.

SLAVLANG 53. Second-Year Russian, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of 52. Proficiency development at the intermediate level, including mMore difficult grammar such as numbers, verb conjugation, and aspect. Vocabulary, speaking skills. Prerequisite: placement test or 52.

SLAVLANG 55. Intermediate Russian Conversation. 2 Units.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SLAVLANG 3 or equivalent placement.

SLAVLANG 60A. Beginning Russian Conversation. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60B. Intermediate Russian Conversation. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60C. Advanced Russian Conversation. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60D. Russian Government. 1 Unit.

This course examines the Russian government and Russian NGOs policies of memorialization of Communist atrocities. We will look at the history of the USSR in order to gain a full understanding of the roots of Russia's contemporary policies on memorialization. We will also examine different sites and analyze how victims are being memorialized. Finally, we will ask what the government's interest is in memorializing crimes.".

SLAVLANG 60E. The Sensuality of Slavic Sustenance. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60F. Perspectives on Slavic Culture and History through Film. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60H. Culture and Politics of Russian Athleticism through the lens of Sochi 2014. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60M. Songs and Poems of Comrades, Cossacks, Gypsies, and Peasants. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60P. Slav Dom Theme Projects. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 60T. Teaching Slavic Conversation. 1 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 70. Reading in Russian. 2 Units.

The course is designed to develop reading competence in Russian. This is not a traditional language course that takes an integrated four-skill approach. The goal of the course is to reach proficiency of advanced level in reading Russian authentic materials pertinent to history and culture. The emphasis is on vocabulary building, reading comprehension, and translation. Intermediate level of Russian is required.

SLAVLANG 99. Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLAVLANG 111. Third-Year Russian, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 53. A snapshot of Russian life. Reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 53.

SLAVLANG 112. Third-Year Russian, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 111. A snapshot of Russian life. Reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 111.

SLAVLANG 113. Third-Year Russian, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 112. A snapshot of Russian life. Reading comprehension, conversational competence, grammatical accuracy, and cultural sophistication. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 112.

SLAVLANG 177. Fourth-Year Russian, First Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 113. Culture, history, and current events. Films, classical and contemporary writers, newspaper articles, documentaries, radio and TV programs, and music. Review and fine-tuning of grammar and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: Placement Ttest, SLAVLANG 113.

SLAVLANG 178. Fourth-Year Russian, Second Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 177. Culture, history, and current events. Films, classical and contemporary writers, newspaper articles, documentaries, radio and TV programs, and music. Review and fine-tuning of grammar and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SLAVLANG 177.

SLAVLANG 179. Fourth-Year Russian, Third Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 178. Culture, history, and current events. Films, classical and contemporary writers, newspaper articles, documentaries, radio and TV programs, and music. Review and fine-tuning of grammar and idiomatic usage. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SLAVLANG 178.

SLAVLANG 181. Fifth-Year Russian, First Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 179. Language proficiency maintenance; appropriate for majors and non-majors with significant language experience overseas. Discussions, oral presentations, and writing essays on contemporary Russia. Prerequisite: Placement Test, or SLAVLANG 179.

SLAVLANG 182. Fifth-Year Russian, Second Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 181. Language proficiency maintenance; appropriate for majors and non-majors with significant language experience overseas. Discussions, oral presentations, and writing essays on contemporary Russia. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 181.

SLAVLANG 183. Fifth-Year Russian, Third Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of SLAVLANG 182. Language proficiency maintenance; appropriate for majors and non-majors with significant language experience overseas. Discussions, oral presentations, and writing essays on contemporary Russia. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SLAVLANG 182.

SLAVLANG 184A. Russian Reading Conversation and Composition. 2-3 Units.

Proficiency in reading, spoken and written Russian through literary and non-literary texts, movies, and contemporary media. Emphasis is on debate, oral presentations, and essay writing.

SLAVLANG 184B. Russian Advanced Conversation and Composition. 2-3 Units.

Proficiency in spoken and written Russian through literary and non-literary texts, movies, and contemporary media. Emphasis is on debate, oral presentations, and essay writing.

SLAVLANG 184C. Russian Advanced Conversation and Composition. 2-3 Units.

Proficiency in spoken and written Russian through literary and non-literary texts, movies, and contemporary media. Emphasis is on debate, oral presentations, and essay writing.

SLAVLANG 199. Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLAVLANG 220. Russian for Slavic PhD Students. 1-3 Unit.

For DLCL graduate students who will teach Russian language and literature. Course objective is to improve spoken Russian on literary and pedagogical topics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

SLAVLANG 299. Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 394. Graduate Studies in Russian Conversation. 1-3 Unit.

.

SLAVLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Russian. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Staff).