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Office: 615 Crothers Way, Encina Commons
Mail Code: 94305-6045
Web Site: http://sgs.stanford.edu

The Stanford Global Studies Division (SGS) is a hub for internationally focused research and teaching on campus. SGS prepares Stanford students for the world through an interdisciplinary education that cultivates knowledge of different cultures, and deepens our understanding of the global affairs through innovative research.  Stanford Global Studies is comprised of 14 centers and programs, which are described below.

Global Studies Minor

The Global Studies minor is available to Stanford undergraduates from any major, and is designed to provide students with the opportunity to pursue interdisciplinary study in one of six specializations, including in-depth language study, while integrating this knowledge into a larger vision of global affairs:

All students are required to complete 28 units, including a 3 unit gateway course. The remaining 25 units are unique to each specialization. Upon completion of the minor, students present their capstone projects in a seminar with other Global Studies minor participants. Students participating in the Bing Overseas Studies Program are especially encouraged to enroll. For questions, contact Dr. Katherine Kuhns at kkuhns@stanford.edu.

To declare the Global Studies minor, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the appropriate specialization adviser (see appropriate specialization page for contact information).  

  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Center for African Studies

Director: James Ferguson
Office: 127 Encina Commons
Web Site: http://africanstudies.stanford.edu

The Center for African Studies (CAS) coordinates an interdisciplinary program in African Studies for undergraduates and graduate students. The program seeks to enrich understanding of the interactions among the social, economic, cultural, historical, linguistic, genetic, geopolitical, ecological, and biomedical factors that shape and have shaped African societies. CAS offers a certificate and a specialization in African Studies as part of the Global Studies minor. For further information, see the "African Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for East Asian Studies

Director: Dafna Zur
Office: Knight Building, 521 Memorial Way
Web Site: http://ceas.stanford.edu

The Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) supports teaching and research on East Asia-related topics across all disciplines; disseminates knowledge about East Asia through projects of local, regional, national, and international scope; and serves as the intellectual gathering point for a collaborative and innovative community of scholars and students of East Asia. CEAS works with all schools, departments, research centers, and student groups to facilitate and enhance all aspects of East Asia-related research, teaching, outreach, and exchange across the Stanford campus.

For further information, see the "East Asian Studies" section of this bulletin.

France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies

Director: Amalia Kessler
Office: Building 260, Room 122
Web Site: http://francestanford.stanford.edu

The France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, founded in partnership with the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, aims to bridge the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, sciences, engineering, business, and law, addressing historical and contemporary issues of significance for France and the United States. The Center brings together Stanford faculty and students and academics in France to advance collaborative research and foster interdisciplinary inquiry. Its programs include conferences, support for collaborative research projects, internships, exchanges, lectures, and seminars.

Global Studies Internship Program

Web Site: https://global-internships.stanford.edu

The Stanford Global Studies Division offers highly qualified Stanford students an opportunity to extend classroom knowledge of the world to immersive cultural and working experiences every summer through the Global Studies Internship Program. Currently enrolled freshmen, sophomores, juniors, seniors, and coterms at Stanford in all majors are eligible to apply, including students who are undeclared. For more information, visit http://global-internships.stanford.edu/.

WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice

Director: David Cohen
Office: Encina Hall West, Room W208
Web Site: https://handacenter.stanford.edu/

The WSD HANDA Center equips a new generation of leaders with the knowledge and skills necessary to protect and promote human rights and dignity for all. Reflecting a deep commitment to international justice and the rule of law, the center collaborates with partners across Stanford University and beyond on innovative programs that foster critical inquiry in the classroom and in the world. The center offers an undergraduate minor. For further information, see the "Human Rights" section of this bulletin.

Program in International Relations

Director: Kenneth Schultz
Office: Encina Hall West, Room W216
Web Site: http://internationalrelations.stanford.edu

International Relations (IR) is an interdisciplinary undergraduate major focusing on changing political, economic, and cultural relations within the international system in the modern era. The IR program also offers an interdisciplinary minor and honors program. For further information, see the "International Relations" section of this bulletin.

Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies

Director: Abbas Milani
Office: 615 Crothers Way
Web Site: http://iranian-studies.stanford.edu

The Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies at Stanford University provides an interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary platform for the study of modern Iranian history, culture, politics, society, and economy. The program combines pedagogy, policy analysis, and research on all aspects of Iran as a civilization, one of the oldest in the world. The program offers research support, internships, a range of events and initiatives, and a specialization in Iranian Studies as part of the Global Studies minor.

Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies

Director: Lisa Blaydes
Office: Encina Commons 124D, 615 Crothers Way
Web Site: http://islamicstudies.stanford.edu

The mission of the Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies is to serve as a forum for interdisciplinary research and teaching in Islamic studies, complemented by seminars, colloquia and public lectures. The program seeks to illuminate Islamic history from its beginnings to the 21st century, the religion of Islam in its many aspects, and the diversity of Muslim cultures and societies, past and present, not only in the Middle East but also including South and Southeast Asia, Africa, Europe, and America. In addition to geographical breadth, the program promotes scholarship from both the humanities and the social sciences. The program offers student grants for research and language training and a specialization in Islamic Studies as part of the Global Studies minor.

Taube Center For Jewish Studies

Director: Ari Kelman
Office: Building 360, Room 362H
Web Site: http://jewishstudies.stanford.edu

The interdisciplinary Taube Center for Jewish Studies coordinates and promotes the study of all aspects of Jewish life. The center offers an undergraduate minor and an interdisciplinary major through the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.  For further information, see the "Jewish Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for Latin American Studies

Director: Alberto Díaz-Cayeros
Office: Bolivar House
Web Site: http://las.stanford.edu

The Stanford Center for Latin American Studies supports research and teaching on Latin America by the faculty and students of Stanford in all fields of study. The center offers a master's degree, in addition to a specialization in Latin American Studies as part of the Global Studies minor. For further information, see the "Center for Latin American Studies" section of this bulletin.

Mediterranean Studies Forum

Director: Lisa Blaydes
Office: Encina Commons 124D, 615 Crothers Way
Web Site: http://mediterraneanstudies.stanford.edu

The Mediterranean Studies Forum encourages scholars to explore the interplay among societies, cultures, and communities around the Mediterranean Basin from the Middle Ages to the present. The forum also studies the relations of the Mediterranean with other regions and areas of the world. The central goal of the forum is to contribute to interfield and interdisciplinary dialogue among scholars of these areas through lectures, colloquia, workshops, conferences, and publications. Particular programming fields include Turkish Studies and Sephardic Studies.

Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies

Director: Amir Weiner
Office: 615 Crothers Way
Web Site: http://creees.stanford.edu

The Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (CREEES) is Stanford University's hub for the interdisciplinary study of a vast region stretching from the former Berlin Wall to the Bering Strait. CREEES is home to a one year master’s degree, and supports undergraduates and graduate students throughout campus, especially in regards to funding for research and language study. CREEES also hosts renowned visiting scholars, lecture series, conferences, and public events. For further information, see the "Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for South Asia

Director: Jisha Menon
Office: 615 Crothers Way
Web Site: http://southasia.stanford.edu

The Center for South Asia (CSA) serves to coordinate and develop Stanford's resources for the study of South Asia across all the disciplines in the School of Humanities and Sciences. It works closely with departments and other units of the University to increase faculty strength, support research, enhance the curriculum, build the library collection, and sponsor programs and events. The program also offers a specialization in South Asian Studies as part of the Global Studies minor.

The Europe Center

Director: Anna Grzymala-Busse
Office: Encina Hall Central C243
Web Site: https://tec.fsi.stanford.edu/

The Europe Center is a multidisciplinary institute committed to the examination of European society, culture, politics, diplomacy, and security. The program also offers a specialization in European Studies as part of the Global Studies minor.

Minor in Global Studies

The minor in Global Studies is designed to give students an in-depth interdisciplinary study in one of six specializations within a larger global perspective.

Global Studies is centered on the interdisciplinary study of regions and their intersecting cultures, languages, history, politics, and societies. Historically, Global (or Area) Studies have sought ways to understand the distinctiveness of cultures and nations by applying the combined knowledge from the social sciences and humanities to their study. This approach was further developed during World War II and the Cold War to be able to understand both American allies and enemies.

Today, Global Studies examine regions and cultures within the larger context of globalization. It applies more branches of knowledge, from human biology and earth sciences to music and management engineering, to better understand the character of regions, their respective developmental trajectories, and the way those trajectories fit into a larger global context.

All students are required to complete 28 units, including GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units). The remaining 25 units are unique to each specialization. Upon completion of the minor, students present their capstone projects in a seminar with other Global Studies minor participants. Students participating in the Bing Overseas Studies Program are especially encouraged to enroll.

Each student chooses one of the six specializations. The specialization appears on the transcript but it does not appear on the diploma.

Admission

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to the Global Studies minor program should consult the relevant center adviser, or Executive Director of Stanford Global Studies,  Kate Kuhns. To declare the Global Studies minor with one of six specializations, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the appropriate specialization adviser (see appropriate specialization page for contact information).  
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Minor in Global Studies with African Studies Specialization

The minor in Global Studies, African Studies specialization, offers students the opportunity to complement their major course of study with an in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of the cultures, histories, politics, religions, and societies of Africa.

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to this minor program should consult the minor adviser at the Center for African Studies. Students declare the minor and the African Studies specialization in Axess (see below for detailed instructions).

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make service, research, or study abroad in Africa as part of their Stanford experience.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with African Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with African Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Laura Hubbard, <lhubbard@stanford.edu>, Associate Director for the Center for African Studies. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in African Studies enables students to:

  1. develop critical knowledge and skills in African Studies
  2. organize their interest in Africa into a coherent course of study through directed mentorship and participation in  intellectual community.
  3. prepare for research, study, or service in Africa

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for African Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

A total of 28 units which include the following:

  1. GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
  2. A minimum of 25 units of Africa-related courses. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements.  Coursework must be letter-graded, except where letter grades are not offered.
  3. At least one quarter's exposure to a sub-Saharan African language. The Center for African Studies and the Special Languages Program of the Language Center can arrange instruction in any of several languages spoken in West, East, Central, and Southern Africa.
  4. One entry level course that covers more than one region of Africa.
  5. A designated focus of study, either disciplinary or regional, through a three course concentration developed with the minor adviser.
  6. A minimum 25-page research paper, with a focus on Africa. This paper may be an extension of a previous paper written for an African Studies course. Other approaches to fulfilling the capstone requirement may be accepted with the approval of the Director of African Studies.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their African Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with European Studies Specialization

The Stanford Global Studies, European Studies specialization, is designed for undergraduates with an interdisciplinary interest in the history, culture, politics, societies, and institutions of Europe, past and present.

The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make Europe-based overseas studies a part of their Stanford experience.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with European Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with European Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with minor advisers, Anna Grzymala-Busse, Faculty Director for The Europe Center, or Christophe Crombez to discuss your academic plan.
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in European Studies enables students to:

  1. Organize their studies in a coherent and mentored minor.
  2. Prepare for or follow up on involvement in a Bing Overseas Studies Program in Europe.

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by Stanford Global Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. Completion of 28 units that include the following:

    1. GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
    2. INTNLREL 122 Introduction to European Studies (5 units)
    3. 5 unit survey course on European history or culture. The list of course alternatives that fulfill this requirement this year are:
      •  DLCL 100 CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People
      •  HISTORY 106B Global Human Geography: Europe and Americas
      •  HISTORY 110B
      •  HISTORY 132 Ordinary Lives: A Social History of the Everyday in Early Modern Europe 
      •  HISTORY 230D Europe in the World, 1789-Present
    4. 15 additional units on a coherent theme of interest developed with the minor adviser. This combination of courses can be on any thematic subject with an interdisciplinary and comparative focus on Europe. See the Related Courses tab below for example courses.  
    5. At least 13 of the 28 units need to be completed on the Stanford campus.
    6. Coursework must be letter-graded work, except where letter grades are not offered.
  2. Advanced proficiency in a modern European language achieved by one of the following:
    1. Completion of six quarters of college-level study of a modern European language.
    2. Completion of a course taught in a modern European language at the 100-level or higher and with a letter grade of 'B' or higher. This may be a course on a European language or literature, or other subject as long as it fulfills the above criteria. (This course may fulfill both the minor foreign language requirement and the minor 28 unit minimum requirement.)
    3. Achieve the advanced proficiency level on the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center.
  3. A capstone experience in European Studies, including but not limited to one of the following:
    1. Completion of a 25-page minimum research paper with a focus on European Studies.
    2. Completion of an overseas study program or internship in Europe.

Students will present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their European Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Iranian Studies Specialization

The Stanford Global Studies, Iranian Studies specialization, is designed for undergraduates with an interdisciplinary interest in the modern history and politics of Iran or the Middle East; Islam, particularly Shiism; the geopolitics of the Middle East; and the religions, ethnicities, and cultures.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan graduate studies, teaching, or research and analysis focused on Iran.

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by Stanford Global Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Iranian Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Iranian Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Roma Parhad, Program Manager for the Iranian Studies Program. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Requirements

A total of 28 units which include the following:

  1. GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)

  2. One area-specific entry course that deals with Iran and the Middle East. If a student wants to take a course on a subject matter not directly related to Iran, the consent of the Director of Iranian Studies is required.
  3. A minimum of 25 units of qualifying courses. 15 units must be from the list of core courses. The remaining 10 units can be chosen from the list of approved elective courses.
    • At least 10 of the 25 units must be completed at the home campus; the remaining 15 units could be completed in an approved study abroad programs. Coursework must be letter-graded work, except where letter grades are not offered.
  4. Completion of two quarters of Persian language, or proven proficiency in the language.
  5. A capstone experience in Iranian Studies for up to 5 units. The project offers students the option to conduct a major independent research paper related to Iran under faculty guidance.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Iranian Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Islamic Studies Specialization

The minor in Stanford Global Studies, Islamic Studies specialization, offers students an interdisciplinary and global exploration of Islam and Muslim societies and cultures. Focus is on knowledge of Islam in all its internal complexity, the history of Islam from its beginnings to the 21st century, Islamic social contexts, and the diversity of human experience as seen in literature and the arts originating in societies affected by Islamic civilizations. Students explore the global extent of Islam and the growth of its diasporas by taking courses on geographical regions such as the Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, Africa, Western Europe, and Americas) and from disciplines such as anthropology, art and art history, comparative literature, history, political science, international relations, and religious studies.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Islamic Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Islamic Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Zack Al-Witri, Associate Director for the Islamic Studies Program to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in Islamic Studies enables students to:

  1. organize their studies in a coherent and mentored minor.
  2. gain exposure to the past and present of Islam in diverse social, political, and cultural settings around the globe.
  3. prepare for or follow up on involvement in a Bing Overseas Studies Program such as in Istanbul, France, Germany, or Cape Town.        

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. Completion of 28 units that includes GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
  2. A minimum of 25 units of Islamic studies-related courses.  Coursework must be letter-graded, except where letter grades are not offered.
  3. At least one course must be an area-specific entry course focusing on the Islamic world. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement:
    • GLOBAL 134 The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance (3-5 units)
    • GLOBAL 133 The Medieval Middle East: Crusaders, Turks, and Mongols (3-5 units)
    • MUSIC 186E Sounds of Islam (3 units)
    • PHIL 101A History of Philosophy from Al-Kindi to Averroes (3-5 units)
    • POLISCI 149S Islam, Iran, and the West (5 units)
    • POLISCI 149T Middle Eastern Politics (5 units)
  4. At least one course must be from each of the following areas:
    • Islamic Arts, Literatures, and Cultures
    • Islam, History, and Politics
    • Religion of Islam
  5. Completion of three courses in a relevant language such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Urdu, Pashto, Kazakh, or Swahili.
  6. A capstone project such as a minimum 25-page research paper, directed reading and research with an Abbasi Program faculty member, or an overseas study, internship, or language training program that is approved by the Abbasi Program.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Islamic Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Latin American Studies Specialization

The minor in Global Studies, Latin American Studies (LAS) specialization, consists of a core set of courses surveying the history, politics, society, ecology, and culture of the Latin American region; advanced language training; and in-depth course work.

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to the minor in Global Studies, Latin American Studies (LAS) specialization, should consult Stanford Global Studies and the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS). Students who wish to complete the minor must declare online (through Axess) and submit a proposal of course work no later than the second quarter of the junior year. The minor must be completed by the second quarter of the senior year. Units taken for a student's major cannot be double-counted towards the minor.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make service, research, or study abroad in Latin America a part of their Stanford experience.

The Global Studies Minor with Specialization in Latin American Studies is open to students in any major.

Upon completion of all requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for Latin American Studies subcommittee on undergraduate programs. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Latin American Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Latin American Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the CLAS associate director to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Requirements

  1. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements. Completion of 28 units as follows: 
    1. GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
    2. A 5-unit course surveying Latin America, either ILAC 131 Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives or an approved substitute.  For further information contact a CLAS undergraduate adviser at latinamerica@stanford.edu.
    3. 20 additional units in courses which together comprise a coherent focus on a theoretical problem or issue of the region, such as but not limited to
      1. culture and identity
      2. political economy
      3. sustainable development.
    4. At least 15 of the 28 units must be completed at Stanford. 
    5. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade, except where letter grades are not offered.
  2. Foreign Language Requirement. The minimum requirement for completion of the minor in Global Studies with Latin American Studies Specialization is advanced proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese by one of the following:
    1. Completion of seven quarters of college-level study of Spanish or Portuguese.
    2. Completion of a course taught in Spanish or Portuguese at the 100-level or higher, with a letter grade of 'B' or higher. This may be a course on Spanish or Portuguese language or literature, or some other subject.
    3. Achievement of the advanced proficiency level on the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center. Contact the Stanford Language Center for test dates and procedures.
  3. Recommended: experience in Latin America such as study abroad, field research, or an internship.
    • Students might present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Latin American Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with South Asian Studies Specialization

The minor in Stanford Global Studies, South Asian Studies specialization, offers students a focused study from an interdisciplinary perspective of the cultures, histories, politics, religions, and societies of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and the Maldives.

The Global Studies Minor with Specialization in South Asian Studies is open to students in any major. Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with South Asian Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with South Asian Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Lalita du Perron, Associate Director for the South Asian Studies Center, to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor and subplan in Axess.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in South Asian Studies enables students to:

  1. acquire a nuanced and sophisticated understanding of the texts and contexts of South Asian Studies .
  2. work on this geographical and disciplinary area within the broader contours, conversations, and methods of Global Studies.
  3. enhance students’ ability to understand and participate in an increasingly global world.

  4. develop critical  and wide-ranging  insight into a key world area.

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for South Asian Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

A total of 28 units which include the following:

  1. GLOBAL 101 Critical Issues in Global Affairs (3 units)
  2. At least 25 units of qualifying courses. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements. At least 10 of the 25 units must be completed at Stanford. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade, except where letter grades are not offered.
    1. A 5-unit core course such as ANTHRO 149 South Asia: History, People, Politics or HISTORY 106A Global Human Geography: Asia and Africa.
    2. 20 units in courses that together represent an area of interdisciplinary focus such as, but not limited to, the following:
      1. immigration and law
      2. urbanization and film
      3. history and culture
    3. All courses, with the exception of Overseas Studies courses, must be taken at the 100-level or higher. For a list of courses, see the "Related Courses" tab in this section.
  3. Foreign Language Requirement. Language requirement: Intermediate proficiency in a South Asian language by one of the following methods:
    1. Completion of two introductory language courses in a South Asian language such as Urdu, Hindi, Persian, Bengali, Pashto, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Gujarati, Malayalam, Garhwali, Nepalese, Tibetan, or Sindhi; other languages may also qualify.
    2. Intermediate proficiency in any of the above languages, as measured by the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center.
  4.  A capstone experience in South Asia such as study abroad, field research, an internship, or another example of sustained and serious involvement in South Asia. The approach taken must be approved by the Center for South Asia faculty director.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their South Asian Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

SGS Division Director

Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science)

SGS Directors

Center for African Studies: James Ferguson (Anthropology)

Center for East Asian Studies: Dafna Zur (East Asian Languages and Cultures)

France-Stanford Center: Amalia Kessler (Law)

WSD Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice: David Cohen (Classics)

Program in International Relations: Kenneth Schultz (Political Science)

Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program In Iranian Studies: Abbas Milani (Hoover Institution)

Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies: Lisa Blaydes (Political Science)

Taube Center For Jewish Studies: Ari Kelman (Graduate School of Education)

Center for Latin American Studies: Alberto Díaz-Cayeros (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Mediterranean Studies Forum: Lisa Blaydes (Political Science)

Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies: Amir Weiner (History)

Center for South Asia: Jisha Menon (Theater and Performance Studies)

The Europe Center: Anna Gryzmala-Busse (Political Science)

The following lists are representative rather than comprehensive lists of courses that may apply to the six specializations in the minor in Stanford Global Studies. Students should consult their adviser to determine courses that apply to their specific program.

African Studies Specialization

The following is a current selection of courses related to African Studies. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, African Studies specialization.

Units
AFRICAST 109Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development3-5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 113VFreedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s3-5
AFRICAST 132Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 138Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention3-5
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 195Shifting Frames1-2
AFRICAST 300Contemporary Issues in African Studies1
Related Courses from Other Departments
AFRICAST 114NDesert Biogeography of Namibia Prefield Seminar3
AFRICAST 119Novel Perspectives on South Africa2-3
AFRICAST 122FHistories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad4
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 199Independent Study or Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 249Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa4-5
ANTHRO 1Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology3-5
ANTHRO 13AIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 41Genes and Identity4
ANTHRO 140Ethnography of Africa3
ANTHRO 141BThe Anthropology of Bits and Bytes: Digital Media in the Developing World5
ANTHRO 147Nature, Culture, Heritage5
ANTHRO 185Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
ECON 118Development Economics5
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 48The Egyptians3-5
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 146History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa4-5
HISTORY 238JThe European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates4-5
OSPCPTWN 16Sites of Memory3
OSPCPTWN 30Introduction to Contemporary Issues in South Africa2
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPCPTWN 38Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective3-5
OSPCPTWN 43Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa4
OSPCPTWN 67ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development3
OSPCPTWN 78Postcolonial Modernist Art Movements in Africa3
OSPCPTWN 79Creative Cityness in the Global South3
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law3-5
POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
SURG 150Politics, Culture, and Economics of Global Surgery1-4
THINK 42Thinking Through Africa: Perspectives on Health, Wealth, and Well-Being4

European Studies Specialization

The following is a current selection of courses related to European Studies. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, European Studies specialization.

Units
ARTHIST 101Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period4
ARTHIST 102Introduction to Greek Art II: The Classical Period4
ARTHIST 105Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 108Virginity and Power: Mary in the Middle Ages4
ARTHIST 111Introduction to Italian Renaissance, 1420-15804
ARTHIST 114Mystical Naturalism: Van Eyck, Dürer, and the Northern Renaissance4
ARTHIST 117Picturing the Papacy, 1300-18504
ARTHIST 118Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto4
ARTHIST 12118th-Century Art in Europe, ca 1660-17804
ARTHIST 122The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-18304
ARTHIST 124The Age of Naturalism, Painting in Europe1830-18744
ARTHIST 126Post-Naturalist Painting4
ARTHIST 142Architecture Since 19004
ARTHIST 147Modernism and Modernity4
ARTHIST 203Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks5
ARTHIST 210Giotto5
ARTHIST 213Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center5
COMPLIT 115Vladimir Nabokov: Displacement and the Liberated Eye3-5
COMPLIT 181Philosophy and Literature3-5
DLCL 100CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People3-5
ENGLISH 81Philosophy and Literature3-5
FRENCH 181Philosophy and Literature3-5
FRENCH 192Women in French Cinema: 1958-3-5
FRENCH 205Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics3-5
FRENCH 219The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine3-5
GERMAN 181Philosophy and Literature3-5
GERMAN 267Prospects for Transatlantic Relations: What Holds the West Together?1-2
GLOBAL 101Critical Issues in Global Affairs3
GLOBAL 106Populism and the Erosion of Democracy5
HISTORY 10CThe Problem of Modern Europe3
HISTORY 30CCulture and Society in Reformation England3
HISTORY 85BJews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture3
HISTORY 106BGlobal Human Geography: Europe and Americas5
HISTORY 110CThe Problem of Modern Europe5
HISTORY 132Ordinary Lives: A Social History of the Everyday in Early Modern Europe5
HISTORY 137AEurope, 1945-20025
HISTORY 140AThe Scientific Revolution5
HISTORY 185BJews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture4-5
HISTORY 222Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia4-5
HISTORY 230DEurope in the World, 1789-Present4-5
HISTORY 233GCatholic Politics in Europe, 1789-19925
HISTORY 239HColonialism and Empire in Modern Europe5
HISTORY 330DEurope in the World, 1789-Present4-5
ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 136Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
ILAC 199Individual Work1-12
ILAC 242Poetry Workshop in Spanish3-5
INTNLREL 122Introduction to European Studies5
INTNLREL 123The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities5
ITALIAN 181Philosophy and Literature3-5
JEWISHST 5Biblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 5BBiblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 185BJews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture4-5
LAW 5005European Union Law2-3
ME 421European Entrepreneurship and Innovation Thought Leaders Seminar1
OSPBER 17Split Images: A Century of Cinema3-4
OSPBER 60Cityscape as History: Architecture and Urban Design in Berlin5
OSPBER 66Theory from the Bleachers: Reading German Sports and Culture3
OSPBER 70The Long Way to the West: German History from the 18th Century to the Present4-5
OSPBER 71EU in Crisis4-5
OSPBER 77"Ich bin ein Berliner" Lessons of Berlin for International Politics4-5
OSPBER 79Political Economy of Germany in Europe: an Historical-Comparative Perspective4-5
OSPBER 82Globalization and Germany4-5
OSPBER 83Refugees and Germany3-4
OSPBER 126XA People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU4-5
OSPBER 174Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective3-5
OSPFLOR 11Film, Food and the Italian Identity4
OSPFLOR 15The Italy Around You: Society, Politics, the Arts and the Economy3
OSPFLOR 26Economics of the EU5
OSPFLOR 34The Virgin Mother, Goddess of Beauty, Grand Duchess, and the Lady: Women in Florentine Art4
OSPFLOR 49On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II5
OSPFLOR 54High Renaissance and Mannerism: the Great Italian Masters of the 15th and 16th Centuries4
OSPFLOR 76Sociology of Migrations5
OSPFLOR 78The Impossible Experiment: Politics and Policies of the New European Union5
OSPMADRD 8ACities and Creativity: Cultural and Architectural Interpretations of Madrid4
OSPMADRD 8BDebating Design: Spanish and International Fashion2
OSPMADRD 14Introduction to Spanish Culture2
OSPMADRD 47Cultural Relations between Spain and the United States:Historical Perceptions and Influences, 1776-24
OSPMADRD 48Migration and Multiculturality in Spain4
OSPMADRD 54Contemporary Spanish Economy and the European Union4
OSPMADRD 56The Political Economy of Spain: A Fragmented Nation within the EU3
OSPMADRD 57Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.4
OSPMADRD 61Society and Cultural Change: The Case of Spain4
OSPMADRD 75Sefarad: The Jewish Community in Spain4
OSPOXFRD 41Western Thought: Origins of Twentieth Century Semiotics4-5
OSPOXFRD 72Oxford Fantasists4-5
OSPOXFRD 93Collecting the World4-5
OSPOXFRD 117WGender and Social Change in Modern Britain4-5
OSPPARIS 24Introduction to French Society2
OSPPARIS 30The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater4
OSPPARIS 32French History and Politics: Understanding the Present through the Past5
OSPPARIS 72The Ceilings of Paris4
OSPPARIS 91The Future of Globalization: Economics, Politics and the Environment5
OSPPARIS 92Building Paris: Its History, Architecture, and Urban Design4
PHIL 81Philosophy and Literature3-5
POLISCI 140PPopulism and the Erosion of Democracy5
REES 100Current Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies1-2
SLAVIC 181Philosophy and Literature3-5
SOC 309Nations and Nationalism4-5

Iranian Studies Specialization

The following is a current selection of courses related to Iranian Studies. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, Iranian Studies specialization.

Units
AFRICAAM 94Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 145ASecond-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 145BSecond-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 145CSecond-Year Modern Persian ,Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
ANTHRO 134BConflict and Change in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
CLASSICS 81Ancient Empires: Near East4-5
COMPLIT 194Independent Research1-5
COMPLIT 243Poets, Courtiers, and Mystics: The Invention of Love in Medieval Persian Literature3-5
COMPLIT 243AFrom Idol to Equal: Changing Images of Love in 20th-Century Persian and Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 244Modern Persian Poetry3-5
COMPLIT 249Rumi: Rhythms of Creation3-5
COMPLIT 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
COMPLIT 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
COMPLIT 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
COMPLIT 399Individual Work1-15
CSRE 95ISpace, Public Discourse and Revolutionary Practices3-4
DLCL 144An Introduction to Persian Literature, an Aesthetic Tradition Over a Millennium Old3-4
DLCL 227Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures1
FEMGEN 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
FILMSTUD 135Around the World in Ten Films3-4
FRENLANG 60EFrench Persian Cooking1
GLOBAL 101Critical Issues in Global Affairs3
GLOBAL 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
GLOBAL 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
GLOBAL 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
HISTORY 87The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan3
HISTORY 187The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan5
HISTORY 201AThe Global Drug Wars4-5
HISTORY 252BDiplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country5
INTNLREL 174Diplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country5
INTNLREL 198Senior Thesis2-10
MS&E 93QNuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism3
POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations with Iran5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 149TMiddle Eastern Politics5
POLISCI 211NNuclear Politics3-5
POLISCI 215FNuclear Weapons and International Politics5
POLISCI 219Directed Reading and Research in International Relations1-10
POLISCI 229Directed Reading and Research in American Politics1-10
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 311NNuclear Politics3-5
POLISCI 315FNuclear Weapons and International Politics5
RELIGST 180Gender Relations in Islam4

Islamic Studies Specialization

The following is a current selection of courses related to Islamic Studies. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, Islamic Studies specialization.

Units
Islamic Arts, Literatures, and Cultures
AFRICAAM 94Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
AFRICAST 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
AMELANG 126Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
ANTHRO 13AIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 28NSecularism and its Critics3-5
ANTHRO 49Violence and Belonging in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 132Religion and Politics in the Muslim World5
ANTHRO 132BIslam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 133AAnthropology of the Middle East3-5
ANTHRO 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
ANTHRO 134BConflict and Change in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 142AYouth in the Global South: Beyond Active Subjects and Passive Objects5
ANTHRO 146AAnthropology of Youth5
ANTHRO 146BGlobal Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society5
ANTHRO 147BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ANTHRO 149South Asia: History, People, Politics5
ANTHRO 149ACities and Citizens in the Middle East4
ANTHRO 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
ANTHRO 247BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ANTHRO 249South Asia: History, People, Politics5
ANTHRO 318Democracy and Political Authority5
ANTHRO 341The Archaeololgy of Religious Crusading in Medieval Europe5
ANTHRO 347Religion and Modernity5
ARCHLGY 132The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique3-5
ARCHLGY 147BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ARCHLGY 232The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique3-5
ARTHIST 1AIntroduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval5
ARTHIST 105Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 105BMedieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture5
ARTHIST 205Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest5
ARTHIST 205AIslamic Painting: Landscape, Body, Power5
ARTHIST 208Hagia Sophia5
ARTHIST 208BThe Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews5
ARTHIST 209Art and Religious Experience in Byzantium and Islam5
ARTHIST 305Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 405Art, Ekphrasis, and Music in Byzantium and Islam5
ARTHIST 408Hagia Sophia5
ARTHIST 408BThe Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews5
ARTHIST 409Iconoclasm5
CLASSICS 56Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval5
COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
COMPLIT 145Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
COMPLIT 243AFrom Idol to Equal: Changing Images of Love in 20th-Century Persian and Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
COMPLIT 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
COMPLIT 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
COMPLIT 252AGreat Arabic Poetry3-5
COMPLIT 252BGreat Arabic Prose3-5
CSRE 129Camus4-5
CSRE 133AAnthropology of the Middle East3-5
CSRE 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
CSRE 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
CSRE 249The Algerian Wars3-5
DLCL 227Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures1
DLCL 245LA ALJAMÍA, ROMÁRABE LANGUAGE3-5
ENGLISH 92APArab and Arab-American Poetry5
FRENCH 249The Algerian Wars3-5
GLOBAL 199Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor1-5
GLOBAL 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
GLOBAL 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
GLOBAL 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
HISTORY 7EIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
HISTORY 239GThe Algerian Wars3-5
ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Shepherds and Butchers, or The Iberian Pastoral3-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
MUSIC 7BMusical Cultures of the World2-3
MUSIC 186ESounds of Islam3
MUSIC 187Spiritual Sound of Central Asia: Introduction to the Music of Central Asia1-5
OSPMADRD 74Islam in Spain and Europe: 1300 Years of Contact4
PHIL 101AHistory of Philosophy from Al-Kindi to Averroes3-5
RELIGST 283Religion and Literature4
TAPS 157World Drama and Performance4
TAPS 157PPerforming Arabs and Others in Theory and Practice4
TAPS 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
TAPS 357World Drama and Performance4
URBANST 144Cities and Citizens in the Middle East4
Islamic History
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
ANTHRO 108BGender in the Arab and Middle Eastern City5
CSRE 82GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
CSRE 218Islam, Race and Revolution: A Pan-American Approach3-5
GLOBAL 133The Medieval Middle East: Crusaders, Turks, and Mongols3-5
GLOBAL 134The Birth of Islam: Authority, Community, and Resistance3-5
HISTORY 39Modern Britain and the British Empire3
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 83SRefugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East5
HISTORY 87The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan3
HISTORY 102History of the International System since 19145
HISTORY 139Modern Britain and the British Empire5
HISTORY 182GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
HISTORY 187The Islamic Republics: Politics and Society in Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan5
HISTORY 201AThe Global Drug Wars4-5
HISTORY 210The History of Occupation, 1914-20104-5
HISTORY 301AThe Global Drug Wars4-5
HISTORY 381Economic and Social History of the Modern Middle East4-5
ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Shepherds and Butchers, or The Iberian Pastoral3-5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 215ASpecial Topics: State-Society Relations in the Contemporary Arab World-Key Concepts and Debates5
PSYC 86QPsychology of Xenophobia3
TAPS 157SEdward Said, or Scholar vs Empire4
Islamic Politics
COMM 177YSpecialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence4-5
COMM 277YSpecialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence4-5
CSRE 82GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
INTLPOL 214Refugees in the Twenty-first Century3-5
MS&E 93QNuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism3
POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations with Iran5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 149TMiddle Eastern Politics5
POLISCI 222The Political Psychology of Intolerance5
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 246APaths to the Modern World: The West in Comparative Perspective3-5
POLISCI 441LGrad Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics3-5
Languages
AMELANG 15TIntermediate to Advanced Turkish Conversation2
AMELANG 84AAccelerated First-Year Turkish, Part 15
AMELANG 84BAccelerated First-Year Turkish, Part 25
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 145ASecond-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 145BSecond-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 145CSecond-Year Modern Persian ,Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 185ASecond-Year Turkish, First Quarter5
AMELANG 185BSecond-Year Turkish, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 185CSecond-Year Turkish, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 297Directed Reading in African and Middle Eastern Languages1-5
AMELANG 395Graduate Studies in African and Middle Eastern Languages1-5
ARABLANG 1First-Year Arabic, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 1AAccelerated First-Year Arabic, Part I5
ARABLANG 2First-Year Arabic, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 2AAccelerated First-Year Arabic, Part II5
ARABLANG 3First-Year Arabic, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 10Arabic Calligraphy3
ARABLANG 21Second-Year Arabic, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 21AAccelerated Second-Year Arabic, Part I5
ARABLANG 21HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 22Second-Year Arabic, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 22AAccelerated second-Year Arabic, Part II5
ARABLANG 22HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 23Second-Year Arabic, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 23HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 24Arabic Skills Workshop4
ARABLANG 125AColloquial Arabic, First Quarter4
ARABLANG 125BConversational/Colloquial Arabic, Second Quarter4
ARABLANG 127Intermediate to Advanced Conversation3
ARABLANG 131Third-Year Arabic, First Quarter4
ARABLANG 131HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 132Third-Year Arabic, Second Quarter4
ARABLANG 132HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 133Third-Year Arabic, Third Quarter4
ARABLANG 133HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 141Fourth-Year Arabic, First Quarter4
ARABLANG 142Fourth-Year Arabic, Second Quarter4
ARABLANG 143Fourth-Year Arabic, Third Quarter4
ARABLANG 297Directed Reading1-5
ARABLANG 394Graduate Studies in Arabic Conversation1-3
ARABLANG 395Graduate Studies in Arabic1-5
COMPLIT 248AReading Turkish I2-4
COMPLIT 248BReading Turkish II2-4
COMPLIT 248CAdvanced Turkish-English Translation2-4
SPECLANG 109AFirst-Year Bengali, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 109BFirst-Year Bengali, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 109CFirst-Year Bengali, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 110ASecond-Year Bengali, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 110BSecond-Year Bengali - Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 110CSecond-Year Bengali - Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 152AFirst-Year Hindi, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 152BFirst-Year Hindi, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 152CFirst-Year Hindi, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 152HHeritage Hindi5
SPECLANG 153ASecond-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 153BSecond-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 153CSecond-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 154AThird-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 154BThird-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 154CThird-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 156AFirst-Year Indonesian, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 157ASecond-Year Indonesian, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 192AFirst-Year Kazakh, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 192BFirst-Year Kazakh, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 192CFirst-Year Kazakh, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 193ASecond-Year Kazakh, First Quarter3
SPECLANG 193BSecond-Year Kazakh, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 193CSecond-Year Kazakh, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 218ABeginning Urdu, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 218BBeginning Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218CBeginning Urdu, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 219BIntermediate Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 229ABeginning Pashto, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 229BBeginning Pashto, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 239ASecond-Year Uzbek, First Quarter3
SPECLANG 239BSecond-Year Uzbek, Second Quarter3
SPECLANG 239CSecond-Year Uzbek, Third Quarter3
SPECLANG 240AThird-Year Uzbek, First quarter3

Latin American Studies Specialization

  1. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken at the 100-level or higher, with the exception of Overseas Studies courses (see also note 1, above).
  2. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade.
  3. Some courses have prerequisites or special enrollment requirements. Students are responsible for making sure they have completed any prerequisites and/or secured an instructor's permission, as needed.

Culture and Society

Units
AMSTUD 271Mexicans in the United States5
ANTHRO 100DChavin de Huantar Research |Seminar3-5
ANTHRO 102BAztec Language and Culture3
ANTHRO 108AThe Formation of Political State in the Peruvian Andes3-5
ANTHRO 124NMaya Mythology and the Popol Vuh3
ANTHRO 153Asylum: Knowledge, Politics, and Population3-5
ANTHRO 206AIncas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology3-5
ANTHRO 215BPeoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica5
ANTHRO 222CResearch in Maya Hieroglyphic Writing1-2
ARCHLGY 100DChavin de Huantar Research |Seminar3-5
CHILATST 111Curander@s, remedios y espiritualidad: Chican@/Latin@ healing practices3-5
CHILATST 140Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film3-5
CHILATST 173Mexican Migration to the United States3-5
COMPLIT 100CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People3-5
CSRE 189Race and Immigration3-4
CSRE 212Biology, Culture and Social Justice in Latin America: Perspectives from Forensic Anthropology5
DLCL 100CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People3-5
FILMSTUD 116International Documentary4
FILMSTUD 316International Documentary4
HISTORY 106BGlobal Human Geography: Europe and Americas5
HISTORY 112Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World5
HISTORY 166CThe Cold War: An International History5
HISTORY 173Mexican Migration to the United States3-5
HISTORY 201AThe Global Drug Wars4-5
HISTORY 274EUrban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America5
HISTORY 279Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HISTORY 301AThe Global Drug Wars4-5
HISTORY 366BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
HISTORY 371Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography4-5
HISTORY 373EThe Emergence of Nations in Latin America: Independence Through 18804-5
HISTORY 379Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HUMRTS 108Spanish Immersion Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the U.S. Mexico Border1-3
ILAC 113QBorges and Translation3-5
ILAC 123Reading the Environment in Brazil3-5
ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 132Drug Wars: from Pablo Escobar to the Mara Salvatrucha to Iguala Mass Student Kidnapping3-5
ILAC 132EIntroduction to Global Portuguese: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 140Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film3-5
ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5
ILAC 209Desaparecidos3-5
ILAC 227The Making of Modern Brazil3-5
ILAC 238Latin American Poetry as Witness to Self and World.4
ILAC 241Fiction Workshop in Spanish3-5
ILAC 242Poetry Workshop in Spanish3-5
ILAC 243Latin American Aesthetics3-5
ILAC 254On the Road w/o GPS: Fiction, Journalism & Art of Survival - Tijuana, Havana, Mexico & Buenos Aires3-5
ILAC 255Climate Change and Latin American Naturecultures3-5
ILAC 262Fiction and History in the Mexican Novel3-5
ILAC 272New Brazilian Cinema3-5
ILAC 277Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - From Novel to Film3-5
ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Shepherds and Butchers, or The Iberian Pastoral3-5
ILAC 336One World or Many? Representing Distance, Time, and Place in Iberian Expansion3-5
ILAC 342Meat3-5
ILAC 373Baroque Brazil3
INTNLREL 154The Cold War: An International History5
LATINAM 177AMapping Poverty, Colonialism and Nation Building in Latin America-Part A1
LATINAM 177BMapping Poverty, Colonialism and Nation Building in Latin America-Part B1
LATINAM 248Racial and Gender Inequalities in Latin America3-5
LATINAM 264VPIndigenous resistance and contradictions in Latin America3-5
LAW 5027Social Conflict, Social Justice, and Human Rights in 21st Century Latin America2
LAW 5028Regional Human Rights Protections: The Inter-American System3
OSPMADRD 55Latin Americans in Spain: Cultural Identities, Social Practices, and Migratory Experience4
OSPSANTG 14Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century4-5
OSPSANTG 29Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America5
OSPSANTG 30Short Latin American Fiction of the 20th Century4-5
OSPSANTG 68The Emergence of Nations in Latin America4-5
OSPSANTG 119XThe Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies5
SOC 189Race and Immigration3-4
SOC 289Race and Immigration3-4
SOC 350WWorkshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation1-3

Environment, Ecology, and Sustainability

Units
ANTHRO 139CAnthropology of Global Health5
ANTHRO 160Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case3-5
ANTHRO 162Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
ANTHRO 260Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case3-5
ANTHRO 262Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
ANTHRO 278Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos5
ANTHRO 337BAnthropological Approaches to Health Issues in Contemporary Latin America5
BIO 234Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective3
BIOE 371Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context1
EARTHSYS 121Building a Sustainable Society: New Approaches for Integrating Human and Environmental Priorities3
ETHICSOC 278MIntroduction to Environmental Ethics4-5
GEOPHYS 212Topics in Climate Change2
HISTORY 278BThe Historical Ecology of Latin America4-5
HISTORY 378The Historical Ecology of Latin America4-5
HUMBIO 129SGlobal Public Health3
ILAC 123Reading the Environment in Brazil3-5
ILAC 255Climate Change and Latin American Naturecultures3-5
OSPSANTG 58Living Chile: A Land of Extremes5

Political Economy

Units
ECON 106World Food Economy5
EDUC 306AEconomics of Education in the Global Economy5
EDUC 404Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century1-2
HISTORY 177DU.S. Intervention and Regime Change in 20th Century Latin America5
INTNLREL 141ACamera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries5
INTNLREL 147Political Economy of the Southern Cone Countries of South America5
INTNLREL 179Major Themes in U.S.-Latin America Diplomatic History5
LAW 5017Law in Latin America2
OSPSANTG 119XThe Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies5
POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
POLISCI 248SLatin American Politics3-5
POLISCI 347GGovernance and Poverty3-5
POLISCI 348SLatin American Politics3-5
POLISCI 440BComparative Political Economy3-5

South Asian Studies Specialization

The following is a current selection of courses related to South Asian Studies. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, South Asian Studies specialization.

Units
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
ANTHRO 28NSecularism and its Critics3-5
ANTHRO 126Urban Culture in Global Perspective5
ANTHRO 149South Asia: History, People, Politics5
HISTORY 39Modern Britain and the British Empire3
HISTORY 139Modern Britain and the British Empire5
RELIGST 114Yoga: Ancient and Modern4
RELIGST 124Sufi Islam4
RELIGST 251Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts3-5
SPECLANG 109AFirst-Year Bengali, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 109BFirst-Year Bengali, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 109CFirst-Year Bengali, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 152AFirst-Year Hindi, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 152BFirst-Year Hindi, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 152CFirst-Year Hindi, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 153ASecond-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 153BSecond-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 153CSecond-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 154AThird-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 154BThird-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 154CThird-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 183AFirst-Year Sanskrit, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 183BFirst-Year Sanskrit, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218ABeginning Urdu, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 218BBeginning Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218CBeginning Urdu, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 219AIntermediate Urdu, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 219BIntermediate Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 229ABeginning Pashto, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 229BBeginning Pashto, Second Quarter5
TAPS 157World Drama and Performance4
TIBETLNG 3First Year Tibetan, Third Quarter4
TIBETLNG 23Intermediate/Advance Tibetan, Third Quarter4
URBANST 114Urban Culture in Global Perspective5

African Studies Courses

AFRICAST 58. Egypt in the Age of Heresy. 3-5 Units.

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Same as: AFRICAAM 58A, ARCHLGY 58, CLASSICS 58

AFRICAST 109. Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development. 3-5 Units.

Throughout the history of modern Africa, Africans have specified their desired future - development, understood broadly - and identified the major obstacles in achieving it. Debates about development have intensified in the post-colonial period, especially as African countries have replaced the independence era leaders. Amidst the general critique of the imposition of external values and rules, Africans have differed, sometimes sharply, on priorities, process, and programs. While for some the challenge is to catch up with development elsewhere, for others it is essential to leap ahead, to set the pace, to initiate a radical social, economic, and political transformation. To ground and extend the common approaches to studying development that emphasize economics and that rely largely on external commentators, we will explore African perspectives. Our major task will be a broad overview, sampling the analyses of Africa¿s intellectuals in several domains. Course participants will review, compare, and analyze major contributions, developing an understanding of contemporary intellectual currents.
Same as: AFRICAST 209

AFRICAST 111. Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Policy making in Africa and the intersection of policy processes and their political and economic dimensions. The failure to implement agreements by international institutions, national governments, and nongovernmental organizations to promote education. Case studies of crowded and poorly equipped schools, overburdened and underprepared teachers, and underfunded education systems.
Same as: AFRICAAM 211, AFRICAST 211

AFRICAST 112. AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?.
Same as: AFRICAAM 111, AFRICAST 212

AFRICAST 113V. Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s. 3-5 Units.

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Same as: AFRICAAM 113V, CSRE 113V, HISTORY 205D

AFRICAST 114N. Desert Biogeography of Namibia Prefield Seminar. 3 Units.

Desert environments make up a third of the land areas on Earth, ranging from the hottest to the coldest environments. Aridity leads to the development of unique adaptations among the organisms that inhabit them. Climate change and other processes of desertification as well as increasing human demand for habitable and cultivatable areas have resulting in increasing need to better understand these systems. Namibia is a model system for studying these processes and includes the Sossuvlei (Sand Sea) World Heritable Site. This seminar will prepare students for their overseas field experience in Namibia. The seminar will provide an introduction to desert biogeography and culture, using Namibia as a case study. During the seminar, students will each give two presentations on aspects of desert biogeography and ecology, specific organisms and their adaptations to arid environments, cultural adaptations of indigenous peoples and immigrants, ecological threats and conservation efforts, and/or national and international policy towards deserts. Additional assignments include a comprehensive dossier and a final exam. Students will also carry out background research for the presentations they will be giving during the field seminar where access to the internet and to other scholarly resources will be limited. In addition, we will cover logistics, health and safety, cultural sensitivity, geography, and politics. We will deal with post-field issues such as reverse culture shock, and ways in which participants can consolidate and build up their abroad experiences after they return to campus.
Same as: EARTHSYS 115N

AFRICAST 119. Novel Perspectives on South Africa. 2-3 Units.

21st-century South Africa continues its literary effervescence. In this class we'll sample some recent novels and related writings to tease out the issues shaping the country (and to some degree the continent) at present. Is `South African literature' a meaningful category today? What are the most significant features we can identify in new writings and how do they relate to contemporary social dynamics? The course will appeal to anyone interested in present-day Cape Town or Johannesburg, including students who have spent a term in BOSP-Cape Town or plan to do so in future. Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. 2-3 units. Course may be repeated for credit.nn nnAll students will write short analyses from the prescribed texts. Students taking the course for three units will write an extended essay on a topic agreed with the instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 119, AFRICAAM 219, AFRICAST 219, CSRE 119

AFRICAST 122F. Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad. 4 Units.

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Same as: AFRICAAM 122F, CSRE 122F, HISTORY 248D

AFRICAST 127. African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present. 4 Units.

This course explores the relationship between art and politics in twentieth century Africa. Artistic production and consumption is considered in the context of various major political shifts, from the experience of colonialism to the struggle against Apartheid. Each week we will look closely at different works of art and examine how artists and designers responded to such challenges as independence, modernization and globalization. We will look at painting, sculpture, religious art, public and performance art, photography and film. How western perceptions and understanding of African art have shifted, and how museums have framed African art throughout the twentieth century will remain important points of discussion throughout the course.
Same as: ARTHIST 127A

AFRICAST 132. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, social, and political aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean of the 20th and 21st century. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry. We will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary genres, and terms. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French, in addition to reading comprehension. Special guest: Moroccan author Meryem Alaoui. Required readings include: Aime Cesaire, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Dany Laferriere, Leonara Miano, Albert Memmi. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 133, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143

AFRICAST 133B. Covering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims. 3-5 Units.

In this course, students will think critically about how knowledge about Islam, Muslims, and Muslim Societies is produced and circulated. As a class, we will consider why and how certain kinds of ideas about Islam and Muslims become representative (i.e., authoritative discourse) while others ideas do not. This is an interdisciplinary class; course material will draw on readings from anthropology, literary criticism, history, sociology and media and cultural studies. We will also be engaging with other kinds of material, including news articles, editorials, documentaries, and films.
Same as: ANTHRO 133B, CSRE 133B

AFRICAST 135. Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems. 3-4 Units.

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Same as: AFRICAST 235, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235

AFRICAST 138. Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore recent debates on the causes and structural terms of large-scale violence in Africa in the context of key contemporary models for reconciliation and transitional justice. Discussions will emphasize the broader international legal and political order each presupposes, and specifically whether their underlying reconstitution of rights and subjectivities are compatible with cultural, political or legal diversity. A historical assessment of the predominating Nuremberg paradigm of transitional justice¿structured around international military intervention and criminal trials based on international criminal courts¿will be contrasted with other regional models that engage with the challenges of the political reconciliation of formerly divided political communities. The necessity of understanding the specificities of both global and local historical and structural contexts will be examined with respect to various proposals for how to balance of balance concerns for both justice and peace. Readings will cover case studies from South Africa, Rwanda, DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan (including Darfur and South Sudan), Libya, Mali, and CAR.
Same as: AFRICAST 238, ANTHRO 138A, ANTHRO 238A

AFRICAST 141A. Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa. 4 Units.

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Same as: ANTHRO 141A

AFRICAST 142. Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice. 3-5 Units.

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Same as: AFRICAST 242, INTNLREL 142

AFRICAST 146M. New Keywords in African Sound. 3-4 Units.

This course identifies and considers new keywords for the study of contemporary African music and sound. Each week we will foster discussion around a keyword and a constellation of case studies. The sonic practices we will encounter range from South African house music to Ghanaian honk horns; from Congolese rumba bands to Tunisian trance singers; from listening to the radio in a Tanzanian homestead to making hip hop music videos on the Kenyan coast. By exploring the unexpected interconnections between contemporary African musical communities, we will discuss new keywords arising in current scholarship, including technologies like the amplifier and the hard drive, spaces like the studio and the city, and analytics like pleasure and hotness. We will also engage with established concepts for the study of postcolonial African cultures, including nationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, diaspora, and Pan-Africanism. This is a seminar-based course open to graduate students, upper level undergraduate students, and other students with consent of the instructor. Proficiency in music is not required. WIM at 4 units only.
Same as: AFRICAAM 146D, CSRE 146D, MUSIC 146M, MUSIC 246M

AFRICAST 151. AIDS in Africa. 3 Units.

Medical, social, and political aspects of the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa including: biology, transmission, diagnosis,and treatment of HIV; mother-to-child transmission and breastfeeding; vaccines; community and activist responses to the HIV epidemic; economics of HIV treatment; governance and health; ethics in research and program implementation.

AFRICAST 195. Shifting Frames. 1-2 Unit.

This is a student driven, dialogue based, and intellectual community focused course. We will explore and challenge the taken-for-granted framing of key African issues and debates. Engagement with discussion leaders drawing on their own research and case studies from across the African continent will guide us across shifting terrain. This course centers the scholarship and voices of African students. Topics include: Afropolitanism, Brain Drain/ Gain, Education, Leadership, Global Health, AI Application in Africa, Economic Development, Industrial Policy, LGBTQI Rights, Gender and Sexuality.

AFRICAST 199. Independent Study or Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

AFRICAST 209. Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development. 3-5 Units.

Throughout the history of modern Africa, Africans have specified their desired future - development, understood broadly - and identified the major obstacles in achieving it. Debates about development have intensified in the post-colonial period, especially as African countries have replaced the independence era leaders. Amidst the general critique of the imposition of external values and rules, Africans have differed, sometimes sharply, on priorities, process, and programs. While for some the challenge is to catch up with development elsewhere, for others it is essential to leap ahead, to set the pace, to initiate a radical social, economic, and political transformation. To ground and extend the common approaches to studying development that emphasize economics and that rely largely on external commentators, we will explore African perspectives. Our major task will be a broad overview, sampling the analyses of Africa¿s intellectuals in several domains. Course participants will review, compare, and analyze major contributions, developing an understanding of contemporary intellectual currents.
Same as: AFRICAST 109

AFRICAST 211. Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Policy making in Africa and the intersection of policy processes and their political and economic dimensions. The failure to implement agreements by international institutions, national governments, and nongovernmental organizations to promote education. Case studies of crowded and poorly equipped schools, overburdened and underprepared teachers, and underfunded education systems.
Same as: AFRICAAM 211, AFRICAST 111

AFRICAST 212. AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?.
Same as: AFRICAAM 111, AFRICAST 112

AFRICAST 219. Novel Perspectives on South Africa. 2-3 Units.

21st-century South Africa continues its literary effervescence. In this class we'll sample some recent novels and related writings to tease out the issues shaping the country (and to some degree the continent) at present. Is `South African literature' a meaningful category today? What are the most significant features we can identify in new writings and how do they relate to contemporary social dynamics? The course will appeal to anyone interested in present-day Cape Town or Johannesburg, including students who have spent a term in BOSP-Cape Town or plan to do so in future. Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. 2-3 units. Course may be repeated for credit.nn nnAll students will write short analyses from the prescribed texts. Students taking the course for three units will write an extended essay on a topic agreed with the instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 119, AFRICAAM 219, AFRICAST 119, CSRE 119

AFRICAST 224. Memory and Heritage In South Africa Syllabus. 1 Unit.

The focus of this course is to provide a forum in which students examine the role of memory and heritage in South Africa. The course will include visiting speakers, discussion and other activities. The complex relationship between memory and heritage in South Africa will provide the basis for a series of broad conversations about citizenship, national reconciliation, memorialization, justice, modernity and heritage ethics.

AFRICAST 235. Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems. 3-4 Units.

The excitement around social innovation and entrepreneurship has spawned numerous startups focused on tackling world problems, particularly in the fields of education and health. The best social ventures are launched with careful consideration paid to research, design, and efficacy. This course offers students insights into understanding how to effectively develop, evaluate, and scale social ventures. Using TeachAids (an award-winning nonprofit educational technology social venture used in 82 countries) as a primary case study, students will be given an in-depth look into how the entity was founded and scaled globally. Guest speakers will include world-class experts and entrepreneurs in Philanthropy, Medicine, Communications, Education, and Technology. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students.
Same as: AFRICAST 135, EDUC 135, EDUC 335, HRP 235, HUMBIO 26, MED 235

AFRICAST 238. Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore recent debates on the causes and structural terms of large-scale violence in Africa in the context of key contemporary models for reconciliation and transitional justice. Discussions will emphasize the broader international legal and political order each presupposes, and specifically whether their underlying reconstitution of rights and subjectivities are compatible with cultural, political or legal diversity. A historical assessment of the predominating Nuremberg paradigm of transitional justice¿structured around international military intervention and criminal trials based on international criminal courts¿will be contrasted with other regional models that engage with the challenges of the political reconciliation of formerly divided political communities. The necessity of understanding the specificities of both global and local historical and structural contexts will be examined with respect to various proposals for how to balance of balance concerns for both justice and peace. Readings will cover case studies from South Africa, Rwanda, DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan (including Darfur and South Sudan), Libya, Mali, and CAR.
Same as: AFRICAST 138, ANTHRO 138A, ANTHRO 238A

AFRICAST 242. Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice. 3-5 Units.

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Same as: AFRICAST 142, INTNLREL 142

AFRICAST 248. Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945. 4-5 Units.

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Same as: AFRICAST 348, HISTORY 248, HISTORY 348, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X

AFRICAST 249. Bodies, Technologies, and Natures in Africa. 4-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary course explores how modern African histories, bodies, and natures have been entangled with technological activities. Viewing Africans as experts and innovators, we consider how technologies have mediated, represented, or performed power in African societies. Topics include infrastructure, extraction, medicine, weapons, communications, sanitation, and more. Themes woven through the course include citizenship, mobility, labor, bricolage, in/formal economies, and technopolitical geographies, among others. Readings draw from history, anthropology, geography, and social/cultural theory.
Same as: ANTHRO 348B, HISTORY 349

AFRICAST 299. Independent Study or Directed Reading. 1-10 Unit.

.

AFRICAST 300. Contemporary Issues in African Studies. 1 Unit.

Guest scholars present analyses of major African themes and topics. Brief response papers required. May be repeated for credit.

AFRICAST 302. Research Workshop. 1 Unit.

Required for African Studies master's students. Student presentations.

AFRICAST 303E. Infrastructure & Power in the Global South. 4-5 Units.

In the last decade, the field of infrastructure studies has entered into conversation with area studies, post/colonial studies, and other scholarship on the "Global South." These intersections have produced dramatic new understandings of what "infrastructures" are, and how to analyze them as conduits of social and political power. This course offers a graduate-level introduction to this recent scholarship, drawing primarily on works from history, anthropology, geography, and architecture.
Same as: ANTHRO 303E, HISTORY 303E

AFRICAST 348. Religion, Radicalization and Media in Africa since 1945. 4-5 Units.

What are the paths to religious radicalization, and what role have media- new and old- played in these conversion journeys? We examine how Pentecostal Christians and Reformist Muslims in countries such as South Africa, Nigeria, Sudan, and Ethiopia have used multiple media forms- newspapers, cell phones, TV, radio, and the internet- to gain new converts, contest the authority of colonial and post-colonial states, construct transnational communities, and position themselves as key political players.
Same as: AFRICAST 248, HISTORY 248, HISTORY 348, RELIGST 230X, RELIGST 330X

AFRICAST 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

.

East Asian Studies Courses

EASTASN 77. Divided Memories & Reconciliation: the formation of wartime historical memory in the Pacific. 4 Units.

Divided Memories will examine the formation of historical memory about World War Two in Asia, looking comparatively at the national memories of China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. It will also study efforts at reconciliation in contemporary Asia. The course will look at the role of textbooks, popular culture, with an emphasis on cinema, and elite opinion on the formation of wartime memory. We will study and discuss controversial issues such as war crimes, forced labor, sexual servitude, and the use of atomic weapons. Class will combine lectures with in class discussion, with short essays or papers.
Same as: EASTASN 277

EASTASN 94. The Rise of China in World Affairs. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: EASTASN 294

EASTASN 97. The International Relations of Asia since World War II. 3-5 Units.

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Same as: EASTASN 297

EASTASN 117. Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia. 3-5 Units.

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Same as: EASTASN 217

EASTASN 143. Taiwan's Democratic Evolution. 3-5 Units.

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Once a poor, insecure autocracy, today Taiwan has been transformed into a prosperous and stable liberal democracy, albeit one whose long-term security remains imperiled by the rising power of the People's Republic of China. We will draw on concepts and theories from political science to explore distinct aspects of this ongoing political evolution, including the transition to and consolidation of democracy, origins and trajectory of economic and social development, sources of Taiwanese nationalism, security of the Taiwanese state and its relationship to the PRC and the United States, parties and elections, and public policy processes and challenges.
Same as: EASTASN 243

EASTASN 162. Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Same as: EASTASN 262

EASTASN 189K. Korea and the World. 3 Units.

This course investigates the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of modern Korea. The course offers a rough mix of history, domestic politics, and foreign relations. It also approaches the empirics of Korea through various theoretical lenses ranging from identity to balance of power to alliance theory to sports diplomacy. We will cover a vast expanse of time, ranging from the Kanghwa treaty to Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un. The course divides into four sections. The first is an understanding of the traditional historical and Cold War context of Korea's external relations. The second assesses the drivers of Korea¿s relations with the region, including Japan, the United States, China, and Russia. The next section is a three-week unit on North Korea. The last section investigates the policy priorities and potential pitfalls in Korea's path to unification as well as the implications of a united Korea on the balance of power in East Asia. No previous background on Korea is required.
Same as: EASTASN 289K

EASTASN 217. Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia. 3-5 Units.

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Same as: EASTASN 117

EASTASN 243. Taiwan's Democratic Evolution. 3-5 Units.

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Once a poor, insecure autocracy, today Taiwan has been transformed into a prosperous and stable liberal democracy, albeit one whose long-term security remains imperiled by the rising power of the People's Republic of China. We will draw on concepts and theories from political science to explore distinct aspects of this ongoing political evolution, including the transition to and consolidation of democracy, origins and trajectory of economic and social development, sources of Taiwanese nationalism, security of the Taiwanese state and its relationship to the PRC and the United States, parties and elections, and public policy processes and challenges.
Same as: EASTASN 143

EASTASN 262. Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Same as: EASTASN 162

EASTASN 277. Divided Memories & Reconciliation: the formation of wartime historical memory in the Pacific. 4 Units.

Divided Memories will examine the formation of historical memory about World War Two in Asia, looking comparatively at the national memories of China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. It will also study efforts at reconciliation in contemporary Asia. The course will look at the role of textbooks, popular culture, with an emphasis on cinema, and elite opinion on the formation of wartime memory. We will study and discuss controversial issues such as war crimes, forced labor, sexual servitude, and the use of atomic weapons. Class will combine lectures with in class discussion, with short essays or papers.
Same as: EASTASN 77

EASTASN 285. The United States, China, & Global Security. 2 Units.

This graduate-level seminar will be taught simultaneously on the campuses of Stanford University and Peking University and will feature a lecture series in which prominent American and Chinese scholars provide presentations that focus on key global security issues. The course content will highlight topics relevant to current U.S.- China relations and their respective roles in Asian and global security. Proposed lecture topics include: an introduction to U.S.- China relations; finance, trade, and investment; cyber security; nonproliferation; maritime security; terrorism; and energy and the environment. Hosted jointly by Stanford University and Peking University, enrollment will be limited to 20 students at each campus and, at Stanford, will be restricted to graduate students and undergraduates with senior standing. Enrollment is competitive, so potential students must complete an application by March 12, 2018 at 5pm: https://web.stanford.edu/dept/CEAS/EASTASN285.fb.
Same as: INTLPOL 285

EASTASN 289K. Korea and the World. 3 Units.

This course investigates the theoretical and empirical underpinnings of modern Korea. The course offers a rough mix of history, domestic politics, and foreign relations. It also approaches the empirics of Korea through various theoretical lenses ranging from identity to balance of power to alliance theory to sports diplomacy. We will cover a vast expanse of time, ranging from the Kanghwa treaty to Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un. The course divides into four sections. The first is an understanding of the traditional historical and Cold War context of Korea's external relations. The second assesses the drivers of Korea¿s relations with the region, including Japan, the United States, China, and Russia. The next section is a three-week unit on North Korea. The last section investigates the policy priorities and potential pitfalls in Korea's path to unification as well as the implications of a united Korea on the balance of power in East Asia. No previous background on Korea is required.
Same as: EASTASN 189K

EASTASN 294. The Rise of China in World Affairs. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: EASTASN 94

EASTASN 297. The International Relations of Asia since World War II. 3-5 Units.

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Same as: EASTASN 97

EASTASN 300. Graduate Directed Reading. 1-7 Unit.

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.

EASTASN 330. Core Seminar: Issues and Approaches in East Asian Studies. 1 Unit.

For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.

EASTASN 390. Practicum Internship. 1 Unit.

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.

EASTASN 402A. Topics in International Technology Management. 1 Unit.

Theme for Autumn 2019 is "Edge Computing: Different Directions for Asia and the U.S.?" Distinguished guest speakers discuss Asian and U.S. approaches to 5G network integration, federated learning, computer chips and servers for edge AI processing, and IOT systems built around intelligent clients, such as register-less stores, smart factories, autonomous vehicles, and augmented reality applications. See syllabus for specific requirements, which may differ from those of other seminars at Stanford.
Same as: EALC 402A, EE 402A

EASTASN 402T. Entrepreneurship in Asian High Tech Industries. 1 Unit.

Distinctive patterns and challenges of entrepreneurship in Asia; update of business and technology issues in the creation and growth of start-up companies in major Asian economies. Distinguished speakers from industry, government, and academia.
Same as: EALC 402T, EE 402T

EASTASN 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

.

Courses

International Relations Courses

INTNLREL 5C. Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Same as: CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C

INTNLREL 33SI. Myths and Realities of U.S.-China Relations. 1 Unit.

This course introduces students to the U.S.-China relationship through a weekly speaker series followed by student-led discussions. Speakers from academia and industry will explore topics such as the business environment of China, the politics of the Sino-American dynamic, and technological growth in China. The purpose of the course is to tackle the myths and misconceptions surrounding U.S.-China relations, and build in students a strong foundational understanding of the multiple facets of the bilateral relationship. Students will be exposed to a variety of issues and will be able to explore a topic of interest through a capstone presentation at the end of the course.

INTNLREL 60Q. United Nations Peacekeeping. 3 Units.

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.

INTNLREL 62Q. Mass Atrocities and Reconciliation. 3 Units.

This seminar considers the theory and practice of transitional justice as exemplified by diverse case studies, such as Germany, South Africa, Bosnia, and Rwanda. We will ask ourselves throughout the term whether and to what extent mass atrocities and grave human rights violations can be ameliorated and healed, and what legal, institutional, and political arrangements may be most conducive to such attempts. We will study war crimes tribunals and truth commissions, and we will ask about their effectiveness, especially in regards to their potential of fostering reconciliation in a given society. In every case we will encounter and evaluate specific shortcomings and obstacles, which will provide us with a more nuanced understanding of the complex process of coming to terms with the past.

INTNLREL 63Q. International Organizations and Accountability. 3 Units.

International organizations (IOs), like the IMF, the World Bank, the United Nations, and others, have been widely criticized as insufficiently accountable. For example, some argue that states are not able to control IOs whose bureaucracies have grown out of control and run amok, while others argue that the real problem is that communities most impacted by IO activities, such as those receiving World Bank loans or UN peacekeeping operations, are least able to influence their activities. Still others contend that the voting rules by which states control IOs are outdated and should be reformed to remedy these problems.nnThrough readings, discussions and case studies, students will learn about a range of international organizations in order to better understand what they do and how they are supposed to be controlled. In addition, we will evaluate the critiques of IO accountability that come from the right and the left, as well as the North, South, East and West, and will analyze different mechanisms of accountability, both formal and informal. Students will have the opportunity to research and present on specific international organizations and accountability mechanisms.

INTNLREL 64Q. Leadership and International Organizations. 3 Units.

What do intergovernmental organizations like the United Nations, the World Food Program, the United Nations High Commission for Refugees actually do? Do these organizations simply act on the interests of the governments that comprise them? Or do they have some autonomy to pursue their own programs, plans, and priorities? Does leadership of these organizations matter for their performance? What dilemmas do the leaders or intergovernmental organizations face as they try to satisfy governments while serving people in need all over the world? This course will get at these questions through examining the lives, careers and choices of leaders of major international organizations over the last thirty years. Reading assignments will include memoirs and biographies of leaders of international organizations, as well as analytical and empirical studies of international organizations. We plan on inviting former and current leaders of international organizations to visit the seminar.

INTNLREL 82. The Ending of World War I: Three Perspectives. 2 Units.

This course is required for those students who will be taking the BOSP Overseas Seminar, The Ending of the First World War and the Shaping of the 20th Century. Enrollment is limited to students who will be taking the overseas seminar, or are waitlisted for the seminar.nnThis course has three learning goals: 1.) to provide historical background on the war and the events and processes leading up to the ending of the war; 2.) to help students formulate possible research topics for the Overseas Seminar; and 3.) to acquaint the students with archival research in preparation for their time in London. The course will be taught from the perspectives of military history, political science, and literature. Each week we will meet to discuss the reading material.

INTNLREL 101Z. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Same as: POLISCI 101Z

INTNLREL 102. History of the International System since 1914. 5 Units.

After defining the characteristics of the international system at the beginning of the twentieth century, this course reviews the primary developments in its functioning in the century that followed. Topics include the major wars and peace settlements; the emergence of Nazism and Communism; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization. The role of international institutions and international society will also be a focus as will the challenges of climate change, inequality, migration, and terrorism.
Same as: HISTORY 102

INTNLREL 103F. The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History. 3-5 Units.

Introduces students to the rich history of military affairs and, at the same time, examines the ways in which we think of change and continuity in military history. How did war evolve from ancient times, both in styles of warfare and perceptions of war? What is the nature of the relationship between war and society? Is there such a thing as a Western way of war? What role does technology play in transforming military affairs? What is a military revolution and can it be manufactured or induced? Chronologically following the evolution of warfare from Ancient Greece to present day so-called new wars, we will continuously investigate how the interdependencies between technological advances, social change, philosophical debates and economic pressures both shaped and were influenced by war. Students satisfying the WiM requirement for the major in International Relations, must enroll in INTNLREL 103F course listing.
Same as: HISTORY 3F, HISTORY 103F

INTNLREL 105C. Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Same as: CSRE 105C, EMED 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112

INTNLREL 110C. America and the World Economy. 5 Units.

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110C.
Same as: POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X

INTNLREL 110D. War and Peace in American Foreign Policy. 3-5 Units.

The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period. Political Science majors taking this course to fulfill the WIM requirement should enroll in POLISCI 110D for 5 units. International Relations majors taking this course should enroll in INTNLREL 110D for 5 units. SCPD students should enroll for 3 units.
Same as: AMSTUD 110D, POLISCI 110D, POLISCI 110Y

INTNLREL 114D. Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the different dimensions of development - economic, social, and political - as well as the way that modern institutions (the state, market systems, the rule of law, and democratic accountability) developed and interacted with other factors across different societies around the world. The class will feature additional special guest lectures by Francis Fukuyama, Larry Diamond, Michael McFaul, Anna Grzymala-Busse, and other faculty and researchers affiliated with the Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. Undergraduate students should enroll in this course for 5 units. Graduate students should enroll for 3.
Same as: INTLPOL 230, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D

INTNLREL 118S. Political Economy of International Trade and Investment. 5 Units.

How domestic and international politics influence the economic relations between countries. Why do governments promote or oppose globalization? Why do countries cooperate economically in some situations but not others? Why do countries adopt bad economic policies? Focus on the politics of international trade and investment. Course approaches each topic by examining alternative theoretical approaches and evaluate these theories using historical and contemporary evidence from many geographical regions around the world. Prerequisites: ECON 1A, ECON 1B, and a statistics course.
Same as: POLISCI 218S

INTNLREL 122. Introduction to European Studies. 5 Units.

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Same as: POLISCI 213E

INTNLREL 123. The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities. 5 Units.

First, this course analyzes the EU's greatest challenge, preserving the monetary union, and discusses the political and economic reforms needed to achieve that goal. In this context the course also studies the fiscal and budgetary polices of the EU. Second, the course discusses the EU's role in global politics, its desire to play a more prominent role, and the ways to reach that objective. Third, the course analyzes the EU's institutional challenges in its efforts to enhance its democratic character.

INTNLREL 124. Immigration Issues in Europe. 4-5 Units.

This course will consider responses to mass migration in Europe and its contribution to a radicalized political landscape. Sampling immigrant integration policies from Germany, Sweden, Denmark, France, Britain, Hungary, Poland, and Italy will help us examine public discourse on cultural and civic assimilation of mostly Muslim immigrants. Issues such as security and counterterrorism, as well as obstacles to cooperation with countries outside the EU (Turkey, Libya), will be included.

INTNLREL 135A. International Environmental Law and Policy: Oceans and Climate Change. 4-5 Units.

This seminar offers an introduction to International Environmental Law, with a strong emphasis on oceans and climate change, its underlying principles, how it is developed and implemented, and the challenges of enforcing it. We will focus on oceans and climate change, exploring the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will explain why these agreements are described as ¿umbrella conventions¿ and how new conventions like the Paris Agreement fit within them. There will be guest speakers, a negotiation simulation, and a legal design sprint focused on re-imagining International Environmental Law.

INTNLREL 136R. Introduction to Global Justice. 4 Units.

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Same as: ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336

INTNLREL 140A. International Law and International Relations. 4-5 Units.

What is the character of international legal rules? Do they matter in international politics, and if so, to what degree? How effective can they really be? What should we expect from international law in shaping international relations? This seminar will provide introductory knowledge of the foundational principles and sources of public international law and a brief review of the most prominent IR-theories. Besides exploring how these theories address the role of IL in international politics, we will also consider a set of practical problems, where IL and IR intersect most dramatically, such as intervention by force, human rights, and enforcement of criminal law. Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors.

INTNLREL 140C. The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War. 4-5 Units.

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Same as: HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140X

INTNLREL 140X. The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War. 4-5 Units.

The involvement of U.S. and the UN in major wars and international interventions since the 1991 Gulf War. The UN Charter's provisions on the use of force, the origins and evolution of peacekeeping, the reasons for the breakthrough to peacemaking and peace enforcement in the 90s, and the ongoing debates over the legality and wisdom of humanitarian intervention. Case studies include Croatia and Bosnia, Somalia, Rwanda, Kosovo, East Timor, and Afghanistan. *International Relations majors taking this course to fulfill the WiM requirement should enroll in INTNLREL 140C for 5 units.
Same as: HISTORY 201C, INTNLREL 140C

INTNLREL 141A. Camera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries. 5 Units.

Rarely screened documentary films, focusing on global problems, human rights issues, and aesthetic challenges in making documentaries on international topics. Meetings with filmmakers.

INTNLREL 142. Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice. 3-5 Units.

This seminar is part of a broader program on Social Entrepreneurship at CDDRL in partnership with the Haas Center for Public Service. It will use practice to better inform theory. Working with three visiting social entrepreneurs from developing and developed country contexts students will use case studies of successful and failed social change strategies to explore relationships between social entrepreneurship, gender, democracy, development and justice. It interrogates current definitions of democracy and development and explores how they can become more inclusive of marginalized populations. This is a service learning class in which students will learn by working on projects that support the social entrepreneurs' efforts to promote social change. Students should register for either 3 OR 5 units only. Students enrolled in the full 5 units will have a service-learning component along with the course. Students enrolled for 3 units will not complete the service-learning component. Limited enrollment. Attendance at the first class is mandatory in order to participate in service learning.
Same as: AFRICAST 142, AFRICAST 242

INTNLREL 143. State and Society in Korea. 4 Units.

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Same as: SOC 111, SOC 211

INTNLREL 145. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 4 Units.

The course, traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo, and Sudan. The final session of the course will be devoted to a discussion of the International Criminal Court and the separate criminal tribunals that have been tasked with investigating and punishing the perpetrators of genocide.

INTNLREL 147. Political Economy of the Southern Cone Countries of South America. 5 Units.

This seminar examines the economic and political development of the five countries that make up South America's Southern Cone (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay) as well as Bolivia (which was historically part of the sub-region and with which today it has close commercial ties). In particular, the course focuses on the era of Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI), explores the reasons why that model of economic development eventually collapsed and how this contributed to the rise of military dictatorships, looks at the return to democratic rule and the adoption of market-oriented economic policies, and concludes with a discussion of the contemporary situation.

INTNLREL 154. The Cold War: An International History. 5 Units.

Though it ended twenty years ago, we still live in a world shaped by the Cold War. Beginning with its origins in the mid-1940s, this course will trace the evolution of the global struggle, until its culmination at the end of the 1980s. Students will be asked to ponder the fundamental nature of the Cold War, what kept it alive for nearly fifty years, how it ended, and its long term legacy for the world. As distinguished from the lecture taught in previous quarters, this class will closely investigate ten major Cold War battlegrounds over the quarter. Selected case studies will include: the division of Germany, Iran in the 1950s, Cuba, Vietnam, the Six Day War, the Chilean coup, sub-Saharan Africa, Afghanistan, Central America, and the Eastern European revolutions of 1989. Students will be asked to consult a combination of original documents and recent histories.
Same as: HISTORY 166C

INTNLREL 168. America as a World Power: U.S. Foreign Relations, 1914 to Present. 5 Units.

This course will examine the modern history of American foreign relations, from 1914 to the present. Beginning with the fateful decision to intervene in the First World War, it will examine the major crises and choices that have defined the "American Century." Our study of U.S. foreign relations will consider such key factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, bureaucracy, psychology, race, and culture. Students will be expected to undertake their own substantial examination of a critical episode in the era studied.
Same as: HISTORY 152K

INTNLREL 168A. American Interventions, 1898-Present. 5 Units.

This class seeks to examine the modern American experience with limited wars, beginning with distant and yet pertinent cases, and culminating in the war in Iraq. Although this class will examine war as a consequence of foreign policy, it will not focus primarily on presidential decision making. Rather, it will place wartime policy in a broader frame, considering it alongside popular and media perceptions of the war, the efforts of antiwar movements, civil-military relations, civil reconstruction efforts, and conditions on the battlefield. We will also examine, when possible, the postwar experience.
Same as: HISTORY 259E, HISTORY 359E

INTNLREL 173. Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History. 5 Units.

Nothing better illustrates the evolution of the modern presidency than the arena of foreign policy. This class will examine the changing role and choices of successive presidential administrations over the past century, examining such factors as geopolitics, domestic politics, the bureaucracy, ideology, psychology, and culture. Students will be encouraged to think historically about the institution of the presidency, while examining specific case studies, from the First World War to the conflicts of the 21st century.
Same as: HISTORY 261G

INTNLREL 174. Diplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country. 5 Units.

The tragic death of Ambassador Chris Stevens has recently highlighted the dangers of diplomacy in the modern era. This class will look at how Americans in embassies have historically confronted questions such as authoritarian rule, human rights abuses, violent changes of government, and covert action. Case studies will include the Berlin embassy in the 1930s, Tehran in 1979, and George Kennan's experiences in Moscow, among others. Recommended for students contemplating careers in diplomatic service. *Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors. As space is limited, first-year students must obtain the instructor's prior consent before enrolling.
Same as: HISTORY 252B

INTNLREL 175. American Empire in the Pacific. 3 Units.

This course will provide an interdisciplinary overview of the history and current state of American empire in the Pacific Islands. Through the lenses of law, history, anthropology, and sustainability science, the course will chart the progression of the American empire, beginning with a brief exploration of pre-contact Pacific cultures, through early colonization, World War II, and the Cold War, to present day, including the intersection of empire and climate change. Themes include cultural imperialism, militarization and experimentation, human rights and global ethics, and social and environmental justice.

INTNLREL 179. Major Themes in U.S.-Latin America Diplomatic History. 5 Units.

This seminar provides an overview of the most important events and initiatives that have characterized the relationship of the United States of America with its neighbors to the south, including Mexico, the Caribbean (especially Cuba, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic), Central America, and South America since the proclamation of the Monroe Doctrine in the early 19th century until the Obama Administration. In particular, the course examines the motivations for the Theodore Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine and the resulting period of blatant interventionism known as "Dollar Diplomacy," the Good Neighbor Policy of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the brutal Cold War period, as well as policies pursued by the Clinton, George W. Bush, and Obama administrations, such as the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA) and the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas (ECPA). The seminar explores not only what motivated U.S. policy makers and how their polices were implemented (and explains why they either succeeded or failed), but also discusses the impacts on individual countries and/or the region as a whole and the long-term consequences whose repercussions are still being felt today. The course also examines the major features of the inter-American system from the Pan American Union to the creation of the Organization of American States (OAS) and its continued relevancy in light of new institutional frameworks such as the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) and the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) that exclude the United States of America.

INTNLREL 180A. Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Same as: ETHICSOC 280, HUMRTS 103, INTLPOL 280

INTNLREL 182. The Great War. 5 Units.

The First World War provided a prototype for a new, horrific kind of war. It catalyzed the emergence of modern means of warfare and the social mechanisms necessary to sustain the industrialized war machine. Killing millions, it became the blueprint for the total war that succeeded it. It also brought about new social and political orders, transforming the societies which it mobilized at unprecedented levels.n nThis course will examine the military, political, economic, social and cultural aspects of the conflict. We will discuss the origins and outbreak of the war, the land, sea and air campaigns, the war's economic and social consequences, the home fronts, the war's final stages in eastern and western Europe as well as non-European fronts, and finally, the war's impact on the international system and on its belligerents and participants' perceptions of the new reality it had created.

INTNLREL 183. The Modern Battle. 5 Units.

The purpose of this seminar is to examine the evolution of modern warfare by closely following four modern battles/campaigns. For this purpose the seminar offers four mock staff rides, facilitating highly engaged, well-researched experience for participants. In a mock staff ride, students are assigned roles; each student is playing a general or staff officer who was involved in the battle/campaign. Students will research their roles and, during the staff ride, will be required to explain "their" decisions and actions. Staff rides will not deviate from historical records, but closely examine how decisions were made, what pressures and forces were in action, battle outcomes, etc. This in-depth examination will allow students to gain a deeper understanding of how modern tactics, technology, means of communications, and the scale of warfare can decide, and indeed decided, campaigns. We will will spend two weeks preparing for and playing each staff ride. One meeting will be dedicated to discussing the forces shaping the chosen battle/campaign: the identity and goals ofnthe belligerents, the economic, technological, cultural and other factors involved, as well as the initial general plan. The second meeting will be dedicated to the battle itself. The four battles will illustrate major developments in modern warfare.
Same as: HISTORY 206C

INTNLREL 189. PRACTICAL TRAINING. 1-3 Unit.

Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the director. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to declared International Relations students only who are non-US citizens. May be repeated for credit.

INTNLREL 197. Directed Reading in International Relations. 1-5 Unit.

Open only to declared International Relations majors.n (Staff).

INTNLREL 198. Senior Thesis. 2-10 Units.

Open only to declared International Relations majors with approved senior thesis proposals.

INTNLREL 200A. International Relations Honors Field Research. 3 Units.

For juniors planning to write an honors thesis during senior year. Initial steps to prepare for independent research. Professional tools for conceptualizing a research agenda and developing a research strategy. Preparation for field research through skills such as data management and statistics, references and library searches, and fellowship and grant writing. Creating a work schedule for the summer break and first steps in writing. Prerequisite: acceptance to IR honors program.

INTNLREL 200B. International Relations Honors Seminar. 3 Units.

Second of two-part sequence. For seniors working on their honors theses. Professional tools, analysis of research findings, and initial steps in writing of thesis. How to write a literature review, formulate a chapter structure, and set a timeline and work schedule for the senior year. Skills such as data analysis and presentation, and writing strategies. Prerequisites: acceptance to IR honors program, and 199 or 200A. * Course satisfies the WiM requirement for International Relations majors who are accepted into the IR Honors program.

INTNLREL 200C. IR Honors Thesis Writing. 1 Unit.

Mandatory seminar for International Relations Honors Students who are writing their Honors Thesis. INTNLREL 200A and 200B are prerequisites.

Jewish Studies Courses

JEWISHST 4. What Didn't Make It into the Bible. 4 Units.

Over two billion people alive today consider the Bible to be sacred scripture. But how did the books that made it into the bible get there in the first place? Who decided what was to be part of the bible and what wasn't? How would history look differently if a given book didn't make the final cut and another one did? Hundreds of ancient Jewish and Christian texts are not included in the Bible. "What Didn't Make It in the Bible" focuses on these excluded writings. We will explore the Dead Sea Scrolls, Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse ancient romance novels, explore the adventures of fallen angels who sired giants (and taught humans about cosmetics), tour heaven and hell, encounter the garden of Eden story told from the perspective of the snake, and learn how the world will end. The course assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history. It is designed for students who are part of faith traditions that consider the bible to be sacred, as well as those who are not. The only prerequisite is an interest in exploring books, groups, and ideas that eventually lost the battles of history and to keep asking the question "why." In critically examining these ancient narratives and the communities that wrote them, you will investigate how religions canonize a scriptural tradition, better appreciate the diversity of early Judaism and Christianity, understand the historical context of these religions, and explore the politics behind what did and did not make it into the bible.
Same as: CLASSICS 9N, RELIGST 4

JEWISHST 4N. A World History of Genocide. 3-5 Units.

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Same as: HISTORY 4N

JEWISHST 5. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Same as: CLASSICS 6G, RELIGST 171A

JEWISHST 5B. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. Pre-requisite: CLASSICS 6G or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Same as: CLASSICS 7G

JEWISHST 5G. Intensive Biblical Greek. 8 Units.

Equivalent to two quarters of Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 6G, 7G). Students will learn the core of New Testament Greek with the goal of learning to accurately translate and read the New Testament. Students will read one-third of the Gospel of John during the course and will be well-prepared to read the Greek New Testament independently after the course. Focus on knowledge of key vocabulary and grammar needed to read the Greek Bible with ease. No previous knowledge of Greek required. Course does not fulfill the Stanford language requirement.
Same as: RELIGST 171X

JEWISHST 18N. Religion and Politics: Comparing Europe to the U.S.. 3-4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative. Historical, political, sociological, and religious studies approaches. The relationship between religion and politics as understood in the U.S. and Europe. How this relationship has become tense both because of the rise of Islam as a public religion in Europe and the rising influence of religious groups in public culture. Different understandings and definitions of the separation of church and state in Western democratic cultures, and differing notions of the public sphere. Case studies to investigate the nature of public conflicts, what issues lead to conflict, and why. Why has the head covering of Muslim women become politicized in Europe? What are the arguments surrounding the Cordoba House, known as the Ground Zero Mosque, and how does this conflict compare to controversies about recent constructions of mosques in Europe? Resources include media, documentaries, and scholarly literature.
Same as: RELIGST 18N

JEWISHST 19N. Everyone Eats: Food, Religion and Culture. 3 Units.

Food is one of the most essential aspects of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. In this seminar we will study how food habits have shaped religious traditions, and vice versa, how religious traditions have shaped food ways. Some traditions are centered around food regiments such as the dietary laws, derived from biblical law that shapes Jewish and Christian tradition very differently. Indeed, many religious and ethical thinkers, as well as anthropologists, have interpreted the meanings of the dietary laws very differently. Further, in many religious traditions the killing of animals and consumption of meat is deeply fraught. We will explore the history of food practices and their contemporary impact; the connections between food, religion, and identity; the meanings that religious thinkers and anthropologists have attributed to food habits; as well as the creative translations of religious traditions into contemporary food ethics by various social movements and groups, predominantly in the U.S.
Same as: CSRE 19N, RELIGST 19N

JEWISHST 39S. The Other Side: Ethnography and Travel Writing through Jewish, Christian and Muslim Eyes. 3 Units.

In an age of reality television and social media, we are bombarded with snapshots of the exotic, monstrous, and bizarre. Yet despite their quantity, these images pale in comparison to the qualities of terror, wonder and curiosity that ancient travelers evoked in their encounters with foreign lands and peoples. Early ethnographers, too, painstakingly explored the beliefs and practices of unfamiliar peoples sometimes very close to home. This course surveys their most vivid writings, from ancient Greece to the colonization of the New World, focusing on the relation between fascination with the other and the author's own religious imagination. In particular, it introduces the contributions of Jewish travelers and ethnographers to this history, which has often been written from the standpoint of imperial, ecclesiastical or colonial power. It stresses literary continuities across three general periods (ancient, medieval, and colonial), showing how remarkably consistent patterns of identification spring from diverse encounters.

JEWISHST 53. Exploring Jewish Spirituality. 4 Units.

It was once accepted as fact that Judaism is, at its core, a rational religion devoid of any authentic mystical tradition. But the past century of scholarship has reversed this claim, demonstrating that the spiritual life has been integral to Judaism's vital heart since ancient times. This yearning for a direct immediate experience of God's Presence, a longing to grasp the mysteries of the human soul and know the inner dynamics of the Divine realm, has taken on many different forms across the centuries. nnThis course will introduce students to the major texts¿from theological treatises to poems and incantations¿and core ideas of Jewish mysticism and spirituality, tracking their development from the Hebrew Bible to the dawn of modernity. Close attention will be paid to the historical context of these sources, and we will also engage with broader methodological approaches¿from phenomenology to philology¿regarding the academic study of religion and the comparative consideration of mysticism in particular.nnThis course assumes no prior background of Judaism or any other religious traditions. All readings will be made available in English. Students are, however, invited to challenge themselves with the ¿optional/advanced¿ readings of sources both primary and secondary. Pending interest, students with facility in the original languages (Hebrew or Aramaic) will be given the opportunity to do so.
Same as: RELIGST 53

JEWISHST 85B. Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B

JEWISHST 86. Exploring the New Testament. 4 Units.

To explore the historical context of the earliest Christians, students will read most of the New Testament as well as many documents that didn't make the final cut. Non-Christian texts, Roman art, and surviving archeological remains will better situate Christianity within the ancient world. Students will read from the Dead Sea Scrolls, explore Gnostic gospels, hear of a five-year-old Jesus throwing divine temper tantrums while killing (and later resurrecting) his classmates, peruse an ancient marriage guide, and engage with recent scholarship in archeology, literary criticism, and history.
Same as: CLASSICS 43, RELIGST 86

JEWISHST 86Q. Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism. 4-5 Units.

For over two millennia, Jews and Judaism have been the object of sustained anxieties, fears, and fantasies, which have in turn underpinned repeated outbreaks of violence and persecution. This course will explore the development and impact of antisemitism from Late Antiquity to the Enlightenment, including the emergence of the Blood libel, the association between Jews and moneylending, and the place of Judaism in Christian and Islamic theology. No prior background in history or Jewish studies is necessary. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Same as: HISTORY 86Q

JEWISHST 101A. First-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 5 Units.

In the first-year program, students acquire essential Hebrew through abundant opportunities to interact in the language in meaningful ways. The students learn to function appropriately in the language in a variety of social and cultural contexts.
Same as: AMELANG 128A

JEWISHST 101B. First-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128A.
Same as: AMELANG 128B

JEWISHST 101C. First-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128B. Fulfill the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 128C

JEWISHST 102A. Second-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128C.
Same as: AMELANG 129A

JEWISHST 102B. Second-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129A.
Same as: AMELANG 129B

JEWISHST 102C. Second-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129B.
Same as: AMELANG 129C

JEWISHST 103A. Third-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129C.
Same as: AMELANG 130A

JEWISHST 104. Hebrew Forum. 1-3 Unit.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMELANG 131A

JEWISHST 104A. First-Year Yiddish, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Same as: AMELANG 140A

JEWISHST 104B. First-Year Yiddish, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140A. Prerequisite: AMELANG.
Same as: AMELANG 140B

JEWISHST 104C. First-Year Yiddish, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140B. Prerequisite: AMELANG 140B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 140C

JEWISHST 105. Hebrew Forum. 2-4 Units.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May repeat for credit.
Same as: AMELANG 131B

JEWISHST 106. Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature. 3-5 Units.

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Same as: AMELANG 126, COMPLIT 145

JEWISHST 107A. Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter. 2 Units.

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. Students that are enrolled in this course must also enroll in Beginning Hebrew. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the year, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Same as: AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A

JEWISHST 107B. Biblical Hebrew, Second Quarter. 2 Units.

Continuation of 170A.
Same as: AMELANG 170B

JEWISHST 107C. Biblical Hebrew, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of 170B.
Same as: AMELANG 170C

JEWISHST 120. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. 3 Units.

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Same as: FEMGEN 130, RELIGST 130

JEWISHST 123. Muslims, Jews, and Christians: Conflict, Coexistence, and Collaboration. 4 Units.

Relationships between Muslims, Jews, and Christians today are informed by a multitude of complex and often painful histories. These faith traditions emerged out of deep and sustained engagement with one another sharing theological and ethical principles, and revering many of the same figures and there have been many periods of rich and productive interaction. Yet there have also been areas of dissension and conflict, and periods when theological, social, or political disagreement devolved into violence and oppression. In recent times (especially following the Holocaust and the establishment of the modern State of Israel), religious, political, and intellectual leaders of Muslim, Jewish, and Christian communities, in the U.S. and around the world, have recognized the need to forge deeper and more meaningful relationships with one another. Knowledge and understanding of the perspectives that different communities and individuals bring to bear on their entangled past, present, and future are a critical part of efforts to resolve intransigent conflicts and advance mutual interests. This course explores some of the most significant moments of interaction through literature and art, polemic and dialogue that have shaped engagements between Muslims, Jews, and Christians throughout history, and examines both prospects and pitfalls for engagement in the present and future.
Same as: RELIGST 133

JEWISHST 125. Modern Jewish Mysticism: Devotion in a Secular Age. 4 Units.

The twentieth-century was a time of tremendous upheaval and unspeakable tragedy for the Jewish communities of Europe. But the past hundred years were also a period of great renewal for Jewish spirituality, a renaissance that has continued into the present day. Beginning with the writings of the Safed Renaissance, the Sabbateanism, and the Hasidic masters, our course will focus on key thinkers in the 19th and 20th centuries, including: Hillel Zeitlin, Martin Buber, Abraham Isaac Kook, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Arthur Green. Drawing upon essays, homilies, and poems, we will examine the ways in which their works re-cast and reinterpret the Jewish tradition in answer to the singular questions and challenges modernity. We will mark the development of their thinking against the two World Wars, the Holocaust, and the complex and multi-faceted processes of secularization. We will also consider the theological project of modern Jewish mystics in dialogue with modern Jewish philosophers (such as Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, and Emmanuel Levinas) as well as modern philosophers and scholars informed by Christianity (from William James to Charles Taylor). This course argues that the processes of sacralization, of reclaiming a life of mystical devotion, are best understood as a unique response to Jewish modernity rather than a retreat to past modalities of religion. In seeking to prove this point, we will explore writers whose work emerged in and engaged with different social and cultural domains. We will investigate their writings with an eye to issues such as power and identity, and will draw upon their works in charting the intersection of mysticism, literature, language and experience. Throughout our readings, we will keep our eye on the sustained impact of feminism on Jewish mysticism in the second half of the twentieth century. This course is structured as a seminar, and our class discussions will be rooted in the primary sources. It assumes no prior background of Judaism or any other religious traditions. All readings will be made available in English.
Same as: RELIGST 165

JEWISHST 127D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of Talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred, but not necessary. The goal of the ongoing workshop is to provide Stanford students with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts and thought.
Same as: JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 127E. Readings in Talmudic Literature Advanced. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Knowledge of Hebrew is required. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Meeting time and location TBA. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 227E, RELIGST 170E

JEWISHST 129. Sacred Words: Jewish Thought and the Question of Language. 4 Units.

Jews have long been referred as the people of the book, but they might better be referred to as the people of the word. Drawing upon texts from the Hebrew Bible to the works of modern Hebrew writers like of Hayyim Nahman Bialik and Amoz Oz, this seminar will chart the development of Jewish thinking on language over the past two millennia. We will explore issues such as: the idea of canonization; oral versus written language; the nature and possibility of translation; the origins of language; notions of negative theology; mystical approaches to the word; the rebirth of Hebrew as a spoken and cultural language; and the limits of language after the Holocaust. This course will also bring Jewish thought into dialogue with contemporary philosophical reflections on issues of language. Modern explorations of language will prove an interesting way of deepening our understanding of the Jewish thinkers on one hand, and enriching contemporary intellectual discourse on the other.
Same as: RELIGST 169

JEWISHST 129A. Milk and Honey, Wine and Blood: Food, Justice, and Ethnic Identity in Jewish Culture. 4 Units.

This course examines Jewish culture and the food practices and traditions that have shaped and continue to shape it. Students learn to prepare a variety of meals while studying about the historical and literary traditions associated with them, such as the dietary `laws¿ and the long history of their interpretation, as well as the cultivation of eating as devotional practice in Jewish mystical traditions. We will explore how regional foods the world over contribute to the formation of distinct Jewish ethnic identities, and how these traditions shape contemporary Jewish food ethics. The course includes guest visits by professional chefs and food writers, and field trips to a local winery.
Same as: RELIGST 129

JEWISHST 130VP. Introduction to Social Demography: A Comparative Approach (Israel & US). 3 Units.

In this class we will learn about Israel's unique demographic structure and we will compare it to the US and other countries. Reading materials include general theories as well as research published in scholarly journals. In the first half of this class we will review basic demographic concepts (mortality, fertility and migration), and we will apply them to the Israeli context, with comparisons between different social groups in Israel and with comparison to the US. We will also review basic demographic theories (theories of population change) and apply them to different countries. nnIn the second half of the class we will focus on demography of the family. We will ask how fertility, marriage and divorce differ for different population groups in Israel and the US, and we will tie family processes to current theories of gender and family change. We will also learn how demographic processes may be related to the reproduction of poverty, and inequality.
Same as: SOC 119VP

JEWISHST 131VP. Poverty and Inequality in Israel and the US: A Comparative Approach. 3 Units.

Poverty rates in Israel are high and have been relatively stable in recent decades, with about one fifth of all households (and a third of all children) living below the poverty line. In this class we will learn about poverty and inequality in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries.nnIn the first few weeks of this class we will review basic theories of poverty and inequality and we will discuss how theories regarding poverty have changed over the years, from the "culture of poverty" to theories of welfare state regimes. We will also learn about various ways of measuring poverty, material hardship, and inequality, and we will review the methods and data used.nnIn the remaining weeks of the class we will turn to substantive topics such as gender, immigration, ethnicity/nationality, welfare policy, age, and health. Within each topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US. Examination of these issues will introduce students to some of the challenges that Israeli society faces today.
Same as: CSRE 120P, SOC 120VP

JEWISHST 132. Between Nation-Building and Liberalization: The Welfare State in Israel. 3 Units.

According to one commentator, the political economy of Israel is characterized by embedded illiberalism. In the context of a national and territorial conflict, the Israeli state fostered comprehensive nation-building projects (such as immigration absorption), via employment and social protection schemes. This course surveys the distinctive development of the Israeli welfare state in comparative perspective, and analyzes its particular politics and outcomes in the form of inclusion but also exclusion of different populations from full citizenship. The course will follow a chronological path from the pre-state crystallization of national welfare institutions to the current neo-liberalization trend that seems to undermine collectivist projects and advance the re-commodification of citizenship. Throughout the course we will discuss issues such as: the role of labor and nationalism in the design of social policy, the production of national, ethnic and gender inequality, and the dynamics of change and continuity following heightened liberalization and internationalization since the 1980s. The course exposes students to key issues of the sociology of the welfare state with particular emphasis on the development and role of the state in a deeply conflicted society, using the Israeli experience. At the conclusion of the course students are expected to understand how welfare state institutions reflect but also reproduce societal schisms and conflicts, and be familiar with central aspects of Israeli politics past and present.
Same as: SOC 102

JEWISHST 132A. Social Inequality in Israel. 3 Units.

Like the US, Israel is a nation of immigrants. Israel additionally shares with the US vast economic, ethnic/racial and gender gaps, which are shaped and are being shaped by the demographic diversity characterizing its society. The course will provide a comparative framework for analyzing social inequality in Israel. We will start by reviewing essential concepts and theories in the study of social stratification. We will then review the main cleavages characterizing Israeli society, while comparing them to gaps in other advances societies and particularly the US. We will focus on class, gender and ethnicity as the main distinctions and will examine their implications for differences in life chances in several domains across the life course. We will conclude with a discussion of possible scenarios for change, which are relevant to both Israel and the US. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the analysis of social inequality in Israel and elsewhere.
Same as: CSRE 132A, SOC 102A

JEWISHST 132D. Sociology of Jewishness. 3-5 Units.

Examines the place of the Jewish people in society throughout various locales and historical periods to understand how interactions among Jews and with other groups have shaped Jewish identities. Topics include modernism, the Holocaust, Israel/nationhood, race/ethnicity, intermarriage, and assimilation. Uses theoretical, empirical, and historical material from multiple social scientific fields of study and explores the study of Judaism from several major sociological lenses.
Same as: CSRE 132J, SOC 132J

JEWISHST 132VP. Family and Society: A Comparative Approach (Israel & the US). 3 Units.

Families are changing: Non-marital partnerships such as cohabitation are becoming more common, marriage is delayed and fertility is declining. In this class we will learn about how families are changing in Israel and we will compare with the US and other countries. Reading materials include general theories as well as research published in scholarly journals. nnAfter reviewing general theories and major scholarly debates concerning issues of family change, we will turn to specific family processes and compare Israel, the US and other countries. We will ask how family transitions may differ for different population groups and at different stages of the life course, and we will tie family processes to current theories of gender. nnWe will cover a wide range of topics, from marriage and marital dissolution to cohabitation, LAT and remarriage. We will also discuss changes in women's labor force participation and how it bears on fertility, parenthood and household division of labor. Within each substantive topic we will survey the debates within contemporary scholarship and we will compare Israel and the US.
Same as: SOC 121VP, SOC 221VP

JEWISHST 133. Sociology of Citizenship. 3 Units.

Not only a legal status, citizenship forms a major concern for political sociologists interested in questions of membership, exclusion, redistribution, and struggles over the boundaries of collective identity. Citizenship is in essence membership in a political community that entails rights and duties, and structures a tripartite relationship between the individual, community and state. The institutions of citizenship include formal and bureaucratic rules of eligibility ¿ but also informal institutions such as identity and belonging. Throughout the course, students are exposed to key issues of the sociology of citizenship such as the historically different paths of men, women, minority groups and immigrants into citizenship, the contested development of rights and duties, the regulation of population, as well as insurgency and collective attempts to rearticulate the terms of the ¿contract¿ with the state. Israel, the USA, France and Germany are used as empirical illustrations. At the conclusion of the course students will know how to utilize the analytic framework of citizenship in order to analyze a wide range of political phenomena in contemporary societies.
Same as: SOC 103

JEWISHST 133A. WELFARE, WORK AND POVERTY.. 3 Units.

Early theorists of the welfare state described it as a reaction to the emergence of needs and interests of specific social groups during processes of economic development and change. Later theorists countered that the welfare state does not merely react to social cleavages during times of economic change but rather works to actively shape them, in line with worldviews or the interests of dominant group members. Adopting the latter approach, the goal of this course is to provide the tools and knowledge necessary for a critical evaluation of the social services provided to Israeli citizens and their impact on social and economic inequalities. The course will survey various approaches to the understanding of the goals of the welfare state. A comparative and historical account of the development of the welfare state will be presented, while highlighting recent developments, such as the increase in poverty rates and the aging of the population. During the course, we will examine the diverse needs that are served by the welfare state, as well as major dilemmas associated with the provision of services. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the development of social policies in Israel and the US.
Same as: CSRE 133J, SOC 103A

JEWISHST 139. Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism. 4 Units.

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Same as: FEMGEN 139

JEWISHST 143. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, social, and political aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean of the 20th and 21st century. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry. We will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary genres, and terms. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French, in addition to reading comprehension. Special guest: Moroccan author Meryem Alaoui. Required readings include: Aime Cesaire, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Dany Laferriere, Leonara Miano, Albert Memmi. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, FRENCH 133

JEWISHST 144B. Poetic Thinking Across Media. 4 Units.

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.

JEWISHST 147A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: JEWISHST 347A

JEWISHST 147B. The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story. 3-5 Units.

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Same as: COMPLIT 127B

JEWISHST 155D. Jewish American Literature. 5 Units.

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Same as: AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, REES 145D

JEWISHST 155J. The Jewish-American Novel: Diaspora, Privilege, Anxiety, Comedy. 4-5 Units.

Jews are sometimes referred to as 'the people of the book.' Would Portnoy's Complaint count as a book that constitutes Jewish-American peoplehood? What about Fear of Flying? This seminar introduces students to influential Jewish-American novels (and some short stories and film) from the late nineteenth century to the present day. These works return time and again to questions of diaspora, race, queer social belonging, and the duty to a Jewish past, mythical or real. Through close readings of short stories and novels coupled with secondary readings about Jewish-American history and culture, we will explore how American Jewishness is constructed differently in changing historical climates. What makes a text Jewish? What do we mean by Jewish humor and Jewish seriousness? How do Jewish formulations of gender and power respond to Jews' entrance into the white American mainstream? As we read, we'll think through and elaborate on models of ethnicity, privilege, sexuality, and American pluralism. Authors include Cahan, Yezierska, Singer, Roth, Bellow, Malamud, Ozick, Mailer, Jong, and Englander.
Same as: AMSTUD 145J, ENGLISH 145J

JEWISHST 185B. Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture. 4-5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, REES 185B

JEWISHST 199B. Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.

JEWISHST 205. Reading Hebrew, First Quarter. 2-4 Units.

Introduction to Hebrew literature through short stories and poetry by notable Israeli writers. In Hebrew. Prerequisite: one year of Hebrew or equivalent.

JEWISHST 215. Understanding Jews. 1-2 Unit.

This discussion-based course will give students an opportunity to explore the constellation of religious, ethnic, national, cultural, artistic, spiritual, and political forces that shape Jewish life in the 21st century. Drawing on historical documents, classical texts, and contemporary events, this course will give students from any background an opportunity to ask hard questions, deepen their own understandings, and challenge their conceptions of what makes Jewish life ¿Jewish.¿ No matter where you went for Sunday school ¿ church, synagogue, the woods, or nowhere at all ¿ this course is a chance to question what you know, and interrogate how you came to know what you know about Jews, Judaism, and Jewish culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 215

JEWISHST 221C. Aramaic Texts. 1-5 Unit.

Reading of Aramaic texts with special focus on grammar and syntax.
Same as: JEWISHST 321C, RELIGST 221C, RELIGST 321C

JEWISHST 221D. Readings in Syriac Literature. 2-5 Units.

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the works of Syriac speaking Christians in antiquity and beyond. This course offers an introduction to the Syriac language, including its script, vocabulary and grammar, and a chance to read from a selection of foundational Syriac Christian texts.
Same as: JEWISHST 321D, RELIGST 221D, RELIGST 321D

JEWISHST 227D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of Talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred, but not necessary. The goal of the ongoing workshop is to provide Stanford students with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts and thought.
Same as: JEWISHST 127D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 227E. Readings in Talmudic Literature Advanced. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Knowledge of Hebrew is required. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Meeting time and location TBA. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 127E, RELIGST 170E

JEWISHST 240. The Yiddish Story. 3-5 Units.

The Yiddish language is associated with jokes, folktales, and miracle legends, as well as modern stories. This class traces the development of Yiddish literature through these short oral and written forms, following Jewish writers out of the East European market town to cities in the Soviet Union, Israel, and especially the United States. We conclude with stories written in other languages about Yiddish writers. Readings include Sholem Aleichem, I. L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Esther Singer-Kreitman, Cynthia Ozick, and Dina Rubina. Readings in English; optional discussion section for students who read Yiddish.
Same as: AMSTUD 240Y

JEWISHST 242G. Myth and Modernity. 3-5 Units.

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Note for German Studies grad students: GERMAN 322 will fulfill the grad core requirement since GERMAN 332 is not being offered this year. NOTE: Enrollment requires Professor Eshel's consent. Please contact him directly at eshel@stanford.edu and answer these 2 questions: "Why do you want to take this course?" and "What do you think you can add to the discussion?" Applications will be considered in the order in which they were received. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.
Same as: COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 222, GERMAN 322, JEWISHST 342

JEWISHST 249. The Algerian Wars. 3-5 Units.

From Algiers the White to Algiers the Red, Algiers, the Mecca of the Revolutionaries in the words of Amilcar Cabral, this course offers to study the Algerian Wars since the French conquest of Algeria (1830-) to the Algerian civil war of the 1990s. We will revisit the ways in which the war has been narrated in literature and cinema, popular culture, and political discourse. A special focus will be given to the Algerian War of Independence (1954-1962). The course considers the racial representations of the war in the media, the continuing legacies surrounding the conflict in France, Africa, and the United States, from Che Guevara to the Black Panthers. A key focus will be the transmission of collective memory through transnational lenses, and analyses of commemorative events and movies. nReadings from James Baldwin, Assia Djebar, Albert Camus, Frantz Fanon, Mouloud Feraoun. Movies include "The Battle of Algiers," "Days of Glory," and "Viva Laldjérie." nTaught in English.
Same as: CSRE 249, FRENCH 249, HISTORY 239G

JEWISHST 265. Jewish Law: Introduction and Topics. 2 Units.

This course will provide an overview of the field of Jewish Law and will seek to provide a few case studies of topics in Jewish Law. All the readings are in English and this course presupposes no background in Jewish Law. Jewish Law is the world's oldest complex legal systems with distinct and idiosyncratic approaches to family, commercial, ritual and many other areas of law. It also has developed an elaborate "conflicts of law" sub-literature focusing on when should Jewish Law apply and when should some other legal system apply, reflecting the long history of the Jewish community in the diaspora as a minority. In this course, we will consider how Jewish law approaches a number of specific topics and we will ponder as well the proper interaction between Jewish law and secular legal norms, Jewish Law and changes in technology, Jewish law and sovereignty, Jewish Law and Bioethics and Jewish law and Family. Other topics will be added as we all see fit. Students who are interested in making a presentation on an area of their choice are welcome to do so. The course will seek to include an optional supplementary "field trip" to see a rabbinical court in action in California. The Learning Outcomes provided by this court include the following: Students who take this course will: 1. Exhibit knowledge and understanding of key concepts in substantive law, procedural law, and legal thought in Jewish Law. 2. Demonstrate facility with legal analysis and reasoning in the Jewish Legal tradition and will demonstrate the ability to conduct legal research in Jewish Law. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer, with consent of the instructor, from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Final Paper. Cross-listed with the Law School (LAW 5038).

JEWISHST 282. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 382

JEWISHST 282K. The Holocaust and Its Aftermath. 4-5 Units.

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Same as: HISTORY 202K, HISTORY 302K, JEWISHST 382K

JEWISHST 284C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 286D. Yours in Struggle: African Americans and Jews in the 20th Century U.S.. 5 Units.

This colloquium explores the history of African Americans and Jews in 20th century US beginning with Jewish immigration from Eastern Europe and the Great Migration to America's urban centers. It considers the geographical and economic tensions that developed between two minority groups living in close proximity; the appropriation of black culture; Jewish claims to whiteness and performance of blackness; intercommunal relations during the Civil Rights movement; the breakdown of the black-Jewish alliance in the late 1960s; and the lingering ramifications of this shift today.
Same as: HISTORY 286D

JEWISHST 287S. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 481

JEWISHST 291X. Learning Religion: How People Acquire Religious Commitments. 4 Units.

This course will examine how people learn religion outside of school, and in conversation with popular cultural texts and practices. Taking a broad social-constructivist approach to the variety of ways people learn, this course will explore how people assemble ideas about faith, identity, community, and practice, and how those ideas inform individual, communal and global notions of religion. Much of this work takes place in formal educational environments including missionary and parochial schools, Muslim madrasas or Jewish yeshivot. However, even more takes place outside of school, as people develop skills and strategies in conversation with broader social trends. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to questions that lie at the intersection of religion, popular culture, and education. May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMSTUD 231X, EDUC 231, RELIGST 231X

JEWISHST 297X. American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America. 2-4 Units.

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Same as: AMSTUD 279X, EDUC 279, HISTORY 288D, RELIGST 279X

JEWISHST 299A. Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter.

JEWISHST 301. Colloquium on Jews, Judaism, and Jewish Culture. 1 Unit.

An interdisciplinary graduate student colloquium for Stanford graduate students interested in Jewish Studies.

JEWISHST 321C. Aramaic Texts. 1-5 Unit.

Reading of Aramaic texts with special focus on grammar and syntax.
Same as: JEWISHST 221C, RELIGST 221C, RELIGST 321C

JEWISHST 321D. Readings in Syriac Literature. 2-5 Units.

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the works of Syriac speaking Christians in antiquity and beyond. This course offers an introduction to the Syriac language, including its script, vocabulary and grammar, and a chance to read from a selection of foundational Syriac Christian texts.
Same as: JEWISHST 221D, RELIGST 221D, RELIGST 321D

JEWISHST 342. Myth and Modernity. 3-5 Units.

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Note for German Studies grad students: GERMAN 322 will fulfill the grad core requirement since GERMAN 332 is not being offered this year. NOTE: Enrollment requires Professor Eshel's consent. Please contact him directly at eshel@stanford.edu and answer these 2 questions: "Why do you want to take this course?" and "What do you think you can add to the discussion?" Applications will be considered in the order in which they were received. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.
Same as: COMPLIT 222A, GERMAN 222, GERMAN 322, JEWISHST 242G

JEWISHST 347A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: JEWISHST 147A

JEWISHST 382. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282

JEWISHST 382K. The Holocaust and Its Aftermath. 4-5 Units.

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Same as: HISTORY 202K, HISTORY 302K, JEWISHST 282K

JEWISHST 384C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 385A. Core Colloquium in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 385A

JEWISHST 385B. Graduate Colloquium in Modern Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

Instructor consent required.
Same as: HISTORY 385B

JEWISHST 393X. The Education of American Jews. 4 Units.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the question of how American Jews negotiate the desire to retain a unique ethnic sensibility without excluding themselves from American culture more broadly. Students will examine the various ways in which people debate, deliberate, and determine what it means to be an "American Jew". This includes an investigation of how American Jewish relationships to formal and informal educational encounters through school, popular culture, religious ritual, and politics.
Same as: EDUC 313, RELIGST 313X

JEWISHST 481. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 287S

JEWISHST 486A. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 486A

JEWISHST 486B. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 486A.
Same as: HISTORY 486B