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Office: Science, Technology, and Society
Mail Code: 94305-2120
Phone: (650) 723-2565
Web Site: http://sts.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society are listed under the subject code STS on the ExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Science, Technology, and Society

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary framework through which to understand the complex interactions of science, technology and the social world. To major in STS, students work through a common core of courses drawn from the social sciences, the humanities, the natural and physical sciences and engineering. Students pursue coursework in one of seven specialized areas:

  • Catastrophic Risks and Solutions
  • Communication and Media
  • Innovation and Organization
  • Life Sciences and Health
  • Politics and Policy
  • Social Dynamics of Data and Information 
  • Self-Designed Concentration

Students may also undertake research in affiliated laboratories and through the honors program for course units. All students complete a capstone project, either by taking one of the senior capstone courses (STS 200) or by applying for and completing an STS honors thesis. Students are encouraged to pursue mastery in at least one field from within the humanities or social sciences and at least one field from within the sciences or engineering. Majors may declare either a B.A. or a B.S. degree (see the specific requirements for each degree).

The Program's affiliated faculty represent over a dozen departments, including Anthropology, Communication, Computer Science, Education, Electrical Engineering, History, Law, Management Science and Engineering, Political Science and Sociology. By learning to bring such a rich collection of disciplinary approaches to bear on questions of science and technology, students graduate uniquely equipped to succeed in professions that demand fluency with both technical and social frameworks. Recent graduates of STS have entered top-ranked Ph.D. and MBA programs and forged successful careers in a variety of fields, including business, engineering, law, public service, medicine and academia.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The Program expects undergraduate majors to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the Program in Science, Technology, and Society. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. A knowledge of core theories and methods in the interdisciplinary field of STS.
  2. An ability to deploy these theories and methods to analyze interactions between science, technology and society in particular historical and cultural contexts.
  3. An ability to critically evaluate empirical evidence and theoretical claims in STS-related debates.
  4. An ability to communicate clearly and persuasively about STS issues to a general audience in multiple media including oral presentation and writing.

Advising and Course Selection

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society offers an advising process that includes faculty, staff and peer advisers. Prospective majors must first meet with a peer adviser and then with the Program’s Student Services Officer to determine which degree they will pursue (the B.A. or B.S.) and how they will fulfill the Program’s basic requirements. When they are ready to declare, they meet with the Program's Student Services Officer to submit their degree plan and then the Associate Director reviews the coursework for intellectual coherence. Majors are then assigned to a faculty adviser who serves as an intellectual mentor and helps them identify the core questions driving their interest in the field. The Program also sponsors a wide variety of events designed to help students meet their colleagues and Program alumni, discover research and internship opportunities, and make their way toward the career of their choice.

STS Core

The program offers a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Science, Technology, and Society. Both degree programs require that the student complete the STS Core.

Units
With a grade of 'C' or higher in each course, complete 8 courses satisfying the following requirements:
A. Gateway Requirement
STS 1The Public Life of Science and Technology4
B. Disciplinary Requirement Note 1 & 2
Six courses; one of these courses must be a STS WIM course and at least one of these courses must be a STS Global course.
1. Social Sciences and Humanities Courses (complete 4 courses) Note 3 & 413-20
Genes and Identity
Medical Anthropology
Prefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors
Urban Culture in Global Perspective
Technology and Inequality
Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise
Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness
Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design
The Rise of Digital Culture
The Dialogue of Democracy
Media Economics
Specialized Writing and Reporting: Sports Journalism
Race and Media
Media, Technology, and the Body
Why is Climate Change Un-believable? Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Action
Law, Order, & Algorithms
World Food Economy
Sociology of Science
The Future of Information
Sociology of Science
Data and Knowledge in the Humanities
The Problem of Evil in Philosophy, Literature, and Film
Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
The Ethical Challenges of the Climate Catastrophe
World History of Science
The Scientific Revolution
Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
The Ethical Challenges of the Climate Catastrophe
History of Ignorance
The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750
When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo
Information Networks and Services
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Philosophy of Biology
International Security in a Changing World
Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster
The Religious Life of Things
Economic Sociology
The Future of Information
Knowledge and Information Infrastructures
Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
2. Engineering and Science Courses (complete 2 courses)6-10
BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience
Ethics in Bioengineering
Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions
Environmental Science and Technology
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Climate and Society
Human Society and Environmental Change
Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism
Decision Science for Environmental Threats
Engineering Economics and Sustainability
Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future
C. Senior Requirement4-10
All students must complete a capstone project, either by taking one of the senior capstone courses (STS 200) or by applying for and completing an STS honors thesis (STS 299).
STS 200NFunkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures5
STS 200QSociology of Science3-4
STS 200UThe Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-17505
STS 299Advanced Individual Work1-5
Total Units41-63

1WIM courses: BIOE 131COMM 120W, COMM 137WCS 181WEARTHSYS 177CHISTORY 140A   STS 191W

2Global courses: ANTHRO 41, ANTHRO 82,  ANTHRO 126, ANTHRO 132CANTHRO 138, COMPLIT 207,  ECON 106, ENGLISH 184CHISTORY 140, HISTORY 44Q, HISTORY 144, HISTORY 234PCEE 64, POLISCI 114SPOLISCI 233F

3May only take HISTORY 140A or HISTORY 232F (not offered 20-21).

4May only take HISTORY 144 or HISTORY 44Q.

Concentration Areas

In addition to the Core requirements common to all STS students, a minimum of 50 units, at least twelve courses, are required from among those designated on the appropriate Concentration Area course list (available in the Concentration Areas tab and on the STS web site). All courses must be taken for a letter grade if offered and may not be double-counted with core course work. Students may count no more than two course petitions outside the list of approved Concentration Area courses toward their STS degree plan. Thematic concentrations are organized around an STS-related area or topic:

  1. Catastrophic Risks and Solutions

  2. Communication and Media

  3. Innovation and Organization

  4. Life Sciences and Health

  5. Politics and Policy

  6. Self-Designed Concentration

  7. Social Dynamics of Data and Information 

A student pursuing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take at least 8 classes from the Socio-Cultural Course menu, including at least 3 designated as Concentration Core and at least 4 classes from the Technical Course menus. 

A student pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree must take at least 8 classes from the Technical Course menu, and at least 4 classes from the Socio-Cultural Course menus, including at least 3 designated as Concentration Core. 

Students in both degree programs are encouraged to pursue sequences of courses that build on one another to increase the coherence of their program and give depth to their skill set and knowledge related to STS.

Alternatively, subject to program approval, a student may choose to design a self-designed concentration. Students interested in designing their own concentration must work with the associate director and have their proposal approved at least 2 quarters prior to your graduating quarter. A proposal (5 to 10 pages) should (a) describe your intellectual objectives in detail, (b) explain why a self-designed concentration is the optimal way to pursue these objectives (as opposed to the five STS concentrations or other majors at Stanford), and (c) list at least 12 courses and 50 units that comprise the plan of study. Students with a self-designed concentration must fulfill the same core requirements as other STS students. More information can be found on the STS website

Each student's Concentration Area, certified or self-designed, requires the approval of the STS Associate Director.

Concentration Area Course Lists

Catastrophic Risks and Solutions 

Thematic concentration in Catastrophic Risks and Solutions:

Units
Socio-Cultural Courses
A.I.: Artificial Intelligence in Fiction
Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment
BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience
Ethics in Bioengineering
Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions
Understanding Energy
100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything
Adaptation to Sea Level Rise and Extreme Weather Events
Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience
High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests
Why is Climate Change Un-believable? Interdisciplinary Approaches to Environmental Action
Critical Theory and Ecology: A Cross-Cultural Perspective
Shades of Green: Redesigning and Rethinking the Environmental Justice Movements
The Holocaust: Insights from New Research
Redesigning Post-Disaster Finance
Fundamentals of Renewable Power
Human Society and Environmental Change
Sustainable Cities
Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism
Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture
Feeding Nine Billion
Decision Science for Environmental Threats
Energy, the Environment, and the Economy
World Food Economy
Environmental Economics and Policy
Climate Law and Policy
Introduction to Global Justice
The Problem of Evil in Philosophy, Literature, and Film
The Ethical Challenges of the Climate Catastrophe
History of Ignorance
The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750
Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges
The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence
The Future of Global Cooperation
Contemporary Issues in International Security
Research Seminar on Cybersecurity: Automotive Safety, Security, and Privacy
International Environmental Law and Policy: Oceans and Climate Change
Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention
Policy Practicum: What we can do to Mitigate Climate Warming
Environmental Law and Policy
Climate: Politics, Finance, and Infrastructure
Environmental Justice
Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Human & Planetary Health
International Environmental Policy
Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Tribal Economic Development and Sustainability
The Future of Globalization: Economics, Politics and the Environment
International Security in a Changing World
Environmental Governance and Climate Resilience
Climate Perspectives: Climate Science, Impacts, Policy, Negotiations, and Advocacy
The Politics of Epidemics
Writing & Rhetoric 2: Ethics and AI
The Public Life of Science and Technology
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
Environment and Society
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Racial Justice in the Nuclear Age
Preventing Human Extinction
Technical Courses
Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature
Environmental Science and Technology
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Water Resources and Hazards
Weather and Storms
Pathogens and Disinfection
Air Pollution Fundamentals
Earthquake Resistant Design and Construction
Introduction to Performance Based Earthquake Engineering
Regional Seismic Risk Analysis and Risk Management
Managing Critical Infrastructure
Immunology of Infectious Disease
AI for Social Good
AI Interpretability and Fairness
Computer and Network Security
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Natural Language Processing with Deep Learning
Machine Learning with Graphs
Machine Learning
Deep Learning
Convolutional Neural Networks for Visual Recognition
Deep Generative Models
Introduction to Cryptography
Deep Learning in Genomics and Biomedicine
Fair, Accountable, and Transparent (FAccT) Deep Learning
Artificial Intelligence for Disease Diagnosis and Information Recommendations
Designing AI to Cultivate Human Well-Being
Designing Machine Learning: A Multidisciplinary Approach
Climate and Society
Energy and the Environment
Biology and Global Change
Global Change and Emerging Infectious Disease
Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia
Energy and the Environment
Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion
Scientific Basis of Climate Change
Climate Change: An Earth Systems Perspective
Data Science for Geoscience
Earthquakes and Volcanoes
Frontiers of Geophysical Research at Stanford
Ice, Water, Fire
Microbiology and Infectious Diseases I
Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis
Advanced Methods in Modeling for Climate and Energy Policy
The Physics of Energy and Climate Change
Data Science 101
Art and Science of Decision Making

Communication and Media

Thematic concentration in Communication and Media:

Units
Socio-Cultural Courses
Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures
Signal to Noise: The Sounds of American Culture
Technology and American Visual Culture
Starstuff: Space and the American Imagination
Technology and Inequality
Technology and the Visual Imagination
Art, Business & the Law
Cell Phone Photography
Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks
Future Media, Media Archaeologies
Communication Research Methods
Media Processes and Effects
The Rise of Digital Culture
Truth, Trust, and Tech
The Dialogue of Democracy
Media Economics
The Politics of Algorithms
Virtual People
Media Psychology
Race and Media
Media, Technology, and the Body
Digital Civil Society
Digital Civil Society
Digital Civil Society
Media, Technology, and the Body
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change
Specialized Writing and Reporting: Health and Science Journalism
Sociology of Science
Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums
Sociology of Science
Data and Knowledge in the Humanities
Technology Entrepreneurship
Introduction to Media
The American West
Advanced Topics in Agnotology
When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo
Politics of Data: Algorithmic Culture, Big Data, and Information Waste
Organizations: Theory and Management
Silicon Valley: The Modern Day Rebirth of Renaissance Florence
Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition
On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II
The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema
Digital Technology in the UK
The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater
Introduction to Perception
Introduction to Cultural Psychology
The Religious Life of Things
Foundations of Social Research
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture
The Future of Information
Knowledge and Information Infrastructures
The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: Technology, History, and Justice
Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Minds and Machines
Cognition in Interaction Design
Virtual Realities: Art, Technology, Performance
Technical Courses
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino
Intro to Digital / Physical Design
Data as Material
Time Shifts
Video Art
Digital Art I
Photography II: Digital
Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction
Introduction to Scientific Computing
Advanced Digital Media Journalism
Mathematical Foundations of Computing
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Exploration of Computing
Programming Abstractions
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Exploring Computational Journalism
Machine Learning with Graphs
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Digital System Design
Introduction to Digital Image Processing
Introduction to Bioimaging
Digital Systems Architecture
Literary Text Mining
Data Challenge Lab
Visual Frontiers
Introduction to Optimization
Introduction to Probability
Information Networks and Services
Networks
Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound
Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music
Computational Music Analysis
Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming
ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development
Digital Technology in the UK
Data Science for Politics
Introduction to Data Analysis
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Data Science 101
Introduction to Applied Statistics

Innovation and Organization

Thematic concentration in Innovation and Organization:

Units
Socio-Cultural Courses
Signal to Noise: The Sounds of American Culture
Technology and American Visual Culture
Genes and Identity
Technology and Inequality
Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity
Modernism and Modernity
Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks
Future Media, Media Archaeologies
Modeling Cultural Evolution
Inventing the Future
Design Theory
Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design
Design of Cities
Truth, Trust, and Tech
The Politics of Algorithms
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change
Development Economics
Labor Economics
Sociology of Science
Sociology of Science
Data and Knowledge in the Humanities
Technology Entrepreneurship
Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
World History of Science
The Scientific Revolution
Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
The American West
History of Ignorance
When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo
Politics of Data: Algorithmic Culture, Big Data, and Information Waste
History and Ethics of Design
Global Engineers' Education
Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems
Forecasting for Innovators: Exponential Technologies, Tools and Social Transformation
Innovation, Creativity, and Change
Organizations: Theory and Management
Global Work
Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices
A People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU
The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers
Galileo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Scientific Revolution in Italy
Silicon Valley: The Modern Day Rebirth of Renaissance Florence
Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition
Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change
Leonardo!
Building the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization
Urban China
An Introduction to the Development of Science and Technology in China
Digital Technology in the UK
The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater
EAP: Analytical Drawing and Graphic Art
The Ceilings of Paris
Building Paris: Its History, Architecture, and Urban Design
Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America
Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment
The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies
Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals
Science and Technology Policy
The Religious Life of Things
Economic Sociology
Formal Organizations
The Social Regulation of Markets
Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change
Foundations of Social Research
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture
The Future of Information
Knowledge and Information Infrastructures
The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: Technology, History, and Justice
Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene
Environment and Society
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Minds and Machines
Cognition in Interaction Design
Virtual Realities: Art, Technology, Performance
Technical Courses
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino
The Hybrid Print
Intro to Digital / Physical Design
Data as Material
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Introduction to Robotics
Machine Learning with Graphs
Experimental Robotics
Human-Computer Interaction: Foundations and Frontiers
Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Digital System Design
Introduction to Bioimaging
Digital Systems Architecture
Intro to Solid Mechanics
An Intro to Making: What is EE
Engineering Economics and Sustainability
Mechanics of Materials
Visual Thinking
Foundations of Product Realization
Introduction to Human Values in Design
Product Design Methods
Design and Manufacturing
Advanced Product Design: Needfinding
Introduction to Decision Making
Introduction to Optimization
Introduction to Probability
Introduction to Stochastic Modeling
Information Networks and Services
Networks
Introduction to Decision Analysis
Future of Work: Issues in Organizational Learning and Design
Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound
Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music
Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming
ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development
Digital Technology in the UK
Introduction to Data Analysis
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Data Science 101
Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
Theory of Probability
Introduction to Applied Statistics

Life Sciences and Health

Thematic concentration in Life Sciences and Health:

Units
Social-Cultural Courses
Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
Madwomen and Madmen: Gender and the History of Mental Illness in the U.S.
In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present
Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors
Genes and Identity
Medical Anthropology
Technology and Inequality
Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise
Anthropology of Global Health
Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity
Culture and Madness: Anthropological and Psychiatric Approaches to Mental Illness
Art and Biology
Ethics in Bioengineering
Media, Technology, and the Body
Human Society and Environmental Change
Sociology of Science
Psychology and American Indian/Alaska Native Mental Health
The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine
Law and the Biosciences
Gendered Innovations in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
World History of Science
Sex, Gender, and Intersectional Analysis in Science, Medicine, Engineering, and Environment
History of Ignorance
People, Plants, and Medicine: Colonial Science and Medicine
Tobacco and Health in World History
Culture, Evolution, and Society
Environmental and Health Policy Analysis
Behavior, Health, and Development
Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context
Foundations of Bioethics
Foundations for Community Health Engagement
Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation Lab (SE Lab) - Human & Planetary Health
Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices
The Value of Life: Philosophical Foundations
Leonardo!
An Introduction to the Development of Science and Technology in China
Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.
Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Philosophy of Biology
Introduction to Perception
Introduction to Cultural Psychology
BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience
The Social Determinants of Health
Foundations of Social Research
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture
The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: Technology, History, and Justice
Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene
Environment and Society
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Technical Courses
Culture and Epigenetics: Towards A Non-Darwinian Synthesis
Data Analysis for Quantitative Research
Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology
Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Genetics
Building Blocks for Chronic Disease
Advances in Therapeutic Development: Neuronal Signaling and Immunology
Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective
Human Behavioral Biology
Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab
Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter)
Systems Biology
Systems Physiology and Design
Chemical Principles I
Chemical Principles II
Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules
Foundations of Physical Chemistry
Laboratory Mouse in Biomedical Research
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Introduction to Bioimaging
Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing
Data Challenge Lab
Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology
Cell and Developmental Biology
The Human Organism
Big Data for Biologists - Decoding Genomic Function
Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics
Coral Reef Ecosystems
Terrestrial Ecology and Conservation
Coastal Ecosystems
From Art to Medicine: The Human Body and Tissue Regeneration
Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific
Mechanics, Fluids, and Heat
Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics
Introduction to Data Analysis
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Data Science 101
Biostatistics
Introduction to Applied Statistics

Politics and Policy

Thematic concentration in Politics and Policy:

Units
Socio-Cultural Courses
Technology and American Visual Culture
Technology and Inequality
Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise
Anthropology of Global Health
Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness
BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience
The Dialogue of Democracy
The Politics of Algorithms
Digital Civil Society
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change
Food and security
Sustainable Cities
World Food Economy
Sociology of Science
Sociology of Science
Data and Knowledge in the Humanities
Human Society and Environmental Change
History and Politics of the Future in Germany, 1900-Present
History of the International System since 1914
The Changing Face of War: Introduction to Military History
World History of Science
The American West
History of Ignorance
Advanced Topics in Agnotology
When Worlds Collide: The Trial of Galileo
Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History
Politics of Data: Algorithmic Culture, Big Data, and Information Waste
Technology & Public Purpose: Practical Solutions for Innovation's Public Dilemmas
International Law and International Relations
The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War
Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals
Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems
Technology and National Security: Past, Present, and Future
Silicon Valley: The Modern Day Rebirth of Renaissance Florence
On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II
Urban China
Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.
The Future of Globalization: Economics, Politics and the Environment
Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment
The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies
Introduction to American Politics and Policy: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
Governing the Global Economy
War and Peace in American Foreign Policy
Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law
International Security in a Changing World
Introduction to American Law
The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America
Challenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy
Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster
BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience
Science and Technology Policy
Foundations of Social Research
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture
The Future of Information
Knowledge and Information Infrastructures
The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: Technology, History, and Justice
Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene
Environment and Society
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Technical Courses
Environmental Science and Technology
Chemical Principles I
Chemical Principles II
Structure and Reactivity of Organic Molecules
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Mechanics
Electricity and Magnetism
Introduction to the Physics of Energy
Introduction to Nuclear Energy
Machine Learning for Social Scientists
Causal Inference for Social Science
Introduction to Data Analysis
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Data Science 101
Introduction to Applied Statistics

Social Dynamics of Data and Information 

Thematic concentration in Social Dynamics of Data and Information:

Units
Socio-Cultural Courses
Signal to Noise: The Sounds of American Culture
Technology and American Visual Culture
Technology and Inequality
Future Media, Media Archaeologies
The Situated Workplace and Public Life
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Shaping the Future of the Bay Area
Technology and Inequality
The Rise of Digital Culture
Truth, Trust, and Tech
The Politics of Algorithms
The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America
Virtual People
Media Psychology
Race and Media
Media, Technology, and the Body
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethics, Public Policy, and Technological Change
The Black Music 1980s: Turntables, Beat Machines and DJ Scholarship
Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums
Data and Knowledge in the Humanities
Introduction to Media
History of Ignorance
Politics of Data: Algorithmic Culture, Big Data, and Information Waste
Technology & Public Purpose: Practical Solutions for Innovation's Public Dilemmas
Fundamentals of Cyber Policy and Security
Forecasting for Innovators: Exponential Technologies, Tools and Social Transformation
Global Work
Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices
Silicon Valley: The Modern Day Rebirth of Renaissance Florence
Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals
Science and Technology Policy
Economic Sociology
Foundations of Social Research
Race in Science
Race in Technology
Race in Medicine
The Future of Information
Knowledge and Information Infrastructures
Doing STS: Introduction to Research
Funkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures
Minds and Machines
Cognition in Interaction Design
Virtual Realities: Art, Technology, Performance
Technical Courses
Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino
Intro to Digital / Physical Design
Data as Material
Cell Phone Photography
Creativity in the Age of Facebook: Making Art for and from Networks
Digital Art I
Photography II: Digital
Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction
Building Modeling for Design & Construction
Sustainable Development Studio
Mathematical Foundations of Computing
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Exploration of Computing
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Exploring Computational Journalism
Introduction to Robotics
Machine Learning with Graphs
Experimental Robotics
Human-Computer Interaction: Foundations and Frontiers
Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab
Law, Order, & Algorithms
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Digital System Design
Introduction to Digital Image Processing
Introduction to Bioimaging
Digital Systems Architecture
Data Science for High Throughput Sequencing
Data science for geoscience
Literary Text Mining
Data Challenge Lab
Data Science for Geoscience
Introduction to Statistics for the Health Sciences
Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics
Introduction to Human Values in Design
Visual Frontiers
Introduction to Optimization
Information Networks and Services
Networks
Future of Work: Issues in Organizational Learning and Design
"Hacking for Defense": Solving National Security issues with the Lean Launchpad
Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound
Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music
Computational Music Analysis
Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming
Data Science for Politics
Introduction to Data Analysis
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Data Science 101
Introduction to Applied Statistics

Interdisciplinary Honors in Science, Technology, and Society

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) offers an opportunity for undergraduates to graduate with Interdisciplinary Honors in STS. The STS honors program is open to STS majors as well as students from other majors.

Students accepted into the program carry out an original honors project, working with a faculty adviser. For STS majors, this project also fulfills the requirements for a capstone course and a sociocultural concentration course. An STS honors thesis tackles a significant problem or question related to the intersection of science, technology, and society. Students draw research methods from one or more of the disciplines that shape STS, such as history, sociology, communication, anthropology, environmental science, computer programming/modeling, engineering, economics, political science, and art history, while also capitalizing on unique analytical perspectives of STS as an intellectual field. STS interdisciplinary honors signals expertise in a given area, organizational skills, and intellectual rigor, and students have used it as a springboard for graduate studies and for careers in fields such as information technology, entrepreneurship, finance, public policy, media, education, law, medicine, and the nonprofit sector. Past honors projects are on file in the STS office library, as well as the digital repository.

Admission

Students are encouraged to apply to the STS honors program during the Spring Quarter of their junior year. Late application is considered up to the add/drop deadline of the Autumn Quarter of their senior year.

For Majors in Science, Technology, and Society

In preparation for applying to the honors program in STS, students should:

  1. Select an area of research interest in STS, prepare related research questions, and identify potential faculty advisers for an honors thesis based on those questions.
  2. Attend one or more of the quarterly STS workshops offered for prospective honors students, and/or take STS 191W Introduction to Research in STS (offered Winter Quarter) or an alternative course on research methods approved by the STS honors program director, and/or speak with the STS honors program director.
  3. Submit a research statement and an honors program application, following the parameters set out at STS Honors Program web site.

For Majors in Other Departments and Programs

In addition to the requirements for STS majors, applicants from other departments should:

  1. Meet with the honors program director as early as possible to ensure that they have sufficient background in relevant analytical and methodological approaches.
  2. Satisfy one of the following:
    • Complete STS 1, The Public Life of Science and Technology, and either two courses approved as sociocultural foundational courses in STS, or two alternative courses approved by the STS honors program director as relevant to the proposed honors research in STS;  or
    • Complete three courses approved by the STS honors program director as relevant to the proposed honors research in STS.

Interdisciplinary Honors Requirements

To graduate with Interdisciplinary Honors in STS, seniors in the honors program need to meet the following criteria:

  1. Enroll in STS 299 with an honors faculty adviser to oversee the thesis for a minimum of 10 units total, with up to 5 units per quarter, over Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters. Students who choose to obtain Permit for Services Only (PSO) status during their final quarter may do so with the consent of the STS honors program director but they must still have enrolled in a minimum of 10 units of STS 299 during previous quarters.
  2. Enroll in STS 298, a required monthly workshops for current STS honors students.
  3. Complete a thesis judged worthy of an honors program by the faculty adviser and STS adviser.
  4. Have an overall Stanford GPA of 3.4 at the end of Winter Quarter, senior year, or demonstrated academic competence.
 

COVID-19 Policies

On July 30, the Academic Senate adopted grading policies effective for all undergraduate and graduate programs, excepting the professional Graduate School of Business, School of Law, and the School of Medicine M.D. Program. For a complete list of those and other academic policies relating to the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 and Academic Continuity" section of this bulletin.

The Senate decided that all undergraduate and graduate courses offered for a letter grade must also offer students the option of taking the course for a “credit” or “no credit” grade and recommended that deans, departments, and programs consider adopting local policies to count courses taken for a “credit” or “satisfactory” grade toward the fulfillment of degree-program requirements and/or alter program requirements as appropriate.


Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Grading

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society counts all courses taken in the academic year 2020-21 with a grade of 'CR' (credit) or 'S' (satisfactory) towards satisfaction of undergraduate degree requirements that otherwise require a letter grade.

STS Affiliated Faculty

Director:  Paul N Edwards

Associate Director:  Kyoko Sato

Executive Board: Paul N Edwards (STS and CISAC), Paula Findlen (History), Mark Granovetter (Sociology), Stephen Luby (Global Health), Rob Reich (Center for Ethics in Society), Gabrielle Hecht (History), Pamela Hinds (Management Science and Engineering), Michael Lepech (Civil and Environmental Engineering), Scott Sagan (Political Science), Fred Turner (Communication)

Affiliated Faculty and Staff: Jeremy Bailenson (Communication), Adam Banks (Graduate School of Education), Thomas Byers (Management Science and Engineering), Angèle Christin (Communication), Jean-Pierre Dupuy (French), Paul N. Edwards (STS and CISAC), Paula Findlen (History), Duana Fullwiley (Anthropology), Mark Granovetter, (Sociology),  Hank Greely (Law), Ann Grimes (Communication), James T. Hamilton (Communication), Gabrielle Hecht (History) Pamela Hinds (Management Science and Engineering), Hector Hoyos (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Miyako Inoue (Anthropology), Sarah Lochlann Jain (Anthropology), Robert Laughlin (Physics), Pamela Lee (Art and Art History), Michael Lepech (Civil and Environmental Engineering),  Helen Longino (Philosophy), Henry Lowood (Stanford University Libraries), Thomas Mullaney (History), Brad Osgood (Electrical Engineering), Walter Powell (Education), Robert Proctor (History), Jessica Riskin (History), Scott Sagan (Political Science), Kyoko Sato (STS), Londa Schiebinger (History), Michael Shanks (Classics, Anthropology), Mitchell Stevens (Education), Fred Turner (Communication), John Willinsky (Education), Xiaochang Li (Communication), Aileen Robinson (Theater & Performance Studies), Daniel McFarland (Education)

Emeriti: James Adams (Management Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering), Barton Bernstein (History), Martin Hellman (Electrical Engineering), Robert McGinn (Management Science and Engineering), Eric Roberts (Computer Science), Walter Vincenti (Aeronautics and Astronautics), Gavin Wright (American Economic History)

Overseas Studies Courses in Science, Technology, and Society

The Bing Overseas Studies Program (BOSP) manages Stanford international and domestic study away programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The BOSP course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Due to COVID-19, all BOSP programs have been suspended for Autumn Quarter 2020-21. All courses and quarters of operation are subject to change.


Units
OSPAUSTL 10Coral Reef Ecosystems3
OSPBER 126XA People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU4-5
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPCPTWN 67ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development3
OSPFLOR 13Galileo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Scientific Revolution in Italy3
OSPFLOR 41The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum4
OSPFLOR 48Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition4
OSPFLOR 49On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II5
OSPFLOR 58Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change4
OSPFLOR 67The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema4
OSPFLOR 96Leonardo!3
OSPFLOR 115YBuilding the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization4
OSPHONGK 24Urban China4
OSPHONGK 28An Introduction to the Development of Science and Technology in China4
OSPMADRD 27Canarian Night Skies4
OSPMADRD 45Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums4
OSPMADRD 57Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.4
OSPMADRD 72Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures4
OSPOXFRD 62Digital Technology in the UK4-5
OSPOXFRD 63Digital Technology in the UK3-4
OSPPARIS 30The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater4
OSPPARIS 44EAP: Analytical Drawing and Graphic Art2
OSPPARIS 72The Ceilings of Paris4
OSPPARIS 76From Art to Medicine: The Human Body and Tissue Regeneration3
OSPPARIS 80The Body, Race, and Difference in Contemporary France5
OSPPARIS 91The Future of Globalization: Economics, Politics and the Environment5
OSPPARIS 92Building Paris: Its History, Architecture, and Urban Design4
OSPSANTG 29Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America5
OSPSANTG 71Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment5
OSPSANTG 85Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific5
OSPSANTG 119XThe Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies5

Courses

STS 1. The Public Life of Science and Technology. 4 Units.

The course focuses on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments. The STS interdisciplinary lens helps students develop and apply skills in three areas: (a) Historical analysis of contemporary global affairs (e.g., spread of technologies; responses to climate change); (b) Bioethical reasoning around health issues (e.g., disease management; privacy rights); and (c) The sociological study of knowledge (e.g., intellectual property, science publishing). A discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.
Same as: CSRE 1T

STS 51A. Race in Science. 1 Unit.

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Fall quarter focuses on science. What is the science of race and racism? How does race affect scientific work? Weekly guest speakers will address such issues as the psychology and anthropology of race and racism; how race, language, and culture affect education; race in environmental science and environmental justice; the science of reducing police violence; and the role of race in genomic research. Talks will take a variety of forms, from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Same as: AFRICAAM 51A, CEE 151A, COMM 51A, CSRE 51A, HUMBIO 71A

STS 51B. Race in Technology. 1 Unit.

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Same as: AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B

STS 51C. Race in Medicine. 1 Unit.

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Same as: AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, CSRE 51C, HUMBIO 71C

STS 123. Making of a Nuclear World: History, Politics, and Culture. 4 Units.

Nuclear technology has shaped our world through its various applications (e.g., weapons, energy production, medicine) and accidents and disasters (e.g., Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, Fukushima). This course will examine the development of nuclear technology and its consequences to politics and culture at the global, national, regional and local levels from interdisciplinary perspectives. Some of the key questions addressed are: How did different countries and communities experience and respond to the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki? How did such experiences affect the later development of the technology in different national contexts? How have nuclear tests and disasters change the ways in which risks are understood and managed globally and locally? What kinds of political activism, international arrangements, and cultural tropes and imageries emerged in response to nuclear technology? We explore these questions through key works and recent studies in history, anthropology, sociology, and science and technology studies, as well as through films and literature.

STS 151. The Future of Information. 4 Units.

As information has a fascinating history (see HISTORY 5A), so it possesses a promising if concerning future. Through lecture, demonstration, online modules, and in-class web-work, this course will provide students with advanced strategies in (a) identifying sources and tools for advancing the quest for information; (b) assessing elements of trust, authority, and chicanery in the provision of information; (c) recognizing the economic and legal structures shaping information sources, services, and rights; and (d) discovering who is behind what information. With a focus on the info-worlds of journalism, learning, governance, students will acquire and practice the forensic skills and web savvy of fact-checkers and investigative reporters, activists and scholars. Here's a class set to determine the future course of information. The class will be a hybrid course, combining in-class delivery of materials, with a number of classes involving students taking online modules (at their convenience) that are designed to teach information literacy skills.
Same as: EDUC 151

STS 166. Knowledge and Information Infrastructures. 3-4 Units.

This course introduces historical, theoretical, and comparative perspectives on knowledge and information systems from the medieval world to the present. Cases include libraries, meteorology, climate science, the Internet, the World Wide Web, and social science data systems. It theorizes how infrastructures form, how they change, and how they shape (and are shaped by) social systems. The course ends with challenges to modern knowledge infrastructures, such as crowdsourcing, citizen science, and alternative and bogus knowledge.
Same as: HISTORY 242D

STS 177. The Cultural Politics of Food and Eating: Technology, History, and Justice. 4-5 Units.

This course will examine our everyday food practices as a site of politics where culture, technology, history, and issues of ethics and justice intersect. Through a survey of academic, journalistic, and artistic works on food and eating, the course will explore a set of key analytical frameworks and conceptual tools in STS, such as the politics of technology, classification and identity, the reproduction of inequality, and nature/culture boundaries. The topics covered include: the industrialization of agriculture; globalization and local foodways; food justice and ethics; new technologies in food practices (e.g., biotechnology, delivery apps); health and diet trends; and food and global challenges (e.g., climate change, COVID-19). Through food as a window, the course intends to achieve two broad intellectual goals. First, students will explore various theoretical and methodological approaches in STS and related fields (e.g., anthropology, history, sociology). Second, student will develop a set of basic skills and tools for their own critical thinking and empirical research, and design and conduct independent research on a topic related to food.

STS 181. Techno-metabolism: Technology, Society, and the Anthropocene. 3-4 Units.

In the Anthropocene epoch, humanity has become a geological force. As the sum of all technological systems and their human components, the technosphere metabolizes energy, materials, and information. Techno-metabolism's waste products- greenhouse gases, microplastics, nuclear waste, etc. - are transforming the biosphere and the geosphere, with radically different effects on disparate peoples and places. Scientists, historians, and others have proposed new ways to conceptualize techno-metabolism in order to reduce energy requirements and material waste. Meanwhile, "data exhaust" - the "waste" data generated by individual activity, from web searches to Facebook and Instagram - is increasingly "recycled" to detect patterns, trends, and individual preferences. In this project-centered course, students will seek creative ways to visualize, understand, and change the interplay of energy, materials, information, and waste. Assignments include reading logs and a term-long group project.

STS 190. Environment and Society. 4 Units.

Humans have long shaped and reshaped the natural world with science and technology. Once a menacing presence to conquer or an infinite reserve for resources, nature is now understood to require constant protection from damage and loss. Global challenges such as climate change have been further forcing us to reconsider our fundamental ideas not only about nature, but also about ethics and justice. This course will examine humanity's varied relationships with the environment, with a focus on the role of science and technology. Topics include: industrialization and modernism, diversity in environmentalism, environmental justice and inequalities, climate politics, global-local tensions, nuclear technology, the Anthropocene debate, and COVID-19 and the environment. Students will explore theoretical and methodological approaches in STS and related fields in social sciences, and conduct original research that engages with environmental issues of their choice. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors, or with consent of instructor.

STS 191. Doing STS: Introduction to Research. 4 Units.

This seminar introduces key analytical approaches and methodologies in STS, as well as basic tools for designing and conducting original research in STS. Students survey a series of influential studies in STS; identify productive questions of their own interest; and explore how to pursue them through strong research design. By completing smaller writing assignments throughout the quarter, you will produce a fully developed research proposal as final assignment. This final proposal can serve as an honors prospectus for students who seek to participate in the STS honors program. First week attendance mandatory.

STS 191W. Doing STS: Introduction to Research. 4 Units.

This seminar introduces key analytical approaches and methodologies in STS, as well as basic tools for designing and conducting original research in STS. Students survey a series of influential studies in STS; identify productive questions of their own interest; and explore how to pursue them through strong research design. By completing smaller writing assignments throughout the quarter, you will produce a fully developed research proposal as final assignment. This final proposal can serve as an honors prospectus for students who seek to participate in the STS honors program. First week attendance mandatory.

STS 198. Independent Research. 1-5 Unit.

Independent research. Student develops own project with supervision by an STS faculty affiliate. Students must email Prof. Edwards with brief project description and name of faculty supervisor. May be repeated for credit.

STS 199. Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.

STS 199A. Curricular Practical Training. 1 Unit.

Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the STS Program Director. At the end of the quarter, a one-page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to declared STS majors only. Course may be repeated twice. Instructor consent required. Please contact the department for a permission number.

STS 199J. Editing a Science Technology and Society Journal. 1-2 Unit.

The Science Technology and Society (STS) Program has a student journal, Intersect, that has been publishing STS student papers for a number of years. This course involves learning about how to serve as an editor of a peer-reviewed journal, while serving as one of the listed editors of Intersect. Entirely operated online, the journal uses a work-flow management to help with the submission process, peer-review, editing, and publication. Student editors learn by being involved in the publishing process, from soliciting manuscripts to publishing the journal's annual issue, while working in consultation with the instructor. Students will also learn about current practices and institutional frameworks around open access and digital publishing.

STS 200A. Food and Society: Politics, Culture and Technology. 5 Units.

This course will examine how politics, culture, and technology intersect in our food practices. Through a survey of academic, journalistic, and artistic works on food and eating, the course will explore a set of key analytical frameworks and conceptual tools in STS, such as the politics of technology, classification and identity, and nature/culture boundaries. The topics covered include: the industrialization of agriculture; technology and the modes of eating (e.g., the rise of restaurants); food taboos; globalization and local foodways; food and environmentalism; and new technologies in production (e.g., genetically modified food). Through food as a window, the course intends to achieve two broad intellectual goals. First, students will explore various theoretical and methodological approaches in STS. In particular, they will pay particular attention to the ways in which politics, culture, and technology intersect in food practices. Second, student will develop a set of basic skills and tools for their own critical thinking and empirical research, and design and conduct independent research on a topic related to food. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.

STS 200F. Sociology of Innovation and Invention. 5 Units.

This course examines the social, cultural, and economic factors that foster novelty. We will study a wide array of historical contexts, from the Renaissance to the present day, in which clusters of related innovations transformed the way things are done. We ask when do such innovations cascade out and produce social inventions that, for good and bad, create profound changes in how things are done, leading to new forms of organizations and new categories of people. Seminar/lecture format, reading intensive, final term paper. Prerequisite: admission to the course is restricted to declared STS seniors and is by application only. Email Emily Van Poetsch (emilyvp@stanford.edu) for an application. Applications must be submitted by 5pm on November 1st.

STS 200L. Critique of Technology. 3-5 Units.

Informed citizens living in today'™s world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? We will pay special attention to the insights that literature, and other arts, can offer for reframing digital culture. Selections by Latin American fiction writers (Cortázar, Zambra), philosophers and thinkers (Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock. Taught in English.

STS 200M. Tobacco and Health in World History. 4-5 Units.

Cigarettes are the world's leading cause of death--but how did we come into this world, where 6 trillion cigarettes are smoked every year? Here we explore the political, cultural, and technological origins of the cigarette and cigarette epidemic, using the tobacco industry's 80 million pages of secret documents. Topics include the history of cigarette advertising and cigarette design, the role of the tobacco industry in fomenting climate change denial, and questions raised by the testimony of experts in court.

STS 200N. Funkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures. 5 Units.

From texts to techne, from artifacts to discourses on science and technology, this course is an examination of how Black people in this society have engaged with the mutually consitutive relationships that endure between humans and technologies. We will focus on these engagements in vernacular cultural spaces, from storytelling traditions to music and move to ways academic and aesthetic movements have imagined these relationships. Finally, we will consider the implications for work with technologies in both school and community contexts for work in the pursuit of social and racial justice.
Same as: AFRICAAM 200N, EDUC 314

STS 200P. Leonardo's World: Science, Technology and Art. 4-5 Units.

Leonardo da Vinci is emblematic of creativity and innovation. His art is iconic, his inventions legendary. His understanding of nature, the human body, and machines made him a scientist and engineer as well as an artist. This class explores the historical Leonardo, exploring his interests and accomplishments as a product of the society of Renaissance Italy. Why did this world produce a Leonardo? Students will contribute to a library exhibit for the 500th anniversary of Leonardo's death in May 2019. This is an STS capstone seminar intended primarily for STS majors.

STS 200Q. Sociology of Science. 3-4 Units.

The sociology of science concerns the social structures and practices by which human beings interpret, use and create intellectual innovations. In particular we will explore the claim that scientific facts are socially constructed and ask whether such a characterization has limits. Course readings will concern the formation and decline of various thought communities, intellectual social movements, scientific disciplines, and broader research paradigms. A special focus will be placed on interdisciplinarity as we explore whether the collision of fields can result in new scientific advances. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Same as: EDUC 120, EDUC 320, SOC 330

STS 200T. Racial Justice in the Nuclear Age. 5 Units.

This upper-level course explores the history of radioactive contamination in the Bay Area and elsewhere. We'll examine the legacy of atomic bomb testing in our region and the current political implications of that legacy. We'll then explore the colonial and postcolonial dimensions of the nuclear age and the long-term contamination it has produced. Case studies vary yearly; they include uranium mining in Africa, nuclear testing in the Pacific, and accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima. At least one field trip!.
Same as: HISTORY 203F

STS 200U. The Age of Plague: Medicine and Society, 1300-1750. 5 Units.

(Undergraduates, enroll in 234P. Graduates, enroll in 334P) The arrival of plague in Eurasia in 1347-51 affected many late medieval and early modern societies. It transformed their understanding of disease, raised questions about the efficacy of medical knowledge, and inspired new notions of public health. This class explores the history of medicine in the medieval Islamic and European worlds. Changing ideas about the body, the roles of different healers and religion in healing, the growth of hospitals and universities, and the evolution of medical theory and practice will be discussed. How did medicine and society change in the age of plague?.
Same as: HISTORY 234P

STS 298. STS Honors Meeting. 1 Unit.

This is a required monthly meeting for STS Honors students.

STS 299. Advanced Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

For students in the STS Honors program. Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member. May be repeated for credit.