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Office: Building 260, Rooms 127-128
Mail Code: 94305-2005
Phone: (650) 724-1333; Fax: (650) 725-9306
Email: dlcl@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages are listed under the subject code DLCL on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages consists of:

Five academic departments

Eight focal groups:

  • Collaborative Teaching Project
  • Humanities Education
  • Materia
  • PATH+ (Persian, Arabic, Turkish, Hebrew)
  • Philosophy and Literature
  • Renaissances
  • The Contemporary and Workshop in Poetics

And the Language Center, which oversees language instruction at Stanford.

The division brings together scholars and teachers dedicated to the study of literatures, cultures, and languages from humanistic and interdisciplinary perspectives. The departments in the division are distinguished by the quality and versatility of their faculty, a wide variety of approaches to cultural traditions and expressions, and the intense focus on the mastery of languages. This wealth of academic resources, together with small classes and the emphasis on individual advising, creates a superior opportunity for students who wish to be introduced to or develop a deeper understanding of non-English speaking cultures.

The division's departments and the Language Center offer instruction at all levels, including introductory and general courses that do not require knowledge of a language other than English. These courses satisfy a variety of undergraduate requirements and can serve as a basis for developing a minor or a major program in the member departments. The more advanced and specialized courses requiring skills in a particular language are listed under the relevant departments, as are descriptions of the minor and major programs.

Focal Groups

While the five departments in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages serve common interests in literary and cultural traditions and their languages, the DLCL's Focal Groups bring together faculty members and graduate students who share topics and approaches that range across languages and national literatures. These groups are designed to respond directly to the research interests of the faculty as a community, and reflect long-term commitments by the participants. They are conceived as portals that open from the Division outward to the wider community of literary and humanities scholars at Stanford. The membership may include any member of the Stanford faculty or any Ph.D. student with an interest in the topic. Most Focal Groups include participants from several humanities departments outside the DLCL.

Thus the DLCL is characterized by two axes of intellectual inquiry:

  • the departmental axis, which is organized by language, nation, and culture
  • the focal axis, which may be organized by genre, period, methodology, or other criteria.

The convergence of the two axes, departments and Focal Groups, locates faculty members and graduate students in at least two intersecting communities. The DLCL believes that this convergence gives institutional form to the intellectual conditions under which many scholars of literature and culture presently work.

Each Focal Group maintains a standing research workshop at which both faculty and graduate student members discuss their work. Several Focal Groups offer formal courses; and all groups are responsible for overseeing research-oriented activities and extracurricular events in the relevant area, including sponsoring conferences, publications, podcasts, and other activities that disseminate the outcomes of their research.

Collaborative Teaching Project

Chair: Laura Wittman (French and Italian)

The Collaborative Teaching Project (CTP) has supported Stanford faculty and graduate students by offering a series of team-taught courses in the humanities, with the goal of preparing graduate students for careers as liberal arts educators. CTP thus facilitates and funds collaborations between one faculty member and 1-2 graduate students in order to co-teach a course. The graduate students and their faculty mentor work together on as many aspects of the course as possible, including syllabus, gathering and choosing materials, preparing assignments, lectures, presentations, class activities, and other in-class events, grading and feedback, evaluation of the course itself, and so on.

Humanities Education

Chair: Russell Berman (Comparative Literature, German Studies)

Faculty Members: Cécile Alduy (French and Italian), Elizabeth Bernhardt (German Studies, Language Center), Eamonn Callan (School of Education), Adrian Daub (German Studies), Thomas Ehrlich (School of Education), Marisa Galvez (French and Italian), Pam Grossman (School of Education), Orrin Robinson (German Studies), Gabriella Safran (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Kathryn Starkey (German Studies), Mitchell Stevens (School of Education), Guadalupe Valdés (School of Education)

Web Site: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/humanities-education-0

The Focal Group on Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.

Materia

Chair: Héctor Hoyos (Iberian and Latin American Cultures)

Web Site: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/content/materia-0

MATERIA is a new discursive space on campus for sustained intellectual exchange on a central tendency in contemporary criticism: the decentering of humans as “our object of study.” We are an inclusive, interdisciplinary group that finds in the notion of post-anthropocentrism an umbrella for some of the most interesting debates of recent years. These span not only post-humanism and new materialism, but also animal and object studies. 

Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (PATH+)

Chair: Alexander Key (Comparative Literature) 

PATH+ is a DLCL focal group that is considering the future of Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. The PATH+ conversation includes scholars, artists, and intellectuals working in and around these languages, literatures, and cultures from across Stanford and from peer institutions internationally.

Philosophy and Literature

Chairs: R. Lanier Anderson (Philosophy), Joshua Landy (French and Italian)

Faculty Members: Keith Baker (History), John Bender (Comparative Literature, English), Russell Berman (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Alexis Burgess (Philosophy), Martón Dornbach (German Studies), Jean-Pierre Dupuy (French and Italian), Amir Eshel (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Gregory Freidin (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Robert Harrison (French and Italian), David Hills (Philosophy), Héctor Hoyos (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Michelle Karnes (English), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), Sianne Ngai (English), Marília Librandi Rocha (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Joan Ramon Resina (Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Comparative Literature), Nariman Skakov (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Blakey Vermeule (English), Laura Wittman (French and Italian), Lee Yearley (Religious Studies)

Web Site: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/philosophy-and-literature

The Focal Group on Philosophy and Literature brings together faculty and students from nine departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. The group offers undergraduate tracks within eight majors, a graduate workshop, and a lecture series.

Renaissances

Chair: Roland Greene (Comparative Literature, English)

Faculty Members: Cécile Alduy (French and Italian), Shahzad Bashir (Religious Studies), Paula Findlen (History), Tamar Herzog (History), Nicholas Jenkins (English), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), David Lummus (French and Italian), Bissera Pentcheva (Art and Art History), Morten Steen Hansen (Art and Art History).

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from over a dozen departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.

The Contemporary

Chair: Amir Eshel (Comparative Literature, German Studies)

Web Site: https://dlcl.stanford.edu/content/contemporary 

The Contemporary focal group examines “the contemporary” with a focus on defining moments such as 1945, 1973, 1989, and 2001. Building upon a 3 year body of work as a DLCL research group, The Contemporary focal group has particularly focused on U.S., European, and Middle Eastern cultural and political forces that characterize our “contemporary.” The group employs a comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the hybrid term “contemporary” as it intersects various fields and serves as a heuristic device to understand phenomena in politics, culture, and the arts.

Workshop in Poetics

Chairs: Roland Greene (Comparative Literature, English), Nicholas Jenkins (English)

Faculty Members: Marisa Galvez (French and Italian), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature)

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/workshop-poetics-0+

The Workshop in Poetics Focal Group is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the five years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are:

  • poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice.
  • historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.

The core mission is to offer Stanford graduate students a space to develop and critique their current projects.

Minor in Modern Languages

Academic Advisor: Elizabeth Bernhardt-Kamil

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Modern Languages that permits students to demonstrate strength in two distinct modern languages and their literatures. The minor draws upon courses housed within the DLCL, East Asian Languages and Cultures, the Stanford Language Center, and the Special Language Program. 

Declaring the Minor

Students declare the minor in Modern Languages through Axess. The minor program is administered by the DLCL undergraduate student support office located in Pigott Hall, room 128 and may be contacted at odunlop@stanford.edu. Plans for completing the minor must be approved by through the student support office.

Minor Program 

  • Students enrolled in the Modern Languages minor must take 6 courses of 3 units or more, for a total of 22 units minimum. 
  • Students will study two modern languages, Language A and Language B.
    • Language A: two intermediate-level or higher courses, for 8 units minimum, and one literature course of 3-5 units.
    • Language B: two intermediate-level or higher courses, for 8 units minimum, and one literature course of 3-5 units. 

Requirements

  • Stanford Language Center courses and BOSP language courses must be second-year level or beyond.
  • Literature courses from BOSP programs are pre-approved for the minor.  
  • Literature courses taught by Stanford faculty (Academic Council members) will be approved with permission of the Program Administrator.
  • Language courses may not include conversational, oral communication, business, or medical language courses.
  • Advanced Placement and transfer credits may not be applied to the minor. 
  • All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Coursework may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. By University policy, no more than 36 units may be required in this minor.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Faculty Director: Alexander Key

The undergraduate minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (MELLAC) has been designed to give students majoring in a variety of departments an opportunity to gain a substantial introduction to Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, Middle Eastern, and African languages, and to the cultures and civilizations of the Middle East and Africa.

Declaring the Minor

Contact the faculty director, Alexander Key (akey@stanford.edu), before declaring the minor in Axess. The minor is administered through the DLCL undergraduate student support office in Pigott Hall, room 128.

Minor Program Overview

The minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (MELLAC) has five tracks.  Coursework in each track may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Arabic Track

The minor track requirements are: 

  • Minimum of 24 units total for this minor track.
  • Completion of six ARABLANG courses at the third and fourth year levels, excluding conversation and colloquial courses. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

  • Up to 5 units of transfer credit may count towards this minor, subject to approval of the faculty director.

  • Students must test for proficiency in Arabic through the Language Center by Winter Quarter of their senior year. Students should minimally receive a notation of intermediate-high. Those requiring outside tutoring are advised to seek resources available through the DLCL student services office in Pigott Hall 128, odunlop@gmail.com.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Hebrew Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum of 32 units total for this minor track.
  • Minimum of 3 HEBREW language classes. Students may test out of this requirement with the approval of the faculty director.

  • Minimum of 20 units of Hebrew literature and culture courses, one of which must be listed in COMPLIT. The Hebrew Forum may count towards this requirement with the approval of the faculty director.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: African Languages, Literatures and Cultures Track

Requirements for the minor are:

  • Minimum 32 units for this minor track. 

  • Three AMELANG language classes in an African language.

  • All three courses must be in the same language.

  • 20 additional units from relevant literature and culture courses, one of these courses must be a COMPLIT course.

  • Other relevant courses are listed under AFRICAST.

  • The faculty director may approve some upper-level language classes to count towards the 20 additional units.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Persian Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum of 30 units total for this minor track.

  • Completion of 20 units of Persian courses listed in AMELANG.

  • Completion of 10 units of Persian courses listed in COMPLIT.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Turkish Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum 30 units total for this minor track.

  • 15 units of Turkish courses listed in AMELANG.

  • 15 units of Turkish courses listed in COMPLIT.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.


COVID-19-Related Degree Requirement Changes

For information on how the Minor in Medieval Studies requirements have been affected by the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 Policies tab" in the "Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages" of this bulletin. For University-wide policy changes related to the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 and Academic Continuity" section of this bulletin.


Minor in Medieval Studies

Faculty Director: Marisa Galvez

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Medieval Studies. The minor in Medieval Studies:

  • provides Stanford students with the historical knowledge and framework through which to view globalism;
  • embeds the study of medieval culture in a coherent framework that resonates with contemporary issues of community building, the virtual world and mobility;
  • and promotes an innovative cross-disciplinary and skill-based approach to Medieval Studies.

Declaring the Minor

Students should declare the minor in Medieval Studies in Axess.  The undergraduate program is administered by the DLCL student services office located in Pigott Hall, room 128.  

Requirements

Students in any major field qualify for the minor by meeting the following requirements:

  • Students complete 6 courses courses of 3 units or more for a total of 25 units. 
  • The 6 courses must include an introductory core course taken for 5 units.
    Units
    ARTHIST 106Byzantine Art and Architecture, 300-1453 C.E.5
    DLCL 204Digital Humanities Across Borders3-5
    HISTORY 115DEurope in the Middle Ages, 300-15003-5
  • Electives may be selected from a large number of offerings in a variety of disciplines according to student interests, but they must follow a coherent course of study. This course of study must be approved by the Undergraduate Faculty Director. Courses are relevant to the major in departments across the University including English, East Asian Studies, History, Religious Studies, Music, Comparative Literature, German, French, Italian, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Classics. 
  • Up to 5 units may be taken in a medieval language, such as (but not limited to) Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Latin, Old French, Middle High German, Classical Arabic.
  • Appropriate courses offered through BOSP may count toward this minor.
  • No transfer credit may be used toward the Medieval Studies minor, and course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors.
  • Advanced placement credit and transfer credit do not apply to this minor.
  • All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Minor in Translation Studies

Faculty Director: Alexander Key

Minor Adviser:  Cintia Santana

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, in cooperation with East Asian Languages and Cultures and the English Department, teaches undergraduates to develop and apply their foreign language knowledge to the production and analysis of translations. The minor is designed to give students majoring in a variety of fields the tools to consider the practical and theoretical issues brought up by translation as an aesthetic, cultural, and ethical practice.

Declaring the Minor

Students will declare the minor in Axess, and then contact the minor adviser, Cintia Santana.  The  program is administered by the DLCL student services office located in Pigott Hall, room 128.  

Requirements

Students must take a minimum of 6 courses for 3 units or more and a minimum of 23 units for a letter grade, in fulfillment of the following requirements:

Units
1. Prerequisite: Complete or test out of a first-year course in the language of interest.
2. Core course: At least 4 units in a Translation Studies core course: ENGLISH/DLCL 293 or FRENCH 185 or Comparative Literature 228/ JAPAN 123/223.4
3. Language study: At least 8 units, second year or beyond (not including conversation/oral communication) and/or relevant literature courses taught in the target language. OSP and transfer units may be considered in consultation with the minor adviser. 8
4. Literature study: At least 7 units in relevant literature courses at the 100-level or above, taught in a DLCL department, East Asian Languages and Cultures, or Classics, and determined in consultation with the minor adviser. For students interested in translation from English into another language, appropriate literature courses in the English department may be substituted.7
5. Electives: At least 4 units in a creative writing course, or a course that foregrounds translation in departments such as Anthropology, any DLCL department, English, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Classics, Linguistics (e.g., LINGUIST 130A), or Computer Science (e.g., CS 124), determined in consultation with the minor adviser.4
6. Final Project: Students must also complete a capstone project: a significant translation and/or translation studies project (e.g. 20 pages of prose, 10 poems, or similar appropriate amount to be determined in consultation with the minor adviser). This work may be carried out under the supervision of an instructor in a required course or as an independent study.
Total Units23

Minor in Modern Languages

Academic Advisor: Elizabeth Bernhardt-Kamil

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Modern Languages that permits students to demonstrate strength in two distinct modern languages and their literatures. The minor draws upon courses housed within the DLCL, East Asian Languages and Cultures, the Stanford Language Center, and the Special Language Program. 

Declaring the Minor

Students declare the minor in Modern Languages through Axess. The minor program is administered by the DLCL undergraduate student support office located in Pigott Hall, room 128 and may be contacted at odunlop@stanford.edu. Plans for completing the minor must be approved by through the student support office.

Minor Program 

  • Students enrolled in the Modern Languages minor must take 6 courses of 3 units or more, for a total of 22 units minimum. 
  • Students will study two modern languages, Language A and Language B.
    • Language A: two intermediate-level or higher courses, for 8 units minimum, and one literature course of 3-5 units.
    • Language B: two intermediate-level or higher courses, for 8 units minimum, and one literature course of 3-5 units. 

Requirements

  • Stanford Language Center courses and BOSP language courses must be second-year level or beyond.
  • Literature courses from BOSP programs are pre-approved for the minor.  
  • Literature courses taught by Stanford faculty (Academic Council members) will be approved with permission of the Program Administrator.
  • Language courses may not include conversational, oral communication, business, or medical language courses.
  • Advanced Placement and transfer credits may not be applied to the minor. 
  • All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
  • Coursework may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. By University policy, no more than 36 units may be required in this minor.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Faculty Director: Alexander Key

The undergraduate minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (MELLAC) has been designed to give students majoring in a variety of departments an opportunity to gain a substantial introduction to Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, Middle Eastern, and African languages, and to the cultures and civilizations of the Middle East and Africa.

Declaring the Minor

Contact the faculty director, Alexander Key (akey@stanford.edu), before declaring the minor in Axess. The minor is administered through the DLCL undergraduate student support office in Pigott Hall, room 128.

Minor Program Overview

The minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (MELLAC) has five tracks.  Coursework in each track may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Arabic Track

The minor track requirements are: 

  • Minimum of 24 units total for this minor track.
  • Completion of six ARABLANG courses at the third and fourth year levels, excluding conversation and colloquial courses. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

  • Up to 5 units of transfer credit may count towards this minor, subject to approval of the faculty director.

  • Students must test for proficiency in Arabic through the Language Center by Winter Quarter of their senior year. Students should minimally receive a notation of intermediate-high. Those requiring outside tutoring are advised to seek resources available through the DLCL student services office in Pigott Hall 128, odunlop@gmail.com.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Hebrew Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum of 32 units total for this minor track.
  • Minimum of 3 HEBREW language classes. Students may test out of this requirement with the approval of the faculty director.

  • Minimum of 20 units of Hebrew literature and culture courses, one of which must be listed in COMPLIT. The Hebrew Forum may count towards this requirement with the approval of the faculty director.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: African Languages, Literatures and Cultures Track

Requirements for the minor are:

  • Minimum 32 units for this minor track. 

  • Three AMELANG language classes in an African language.

  • All three courses must be in the same language.

  • 20 additional units from relevant literature and culture courses, one of these courses must be a COMPLIT course.

  • Other relevant courses are listed under AFRICAST.

  • The faculty director may approve some upper-level language classes to count towards the 20 additional units.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Persian Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum of 30 units total for this minor track.

  • Completion of 20 units of Persian courses listed in AMELANG.

  • Completion of 10 units of Persian courses listed in COMPLIT.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures: Turkish Track

The minor track requirements are:

  • Minimum 30 units total for this minor track.

  • 15 units of Turkish courses listed in AMELANG.

  • 15 units of Turkish courses listed in COMPLIT.

  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.


COVID-19-Related Degree Requirement Changes

For information on how the Minor in Medieval Studies requirements have been affected by the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 Policies tab" in the "Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages" of this bulletin. For University-wide policy changes related to the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 and Academic Continuity" section of this bulletin.


Minor in Medieval Studies

Faculty Director: Marisa Galvez

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Medieval Studies. The minor in Medieval Studies:

  • provides Stanford students with the historical knowledge and framework through which to view globalism;
  • embeds the study of medieval culture in a coherent framework that resonates with contemporary issues of community building, the virtual world and mobility;
  • and promotes an innovative cross-disciplinary and skill-based approach to Medieval Studies.

Declaring the Minor

Students should declare the minor in Medieval Studies in Axess.  The undergraduate program is administered by the DLCL student services office located in Pigott Hall, room 128.  

Requirements

Students in any major field qualify for the minor by meeting the following requirements:

  • Students complete 6 courses courses of 3 units or more for a total of 25 units. 
  • The 6 courses must include an introductory core course taken for 5 units.
    Units
    ARTHIST 106Byzantine Art and Architecture, 300-1453 C.E.5
    DLCL 204Digital Humanities Across Borders3-5
    HISTORY 115DEurope in the Middle Ages, 300-15003-5
  • Electives may be selected from a large number of offerings in a variety of disciplines according to student interests, but they must follow a coherent course of study. This course of study must be approved by the Undergraduate Faculty Director. Courses are relevant to the major in departments across the University including English, East Asian Studies, History, Religious Studies, Music, Comparative Literature, German, French, Italian, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures, and Classics. 
  • Up to 5 units may be taken in a medieval language, such as (but not limited to) Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Latin, Old French, Middle High German, Classical Arabic.
  • Appropriate courses offered through BOSP may count toward this minor.
  • No transfer credit may be used toward the Medieval Studies minor, and course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors.
  • Advanced placement credit and transfer credit do not apply to this minor.
  • All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Minor in Translation Studies

Faculty Director: Alexander Key

Minor Adviser:  Cintia Santana

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, in cooperation with East Asian Languages and Cultures and the English Department, teaches undergraduates to develop and apply their foreign language knowledge to the production and analysis of translations. The minor is designed to give students majoring in a variety of fields the tools to consider the practical and theoretical issues brought up by translation as an aesthetic, cultural, and ethical practice.

Declaring the Minor

Students will declare the minor in Axess, and then contact the minor adviser, Cintia Santana.  The  program is administered by the DLCL student services office located in Pigott Hall, room 128.  

Requirements

Students must take a minimum of 6 courses for 3 units or more and a minimum of 23 units for a letter grade, in fulfillment of the following requirements:

Units
1. Prerequisite: Complete or test out of a first-year course in the language of interest.
2. Core course: At least 4 units in a Translation Studies core course: ENGLISH/DLCL 293 or FRENCH 185 or Comparative Literature 228/ JAPAN 123/223.4
3. Language study: At least 8 units, second year or beyond (not including conversation/oral communication) and/or relevant literature courses taught in the target language. OSP and transfer units may be considered in consultation with the minor adviser. 8
4. Literature study: At least 7 units in relevant literature courses at the 100-level or above, taught in a DLCL department, East Asian Languages and Cultures, or Classics, and determined in consultation with the minor adviser. For students interested in translation from English into another language, appropriate literature courses in the English department may be substituted.7
5. Electives: At least 4 units in a creative writing course, or a course that foregrounds translation in departments such as Anthropology, any DLCL department, English, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Classics, Linguistics (e.g., LINGUIST 130A), or Computer Science (e.g., CS 124), determined in consultation with the minor adviser.4
6. Final Project: Students must also complete a capstone project: a significant translation and/or translation studies project (e.g. 20 pages of prose, 10 poems, or similar appropriate amount to be determined in consultation with the minor adviser). This work may be carried out under the supervision of an instructor in a required course or as an independent study.
Total Units23

Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts

Faculty Director: Joshua Landy, French and Italian, and Comparative Literature

Director of Graduate Studies: Adrian Daub, German Studies, and Comparative Literature

Overview

The Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts offers rigorous, structured training for students interested in the interdisciplinary intersection of philosophy with criticism in literature and the arts.

Application and Admission

Students declare the minor after admission to candidacy and before attaining TGR status by submitting an Application for Ph.D. Minor form.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts 

All students in the Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts take:

  1. PHIL 333/DLCL 333 Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar, team taught by faculty from philosophy and from a literature or arts department.

  2. Two additional courses at the 200 level or above which are deemed by the Committee in Charge to include material of substantial special relevance to the domain of philosophy, literature, and the arts. A list of approved courses may be found each year at https://philit.stanford.edu/graduates/graduate-special-relevance-courses. At least one of these courses should be offered in a participating department other than the student’s major department (e.g., a philosophy course for students in literature and arts departments, a literature or arts course for philosophy students).

  3. All students take two graduate-level courses providing a structured program of course work in the student’s minor field (such as philosophy for literature and arts students, or literary or arts criticism for philosophy students): 

    • Graduate students in Philosophy take two graduate-level courses in a single literature, or in one of the arts.

    • Graduate students in literature or arts departments, including Classics, take two graduate-level courses in Philosophy, at least one of which must be in metaphysics, epistemology, or the philosophies of language, mind, or action (the PHIL 280s series and related upper-level seminars), and at least one of which must be in value theory (understood to include ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy, the PHIL 270s series and related upper-level seminars)

    • Graduate students in other departments submit a plan of study for approval by the Faculty Director reflecting graduate-level course work that provides a background both within philosophy and within the study of literature or the arts that is substantially equivalent to that achieved by philosophy, literature, or arts students in their minor field. Students are advised that this plan of study may involve more course work than would be needed for students whose major field is in literature, arts, or philosophy departments.

  4. If the five required courses do not total 20 units, students may satisfy the 20 unit requirement by taking units of DLCL 222 Philosophy and Literature or by taking additional graduate level courses of special relevance at their discretion and with the agreement of their minor adviser. 

Notes:
  • Students are encouraged to include a member from the minor field on the University Oral Committee or on another of the general examination committees if that is judged more appropriate by the student’s departmental and minor advisers. Students in departments which deploy the University Oral as a dissertation defense are advised that a member from the student’s minor field should be involved on the dissertation committee throughout the dissertation writing period.

  • Currently-enrolled students (as of August 31, 2017) in the old Ph.D. minor in the Humanities, or in its Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts subplan, have the option to continue under the current Ph.D. minor name or to change to the new Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. Students were required to make this election by the end of Autumn Quarter 2017-18. New students (as of September 1, 2017) would enroll in the Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. The subplan is no longer be available for student enrollment as of September 1, 2017.

Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts

Faculty Director: Joshua Landy, French and Italian, and Comparative Literature

Director of Graduate Studies: Adrian Daub, German Studies, and Comparative Literature

Overview

The Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts offers rigorous, structured training for students interested in the interdisciplinary intersection of philosophy with criticism in literature and the arts.

Application and Admission

Students declare the minor after admission to candidacy and before attaining TGR status by submitting an Application for Ph.D. Minor form.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts 

All students in the Ph.D. Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts take:

  1. PHIL 333/DLCL 333 Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar, team taught by faculty from philosophy and from a literature or arts department.

  2. Two additional courses at the 200 level or above which are deemed by the Committee in Charge to include material of substantial special relevance to the domain of philosophy, literature, and the arts. A list of approved courses may be found each year at https://philit.stanford.edu/graduates/graduate-special-relevance-courses. At least one of these courses should be offered in a participating department other than the student’s major department (e.g., a philosophy course for students in literature and arts departments, a literature or arts course for philosophy students).

  3. All students take two graduate-level courses providing a structured program of course work in the student’s minor field (such as philosophy for literature and arts students, or literary or arts criticism for philosophy students): 

    • Graduate students in Philosophy take two graduate-level courses in a single literature, or in one of the arts.

    • Graduate students in literature or arts departments, including Classics, take two graduate-level courses in Philosophy, at least one of which must be in metaphysics, epistemology, or the philosophies of language, mind, or action (the PHIL 280s series and related upper-level seminars), and at least one of which must be in value theory (understood to include ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy, the PHIL 270s series and related upper-level seminars)

    • Graduate students in other departments submit a plan of study for approval by the Faculty Director reflecting graduate-level course work that provides a background both within philosophy and within the study of literature or the arts that is substantially equivalent to that achieved by philosophy, literature, or arts students in their minor field. Students are advised that this plan of study may involve more course work than would be needed for students whose major field is in literature, arts, or philosophy departments.

  4. If the five required courses do not total 20 units, students may satisfy the 20 unit requirement by taking units of DLCL 222 Philosophy and Literature or by taking additional graduate level courses of special relevance at their discretion and with the agreement of their minor adviser. 

Notes:
  • Students are encouraged to include a member from the minor field on the University Oral Committee or on another of the general examination committees if that is judged more appropriate by the student’s departmental and minor advisers. Students in departments which deploy the University Oral as a dissertation defense are advised that a member from the student’s minor field should be involved on the dissertation committee throughout the dissertation writing period.

  • Currently-enrolled students (as of August 31, 2017) in the old Ph.D. minor in the Humanities, or in its Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts subplan, have the option to continue under the current Ph.D. minor name or to change to the new Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. Students were required to make this election by the end of Autumn Quarter 2017-18. New students (as of September 1, 2017) would enroll in the Ph.D. minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. The subplan is no longer be available for student enrollment as of September 1, 2017.

COVID-19 Policies

On July 30, the Academic Senate adopted grading policies effective for all undergraduate and graduate programs, excepting the professional Graduate School of Business, School of Law, and the School of Medicine M.D. Program. For a complete list of those and other academic policies relating to the pandemic, see the "COVID-19 and Academic Continuity" section of this bulletin.

The Senate decided that all undergraduate and graduate courses offered for a letter grade must also offer students the option of taking the course for a “credit” or “no credit” grade and recommended that deans, departments, and programs consider adopting local policies to count courses taken for a “credit” or “satisfactory” grade toward the fulfillment of degree-program requirements and/or alter program requirements as appropriate.


Undergraduate Degree Requirements

Grading

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages minor programs count all courses taken in academic year 2020-21 with a grade of 'CR' (credit) or 'S' (satisfactory) towards satisfaction of undergraduate degree requirements that otherwise require a letter grade.

Graduate Degree Requirements

Grading

Doctoral students in the department must take required courses for a letter grade  and are expected to earn a grade of 'B' or better in each required course. In other courses, doctoral students are expected to earn a grade of 'B' or better in each course taken for a letter grade in AY 2020-21 that will count towards their degree requirement. Any grade of 'B-' or below is considered to be less than satisfactory. Grades of 'B' or below are reviewed by faculty: while the grade will stand, the student may be required to revise and resubmit the work associated with that course. For courses taken for CR/NC, instructors will be asked to submit written assessment to the student and the department of what would be the equivalent letter grade to allow for review of satisfactory academic achievement by the DGS and department.

Certificate in Language Program Management

Faculty Director: Elizabeth Bernhardt

Programs in contemporary foreign language teaching preparation entail a knowledge base that has grown over the past 30 years, rooted in data from an explosion of linguistic as well as applied linguistic research.

In tandem with the Language Center's primary focus on learning research and theory, which graduate students explore in the teaching preparation program, the Language Program Management certificate focuses on developing the professional leadership and academic skills necessary for a career that includes the coordination and management of language learning.

The program funds summer internships which enable the completion of a certificate in Language Program Management and are intended to help Stanford graduate students prepare themselves for such work in complement to their literary studies. The certificate program is not declared on Axess and does not appear on the transcript or diploma.

Prerequisites

  1. Foreign language acquisition: Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) rating of at least advanced mid
  2. Academic and professional development:
  • DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages
  • Modified Oral Proficiency Interview (MOPI) Assessment workshop (2 days)
  • Limited OPI Tester Certification (average 6 months)
  • Teaching of three first-year language courses through the Language Center

These are generally met by the end of a graduate student's second year in the PhD program. Once meeting these criteria, the student may be admitted to the Program.

Requirements

Upon admission to the program, students must complete the following:

  1. DLCL 302 The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures: a course designed to focus student attention on the development of oral language proficiency through the upper levels and emphasize the need for upper register speaking and writing for literature learning and teaching.
  2. OPI workshop (additional 2 days of training at the Advanced and Superior levels): this workshop is the extension of the MOPI. It focuses on upper register performance on the FSI-ACTFL scale. Hosted by either the Language Center, regional workshop, or at the national meeting of the ACTFL.
  3. Completion of Writing Proficiency Familiarization workshop (Winter Quarter): Workshop conducted by a certified writing tester and structured in parallel to the MOPI/OPI assessment paradigm.
  4. DLCL 303 Language Program Management (Summer Quarter): an administrative internship including, but not limited to, experiences with the following:
  • Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL
  • Placement testing and student advisement
  • Technology in teaching and learning
  • Processes for teacher observation and feedback
  • Procedures in staff supervision and human resources
  • Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches
  • Interface with external programs (e.g., BOSP, Bechtel, VPTL)

Division Chair: Cécile Alduy 

Courses

DLCL 11. Great Books, Big Ideas from Ancient Greece and Rome. 3 Units.

This course will journey through ancient Greek and Roman literature from Homer to St. Augustine, in constant conversation with the other HumCore travelers in the Ancient Middle East, Africa and South Asia, and Early China. It will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas (such as the idea of history); and it will reflect on questions including: What is an honorable life? Who is the Other? How does a society fall apart? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? Should art serve an exterior purpose? Do we have any duties to the past? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/.
Same as: CLASSICS 37, HUMCORE 112

DLCL 12Q. Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Middle Ages and Renaissance. 3-4 Units.

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton. N.B. This is the second of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar).
Same as: FRENCH 12Q, HUMCORE 12Q, ILAC 12Q

DLCL 13. Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern. 3 Units.

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Same as: FRENCH 13, HISTORY 239C, HUMCORE 13, PHIL 13

DLCL 13Q. Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern. 3-4 Units.

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the European track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study European history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future. Students who take HUMCORE 11 and HUMCORE 12Q will have preferential admission to HUMCORE 13Q (a WR2 seminar). **NOTE** This class meets Monday and Wednesday in room 20-22K and Fridays in room 260-113 to attend a lecture along with the other two HUMCORE courses this quarter.
Same as: GERMAN 13Q, HUMCORE 13Q

DLCL 33. Humanities Core: Global Identity, Culture, and Politics from the Middle East. 3 Units.

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities at college in the Bay Area? In 1850s Lebanon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions (except the last one; he was a Christian magazine editor). In this course we will engage with claims about identity, culture, and politics that some might say come from the "Middle East" but that we understand as global. Ganzeer's graphic novel is as much for California as it is for Egypt. Ataturk's speech is about power and identity just like Donald Trump is about power and identity. In Turkish novels and in Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course look to their pasts and our futures. What happens next? This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.future.
Same as: COMPLIT 33, HUMCORE 33

DLCL 52. Global Humanities: The Grand Millennium, 800-1800. 3-4 Units.

How should we live? This course explores ethical pathways in European, Islamic, and East Asian traditions: mysticism and rationality, passion and duty, this and other worldly, ambition and peace of mind. They all seem to be pairs of opposites, but as we'll see, some important historical figures managed to follow two or more of them at once. We will read works by successful thinkers, travelers, poets, lovers, and bureaucrats written between 800 and 1900 C.E. We will ask ourselves whether we agree with their choices and judgments about what is a life well lived.
Same as: HISTORY 206D, HUMCORE 52, JAPAN 52

DLCL 100. CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People. 3-5 Units.

This course takes students on a trip to major capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Dante, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Gogol, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Same as: COMPLIT 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153

DLCL 101. Translation Matters: Applications in the 21st Century. 1-2 Unit.

For students interested in translation, interpreting, and translationnstudies. The course will highlight guest speakers who apply translation inna variety of professional contexts (e.g. medical, legal, literary, religious contexts, localization, machine-translation).

DLCL 102. 10 Jobs in 10 Weeks: Leveraging Your Liberal Arts Career. 1 Unit.

This interactive course gives students a taste of 10 different career fields over 10 weeks to help students explore and reflect on career interests, values, and goals. Students will also participate in exercises that help them to articulate the core skills humanities, arts, and social sciences students bring to their careers. Each week features alumni from different industries, who share about their work and lead students through an interactive case or project from a typical workday.

DLCL 111Q. Texts and Contexts: Spanish/English Literary Translation Workshop. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practical skills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English and English to Spanish. Students will workshop and revise a translation project throughout the quarter. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies, and semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translation in the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological and socio-cultural forces that shape translations.
Same as: COMPLIT 111Q, ILAC 111Q

DLCL 113Q. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Same as: ILAC 113Q

DLCL 121. Performing the Middle Ages. 3-5 Units.

Through an analysis of medieval courtly love, religious, satirical, and Crusade lyrics, we will study the rise of a new subjectivity; the female voice; the roles of poet, audience, and patron; oral and manuscript transmission; and political propaganda. Special attention will be given to performance as a reimagining of self and social identity. Authors include Bertran de Born, Marie de France, Hildegard von Bingen, Walther von der Vogelweide, Dante, and Chaucer. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about performance into dialogue with modern conceptions. Taught in English, all texts in translation. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 FRENCH 166 Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting counts for DLCL 121.

DLCL 122. Medieval Manuscripts, Digital Methodologies. 3-5 Units.

Medieval Studies is entering a phase of digital abundance. In the last seven years, more medieval material has been put online than has ever been available for study at any point in the past. How can we engage with the growing mass of digitized material available to us? How does this sudden access impact the work we do, the types of questions we ask, the connections we make, and the audiences we write for?nnIn this course, we will examine and evaluate digital medieval resources and software that has been created for interacting with those resources. Students will have the opportunity to design and create an innovative project based on medieval primary sources held at Stanford, applying current digital methods in the analysis and presentation of those resources.
Same as: ENGLISH 122

DLCL 123. Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture. 5 Units.

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy either the Ways-Creative Expression requirement or Ways-Engaging Difference. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 HISTORY 115D Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 counts for DLCL 123.
Same as: ARTHIST 105B, ARTHIST 305B

DLCL 141. Poems, Poetry, Worlds. 5 Units.

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of philosophy, history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. The readings address poetry of several cultures (Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Occitania, Peru) in comparative relation to that of the English-speaking world, and in light of classic and recent theories of poetry.
Same as: COMPLIT 121

DLCL 142. Literature as Performance. 5 Units.

The purpose of this course is to re-embed great dramatic texts in a history and theory of performance, using Bay Area and Stanford productions, audiovisual materials, and your own trans-medial projects to help us reconceive theater off the page, moving in time, space and thought.
Same as: COMPLIT 122

DLCL 143. The Novel and the World. 5 Units.

The European Design of the Novel. The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Cervantes, Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queirós, Kafka, Woolf, Verga, and Rodoreda.
Same as: COMPLIT 123

DLCL 144. An Introduction to Persian Literature, an Aesthetic Tradition Over a Millennium Old. 3-4 Units.

This course aims at familiarizing undergraduate/graduate students with some of the most significant classical and modern works of Persian literature, an aesthetic tradition over a millennium old. It requires no prior knowledge of, or familiarity with the canon of Persian literature, as it works through lecture-discussions on the history of Persian literature coupled with close readings and analyses of the best modern translations available in English along with the Persian texts. As such, students with knowledge of four quarters of Persian Language or more are encouraged; however, the requirement is to have one year of Persian Language class. The course will include some discussions of literary history, literary translation and cross-cultural interactions as well as questions of historical trends, literary genres and other areas of interest to comparative literary studies. Students will be encouraged to search and share relevant secondary sources, both online and in print. Students will also be encouraged to explore additional works of their choice and share their findings with other class members. Attendance is an integral part of the course and will play a crucial part in determining active participation. Take-home and midterm tests are designed to ensure that students keep up with the reading and are able to place the literary works in their proper aesthetic, social, and historical contexts. A final term paper on a relevant topic agreed upon between students and the instructor in individual conferences should bring together the result of the lectures, discussions and various readings in a statement of some significance with a scope that will connect more than one work and one period of Persian literature.

DLCL 189A. Honors Thesis Seminar. 4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies. NOTE: The professor will send a survey to students that are enrolled to determine the day / time this class will meet.

DLCL 189B. Honors Thesis Seminar. 2-4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.

DLCL 189C. Honors Thesis Seminar. 2-4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.

DLCL 199. Honors Thesis Oral Presentation. 1 Unit.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Regular advisory meetings required.

DLCL 203. The Early Printed Book. 1-5 Unit.

This course will focus on the printed book in Europe from the fifteenth through the sixteenth century. An ongoing theme will be the transition from a purely manuscript culture to one in which both manuscript and print thrived. The course will have a bibliographical as well as an historical focus. covering typography, illustration, and the collation of early printed books. Taught in English.

DLCL 204. Digital Humanities Across Borders. 3-5 Units.

What if you could take a handwritten manuscript, or a pile of 100 books, and map all the locations that are referenced, or see which characters interact with one another, or how different translators adapted the same novel -- without reading through each text to manually compile those lists? Digital humanities tools and methods make it possible, but most tools and tutorials assume the texts are in English. If you work with text (literature, historical documents, fanfic, tweets, or any other textual material) in languages other than English, DLCL 204 is for you. In 1:1 consultation with the instructor, you'll chart your own path based on the language you're working with, the format of the text, and what questions you'd like to try to answer. No previous programming or other technical experience is required, just a reading knowledge of a language other than English (modern or historical). We'll cover the whole process of using digital tools, from start to finish: text acquisition, text enrichment, and analysis/visualization, all of which have applications in a wide range of job contexts within and beyond academia. You'll also have the chance to hear from scholars who are doing digital humanities work in non-English languages, about their experience working across the technical and linguistic borders within their discipline, and within the broader DH community. While this course will be online and primarily asynchronous, there will be opportunities for students to meet synchronously throughout the quarter in language- and tool-based affinity groups.
Same as: COMPLIT 204A, ENGLISH 204

DLCL 205. Project Management and Ethical Collaboration for Humanists. 3-5 Units.

What does it look like to manage a collaborative project in a way that's both effective and ethical, taking into account the needs of people as well as the task? This class will cover project management and collaboration as they are practiced in digital humanities, "alt-ac" (alternative academic) jobs, and similar environments outside academia. In addition to readings and discussion, students will participate in a simulation of one year in the life of a digital humanities project (in the style of Dungeons and Dragons and similar role-playing games), with each student playing the role of a member on the project team.
Same as: DLCL 305

DLCL 209. Paleography of Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts. 3-5 Units.

Introductory course in the history of writing and of the book, from the late antique period until the advent of printing. Opportunity to learn to read and interpret medieval manuscripts through hands-on examination of original materials in Special Collections of Stanford Libraries as well as through digital images. Offers critical training in the reading of manuscripts for students from departments as diverse as Classics, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, English, and the Division of Languages Cultures and Literatures.
Same as: CLASSICS 215, HISTORY 309G, RELIGST 204

DLCL 219. Collaborative Teaching Project. 1 Unit.

The Collaborative Teaching Project (CTP) has supported Stanford faculty and graduate students by offering a series of team-taught courses in the humanities, with the goal of preparing graduate students for careers as liberal arts educators. CTP thus facilitates and funds collaborations between one faculty member and 1-2 graduate students in order to co-teach a course. The graduate students and their faculty mentor work together on as many aspects of the course as possible, including syllabus, gathering and choosing materials, preparing assignments, lectures, presentations, class activities, and other in-class events, grading and feedback, evaluation of the course itself, and so on.

DLCL 220. Humanities Education. 1 Unit.

Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.

DLCL 221. Materia. 1 Unit.

Materia is a focal group on post-anthropocentrism, Latin Americanist and otherwise. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers such as Fernando Ortiz, Bruno Latour, and Jane Bennett, we engage with works of literature and criticism that de-center the human as object of study. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group, prepare the pre-circulated readings, and actively contribute to discussion throughout the year. The latter can take place during plenary, over office hours with faculty coordinators, or via contributions to the focal group's online platforms. A short quarterly response paper that relates group discussions with the student's ongoing research is recommended. May be repeated for credit.

DLCL 222. Philosophy and Literature. 1 Unit.

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must secure written permission in advance from one of the instructors, before the final study list deadline. They must then do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year's activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.

DLCL 223. Renaissances. 1 Unit.

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from several departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.

DLCL 224. Workshop in Poetics. 1 Unit.

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the many years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are: poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice, and historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.

DLCL 227. Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures. 1 Unit.

PATH+ is a DLCL focal group that provides a space for conversations about Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the quarter. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself.

DLCL 229. The Contemporary. 1 Unit.

The Contemporary is a focal group dedicated to the study of recent innovative works in literature and the arts as they touch on social, political, and philosophical concerns of our era. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers as Hannah Arendt, Paul Rabinow, or Giorgio Agamben, we seek to trace the capacity of the artistic imagination to broaden the vocabulary with which we address contemporary challenges to freedom and to meaningful action. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and contribute one substantive response during the year. This can come in the form of an individual discussion with one of the two lead faculty, 1,500 words of contribution to the focal group's online platforms, or a presentation to the group itself. May be repeated for credit.

DLCL 230. Medieval Studies Workshop. 1 Unit.

The Medieval Studies Workshop brings together faculty members and Ph.D. students from several departments to consider interdisciplinary scholarly developments in the field of medieval studies, a period spanning the fifth through the fifteenth century CE. To earn the unit, graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group and actively contribute to discussion throughout the year. The latter can take place during plenary or over office hours with faculty leaders. May be repeated for credit.

DLCL 237. Political Exhumations. Killing Sites Research in Comparative Perspective. 3-5 Units.

The course discusses the politics and practices of exhumation of individual and mass graves. The problem of exhumations will be considered as a distinct socio-political phenomenon characteristic of contemporary times and related to transitional justice. The course will offer analysis of case studies of political exhumations of victims of the Dirty War in Argentina, ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia, the Holocaust, communist violence in Poland, the Rwandan genocide, and the Spanish Civil War. The course will make use of new interpretations of genocide studies, research of mass graves, such as environmental and forensic approaches.
Same as: ANTHRO 137D, ARCHLGY 137, ARCHLGY 237, REES 237

DLCL 239. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.

DLCL 245. LA ALJAMÍA, ROMÁRABE LANGUAGE. 3-5 Units.

This specific course will offer an overview of Aljamía, language of the Moors, considered an "Islamic variant of Spanish" that serves them to approach respectfully the language of their religious cult-material reality, beyond their day-to-day communication. Students will study a crucial part of the history of medieval and early modern Spain and especially the history of Moors as a community of crypto Muslims.

DLCL 254. Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment. 3-5 Units.

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Same as: ANTHRO 154C, ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, REES 254

DLCL 259C. Ecological Humanities. 3 Units.

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Same as: ANTHRO 159C, ANTHRO 259C, REES 259C

DLCL 293. Literary Translation. 4 Units.

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Same as: ENGLISH 293

DLCL 298. Preparing to Teach English as a Second Language. 3 Units.

This course focuses on practical aspects of teaching English to speakers of other languages. Its primary focus is an overview of the structure of English, which is crucial for effective English language instruction. Students in this course will also have practicum experience including classroom observations, pedagogical text evaluations, and supervised instruction of English language learners.

DLCL 299. DLCL CS+ CAPSTONE. 2 Units.

Only DLCL/CS+ joint majors may enroll in this course.

DLCL 301. The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages. 3 Units.

This course approaches the teaching of second languages from a learning perspective. In other words, it eschews the traditional focus on ¿teaching methods¿ and emphasizes instructional decision-making within the context of learners¿ intellectual and linguistic development. The course is designed to prepare language instructors to teach languages at the beginning and intermediate levels in a variety of university settings to an array of populations.

DLCL 302. The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures. 1-3 Unit.

This course is a follow-up to The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages (DLCL 301) and is structured to reflect the needs and challenges of students and teachers embarking on courses at the late second-year level and beyond. Participants will focus on a language and literary area within a chosen foreign language. They will interrogate how literature learning assists further language acquisition and how the level of language knowledge facilitates and impedes literary interpretation and reading comprehension. Prerequisite: DLCL 301.

DLCL 303. Language Program Management. 1-3 Unit.

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).

DLCL 305. Project Management and Ethical Collaboration for Humanists. 3-5 Units.

What does it look like to manage a collaborative project in a way that's both effective and ethical, taking into account the needs of people as well as the task? This class will cover project management and collaboration as they are practiced in digital humanities, "alt-ac" (alternative academic) jobs, and similar environments outside academia. In addition to readings and discussion, students will participate in a simulation of one year in the life of a digital humanities project (in the style of Dungeons and Dragons and similar role-playing games), with each student playing the role of a member on the project team.
Same as: DLCL 205

DLCL 311. Professional Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.

DLCL 312. Pitching and Publishing in Popular Media. 1 Unit.

Most of the time, writing a pitch for a popular outlet just means writing an email. So why be intimidated? This course will outline the procedure for pitching essays and articles to popular media: how to convince an editor, agent, or anyone else that your idea is compelling, relevant, and deliverable. We'll take a holistic approach to self-presentation that includes presenting yourself with confidence, optimizing your social media and web platform, networking effectively, writing excellent queries and pitches, avoiding the slush pile, and perhaps most importantly, persevering through the inevitable self-doubt and rejection.We will focus on distinguishing the language, topics and hooks of popular media writing from those of academic writing, learn how to target and query editors on shortform pieces (personal essays, news stories, etc.), and explore how humanists can effectively self-advocate and get paid for their work.
Same as: ENGLISH 318, FEMGEN 312F

DLCL 321. Classical Seminar: Rethinking Classics. 4-5 Units.

Literary and philosophical texts from Antiquity (including Homer, the Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, and Augustine). In each case, we will examine the cultural contexts in which each text was composed (e.g. political regimes and ideologies; attitudes towards gender and sexuality; hierarchies of class and status; discourses on "barbarians" and resident aliens). We will study various theoretical approaches to these books in an effort to "rethink" these texts in the 21st century.
Same as: CLASSICS 244

DLCL 322. Medieval Seminar. 3-5 Units.

The cultural,literary, and artistic evolution of the Middle Ages. The barbarian invasions and the Germanic ethos, the Celtic heritage,and the monastic tradition. Romanesque art and architecture,pilgrimages,and the Crusades. Gothic aesthetics, chivalry and courtly love, scholasticism, and the rise of universities. The late Middle Ages, humanism, and the threshold of the Renaissance. Texts include: Beowulf, Mabinogion, Song of Roland, Chretien de Troyes' Lancelot and Yvain, Dante's Divine Comedy, Boc­caccio's Decameron, and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.nn3-5 units.

DLCL 323. Early Modern Seminar. 3-5 Units.

Explores some of the key texts of European early modernity and the critical paradigms according to which the idea of the "Renaissance" has been formed, analyzed, and questioned since the 19th century. Will aim to provide a broad introduction to Early Modern studies from the point of view of the Italian Renaissance and its reception in different European contexts. Taught in English.

DLCL 325. Modern Seminar. 3-5 Units.

The postmodern condition as post-WWII rupture in Western tradition; moral, political, cultural, and aesthetical dimensions. Sources include literature, philosophy, essays, films, and painting. Authors and artists include: Primo Levi, Hannah Arendt, Alain Resnais, Samuel Beckett, Georges Bataille, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, David Riesman, Georges Perec, Juliet Mitchell, and Francis Bacon.

DLCL 333. Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar. 2-4 Units.

This course serves as the Core Seminar for the PhD Minor in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts. It introduces students to a wide range of topics at the intersection of philosophy with literary and arts criticism. The seminar is intended for graduate students. It is suitable for theoretically ambitious students of literature and the arts, philosophers with interests in value theory, aesthetics, and topics in language and mind, and other students with strong interest in the psychological importance of engagement with the arts. May be repeated for credit. In this year¿s installment, we focus on how artistic kinds or genres help set the terms on which individual works are experienced, understood, and valued, with special attention to lyric poetry and music.
Same as: ENGLISH 333, MUSIC 332, PHIL 333

DLCL 354A. DLCL Film Series: Rebel With a Cause. 1 Unit.

This quarter's film series will examine the representation of resistance, rebellion, and revolt in international cinema. Starting with Michael Almereyda's biographical drama Experimenter (2015), we will examine Stanley Milgram's studies on complicity, conformity, and resistance in his famous experiments on following instructions to inflict pain. From there we will move to canonical cinematic representations of acts of resistance like Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's The Lives of Others (2006), Jean-Pierre Melville's Army of Shadows (1969), and Sergei Eisenstein's Battleship Potemkin (1925) to discuss why these films have been canonized as some of the most suspenseful and powerful films of all time. Viewing Marcel Carné's Children of Paradise (1945), filmed during the Nazi Occupation of France, and Victor Erice's The Spirit of the Beehive (1973), filmed during the Franco regime in Spain, will allow us to discuss the ways that cinema itself is used as a tool of resistance. And discussing Walter Salles' Motorcycle Diaries (2004), Francisco Vargas' The Violin (2005), and Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds (2009) will allow us to explore the ways that resistance in diverse forms from unexpected actors can lead to movements that may or may not change the world. Discussion will focus on analyzing the structures, actors, and acts of resistance, rebellion, and revolt in international film. In particular we will look at who resists and why; how a rebel's identity and social position affects his or her political engagement; and how different forms of resistance can create movements that evolve from grassroots, across governments, and around the globe. In our study of representations of resistance across different schools and cultures of cinema, film technologies, and cinematic history, we will also address the ways that film creates suspense and intrigue, represents cause and effect, and prompts questions of ethics. Screening Schedule: April 4 Experimenter (2015) Michael Almereyda , April 11 Army of Shadows (1969) Jean-Pierre Melville, April 18 Children of Paradise (1946) Marcel Carné , April 25 Battleship Potemkin (1925) Sergei Eisenstein, May 2 The Lives of Others (2006) Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck, May 9 Motorcycle Diaries (2004) Walter Salles, May 16 The Violin (2005) Francisco Vargas, May 23 The Battle of Algiers (1966) Gillo Pontecorvo, June 6 The Spirit of the Beehive (1973) Victor Erice , and June 13 Inglourious Basterds (2009) Quentin Tarantino.

DLCL 369. Introduction to the Profession of Literary Studies. 1-2 Unit.

A survey of how literary theory and other methods have been made institutional since the nineteenth century. The readings and conversation are designed for entering Ph.D. students in the national literature departments and comparative literature.
Same as: COMPLIT 369, FRENCH 369, GERMAN 369, ITALIAN 369

DLCL 396. Humanities+Design: Visualizing the Grand Tour. 4-5 Units.

Study of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour of Italy through visualization tools of the digital age. Critical readings in both visual epistemology and current Grand Tour studies; interrogating the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in digital humanities; what new insights in eighteenth-century British travel to Italy does data visualization offer us? Students will transform traditional texts and documents into digital datasets, developing individual data analysis projects using text mining, data capture and visualization techniques.
Same as: CLASSICS 396, HISTORY 336E