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Office: Stanford Arts Institute, Littlefield Center, 2nd Floor
Mail Code: 94305-2250
Email: artsinstitute@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://arts.stanford.edu/arts-institute/

The Stanford Arts Institute offers interdisciplinary arts curricula and research programs, drawing on the wide-ranging intellectual resources of Stanford University. The Institute forges arts connections across the University; presents arts events; incubates new arts projects; and supports artists and cultural groups across campus. Since its founding in 2006, the Stanford Arts Institute has been a catalyst helping the Stanford arts community to grow, experiment, and advance art thinking and making.

Courses offered by the Stanford Arts Institute are listed under the subject code ARTSINST on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Honors in the Arts

Web site: https://arts.stanford.edu/for-students/academics/honors-in-the-arts/

Information concerning the 2020-21 program will be available on February 14, 2020.

The Stanford Arts Institute offers an interdisciplinary Honors in the Arts program, for interested undergraduates in any major. The program supports collaborative or individual projects that combine the critical and creative imaginations. Projects must be completed in one year. All students will work with mentors and also participate in a weekly workshop.

Honors in the Arts can be completed in addition to honors work in a student's home department or alongside another capstone program, such as the Senior Reflection in Biology.

Admission

Students must have an overall GPA of 3.4 or higher. Students with demonstrated strengths relevant to the program may petition the GPA requirement at the time of application.

To qualify for admission, students must identify three courses, at least two of which must be completed by the end of the third year, that have provided the necessary foundation for the capstone project. The Creativity Course Guide and the Interdisciplinary Course Guide include courses that provide an introduction to the study of the arts disciplines as well as incorporating the arts in an interdisciplinary context.

How to Apply

Admission to the program is competitive. Students apply for entry into the program during the Spring Quarter of their junior year. 

Eligibility requirements include:

  • Stanford senior during the academic year following the Spring Quarter application.
  • A minimum overall GPA of 3.4 is normally required. However, applicants can submit a GPA petition if needed. 
  • Completion of previous courses and/or creative projects that have prepared the student to execute an interdisciplinary capstone project.

Application materials include:

  • Honors project proposal which addresses the following:
    1. the concept for the interdisciplinary capstone project or research
    2. a description of the student's background in the disciplines to be drawn upon for the project
    3. why the project cannot be completed in your major department
    4. a statement of the relevance of Honors in the Arts to the student's education both at Stanford and beyond
  • Unofficial transcript
  • A completed Faculty Reference Form (provided in the application)
  • Portfolio of relevant work. The details for the portfolio vary depending on a student's main medium of expression. If the following limits present a significant obstacle, please contact Devin Garnick (dgarnick@stanford.edu):
    • Creative writers should submit work that best exemplifies their strengths as a writer. Most writers submit about 12 pages of prose, 5-7 poems, or a short scene from a play, depending on the proposed project.
    • Artists working in visual, audio, or other forms of visual or digital media should submit work that most exemplifies their strengths in the relevant form. The committee accepts the following: up to 5 images (compiled in a single pdf file), 5 minutes of video or audio, pdfs, and linked external media (such as YouTube, Vimeo, and SoundCloud). 

See the Honors in the Arts website for additional information on applying to the program.

Preparation for Honors in the Arts

To qualify for admission, students must identify three courses, at least two of which must be completed by the end of the third year, that have provided the necessary foundation for the capstone project. The Creativity Course Guide and the Interdisciplinary Course Guide include courses that provide an introduction to the study of the arts disciplines as well as incorporating the arts in an interdisciplinary context.

Requirements

Students admitted to the program are required to take the following sequence of courses (6 units total) during their senior year:

  • Autumn Quarter, Senior Year: ARTSINST 200A Capstone in the Arts Workshop (2 units)
  • Winter Quarter, Senior Year: ARTSINST 200B Capstone in the Arts Workshop (2 units)
  • Spring Quarter, Senior Year: ARTSINST 200C Capstone in the Arts Workshop (2 units)

In addition to the above courses, students admitted to the program are required to take the following courses or actions prior to their senior year:

  • Prior to Spring Quarter, junior year: Two preparatory courses for interdisciplinary study, 4-8 units
  • Prior to Spring Quarter, junior year, or concurrent with Autumn Quarter of senior year: One further preparatory course for interdisciplinary study, 2-4 units
  • Spring Quarter, junior year: Apply for admission to Honors in the Arts
  • Spring Quarter, junior year: Confirm preparatory courses with honors program director

Each Spring, students present their honors projects during a public symposium.

Honors Projects

All accepted projects are eligible for modest financial support for materials needed to complete the project.

Through a yearlong process, students develop a capstone project that goes beyond the traditional boundaries of their major.

  • Honors projects are typically creative projects involving an arts practice element. Honors projects may also be scholarly research projects involving a multidisciplinary approach.
  • Students can apply with an individual or team-based project. For team-based projects (2-5 students per team), applicants must delineate what expertise each student brings to the project.
  • Students must receive at least an 'A-' on the capstone project. Students who receive a grade of less than an 'A-' but greater than 'NP' receive credit for the workshops but do not receive honors.
  • Mentors: Each student works closely with a graduate student mentor or a lecturer to develop and shape the capstone project. Students in the program are responsible for setting up regular meetings with their mentor throughout the academic year. The workshop class also allows for weekly progress reports and strategies for advancing the work.

Requirements and further information can be found here on the Honors in the Arts website.

Arts Immersions

New York City Arts Immersion

The Stanford Arts Institute offers an Arts Immersion trip to New York City during Spring Break, March 21 - 28, 2020.

Students travel with Stanford faculty and Arts Institute staff for a week-long engagement with the arts, meeting institutional leaders, policy makers, and arts practitioners. On past trips, students have visited museums, galleries, concert halls; have seen dance rehearsals, opera, and a Broadway show; and they have had the chance to meet with alumni in the arts. In the Spring Quarter class ARTSINST 11Q Art in the Metropolis, students revisit their immersion experience by reading critical literature and participating in rigorous discussion.

See the Arts Immersion web site and subscribe to the Arts Update for information about upcoming information sessions in Autumn 2019.

Admission

Applications are welcomed from all undergraduate class years. Before applying, students should be aware that they must enroll in and attend the Spring Quarter course: ARTSINST 11Q/TAPS 11Q Art in the Metropolis.

Units
ARTSINST/TAPS 11QArt in the Metropolis (required)3

Visit the Arts Immersion website to submit a complete application. Applications are due by 9 a.m. on December 2, 2019.

Important Dates

  • Application Period: August 1—December 2, 2019 at 11:59 p.m.
  • Acceptance Notification: Friday, December 13, 2019
  • Travel to New York: Saturday, March 21—Saturday, March 28, 2020
  • ARTSINST 11Q Art in the Metropolis, Spring 2020, Thursdays, 9 - 11:50 a.m.

Venice Arts Immersion

In collaboration with the Bing Overseas Program, the Stanford Arts Institute offers an Arts Immersion trip to Venice, Italy to visit the 58th Venice Biennale September 5-17, 2019. Special attention will be paid to key issues in contemporary art, including globalization, the role of exhibitions and the art market, and the relationship between art and its immediate historical context. One of the primary aims of this course is to place the work on display at the Biennale in conversation with the rich art historical legacy of the city of Venice. To this end, students will explore issues of migration, cultural exchange, and labor in sites including the Peggy Guggenheim Foundation, the Arena Chapel in Padua, the Jewish Quarter, and the Doge's Palace. 

Creative Cities

Building on a three-year postdoc fellowship program during 2016-2019, the Creative Cities Working Group examines the complex life of art in cities. The Working Group engages a broad array of Bay Area writers, thinkers, artists, and curators who are engaging critical thought at the nexus of art and urban life. Seeking to advance and understand the historical and future roles of art in cities, our project fosters research, conversation, and artistic projects in urban life. Using the city as the stage for inquiry, the project examines how art helps and hinders developments in the urban sphere, creative economies, urban studies, the built environment, and more. Please check the Creative Cities website for current information about the Creative Cities Working Group, guest speakers, and other programming.

Artist in Residence

Stanford Arts Institute routinely hosts Artists in Residence. Please check our website for current information about courses and programming related to visiting artists.

Interim Chair: Jisha Menon 

Director of Undergraduate Studies: Jisha Menon

Courses

ARTSINST 11Q. Art in the Metropolis. 3 Units.

This seminar is offered in conjunction with the annual "Arts Immersion" trip to New York that takes place over the spring break and is organized by the Stanford Arts Institute (SAI). Participation in the trip is a requirement for taking part in the seminar (and vice versa). The trip is designed to provide a group of students with the opportunity to immerse themselves in the cultural life of New York City guided by faculty and SAI staff. Students will experience a broad range and variety of art forms (visual arts, theater, opera, dance, etc.) and will meet with prominent arts administrators and practitioners, some of whom are Stanford alumni. For further details and updates about the trip, see https://arts.stanford.edu/for-students/academics/arts-immersion/new-york/.
Same as: ENGLISH 11Q, MUSIC 11Q, TAPS 11Q

ARTSINST 50. Arts in Context: The Process of Cultural Production. 1-2 Unit.

A combination of practical skill-building and discussions with practicing arts professionals, this course will provide students with the foundational skills necessary to produce programs on campus and/or work in the arts. The talks and workshops will cover topics including curatorial practice and programming (for both visual and performing arts); grant writing and other fundraising methodology; budgeting and financial management; contracts and other legal considerations; and public relations and marketing. Every session is open for drop-in attendance, or students may take the entire series for credit. May be repeat for credit.
Same as: MUSIC 50, TAPS 50

ARTSINST 100. The Questions of Clay: Craft, Creativity and Scientific Process. 5 Units.

Students will create individual studio portfolios of ceramic work and pursue technical investigations of clay properties and the firing process using modern scientific equipment. Emphasis on development of creative process; parallels between science and traditional craft; integration of creative expression with scientific method and analysis. Prior ceramics experience desirable but not necessary. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: any level of background in physics, Instructor permission.
Same as: APPPHYS 100

ARTSINST 141. Online Jamming and Concert Technology. 2-4 Units.

Today's vast amount of streaming and video conferencing on the Internet lacks one aspect of musical fun and that's what this course is about: high-quality, near-synchronous musical collaboration. Under the right conditions, the Internet can be used for ultra-low-latency, uncompressed sound transmission. The course teaches open-source (free) techniques for setting up city-to-city studio-to-studio audio links. Distributed rehearsing, production and split ensemble concerts are the goal. Setting up such links and debugging them requires knowledge of network protocols, network audio issues and some ear training.
Same as: MUSIC 153

ARTSINST 142. Drawing with Code. 4 Units.

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Same as: ARTSTUDI 163

ARTSINST 150. The Changing World of Popular Music. 2 Units.

This course will cover changes in the business, economics, and practices of the popular music industry. It will provide a brief historical overview of the industry and its business models. The majority of the course will focus on the industry as it works today and on forces that are causing it to change rapidly. The course will feature guest artists and executives with current experience in the field, as well as project-based assignments designed to give students hands-on experience.Topics will include: Economics and business models of commercial music business,Technology and music production, Technology and music distribution, Technology and marketing, Leadership in the music industry: case studies, Managing creative projects, Copyright and legal issues. To secure your spot in the course, enroll in Axess and attend the first class session.
Same as: MUSIC 150P

ARTSINST 150G. Performing Race, Gender, and Sexuality. 4 Units.

In this theory and practice-based course, students will examine performances by and scholarly texts about artists who critically and mindfully engage race, gender, and sexuality. Students will cultivate their skills as artist-scholars through written assignments and the creation of performances in response to the assigned material. Attendance and written reflection about a live performance event on campus are required. Students will also learn various meditation practices as tools for making and critiquing performance, in both our seminar discussions and performance workshops. We will approach mindfulness as method and theory in our own practice, as well as in relation to the works studied. We will also consider the ethics and current debates concerning the mindfulness industry. Examples of artists studied include James Luna, Nao Bustamante, Renee Cox, William Pope.L, Cassils, boychild, Curious, Adrian Piper, Xandra Ibarra, Valérie Reding, Guillermo Gomez-Peña, and Ana Mendieta.
Same as: CSRE 150G, CSRE 350G, FEMGEN 150G, LIFE 150G, TAPS 150G

ARTSINST 197. Industry Immersion: TV and Film. 2 Units.

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the exciting and ever-changing TV and Film industries. Each week features Stanford alumni and industry professionals who will share information about their company and current role, insights about their career path, and a deep dive into trends facing the industry. Guest lecturers will have a range of experience and roles including writers, producers, cinematographers, and studio executives. Each class will also feature a hands-on project pulled from a typical workday. The course will be 6 weeks long, with the final session featuring a visit a local TV or Film company. Priority will be given to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors interested in careers in TV and Film. Instructor Permission Required. Please fill out this form prior to enrolling in the course: https://goo.gl/forms/HwDDkPTrIPw52X7J2.

ARTSINST 197B. Industry Immersion: Fashion. 2 Units.

This course is designed to give students the opportunity to immerse themselves in the expanding and evolving fashion industry. Currently the three most relevant issues and trends impacting the fashion industry are designing for diverse audiences, sustainable practices, and the impact of technology. nnThis course will introduce and explore these topics via readings, lectures, workshops and projects. Six weeks of the course will include visits to our class by influential industry professionals who will share information about their company and current role, and their perspectives on one or more of the topics above. In addition to the lecture, each class will include a workshop element drawn from everyday efforts to address these issues. Guest lecturers will have a range of experience and viewpoints of the changing landscape. Credit will be based on attendance, class participation, assignments and a final presentation.

ARTSINST 199. Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

ARTSINST 200A. Capstone in the Arts Workshop. 2 Units.

First in a three-quarter series required of all Capstone in the Arts participants (Capstone Track and Honors Track). Students initiate and develop interdisciplinary creative projects with the support of peers and mentors in a small, workshop format. Required enrollment in 200 A,B,C.

ARTSINST 200B. Capstone in the Arts Workshop. 2 Units.

Second in a three-quarter series required of all Capstone in the Arts participants (Capstone Track and Honors Track). Students initiate and develop interdisciplinary creative projects with the support of peers and mentors in a small, workshop format. Required enrollment in 200 A,B,C.

ARTSINST 200C. Capstone in the Arts Workshop. 2 Units.

Third in a three-quarter series required of all Capstone in the Arts participants (Capstone Track and Honors Track). Students initiate and develop interdisciplinary creative projects with the support of peers and mentors in a small, workshop format. Required enrollment in 200 A,B,C.

ARTSINST 210. Stanford/WMG Leadership Initiative Capstone Workshop. 1 Unit.

Workshop required for all Stanford/WMG Leadership Initiative fellows. Students initiate and develop capstone projects based on their interests in the music industry.