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Mail Code: 94305-2084
Phone: (650) 723-3782
Email: ja2010@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://aaas.stanford.edu

Undergraduate Program in African and African American Studies

The Program in African and African American Studies (AAAS), established in 1969, was the first ethnic studies program developed at Stanford University and the first African and African American Studies program at a private institution in the U.S. The AAAS program provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of peoples of African descent as a central component of American culture, offering a course of study that promotes research across disciplinary and departmental boundaries as well as providing research training and community service learning opportunities for undergraduates. It has developed an extensive network of Stanford scholars who work in race studies specific to AAAS and in concert with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

AAAS encourages an interdisciplinary program of study drawn from fields including anthropology, art, art history, economics,education, drama, history, languages, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology. The program emphasizes rigorous and creative scholarship and research, and fosters close academic advising with a faculty adviser, the AAAS Associate Director, and the Director.

AAAS is an interdisciplinary program (IDP) affiliated with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and offers a major independent of it. CCSRE offers additional majors in Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and Native American Studies.

The Interdisciplinary Program in African and African American Studies (AAAS) provides students the opportunity to structure a major or minor with a core curriculum designed to develop a comparative and multidisciplinary understanding of the experiences and communities on the continent of Africa and African Americans within a broader global, diasporic dialogue. Additionally, majors or minors can focus their course work in one of eleven thematic concentrations.

The directors of the program and the advisory board constitute the AAAS curriculum committee, the policy making body for the interdisciplinary program. 

Mission Statement for the Undergraduate Program in African and African American Studies

The mission of the undergraduate program in African and African American Studies is to provide students with an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of people of African descent as a central component of American culture. Courses in the major promote research across disciplinary and departmental boundaries as well as provide students with research training and community service learning opportunities. Courses of study are drawn from anthropology, art, art history, economics, education, drama, history, languages, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology among others. The program provides an intellectual background for students considering graduate school or professional careers.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the program's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an interdisciplinary understanding of scholarship related to the African diaspora and Africa, drawing on interdisciplinary course work and each student's individualized concentration.
  2. the ability to identify and critically assess different disciplinary, methodological, and interpretive approaches to the study of African Americans, Africans, and/or people of the African diaspora.
  3. an understanding of comparative approaches to race.
  4. skills in disciplinary methods necessary for their study.
  5. the ability to express their interpretive and analytical arguments in clear, effective prose. 

Bachelor of Arts in African and African American Studies

Core Curriculum

All core courses taken for the major must be taken for a letter grade.

Requirements

Majors must complete a total of 60 units, consisting of the following:

  1. One of two required courses:
    1. AFRICAAM 43 Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (3-5 units), or
    2. AFRICAAM 105 Introduction to African and African American Studies (5 units)
  2. One Social Science course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)
  3. One Humanities course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)
  4. One course in African Studies. (5 units)
  5. AFRICAAM 200X Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar - WIM. (5 units)
  6. 35 units of AAAS core and related courses

Students also work closely with a faculty adviser, the AAAS associate director, and the AAAS director in developing a coherent thematic emphasis within their major that reflects their scholarly interests in the field.

Thematic Emphasis

AAAS majors select a thematic emphasis. Selecting an emphasis allows students to customize their curriculum and synthesize coursework taken across various departments and programs into a coherent focus. Emphases offered include (but are not limited to):

Core Courses

Units
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 30The Egyptians3-5
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
AFRICAAM 43Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 47History of South Africa3
AFRICAAM 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
AFRICAAM 50BNineteenth Century America3
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 75EBlack Cinema2
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
AFRICAAM 116Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
AFRICAAM 123Great Works of the African American Tradition5
AFRICAAM 147History of South Africa5
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 159James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature5
AFRICAAM 181QAlternative Viewpoints: Black Independent Film4
AFRICAAM 189Black Life and Death in the Neoliberal Era5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 226Mixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AFRICAAM 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAAM 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
AFRICAST 109Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development3-5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 127African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 138Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention3-5
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 151AIDS in Africa3
AFRICAST 195Shifting Frames1-2
AFRICAST 199Independent Study or Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAST 209Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development3-5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 224Memory and Heritage In South Africa Syllabus1
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 299Independent Study or Directed Reading1-10
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMSTUD 262CAfrican American Literature and the Retreat of Jim Crow5
AMSTUD 262DAfrican American Poetics5
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
HISTORY 245GLaw and Colonialism in Africa4-5
HISTORY 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
SOC 149The Urban Underclass4
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5

Directed Reading and Research

Directed reading and research allows students to focus on a special topic of interest. In organizing a reading or research plan, the student consults with the director of the major and one or more faculty members specializing in the area or discipline.

Courses that fulfill directed reading and research requirements:

Units
AFRICAAM 1901-5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5

Senior Seminar

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis or senior paper is under the supervision of a faculty project adviser. All majors in the IDP in AAAS, even those who opt to write honors theses in other departments and programs, must enroll in AFRICAAM 200X Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar, offered in Autumn Quarter. The course takes students through the process of researching an honors thesis, including conceptualization, development of prospectus, development of theses, research, analysis, and finally the process of drafting and writing. This course meets the Writing in the Major requirement (WIM). 

Honors Program for Majors in African and African American Studies

The honors program offers an opportunity to do independent research for a senior thesis. It is open to majors who have maintained a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.5 in the major and 3.3 overall. The honors thesis is intended to enable students to synthesize skills to produce a document or project demonstrating a measure of competence in their specialty.

The honors program begins with a proposal describing the project that is approved by the faculty adviser and AAAS directors. Students are required to identify both a faculty adviser and a second reader for the thesis project. The faculty adviser for the honors thesis must be an academic council faculty member and affiliated faculty of the student's major. 

Honors students must enroll in AFRICAAM 200X Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, during Autumn Quarter of the senior year and may take up to an additional 10 units of honors work (AFRICAAM 200Y Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research and AFRICAAM 200Z Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research) to be distributed across Winter and Spring quarters of senior year to continue their access to peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in AAAS.

In May of the senior year, honors students are afforded an opportunity to present their research formally. Prizes for best undergraduate honors thesis are awarded annually by the Program in African and African American Studies.

Thematic Emphasis

AAAS majors select a thematic emphasis. Selecting an emphasis allows students to customize their curriculum and synthesize course work taken across various departments and programs into a coherent focus. Emphases offered include; for faster navigation click on the links to the right:

Thematic Emphasis in Africa

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Africa. The Thematic Emphasis in Africa concentration is designed to investigate how individual African states' domestic and foreign policy, law, history, culture, and society are formed within conversations, debates, policies and studies. Issues of immigration, citizenship, empire and expansion, defense, diplomacy, human rights, public welfare, social justice and law, educational rights and other topics are explored.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Africa concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 30The Egyptians3-5
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 47History of South Africa3
AFRICAAM 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
AFRICAAM 111AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAAM 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
AFRICAAM 146AAfrican Politics4-5
AFRICAAM 147History of South Africa5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AFRICAST 109Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development3-5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 127African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 138Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention3-5
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 151AIDS in Africa3
AFRICAST 195Shifting Frames1-2
AFRICAST 199Independent Study or Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAST 209Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development3-5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 224Memory and Heritage In South Africa Syllabus1
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 299Independent Study or Directed Reading1-10
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
ANTHRO 27NEthnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives3-5
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 140Ethnography of Africa3
ANTHRO 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
ANTHRO 185Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ANTHRO 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
ANTHRO 239Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 241The State in Africa5
ANTHRO 285Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 192BArt of the African Diaspora4
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 146History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa4-5
HISTORY 147History of South Africa5
HISTORY 245GLaw and Colonialism in Africa4-5
HISTORY 248SColonial States and African Societies, Part I4-5
HISTORY 249SColonial States and African Societies, Part II4-5
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5

Thematic Concentration in African Americans

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in African Americans. The Thematic Concentration in African Americans concentration is designed to explore the historical and contemporary experiences of African Americans. Attention is paid to the interactions between the social, economic, cultural, historical, linguistic, genetic, geopolitical, ecological, and biomedical factors that shape and have shaped African American society.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the African American concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 20AJazz Theory3
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 43Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 50BNineteenth Century America3
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 75EBlack Cinema2
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
AFRICAAM 116Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 123Great Works of the African American Tradition5
AFRICAAM 150BNineteenth Century America5
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 158Black Queer Theory5
AFRICAAM 181QAlternative Viewpoints: Black Independent Film4
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 226Mixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AFRICAAM 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAAM 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
AMSTUD 50NThe Literature of Inequality: Have and Have-Nots from the Gilded Age to the Occupy Era3
AMSTUD 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
AMSTUD 101Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
AMSTUD 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AMSTUD 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
AMSTUD 201History of Education in the United States3-5
AMSTUD 214The American 1960s: Thought, Protest, and Culture5
AMSTUD 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMSTUD 262CAfrican American Literature and the Retreat of Jim Crow5
AMSTUD 262DAfrican American Poetics5
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
DANCE 45Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond1-2
EDUC 193CPsychological Well-Being On Campus: Perspectives Of The Black Diaspora1
EDUC 216Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
ENGLISH 68NMark Twain and American Culture4
HISTORY 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 50BNineteenth Century America3
HISTORY 50CThe United States in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 150BNineteenth Century America5
HISTORY 150CThe United States in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
HISTORY 167AMartin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle3-5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
HISTORY 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
HUMBIO 121EEthnicity and Medicine1-3
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 265African American Vernacular English3-5
MUSIC 20AJazz Theory3
POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
PSYCH 183SPARQ Lab2-3
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PUBLPOL 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
SOC 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society4
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 149The Urban Underclass4
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4

Thematic Concentration in Class

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Class. The Thematic Concentration in Class concentration is designed to explore the cultural, social, legal, and political construction of racial and ethnic differences in African and/or African American history, while examining the historical specificity of markets, money, property, and labor relations and explores the interdependence between the economy and politics, society, and culture.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Class concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 226Mixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AFRICAAM 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
ANTHRO 145Race and Power5
ANTHRO 245Race and Power5
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
EDUC 232Culture, Learning, and Poverty2-3
EDUC 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
HISTORY 248SColonial States and African Societies, Part I4-5
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
PSYCH 183SPARQ Lab2-3
SOC 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society4
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3-4
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
SOC 149The Urban Underclass4
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4

Thematic Concentration in Diaspora

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in the Diaspora. The Thematic Concentration in Diaspora concentration is designed to explore the exchanges among peoples and cultures from the continent of Africa and their global impact through symbolic, aesthetic and empirical exchanges (i.e. trade, travel, exploration, and migration). This concentration will also examine comparisons, connections and genealogical relations among geographically dispersed cases in order to consider past and present African identities in their global contexts.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Diaspora concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 126BCurricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population3-4
AFRICAAM 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAST 138Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention3-5
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
ANTHRO 27NEthnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives3-5
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ANTHRO 138Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise5
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
ANTHRO 239Ethnography of Africa5
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 192BArt of the African Diaspora4
COMPLIT 149The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures3-5
DANCE 106Choreography Project: Dancing, Recollected1
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 249SColonial States and African Societies, Part II4-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4

Thematic Concentration in Education

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Education. The Thematic Concentration in Education concentration is designed to explore the history, policy, and practice in education to understand how issues of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, culture, and language shape educational opportunity. The goal of the concentration is to develop an understanding of the core issues facing educators and policy makers so that students may learn how they can contribute to the social and political discourse surrounding issues of education and opportunity policy.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Diaspora concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
AFRICAAM 106Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
AFRICAAM 112Urban Education3-5
AFRICAAM 116Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
AFRICAAM 130Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
AFRICAAM 165Identity and Academic Achievement3
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
AFRICAAM 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AMSTUD 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
AMSTUD 201History of Education in the United States3-5
AMSTUD 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
EDUC 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
EDUC 110Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
EDUC 193CPsychological Well-Being On Campus: Perspectives Of The Black Diaspora1
EDUC 201History of Education in the United States3-5
EDUC 216Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
EDUC 232Culture, Learning, and Poverty2-3
EDUC 243Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction3-5
EDUC 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
EDUC 322Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
HISTORY 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 265African American Vernacular English3-5
SOC 132Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3-4
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5

Thematic Concentration in Gender

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Gender. The Thematic Concentration in Gender concentration is designed to explore the historical and contemporary experiences and histories of women or men among the cultures from the continent of Africa and the diaspora. Students also explore how these how societies organize gender roles, relations, and identities, and how these intersect with other hierarchies of power, such as class, race, nationality, ethnicity, sexuality, disability and age.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Gender concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 43Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 145APoetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature5
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 158Black Queer Theory5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 201History of Education in the United States3-5
ANTHRO 135HConversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community1-2
ANTHRO 135ICSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford1-2
ANTHRO 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
CSRE 144Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
EDUC 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
FEMGEN 154Black Feminist Theory5
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
PSYCH 183SPARQ Lab2-3
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 142Sociology of Gender3

Thematic Concentration in Historical Period

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Historical Period. The Thematic Concentration in Historical Period concentration is designed to explore African and/or African American history and politics from a multidisciplinary perspective.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Historical Period concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 30The Egyptians3-5
AFRICAAM 50BNineteenth Century America3
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
AFRICAAM 107CThe Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity4-5
AFRICAAM 116Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
AFRICAAM 150BNineteenth Century America5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAAM 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
AMSTUD 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMSTUD 262CAfrican American Literature and the Retreat of Jim Crow5
EDUC 216Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
ENGLISH 68NMark Twain and American Culture4
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 50BNineteenth Century America3
HISTORY 50CThe United States in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 147History of South Africa5
HISTORY 150BNineteenth Century America5
HISTORY 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
HISTORY 167AMartin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle3-5
HISTORY 245GLaw and Colonialism in Africa4-5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
HISTORY 267EMartin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy4-5
MUSIC 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
MUSIC 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5

Thematic Concentration in Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics (IDA)

The Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics concentration is designed to be attainable and flexible within the AAAS major. Each quarter IDA offers a range of courses taught by IDA-affiliated faculty or Artists. A concentration typically requires 15 units in IDA-approved courses, which may include the senior honors thesis.

IDA Concentration students must also complete a senior creative project. Possible senior projects could include: a stage production, an album of music, a fiction or creative non-fiction piece, or an arts workshop curriculum for a community setting. Students who elect to write an honors thesis may incorporate their project as the basis for their thesis.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office and/or The Institute for Diversity in the Arts.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics (IDA) concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 3EMichelle Obama in American Culture1
AFRICAAM 5IHamilton: An American Musical1
AFRICAAM 10AIntroduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy1
AFRICAAM 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 20AJazz Theory3
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
AFRICAAM 36REPRESENT! Covering Race, Culture, and Identity In The Arts through Writing, Media, and Transmedia.5
AFRICAAM 37Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation2
AFRICAAM 40Liquid Flow: Introduction to Contemporary Dance and Dance-making1
AFRICAAM 45Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond1-2
AFRICAAM 52Introduction to Improvisation in Dance: From Salsa to Vodun to Tap Dance3-4
AFRICAAM 71Introduction to Capoeira: An African Brazilian Art Form1
AFRICAAM 75EBlack Cinema2
AFRICAAM 94Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
AFRICAAM 101Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
AFRICAAM 102BArt and Social Criticism5
AFRICAAM 120FBuying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA4-5
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
AFRICAAM 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts2-4
AFRICAAM 128Roots Modern Experience - Mixed Level1
AFRICAAM 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAAM 154GBlack Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures3-4
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 159James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature5
AFRICAAM 160JConjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic2
AFRICAAM 165GAfro-German Art Forms3-5
AFRICAAM 176BDocumentary Fictions4
AFRICAAM 181QAlternative Viewpoints: Black Independent Film4
AFRICAAM 189Black Life and Death in the Neoliberal Era5
AFRICAAM 194Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures4
AFRICAAM 194ATopics in Writing & Rhetoric: Freedom's Mixtape: DJing Contemporary African American Rhetorics4
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200NFunkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 226Mixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AFRICAAM 258Black Feminist Theater and Theory4
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAST 127African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
AFRICAST 132Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AMSTUD 3EMichelle Obama in American Culture1
AMSTUD 5IHamilton: An American Musical1
AMSTUD 12AIntroduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
AMSTUD 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
AMSTUD 101Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
AMSTUD 102Art and Social Criticism5
AMSTUD 143MAmerican Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore3-5
AMSTUD 151Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present4
AMSTUD 152KMixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 186DAsian American Art: 1850-Present4
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AMSTUD 261Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies4-5
AMSTUD 262DAfrican American Poetics5
ANTHRO 120FBuying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA4-5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ANTHRO 320ARace, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations3-5
ARCHLGY 134Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present3-5
ARCHLGY 234Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present3-5
ARTHIST 118APublic Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 151Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present4
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
ARTHIST 162BArt and Social Criticism5
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
ARTHIST 186BAsian American Art: 1850-Present4
ARTHIST 192BArt of the African Diaspora4
ARTHIST 193Jacob Lawrence's Twentieth Century: African American Art and Culture5
ARTHIST 211The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation5
ARTHIST 221EPeripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia3-5
ARTHIST 284BMuseum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present3-5
ARTHIST 351Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present4
ARTHIST 502Methods: The Writer's Voice5
ARTSINST 50Arts in Context: The Process of Cultural Production1-2
ARTSINST 182Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment3-4
ARTSTUDI 170PHOTOGRAPHY I: BLACK AND WHITE4
ARTSTUDI 270Advanced Photography Seminar1-5
ASNAMST 31NBehind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko3
ASNAMST 91AASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W3-5
ASNAMST 157An Introduction to Asian American Literature: The Short Story3
ASNAMST 174SWhen Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness5
ASNAMST 186BAsian American Art: 1850-Present4
CHILATST 109GENTE: An incubator for transforming national narratives5
CLASSICS 16NSappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos3
COMPLIT 37QZionism and the Novel3
COMPLIT 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
COMPLIT 55NBatman, Hamilton, Díaz, and Other Wondrous Lives3-5
COMPLIT 110Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
COMPLIT 149The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures3-5
COMPLIT 310Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
COMPLIT 348US-Mexico Border Fictions: Writing La Frontera, Tearing Down the Wall3-5
CSRE 3EMichelle Obama in American Culture1
CSRE 5IHamilton: An American Musical1
CSRE 10AIntroduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy1
CSRE 10AYPacific Standard Time LA/LA creative projects in a Celebration Beyond Borders1-2
CSRE 21African American Vernacular English3-5
CSRE 41Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
CSRE 44Living Free: Embodying Healing and Creativity in The Era of Racial Justice Movements1-4
CSRE 47QHeartfulness: Mindfulness, Compassion, and Responsibility3
CSRE 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
CSRE 55NBatman, Hamilton, Díaz, and Other Wondrous Lives3-5
CSRE 61Introduction to Dance Studies: Dancing Across Stages, Clubs, Screens, and Borders3-4
CSRE 78Art + Community: Division, Resilience & Reconciliation1-5
CSRE 82GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
CSRE 95IRevolutionary Practices: Space and Public Discourse in Iran4
CSRE 102AArt and Social Criticism5
CSRE 111The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation5
CSRE 120FBuying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA4-5
CSRE 123AAmerican Indians and the Cinema5
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts2-4
CSRE 141ECounterstory in Literature and Education3
CSRE 149The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures3-5
CSRE 151DMigration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present4
CSRE 152Introduction to Improvisation in Dance: From Salsa to Vodun to Tap Dance3-4
CSRE 154DBlack Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures3-4
CSRE 156TPerforming History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
CSRE 160JConjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic2
CSRE 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
CSRE 165IAfro-German Art Forms3-5
CSRE 174SWhen Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness5
CSRE 188QImagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person4-5
CSRE 194KTTopics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Last Hopi On Earth: The Rhetoric of Entertainment Inequity4
CSRE 201DPublic Art Interventions in Social & Cultural Spaces4-5
CSRE 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
CSRE 258Black Feminist Theater and Theory4
CSRE 389ARace, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations3-5
DANCE 1Introduction to Contemporary Dance & Movement: Liquid Flow1
DANCE 2Introduction to Dance & Movement: Afro Flows1
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation2
DANCE 45Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond1-2
DANCE 58Beginning Hip Hop1
DANCE 59Intermediate-Advanced Hip-Hop1
DANCE 71Introduction to Capoeira: An African Brazilian Art Form1
DANCE 102Musical Theater Dance Styles1
DANCE 106Choreography Project: Dancing, Recollected1
DANCE 106IStanford Dance Community: Inter-Style Choreography Workshop1-2
DANCE 108Hip Hop Meets Broadway1
DANCE 128Roots Modern Experience - Mixed Level1
DANCE 160JConjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic2
DANCE 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
DANCE 161DIntroduction to Dance Studies: Dancing Across Stages, Clubs, Screens, and Borders3-4
EARTHSYS 95Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice2
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
EDUC 141Counterstory in Literature and Education3
EDUC 314Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Culture3-5
EDUC 341Counterstory in Literature and Education3
EDUC 389ARace, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations3-5
ENGLISH 12AIntroduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature3-5
ENGLISH 43AAmerican Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore3-5
ENGLISH 91AASIAN-AMERICAN AUTOBIOGRAPHY/W3-5
ENGLISH 143AAmerican Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore3-5
ENGLISH 152KMixed-Race Politics and Culture5
ENGLISH 159James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature5
ENGLISH 287GA Woman's Life: 20th- (and 21st-) Century Memoirs by Women5
FEMGEN 3EMichelle Obama in American Culture1
FEMGEN 12SIBeyond the Athlete: Intersection of Diversity, Storytelling, and Athletics1-2
FEMGEN 13NWomen Making Music3
FEMGEN 21SStoryCraft: Athlete Relationships2
FEMGEN 21TStoryCraft: On Sexuality2
FEMGEN 24NSappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos3
FEMGEN 36NGay Autobiography4
FEMGEN 97Bow Down: Queer Hip-Hop Pedagogy3
FEMGEN 102Art and Social Criticism5
FEMGEN 110XIntroduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
FEMGEN 113XFeminist Poetry in the U.S., 1973-20173-5
FEMGEN 133Transgender Performance and Performativity4
FEMGEN 154GBlack Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures3-4
FEMGEN 159James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature5
FEMGEN 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
FEMGEN 188QImagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person4-5
FEMGEN 205Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics3-5
FEMGEN 258XBlack Feminist Theater and Theory4
FEMGEN 261Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies4-5
FEMGEN 310XIntroduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
FEMGEN 314Performing Identities4
FEMGEN 361Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies4-5
FILMSTUD 100CHistory of World Cinema III, 1960-Present4
FILMSTUD 132AIndian Cinema5
FILMSTUD 213Theories of Melodrama5
FILMSTUD 300CHistory of World Cinema III, 1960-Present4
FILMSTUD 332AIndian Cinema5
FILMSTUD 413Theories of Melodrama5
FRENCH 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
FRENCH 205Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics3-5
GERMAN 165Afro-German Art Forms3-5
GLOBAL 145Revolutionary Practices: Space and Public Discourse in Iran4
HISTORY 3EMichelle Obama in American Culture1
HISTORY 3GHamilton: An American Musical1
HISTORY 36NGay Autobiography4
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 82GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
HISTORY 182GMaking Palestine Visible3-5
HISTORY 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
HISTORY 355DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
ILAC 149The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures3-5
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
ILAC 281EPeripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia3-5
ILAC 348US-Mexico Border Fictions: Writing La Frontera, Tearing Down the Wall3-5
JEWISHST 37QZionism and the Novel3
JEWISHST 143Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
LIFE 124Counterstory in Literature and Education3
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 253Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Racial, Ethnic, and Linguistic Formations3-5
MUSIC 4SIInteractive Introduction to North American Taiko1
MUSIC 14NWomen Making Music3
MUSIC 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
MUSIC 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
MUSIC 20AJazz Theory3
MUSIC 31NBehind the Big Drums: Exploring Taiko3
MUSIC 50Arts in Context: The Process of Cultural Production1-2
MUSIC 184EMusical Theater Dance Styles1
NATIVEAM 143AAmerican Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore3-5
NATIVEAM 211The California Missions: Art History and Reconciliation5
PWR 1WIWriting & Rhetoric 1: By Any Means Necessary: The Rhetoric of Black Radical Movements4
PWR 2JCWriting & Rhetoric 2: Walk(s) of Shame: The Rhetoric of Respectability4
PWR 194ABTopics in Writing & Rhetoric: Freedom's Mixtape: DJing Contemporary African American Rhetorics4
PWR 194ABATopics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Prince2-3
PWR 194AJTopics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures4
PWR 194KTTopics in Writing & Rhetoric: The Last Hopi On Earth: The Rhetoric of Entertainment Inequity4
STS 200NFunkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures5
TAPS 20NPrisons and Performance3
TAPS 21SStoryCraft: Athlete Relationships2
TAPS 21TStoryCraft: On Sexuality2
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
TAPS 50Arts in Context: The Process of Cultural Production1-2
TAPS 133TTransgender Performance and Performativity4
TAPS 152Introduction to Improvisation in Dance: From Salsa to Vodun to Tap Dance3-4
TAPS 154GBlack Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures3-4
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
TAPS 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
TAPS 161DIntroduction to Dance Studies: Dancing Across Stages, Clubs, Screens, and Borders3-4
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5
TAPS 258Black Feminist Theater and Theory4
TAPS 314Performing Identities4
TAPS 356Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
URBANST 182Activating Urban Spaces: Materializing Hidden Narratives in the Urban Environment3-4
WELLNESS 180The Flourishing Activist: Mindfully Being the Revolution1-2

Thematic Concentration in Linguistics

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Linguistics. The Thematic Concentration in Linguistics concentration is designed to explore the relationships between language, race and ethnicity across a wide range of social, cultural and educational contexts.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office. Students may obtain credit for the study of approved AAAS languages towards their degree. If students take 15 or more units of an approved language relevant to AAAS, they may apply 5 of those units toward their degree.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Linguistics concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AMELANG 100ABeginning Amharic, First Quarter4
AMELANG 100BFirst-Year Amharic, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 100CFirst-Year Amharic, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 101ASecond-Year Amharic, First Quarter4
AMELANG 101BSecond-Year Amharic, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 101CSecond-Year Amharic, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 103AFirst-Year Hausa, First Quarter4
AMELANG 103BFirst-Year Hausa, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 103CFirst-Year Hausa, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 106AFirst-Year Swahili, First Quarter5
AMELANG 106BFirst-Year Swahili, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 106CFirst-Year Swahili, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 107ASecond-Year Swahili, First Quarter4
AMELANG 107BSecond-Year Swahili, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 107CSecond-Year Swahili, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 108AThird-Year Swahili, First Quarter4
AMELANG 108BThird-Year Swahili, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 108CThird-Year Swahili, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 110AFirst-Year Wolof, First Quarter3
AMELANG 114ABeginning Afrikaans, First Quarter4
AMELANG 114BBeginning Afrikaans, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 115ASecond year - Afrikaans, First Quarter4
AMELANG 115BSecond - year Afrikaans, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 115CSecond - YearAfrikaans, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 134AFirst-Year Igbo, First Quarter4
AMELANG 134BFirst-Year Igbo, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 134CFirst-Year Igbo, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 135ASecond-Year Igbo, First Quarter4
AMELANG 135BSecond-Year Igbo, Second Quarter3
AMELANG 135CSecond-Year Igbo, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 136AFirst-Year Xhosa, First Quarter4
AMELANG 136BFirst-Year Xhosa, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 136CFirst-Year Xhosa, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 137ASecond-Year Xhosa, First Quarter4
AMELANG 137BSecond-Year Xhosa, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 137CSecond-Year Xhosa, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 147AFirst-Year Bambara, First Quarter4
AMELANG 153Introduction to Twi1
AMELANG 153AFirst-Year Twi, First Quarter4
AMELANG 153BFirst-Year Twi, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 153CFirst-Year Beginning Twi, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 154ASecond-Year Twi, First Quarter4
AMELANG 154BSecond-Year Twi, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 154CSecond-Year Twi, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 156AFirst-Year Zulu, First Quarter4
AMELANG 156BFirst-Year Zulu, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 156CFirst-Year Zulu, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 157ASecont-Year Zulu, First Quarter4
AMELANG 157BSecond-Year Zulu, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 157CSecond-Year Zulu, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 180AFirst-Year Kinyarwanda, First Quarter4
AMELANG 180BFirst-Year Kinyarwanda, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 182AIntermediate Fulani, First Quarter3
AMELANG 182BIntermediate Fulani, Second Quarter3
AMELANG 182CIntermediate Fulani, Third Quarter3
AMELANG 187AFirst-Year Yoruba, First Quarter4
AMELANG 187BFirst-Year Yoruba, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 187CFirst-Year Yoruba, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 203ABeginning Hausa, First Quarter4
AMELANG 203BBeginning Hausa, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 206BIntensive Beginning Swahili, Part B5
AMELANG 206CIntensive Beginning Swahili, Part C5
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 251Sociolinguistic Field Methods3-5
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 265African American Vernacular English3-5

Thematic Concentration in Mixed Race

Students in the African & African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Mixed Race. The Thematic Concentration in Mixed Race concentration is designed to explore how African and/or African American identities were and are constituted in relation to issues of race and ethnicity. The concentration investigates how conversations, debates, and policies on mixed race identities effect domestic and foreign policy, law, history, culture, society and studies on race and ethnicity. In this concentration a number of topics (Issues of immigration, citizenship, empire and expansion, defense, diplomacy, human rights, public welfare, social justice and law, educational rights, etc) are explored from the angle of how racial and ethnic difference impacts debate and policy.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Mixed Race concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 41Genes and Identity3
AFRICAAM 126BCurricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population3-4
AFRICAAM 131Genes and Identity5
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 158Black Queer Theory5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 226Mixed-Race Politics and Culture5
AFRICAAM 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AFRICAAM 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMSTUD 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
AMSTUD 101Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
ANTHRO 27NEthnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives3-5
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ANTHRO 135HConversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community1-2
ANTHRO 135ICSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford1-2
ANTHRO 145Race and Power5
ANTHRO 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
ANTHRO 245Race and Power5
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
COMPLIT 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
CSRE 144Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
EDUC 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
ENGLISH 15SCA New Millennial Mix: The Art & Politics of the "Mixed Race Experience"2
HISTORY 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PUBLPOL 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5

Thematic Concentration in Theory

Students in the African and African American Studies major can choose a concentration in Theory. The Thematic Concentration in Theory concentration is a program designed to explore the meta-narratives and theoretical frameworks for analyzing enduring issues of cultural, religious, and political life both within African and/or African American societies and between political communities. Students will also explore the role of identities, values and prejudices that are the product of historical processes and the interaction of different peoples.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this concentration should contact the AAAS undergraduate program office.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Theory concentration.

Units
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 107CThe Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity4-5
AFRICAAM 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts2-4
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 158Black Queer Theory5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study3-5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 195Shifting Frames1-2
HUMBIO 170Facts, Science & Making Policy5
LAWGEN 112NLaw and Inequality3
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
LINGUIST 251Sociolinguistic Field Methods3-5
LINGUIST 255BSociolinguistics Classics and Community Studies3-5
POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
RELIGST 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
SOC 14NInequality in American Society4
SOC 15NThe Transformation of Socialist Societies3
SOC 46NRace, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities3
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
URBANST 123Approaching Research and the Community2-3

Minor in African and African American Studies

Students who minor in AAAS complete a minimum of 30 units of approved courses. 15 of the required units must include:

  1. One of two required courses:
    1. AFRICAAM 43 Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (3-5 units) or
    2. AFRICAAM 105 Introduction to African and African American Studies (5 units)
  2. One Social Science course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)
  3. One Humanities course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)

Director: Dr. H. Samy Alim (Education)

Associate Director: Dr. Cheryl A. Brown

Advisory Committee: H. Samy Alim (Education), Ralph Richard Banks (Law), Jan Barker-Alexander (Director, Black Community Services Center), Jennifer Brody (Drama), Bryan Anthony Brown (Education), Cheryl Brown (Program in African and African American Studies), James Campbell (History), Clayborne Carson (History), Jennifer Eberhardt (Psychology), Harry Elam (Drama), Michele Elam (English), James Ferguson (Anthropology), Corey Fields (Sociology), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Allyson Hobbs (History), Vaughn Rasberry (English), John R. Rickford (Linguistics), Joel Samoff (African Studies), Grant Parker (Classics), Adam Banks (Education), Jonathan Calm (Art & Art History)

Affiliated Faculty: David Abernethy (Political Science, emeritus), H.Samy Alim (Education), R. Lanier Anderson (Philosophy), Arnetha Ball (Education), Ralph Richard Banks (Law), Lucius Barker (Political Science, emeritus), Don Barr (Sociology), Shasad Bashir (Religious Studies), Carl Bielefeldt (Religious Studies), Jennifer Brody (Drama), Bryan Anthony Brown (Education), Cheryl Brown (Associate Director, Program in African and African American Studies), Albert Camarillo (History), James Campbell (History), Clayborne Carson (History), Gordon Chang (History), Wanda Corn (Art and Art History, emerita), David Degusta (Anthropology), Sandra Drake (English, emerita), Jennifer Eberhardt (Psychology), Paulla Ebron (Anthropology), Harry Elam (Vice Provost), Michele Elam (English), James Ferguson (Anthropology), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies), Aleta Hayes (Drama), Jeff Chang (Director, Identity Diversity, and Aesthetics), Allyson Hobbs (History), Gavin Jones (English), Terry Karl (Political Science), Anthony Kramer (Drama), Teresa LaFromboise (Education), Brian Lowery (Graduate School of Business), Lisa Malkki (Anthropology), Hazel Markus (Psychology), Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz (Art and Art History), Daniel Murray (Director, Service Learning in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Paula Moya (English), Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi (French and Comparative Literature), Susan Olzak (Sociology), David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature), Arnold Rampersad (English), Vaughn Rasberry (English), John R. Rickford (Linguistics), Richard Roberts (History), Sonia Rocha (Sociology), Michael Rosenfeld (Sociology), José David Saldívar (English), Ramón Saldívar (English), Joel Samoff (African Studies), Gary Segura (Political Science), Paul Sniderman (Political Science), C. Matthew Snipp (Sociology), Ewart Thomas (Psychology), Jeane Tsai (Psychology), Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science), Bryan Wolf (American Art and Culture), Yvonne Yarbo-Bejarno (Spanish and Portuguese), Grant Parker (Classics), Alvan Ikoku (Comparative Literature and Medicine), Lauren Davenport (Political Science), Adam Banks (Education), Jonathan Calm (Art & Art History)

Related Courses

Units
AFRICAAM 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 20AJazz Theory3
AFRICAAM 28Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse1-3
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 36REPRESENT! Covering Race, Culture, and Identity In The Arts through Writing, Media, and Transmedia.5
AFRICAAM 37Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation2
AFRICAAM 40Liquid Flow: Introduction to Contemporary Dance and Dance-making1
AFRICAAM 41Genes and Identity3
AFRICAAM 45Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond1-2
AFRICAAM 52NMixed-Race Politics and Culture3
AFRICAAM 100Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation3-5
AFRICAAM 101FRace & Technology1-2
AFRICAAM 106Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
AFRICAAM 107CThe Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity4-5
AFRICAAM 111AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa3-5
AFRICAAM 112Urban Education3-5
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
AFRICAAM 126BCurricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population3-4
AFRICAAM 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts2-4
AFRICAAM 130Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
AFRICAAM 131Genes and Identity5
AFRICAAM 132Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
AFRICAAM 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAAM 145APoetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature5
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
AFRICAAM 146AAfrican Politics4-5
AFRICAAM 150BNineteenth Century America5
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 157PSolidarity and Racial Justice4-5
AFRICAAM 158Black Queer Theory5
AFRICAAM 159James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature5
AFRICAAM 165Identity and Academic Achievement3
AFRICAAM 176BDocumentary Fictions4
AFRICAAM 189Black Life and Death in the Neoliberal Era5
AFRICAAM 192Sexual Violence in America4-5
AFRICAAM 194Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures4
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AFRICAAM 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMELANG 108AThird-Year Swahili, First Quarter4
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
AMSTUD 50NThe Literature of Inequality: Have and Have-Nots from the Gilded Age to the Occupy Era3
AMSTUD 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
AMSTUD 101Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film3-5
AMSTUD 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AMSTUD 121ZPolitical Power in American Cities5
AMSTUD 150BNineteenth Century America5
AMSTUD 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 201History of Education in the United States3-5
AMSTUD 214The American 1960s: Thought, Protest, and Culture5
AMSTUD 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
ANTHRO 27NEthnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives3-5
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ANTHRO 135HConversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community1-2
ANTHRO 135ICSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford1-2
ANTHRO 138Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise5
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 140Ethnography of Africa3
ANTHRO 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
ANTHRO 145Race and Power5
ANTHRO 185Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ANTHRO 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
ANTHRO 238Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise5
ANTHRO 239Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 241The State in Africa5
ANTHRO 245Race and Power5
ANTHRO 285Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
ARTHIST 192BArt of the African Diaspora4
COMPLIT 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
COMPLIT 149The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures3-5
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts2-4
CSRE 144Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation2
DANCE 45Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond1-2
DANCE 58Beginning Hip Hop1
DANCE 106Choreography Project: Dancing, Recollected1
DANCE 108Hip Hop Meets Broadway1
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
EDUC 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
EDUC 110Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
EDUC 193CPsychological Well-Being On Campus: Perspectives Of The Black Diaspora1
EDUC 201History of Education in the United States3-5
EDUC 216Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
EDUC 232Culture, Learning, and Poverty2-3
EDUC 243Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction3-5
EDUC 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
EDUC 322Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
ENGLISH 15SCA New Millennial Mix: The Art & Politics of the "Mixed Race Experience"2
ENGLISH 68NMark Twain and American Culture4
FEMGEN 154Black Feminist Theory5
HISTORY 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 50BNineteenth Century America3
HISTORY 50CThe United States in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 146History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa4-5
HISTORY 147History of South Africa5
HISTORY 150BNineteenth Century America5
HISTORY 150CThe United States in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 167AMartin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle3-5
HISTORY 248SColonial States and African Societies, Part I4-5
HISTORY 249SColonial States and African Societies, Part II4-5
HISTORY 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
HUMBIO 121EEthnicity and Medicine1-3
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
HUMBIO 170Facts, Science & Making Policy5
LAWGEN 112NLaw and Inequality3
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
LINGUIST 251Sociolinguistic Field Methods3-5
LINGUIST 255BSociolinguistics Classics and Community Studies3-5
LINGUIST 265African American Vernacular English3-5
MUSIC 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
MUSIC 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
MUSIC 20AJazz Theory3
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
PSYCH 183SPARQ Lab2-3
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PUBLPOL 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
RELIGST 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
SOC 14NInequality in American Society4
SOC 15NThe Transformation of Socialist Societies3
SOC 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society4
SOC 46NRace, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities3
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
SOC 132Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3-4
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 142Sociology of Gender3
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4
URBANST 123Approaching Research and the Community2-3

Overseas Studies Courses in African and African American Studies

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Units
OSPCPTWN 18Xhosa Language and Culture2
OSPCPTWN 31Political Economy of Foreign Aid3
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPCPTWN 38Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective3-5
OSPCPTWN 45Transitional Justice and Transformation Debates in South Africa4
OSPPARIS 186FContemporary African Literature in French4

Courses

AFRICAAM 3E. Michelle Obama in American Culture. 1 Unit.

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Same as: AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, FEMGEN 3E, HISTORY 3E

AFRICAAM 5I. Hamilton: An American Musical. 1 Unit.

"Hamilton" is one the most popular and most celebrated musicals in American history. It has received 11 Tony Awards, including best musical, and 16 Tony nominations, the most nominations in Broadway history. It won the Pulitzer Prize and a Grammy Award. The musical draws on the language and rhythms of hip-hop and R & B, genres that are underrepresented in the musical theater tradition. "Hamilton" has redefined the American musical, particularly in terms of sound, casting, and storytelling. What explains the deep cultural impact and acclaim for this play?n nThis interdisciplinary course examines Alexander Hamilton and his world as well as Hamilton: An American Musical through a series of lectures from faculty in History, Theater and Performance Studies, English, Music, and Writing and Rhetoric.
Same as: AMSTUD 5I, CSRE 5I, HISTORY 3G

AFRICAAM 10A. Introduction to Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics: Arts, Culture, and Pedagogy. 1 Unit.

This weekly lecture series introduces students to the study of identity, diversity, and aesthetics through the work of leading artists and scholars affiliated with the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA). This year's course highlights the educational impact of arts and culture. How can arts and culture help to advance pedagogies of liberation? Among other things, we will examine hip-hop education and how it illuminates ideas around culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies, indigenous knowledges, embodied knowledges, hip-hop feminisms, and community engaged research. We will look at case studies from East Palo Alto, CA and Cape Town, South Africa.
Same as: CSRE 10A

AFRICAAM 17N. Race and Politics: Perspectives on the 2016 Presidential Election. 3 Units.

This course is intended as a seminar-based exploration of the complex ways that race has informed political behavior and attitudes during the 2016 Presidential election. The class is designed to introduce freshman to sociological ways of understanding the social world, and the rigors of college thinking more broadly. As a group we will explore the mechanisms through which race informs political behavior, while also paying close attention to the ways that politics also informs our understanding of race. The course treats ¿race¿ as multifaceted construct, with multiple (and often times conflicting) influences on political behavior. The course stresses thennconstructed nature of both race and politics. The course will be split into 3 parts. In the first partnnwe will explore the relationship between racial identity and political behavior at the individualnnlevel. The second part of the course will examine how ideas about racial groups shape politicalnnattitudes and behaviors, as well as policy outcomes. The third part of the course will explore hownnrace is used to mobilize political and economic actors.
Same as: CSRE 17N, SOC 17N

AFRICAAM 18A. Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940. 3 Units.

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Same as: MUSIC 18A

AFRICAAM 18B. Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present. 3 Units.

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Same as: MUSIC 18B

AFRICAAM 20A. Jazz Theory. 3 Units.

Introduces the language and sounds of jazz through listening, analysis, and compositional exercises. Students apply the fundamentals of music theory to the study of jazz. Prerequisite: 19 or consent of instructor.
Same as: MUSIC 20A

AFRICAAM 21. African American Vernacular English. 3-5 Units.

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Same as: CSRE 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265

AFRICAAM 28. Health Impact of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse across the Lifecourse. 1-3 Unit.

Cross-listed with SOMGEN 237 and FEMGEN 237. HumBio students must enroll in HUMBIO 28 or AFRICAAM 28. An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students should enroll in SOMGEN 237 for 1-3 units. To receive a letter grade in any listing, students must enroll for 3 units. This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: HUMBIO 28

AFRICAAM 30. The Egyptians. 3-5 Units.

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Participation in class is required.
Same as: CLASSICS 82, HISTORY 48, HISTORY 148

AFRICAAM 31. RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora. 1 Unit.

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad). This course is limited to Freshman and Sophomore enrollment.

AFRICAAM 32. The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice. 1-5 Unit.

This course-series brings together leading scholars with critically-acclaimed artists, local teachers, youth, and community organizations to consider the complex relationships between culture, knowledge, pedagogy and social justice. Participants will examine the cultural meaning of knowledge as "the 5th element" of Hip Hop Culture (in addition to MCing, DJing, graffiti, and dance) and how educators and cultural workers have leveraged this knowledge for social justice. Overall, participants will gain a strong theoretical knowledge of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies and learn to apply this knowledge by engaging with guest artists, teachers, youth, and community youth arts organizations.
Same as: AMSTUD 32, CSRE 32A, EDUC 32, EDUC 432, TAPS 32

AFRICAAM 36. REPRESENT! Covering Race, Culture, and Identity In The Arts through Writing, Media, and Transmedia.. 5 Units.

Probably since the first audience formed for the first chalk scrawls in a cave, there have been storytellers to narrate that caveperson's art and life, and critics to troll that caveperson's choice and usage of color. And so it goes. This course is an exploration into how to cover race, culture, and identity in the arts in journalism, such as print, web, video, radio, and podcasting. It is also an arts journalism practicum. During the quarter, we will be working toward creating work that is publishable in various venues and outlets. In this course, we will be discussing exemplary arts writers and their works and interrogating critical questions around race, identity, representation, and ethics. Experienced journalists, editors, and experts from different platforms and backgrounds will also be imparting important skills and training that will help you to navigate today's working media and transmedia environments. Those who enroll in the class will be expected to produce quality content (e.g. articles, blog posts, video reports, podcasts) for media outlets. Some travel outside of class may be required for additional reporting and training. This seminar class will be By Instructor Approval Only. Please submit an application by February 22 at 11:59pm. Starred items are required. The app is available at: http://bit.ly/RepresentClass36 Those selected for this class will be informed by March 2nd so that they may enroll in the course. Please do not apply for the course if you are unsure about completing it. If you have any questions, you may email the instructor at: jeffc410@stanford.edu.
Same as: CSRE 36

AFRICAAM 37. Chocolate Heads Performance Project: Dance & Intercultural Performance Creation. 2 Units.

Students from diverse dance styles (ballet to hip-hop to contemporary) participate in the dance-making/remix process and collaborate with musicians, visual artists, designers and spoken word artists, to co-create a multidisciplinary finished production and installation. Students of all dance or athletic backgrounds are welcome to audition on Wednesday (9/26) and Monday (10/1) during class time. Visual artists, musicians and dancers may also contact the instructor for further information at ahayes1@stanford.edu.
Same as: DANCE 30

AFRICAAM 40. Liquid Flow: Introduction to Contemporary Dance and Dance-making. 1 Unit.

This introductory dance course combines the fundamentals of contemporary dance technique and exercises from various movement practices, such as yoga and Tai chi. Liquid Flow implies the continuum from the dance of the everyday to the studio to the stage. Students will develop articulation, flexibility and "grace", learn contemporary, popular and classic dance vocabulary, and gain freedom dancing with others. Designed for beginners, we welcome student movers from diverse dance traditions, non-dancers, athletes, and more advanced dancers, who desire fluidity in their daily life, from thought to action.

AFRICAAM 40SI. Possessive Investment in Whiteness. 1-2 Unit.

An approachable but nuanced way of developing a notion of the construction and maintenance of whiteness in the United States. By focusing on George Lipsitz's book, the class works to challenge and refine the ideas of white privilege and race in the history and contemporary United States. By focusing on the single text, with some outside supplementary material, the course does not contend that Lipsitz is providing the only truth, but the class looks to complicate his notions and expand them with personal and outside understandings. May be repeated for credit.

AFRICAAM 41. Genes and Identity. 3 Units.

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Same as: ANTHRO 41, CSRE 41A

AFRICAAM 43. Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly English 43/143). In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond.
Same as: AMSTUD 12A, ENGLISH 12A

AFRICAAM 45. Dance Improv StratLab: Freestyle Improvisation from Contemporary to Hip Hop & Beyond. 1-2 Unit.

This class is an arena for physical and artistic exploration to fire the imagination of dance improvisers, cultivate sensation and perception within and without studio practice and to promote interactive intelligence.nStudents will learn to harness and transform habitual movement patterns and dance trainings as resources for new ways of moving: expand their awareness of being a part of a bigger picture, while being attentive to everything all at once: and to use visual, aural and kinesthetic responses to convert those impulses into artistic material. Class will be accompanied by live and recorded music and include weekly jam sessions. Open to students from all dance, movement, athletic backgrounds and skill levels. Beginners welcome.
Same as: DANCE 45

AFRICAAM 47. History of South Africa. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Same as: CSRE 74, HISTORY 47

AFRICAAM 48Q. South Africa: Contested Transitions. 4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for South Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Same as: HISTORY 48Q

AFRICAAM 50B. Nineteenth Century America. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Same as: CSRE 50S, HISTORY 50B

AFRICAAM 52. Introduction to Improvisation in Dance: From Salsa to Vodun to Tap Dance. 3-4 Units.

This seminar introduces students to Dance Studies by exploring the topic of improvisation, a central concept in multiple genres of dance and music. We will survey a range of improvised dance forms¿from salsa to vodun to tap dance¿through readings, video viewings, discussion, and movement exercises (no previous dance experience required). When studying each genre, we will examine how race, gender, sexuality, citizenship, and other power structures affect the practices and theorizations of improvisation. Topics include community and identity formation; questions of technique versus ¿natural¿ ability; improvisation as a spiritual practice; and the role of history in improvisers¿ quest for spontaneity. Course material will focus on improvised dance, but we will also read pertinent literature in jazz music, theatre, and the law.
Same as: CSRE 152, TAPS 152

AFRICAAM 52N. Mixed-Race Politics and Culture. 3 Units.

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Same as: ENGLISH 52N, POLISCI 29N

AFRICAAM 54Q. African American Women's Lives. 3-4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. African American women have been placed on the periphery of many historical documents. This course will encourage students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences. Drawing largely on primary sources such as letters, personal journals, literature and film, this course explores the everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America. We will begin in our present moment with a discussion of Michelle Obama and then we will look back on the lives and times of a wide range of African American women including: Charlotte Forten Grimké, a 19th-century reformer and teacher; Nella Larsen, a Harlem Renaissance novelist; Josephine Baker, the expatriate entertainer and singer; and Ida B. Wells and Ella Baker, two luminaries of civil rights activism. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Same as: AMSTUD 54Q, FEMGEN 54Q, HISTORY 54Q

AFRICAAM 55F. The Civil War and Reconstruction Era, 1830 to 1877. 3-5 Units.

(HISTORY 55F is 3 units; HISTORY 155F is 5 units.)This course explores the causes, course, and consequences of the American Civil War. The Civil War profoundly impacted American life at national, sectional, and constitutional levels, and radically challenged categories of race and citizenship. Topics covered include: the crisis of union and disunion in an expanding republic; slavery, race, and emancipation as national problems and personal experiences; the horrors of total war for individuals and society; and the challenges--social and political--of Reconstruction.
Same as: AMSTUD 55F, AMSTUD 155F, HISTORY 55F, HISTORY 155F

AFRICAAM 58A. Egypt in the Age of Heresy. 3-5 Units.

Perhaps the most controversial era in ancient Egyptian history, the Amarna period (c.1350-1334 BCE) was marked by great sociocultural transformation, notably the introduction of a new 'religion' (often considered the world's first form of monotheism), the construction of a new royal city, and radical departures in artistic and architectural styles. This course will introduce archaeological and textual sources of ancient Egypt, investigating topics such as theological promotion, projections of power, social structure, urban design, interregional diplomacy, and historical legacy during the inception, height, and aftermath of this highly enigmatic period. Students with or without prior background are equally encouraged.
Same as: AFRICAST 58, ARCHLGY 58, CLASSICS 58

AFRICAAM 58Q. American Landscapes of Segregation. 3-4 Units.

This course examines various landscapes of segregation in U.S. history from 19th century reconstruction and settler expansion through the contemporary U.S. security state. Each week we consider different histories of segregation including native reservation and boarding school stories, Jim Crow and post-World War II urban/suburban segregation, school integration and bussing, and the rise of the carceral state. We will ask: How have Americans moved through space with different degrees of freedom and constraint over time, and how has that shaped what it has meant to be an American in different ways for different groups? How has access to land, property, consumer, recreational and educational spaces and resources been regulated by categories of race, gender, sexuality, colonial subjectivity, immigrant status and class? To gain a better sense of our local history, we will also consider how structures of segregation have historically mapped the Bay Area. Sources include primary and secondary historic texts, feature and documentary films, photography, and poetry.
Same as: AMSTUD 58Q, HISTORY 58Q

AFRICAAM 64C. From Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-1965. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 164C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 164C.) Explores the working lives, social worlds, political ideologies and cultural expressions of African Americans from emancipation to the early civil rights era. Topics include: the transition from slavery to freedom, family life, work, culture, leisure patterns, resistance, migration and social activism. Draws largely on primary sources including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, personal journals, newspaper articles, pamphlets, speeches, literature, film and music.

AFRICAAM 68D. American Prophet: The Inner Life and Global Vision of Martin Luther King, Jr.. 3-5 Units.

Martin Luther King, Jr., was the 20th-century's best-known African-American leader, but the religious roots of his charismatic leadership are far less widely known. The documents assembled and published by Stanford's King Research and Education Institute provide the source materials for this exploration of King's swift rise to international prominence as an articulate advocate of global peace and justice.
Same as: AMSTUD 168D, CSRE 68, HISTORY 68D, HISTORY 168D

AFRICAAM 71. Introduction to Capoeira: An African Brazilian Art Form. 1 Unit.

Capoeira is an African Brazilian art form that incorporates, dance, music, self-defense and acrobatics. Created by enslaved Africans in Brazil who used this form as a tool for liberation and survival, it has since become a popular art form practiced around the world. In this course students will learn basic movements for both Capoeira Angola and Capoeira Regional, and the history of this rich and physically rigorous art form. Students will learn basic acrobatic skills, be introduced to Capoeira songs, and learn to play rhythms on the drum, pandeiro (tambourine), and the Berimbau -- a single stringed bow instrument. This course will be physically rigorous and fun! No previous experience necessary.
Same as: DANCE 71

AFRICAAM 75E. Black Cinema. 2 Units.

How filmmakers represent historical and cultural issues in Black cinema.

AFRICAAM 78. Art + Community: Division, Resilience & Reconciliation. 1-5 Unit.

Violence and trauma isolates and segregates us. Part of the healing process must be about coming back into community. Freedom is meaningful only insofar as it lifts all, especially those who have been done the most harm. In times of violence and polarization, art can heal and brings people together. In this course, we will explore how we make and sustain community, especially in the face of threats from within and without. We will do this especially through examining how artists and culture workers of color develop and advance practices that build mutuality, criticality, renewal, trust, and joy in the face of ongoing racial injustice and cultural inequity.
Same as: CSRE 78

AFRICAAM 80Q. Race and Gender in Silicon Valley. 3 Units.

This course interrogates the social challenges of Silicon Valley, a place of privilege, privation, and precarity, and encourages students to perform their own ethnographical studies through writing, coding, engagement, digital culture, and social practice. We will learn about the importance of technology in shaping our critical understanding of social conditions in our community and the global economy.
Same as: CS 80Q

AFRICAAM 94. Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance. 3-4 Units.

This course examines the history and traditions of artistic engagement in public space in Iran. It offers a unique glimpse into Iran's contemporary art and visual culture through the investigation of public art practices and cultural expression, as well as older traditions of performing arts such as Parde-khani and Ta zieh. The course will be held in conjunction with the Stanford symposium, Art, Social Space and Public Discourse in Iran.

AFRICAAM 95. Liberation Through Land: Organic Gardening and Racial Justice. 2 Units.

Through field trips, practical work and readings, this course provides students with the tools to begin cultivating a relationship to land that focuses on direct engagement with sustainable gardening, from seed to harvest. The course will take place on the O'Donohue Family Stanford Educational Farm, where students will be given the opportunity to learn how to sow seeds, prepare garden beds, amend soils, build compost, and take care of plants. The history of forced farm labor in the U.S., from slavery to low-wage migrant labor, means that many people of color encounter agricultural spaces as sites of trauma and oppression. In this course we will explore the potential for revisiting a narrative of peaceful relation to land and crop that existed long before the trauma occurred, acknowledging the beautiful history of POC coexistence with land. Since this is a practical course, there will be a strong emphasis on participation. Application available at https://goo.gl/forms/cbYX3gSGdrHgHBJH3; deadline to apply is September 18, 2018, at midnight. The course is co-sponsored by the Institute for Diversity in the Arts (IDA) and the Earth Systems Program.
Same as: CSRE 95, EARTHSYS 95

AFRICAAM 100. Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation. 3-5 Units.

Taught by long-time community organizer, Beatriz Herrera. This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. We will develop skills for 1-on-1 relational meetings, media messaging, fundraising strategies, power structure analysis, and strategies organizing across racial/ethnic difference. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change. Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels. Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.
Same as: CSRE 100, FEMGEN 100X, URBANST 108

AFRICAAM 101. Black & White Race Relations in American Fiction & Film. 3-5 Units.

Movies and the fiction that inspires them; power dynamics behind production including historical events, artistic vision, politics, and racial stereotypes. What images of black and white does Hollywood produce to forge a national identity? How do films promote equality between the races? What is lost or gained in film adaptations of books? NOTE: Students must attend the first day; admission to the class will be determined based on an in class essay.
Same as: AMSTUD 101, CSRE 41

AFRICAAM 101F. Race & Technology. 1-2 Unit.

The program in African & African American Studies will be offering a weekly lecture series to expose and introduce underrepresented groups to the world of technology by creating a space where the idea of starting can lead to a "Start Up". The AAAS "Race & Technology" course endeavors to de-code the language of technology creation, how to build a team, problem solving, pitching an idea, leveraging the work of all disciplines in creating an entrepreneurship mindset. nnnScholars and industry people will cover topics such as the digital divide, women in technology, and social media.
Same as: AFRICAAM 201F

AFRICAAM 102B. Art and Social Criticism. 5 Units.

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition's agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP's emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago's The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson's Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon's paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Adrian Piper, Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?.
Same as: AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A, FEMGEN 102

AFRICAAM 105. Introduction to African and African American Studies. 5 Units.

Interdisciplinary. Central themes in African American culture and history related to race as a definitive American phenomenon. African survivals and interpretations of slavery in the New World, contrasting interpretations of the Black family, African American literature, and art. Possible readings: Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Alice Walker, and Bell Hooks. Focus may vary each year.

AFRICAAM 106. Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Same as: CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337

AFRICAAM 107C. The Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity. 4-5 Units.

Explore problems of race and ethnicity as viable criteria in studying ancient societies and consider the question, What is the Mediterranean?, in relation to premodern evidence. Investigate the role of blackness as a marker of ethnicity; the demography of slavery and its roles in forming social identities; and environmental determinism as a factor in ethnic and racial thinking. Consider Greek and Roman perspectives and behavior, and their impact on later theories of race and ethnicity as well as the Mediterranean as a whole.
Same as: CSRE 107

AFRICAAM 111. AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Foreign aid can help Africa, say the advocates. Certainly not, say the critics. Is foreign aid a solution? or a problem? Should there be more aid, less aid, or none at all? Africa has developed imaginative and innovative approaches in many sectors. At the same time, many African countries have become increasingly dependent on foreign aid. How do foreign aid and local initiatives intersect? We will examine several contentious issues in contemporary Africa, exploring roots, contested analyses, and proposed solutions, examining foreign aid and the aid relationship. As African communities and countries work to shape their future, what are the foreign roles, and what are their consequences?.
Same as: AFRICAST 112, AFRICAST 212

AFRICAAM 112. Urban Education. 3-5 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X, SOC 229X

AFRICAAM 113V. Freedom in Chains: Black Slavery in the Atlantic, 1400s-1800s. 3-5 Units.

This course will focus on the history of slavery in the British, French, Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Atlantic world(s), from the late 1400s to the 1800s. Its main focus will be on the experiences of enslaved Africans and their descendants. Between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Europeans forcibly embarked over 10 million Africans to the Americas. Drawing on methodologies used by historians, archaeologists and anthropologists, the course will reconstruct the daily lives and the socio-economic, cultural and political histories of these captives. We will seek to hear their voices by investigating a variety of historical testimonies and recent scholarship. The course will examine slavery in the context of broader trends in Atlantic World studies, a field that has grown considerably in recent years, providing new ways of understanding historical developments across national boundaries. We will seek to identify commonalities and differences across time periods and regions and the reasons for those differences. Covered topics will include slave ship voyages, labor, agency, the creation of new identities (creolization), religion, race, gender, resistance, legacies, and memory.
Same as: AFRICAST 113V, CSRE 113V, HISTORY 205D

AFRICAAM 116. Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-1990. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. The relationship among race, power, inequality, and education from the 1880s to the 1990s. How schools have constructed race, the politics of school desegregation, and ties between education and the late 20th-century urban crisis.
Same as: AMSTUD 216, CSRE 216X, EDUC 216, HISTORY 255E

AFRICAAM 117. Maroon Freedom: Black Resistance, Autonomy, and Fugitivity in the U.S. South. 5 Units.

Maroons and their communities, or communities of those some would call ¿runawaynslaves,¿ were an ever-present feature of slaveholding societies throughout the Americas. Everywhere they existed, they proved the indomitable spirit of African people and the inherent failure of the institution of slavery. This course examines the conditions and characteristics of marronage specific to the U.S. south ¿ a site that was far from impervious to this hemispheric tradition of enslaved resistance. We will look closely at the demographic, economic, and geographic opportunities for enslaved mobility and resistance that shaped marronage in U.S. contexts. Our analysis includes marronage as it occurred in the Spanish and French colonial territories of Louisiana and Florida. The central focus will be the historical impact of marronage on enslaved and enslaver communities in the south from 1700 to 1865. Moving across space and time, this course takes a chronological,nthematic, and interdisciplinary approach to investigating maroon survival, autonomy, gender, kinship, community, and the relationship between marronage and insurrection. We examine a wide range of evidence spanning periodicals, state mandates, archaeology, runaway slave advertisements, slave narratives, oral histories, and traveler¿s logs, in addition to secondary literature.

AFRICAAM 117J. Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary American Film. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to the theoretical and analytical frameworks necessary to critically understand constructions of race, gender, and sexuality in contemporary American film. Through a sustained engagement with a range of independent and Hollywood films produced since the 1990s, students analyze the ways that cinematic representations have both reflected and constructed dominant notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the United States. Utilizing an intersectional framework that sees race, gender, and sexuality as always defined by one another, the course examines the ways that dominant notions of difference have been maintained and contested through film in the United States. Films to be discussed include Better Luck Tomorrow, La La Land, Mosquita y Mari, Get Out, and Moonlight.nTO BE ADDED TO THE WAITLIST: Please email williamgow@stanford.edu.
Same as: AMSTUD 117, ASNAMST 117D, CSRE 117D, FEMGEN 117F

AFRICAAM 119. Novel Perspectives on South Africa. 2-3 Units.

21st-century South Africa continues its literary effervescence. In this class we'll sample some recent novels and related writings to tease out the issues shaping the country (and to some degree the continent) at present. Is `South African literature' a meaningful category today? What are the most significant features we can identify in new writings and how do they relate to contemporary social dynamics? The course will appeal to anyone interested in present-day Cape Town or Johannesburg, including students who have spent a term in BOSP-Cape Town or plan to do so in future. Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. 2-3 units. Course may be repeated for credit.nn nnAll students will write short analyses from the prescribed texts. Students taking the course for three units will write an extended essay on a topic agreed with the instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 219, AFRICAST 119, AFRICAST 219, CSRE 119

AFRICAAM 120F. Buying Black: Economic Sovereignty, Race, and Entrepreneurship in the USA. 4-5 Units.

This seminar examines how communities of color have critiqued and transformed capitalism in America through concepts of economic independence, entrepreneurship, and sovereignty. By tracing concepts such as the double-duty dollar, casino/tribal capitalisms, retail boycotts, and buying black, the course traces ethnic entrepreneurialism in America. Students will also consider the international context of such US-based movements, particularly in relation to American imperialism and global supply-chain capitalism.
Same as: ANTHRO 120F, CSRE 120F

AFRICAAM 121N. How to Make a Racist. 3 Units.

How does a child, born without beliefs or expectations about race, grow up to be racist? To address this complicated question, this seminar will introduce you to some of the psychological theories on the development of racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination. Together, these theories highlight how cognitive, social, and motivational factors contribute to racist thinking. We will engage thoughtfully and critically with each topic through reflection and discussion. Occasionally, I will supplement the discussion and class activities with a brief lecture, in order to highlight the central issues, concepts, and relevant findings. We will share our own experiences, perspectives, and insights, and together, we will explore how racist thinking takes root. Come to class with an open mind, a willingness to be vulnerable, and a desire to learn from and with your peers. Students with diverse opinions and perspectives are encouraged to enroll.
Same as: CSRE 21N, PSYCH 21N

AFRICAAM 121X. Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language. 3-4 Units.

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 121X, ANTHRO 121A, CSRE 121X, EDUC 121, LINGUIST 155

AFRICAAM 122E. Art in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces. 4 Units.

This class will introduce students to both historical and contemporary public art practices and the expression of race and identity through murals, graffiti, site-specific works and performative interventions in public spaces. Involving lectures, guest speakers, field trips, and hands-on art practice, students will be expected to produce both an individual and group piece as a final project.
Same as: CSRE 122E

AFRICAAM 122F. Histories of Race in Science and Medicine at Home and Abroad. 4 Units.

This course has as its primary objective, the historical study of the intersection of race, science and medicine in the US and abroad with an emphasis on Africa and its Diasporas in the US. By drawing on literature from history, science and technology studies, sociology and other related disciplines, the course will consider the sociological and cultural concept of race and its usefulness as an analytical category. The course will explore how the study of race became its own ¿science¿ in the late-Enlightenment era, the history of eugenics--a science of race aimed at the ostensible betterment of the overall population through the systematic killing or "letting die" of humanity¿s "undesirable" parts, discuss how the ideology of pseudo-scientific racism underpinned the health policies of the French and British Empires in Africa, explore the fraught relationship between race and medicine in the US, discuss how biological notions of race have quietly slipped back into scientific projects in the 21st century and explore how various social justice advocates and scholars have resisted the scientific racisms of the present and future and/or proposed new paths towards a more equitable and accessible science.
Same as: AFRICAST 122F, CSRE 122F, HISTORY 248D

AFRICAAM 123. Great Works of the African American Tradition. 5 Units.

Foundational African and African American scholarly figures and their work from the 19th century to the present. Historical, political, and scholarly context. Dialogues distinctive to African American culture. May be repeated for credit.

AFRICAAM 124F. The Mothership Connection: Black Science Fiction Across Media. 4 Units.

As science fiction becomes the lingua franca of American popular culture and race takes center stage in our contemporary social and political discourses, the works of black SF creators offer a number of powerful conceptual tools for thinking about race, and particularly for exploring the experience and effects of the African diaspora. This course will consider how black authors, artists, musicians, and filmmakers have responded to or engaged the transmedia genre of SF, as well as the role that race plays in the history of science fiction. What is Afrofuturism, and is it distinct from black science fiction? How does black SF relate to other speculative genres and aesthetics (horror, fantasy, new age, psychedelia, etc.)? Is there something inherently science fictional about the Afro-diasporic experience? How do typical SF tropes - robots, spaceships, technology, the apocalypse, the posthuman - change when considered in the aftermath of the Miiddle Passage and chattel slavery?.
Same as: CSRE 124F

AFRICAAM 126B. Curricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population. 3-4 Units.

Recently two laws in Brazil (10639/2003 and 13465/2008), which came about due to intense pressure from Black and Indigenous social movements throughout the 20th century, have introduced changes in public education curriculum policies. These new curriculum policies mandate that the study of Afro-Brazilian, African, and Indigenous histories and cultures must be taught at all educational levels including at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. As part of this mandate, educators are now directed to incorporate considerations of ethnic-racial diversity in relation to people's thinking and experiences. These policies aim to fight racism as well as other forms of discrimination, and moreover, encourage the building of more equitable pedagogies. This course will discuss past and current policies and practices in Brazilian education from the point of view of different social projects organized by Indigenous Peoples, Afro-Brazilians, Asian-Brazilians, as well as Euro-Brazilians. It will also focus on Latin American efforts to promote equity in education, as well as to articulate different points of view, and reinforce and build epistemologies that support the decolonization of thinking, behaviors, research and policies. As part of this process, the course will study the experiences of people demanding these new public policies in terms of the extent to which they were able to influence institutional structures and to establish particular policy reforms. The course will also analyze theoretical frameworks employed by opponents of these movements to resist policies that might challenge their privileged place in society. In doing this, the course will offer theoretical and methodological avenues to promote research that can counter hegemonic curricular policies and pedagogical practices. The course will be fully participatory and oriented towards generating ongoing conversations and discussion about the various issues that arose in Brazil in relation to these two recent laws. To meet these goals, we will do a close reading of relevant scholarly works, paying particular attention to their theoretical frameworks, research designs, and findings.
Same as: CSRE 126B, EDUC 136B, EDUC 236B, PUBLPOL 126B

AFRICAAM 127A. Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts. 2-4 Units.

This course explores the history and development of the hip-hop arts movement, from its precursor movements in music, dance, visual arts, literature, and folk and street cultures to its rise as a neighborhood subculture in the Bronx in the early 1970s through its local, regional and global expansion and development. Hip-hop aesthetics, structures, and politics will be explored within the context of the movement's rise as a post-multicultural form in an era of neoliberal globalization. (This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.).
Same as: CSRE 127A

AFRICAAM 128. Roots Modern Experience - Mixed Level. 1 Unit.

In this course students will be introduced to a series of Afro-contemporary dance warm ups and dance combinations that are drawn from a broad range of modern dance techniques, somatic practices and dance traditions of the African diaspora with a particular focus on Afro Brazilian, Afro Cuban and Haitian dance forms. Our study of these dance disciplines will inform the movement vocabulary, technical training, class discussions, and choreography we experience in this course. Students will learn more about the dances and rhythms for the Orishas of Brazil and Cuba, and the Loa of Haiti with an additional focus on other African diaspora dance forms such as, Cuban Haitian, Palo, Samba and Samba-Reggae. Dance combinations will consist of dynamic movement patterns that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, musicality and coordination. Through this approach to our warm ups and class choreography, we will deepen our analysis and understanding of how African diaspora movement traditions are inherently embedded in many expressions of the broadly termed form known as contemporary dance.
Same as: DANCE 128

AFRICAAM 130. Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms. 3-5 Units.

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques.
Same as: CSRE 130, EDUC 123, EDUC 322

AFRICAAM 131. Genes and Identity. 5 Units.

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Same as: ANTHRO 131, CSRE 131

AFRICAAM 132. Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health. 4 Units.

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen.
Same as: CSRE 122S, HUMBIO 122S

AFRICAAM 133. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, social, and political aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean of the 20th and 21st century. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry. We will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary genres, and terms. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French, in addition to reading comprehension. Special guest: Moroccan author Meryem Alaoui. Required readings include: Aime Cesaire, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Dany Laferriere, Leonara Miano, Albert Memmi. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143

AFRICAAM 135A. Islam in America. 4 Units.

This course explores the history of Islam in North America with special emphasis on the experience of Muslims in the United States. Contrary to popularly held belief, Muslims have been critical participants in the construction of American identity from the 16th century onwards when Muslim slaves were forcibly brought to Colonial America. Our course will explore the diverse ways Muslims in America have imagined, practiced, and negotiated their religious identity. We will move chronologically, and we will focus upon three crucial themes: the convergence of constructions of racial, religious, and national identities in America; the ever-shifting terrain of notions of authority and authenticity amongst Muslims in America; and global resonances of the practices and ideas of American Muslims.
Same as: AMSTUD 135X, CSRE 135, GLOBAL 137, RELIGST 135

AFRICAAM 136B. White Identity Politics. 3-5 Units.

Pundits proclaim that the 2016 Presidential election marks the rise of white identity politics in the United States. Drawing from the field of whiteness studies and from contemporary writings that push whiteness studies in new directions, this upper-level seminar asks, does white identity politics exist? How is a concept like white identity to be understood in relation to white nationalism, white supremacy, white privilege, and whiteness? We will survey the field of whiteness studies, scholarship on the intersection of race, class, and geography, and writings on whiteness in the United States by contemporary public thinkers, to critically interrogate the terms used to describe whiteness and white identities. Students will consider the perils and possibilities of different political practices, including abolishing whiteness or coming to terms with white identity. What is the future of whiteness? n*Enrolled students will be contacted regarding the location of the course.
Same as: ANTHRO 136B, CSRE 136

AFRICAAM 139. Black Feminist Epistemology and Analytics. 5 Units.

Building from the foundational canon of black feminist theory and praxis, this seminar will explore more recent advances in black feminist epistemologies and modes of analysis. Students will engage black feminist conceptions of the human and the self; love and relationality in precarious conditions; speculative queer, sexual, and body politics; aesthetics and cultural theory; and contemporary proposals for radical freedom and social transformation. We will consider how black feminist theory not only engages, builds on, critiques, and transforms other schools of thought, but also produces its own systems of reason and interpretation.
Same as: FEMGEN 154E

AFRICAAM 141X. Activism and Intersectionality. 3-4 Units.

How are contemporary U.S. social movements shaped by the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality? This course explores the emergence, dynamics, tactics, and targets of social movements. Readings include empirical and theoretical social movement texts, including deep dives into Black, White, and Chicana feminisms; the KKK; and queer/LGBT movements. We will explore how social movement emergence and persistence is related to participants¿ identities and experiences with inequality; how the dynamics, targets, and tactics of mobilized participants are shaped by race, class, gender, and/or sexuality; and how social movement scholars have addressed the intersectional nature of inequality, identity, and community.
Same as: CSRE 141X, FEMGEN 141, SOC 153

AFRICAAM 144. Living Free: Embodying Healing and Creativity in The Era of Racial Justice Movements. 1-4 Unit.

What does it mean to live free? It is often said that the one demand for the Movement for Black Lives is to "stop killing us." This demand has led Black artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies. This surge of creativity has impacted and intersected with work happening in queer and trans communities and in many other communities of color, including indigenous movements for safe and clean water, student protests against campus racism, the undocumented movement, prison abolition among others.  This justice based work urges us to interrupt systems of violence with systems of healing that recover traditions, invent new modalities, and connect to survival practices developed by many generations of people in community.nnIn this course we will bring together leading artists, thinkers, organizers, and healers to envision work and embody practices that resist the subjugation and erasure of their bodies, land, and natural resources. In this course we ask: what does it mean to embody health? How can we shift frameworks of pathology into frameworks of wholeness? What practices can we develop, recover, and share that help us create systems that support and value equity, healing and creativity for communities most at risk? And finally, how can we all live free?.
Same as: CSRE 44

AFRICAAM 145A. Poetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature. 5 Units.

Mid 20th-century to the present. How historical, economic, and political conditions in Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, Antigua, and Guadeloupe affected women. How Francophone, Anglophone, and Hispanophone women novelists, poets, and short story writers respond to similar issues and pose related questions. Caribbean literary identity within a multicultural and diasporic context; the place of the oral in the written feminine text; family and sexuality; translation of European master texts; history, memory, and myth; and responses to slave history, colonialism, neocolonialism, and globalization.

AFRICAAM 145B. Africa in the 20th Century. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Same as: HISTORY 145B

AFRICAAM 146A. African Politics. 4-5 Units.

Africa has lagged the rest of the developing world in terms of economic development, the establishment of social order, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, and to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and how it might be overcome.
Same as: POLISCI 146A

AFRICAAM 146D. New Keywords in African Sound. 3-4 Units.

This course identifies and considers new keywords for the study of contemporary African music and sound. Each week we will foster discussion around a keyword and a constellation of case studies. The sonic practices we will encounter range from South African house music to Ghanaian honk horns; from Congolese rumba bands to Tunisian trance singers; from listening to the radio in a Tanzanian homestead to making hip hop music videos on the Kenyan coast. By exploring the unexpected interconnections between contemporary African musical communities, we will discuss new keywords arising in current scholarship, including technologies like the amplifier and the hard drive, spaces like the studio and the city, and analytics like pleasure and hotness. We will also engage with established concepts for the study of postcolonial African cultures, including nationalism, cosmopolitanism, globalization, diaspora, and Pan-Africanism. This is a seminar-based course open to graduate students, upper level undergraduate students, and other students with consent of the instructor. Proficiency in music is not required. WIM at 4 units only.
Same as: AFRICAST 146M, CSRE 146D, MUSIC 146M, MUSIC 246M

AFRICAAM 147. History of South Africa. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Same as: CSRE 174, HISTORY 147

AFRICAAM 150B. Nineteenth Century America. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 150B, CSRE 150S, HISTORY 150B

AFRICAAM 154. Black Feminist Theory. 5 Units.

This course will examine black feminist theoretical traditions, marking black women's analytic interventions into sexual and pleasure politics, reproduction, citizenship, power, violence, agency, art, representation, and questions of the body. Exploring concepts like intersectionality, matrices of violence, the politics of respectability, womanism, and other contours of a black feminist liberation politic, we will look to black feminist scholars, activists, and artists from the 19th century to today.
Same as: FEMGEN 154

AFRICAAM 154G. Black Magic: Ethnicity, Race, and Identity in Performance Cultures. 3-4 Units.

In 2013, CaShawn Thompson devised a Twitter hashtag, #blackgirlmagic, to celebrate the beauty and intelligence of black women. Twitter users quickly adopted the slogan, using the hashtag to celebrate everyday moments of beauty, accomplishment, and magic. In contrast, #blackmagic is used to describe everything from the uncanny to the personal. This course examines the discursive phenomenon of "black magic" and its permutations throughout Anglo-American histories. We will investigate the binaries of black/dark, white/light magic that has entered our contemporary lexicon, reading material on religion, magic performance, and theater.
Same as: CSRE 154D, FEMGEN 154G, TAPS 154G

AFRICAAM 155J. Global Black Feminism. 3-5 Units.

Students will examine the long history of Black feminists in a variety of international spaces (including Europe, Asia, the Caribbean, and the U.S). Students will see how these international spaces have informed the ideology of many Black feminists. In particular, students will read from Miss Mary Seacole, Mary Church Terrell, Audre Lorde, May Ayim, Angela Davis, and many more.
Same as: GERMAN 155

AFRICAAM 156. Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson. 4 Units.

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Same as: CSRE 156T, TAPS 156, TAPS 356

AFRICAAM 157P. Solidarity and Racial Justice. 4-5 Units.

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Same as: AMSTUD 157P, CSRE 157P, FEMGEN 157P

AFRICAAM 158. Black Queer Theory. 5 Units.

This course takes a multifaceted approach to black queer theory, not only taking up black theories of gender and queer sexuality, but queer theoretical interrogations of blackness and race. The course will also examine some of the important ways that black queer theory reads and is intersected with issues like affect, epistemology, space and geography, power and subjectivity, religion, economy, the body, and the law, asking questions like: How have scholars critiqued the very language of queer and the ways it works as a signifier of white marginality? What are the different spaces we can find queer black relationality, eroticism, and kinship? How do we negotiate issues like trans*misogyny or tensions around gender and sexuality in the context of race? Throughout the course, students will become versed in foundational and emerging black queer theory as we engage scholars like Sharon Holland, Cathy Cohen, Hortense Spillers, Marlon B. Ross, Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman, Barbara Smith, Roderick Ferguson, Robert Reid-Pharr, E. Patrick Johnson, and many others. Students will also gain practice applying black queer theory as an interpretive lens for contemporary social issues and cultural production including film, music, art, and performance.
Same as: FEMGEN 158

AFRICAAM 159. James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature. 5 Units.

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.
Same as: ENGLISH 159, FEMGEN 159

AFRICAAM 159A. Literature and Protest. 3-5 Units.

How does literary art get involved in politics? What is the border between propaganda and art? This class examines moments when writers seem suddenly not only to represent politically charged topics and themes, but to have a part in bringing about political change. We¿ll look at case studies from the anti-apartheid movement in South Africa, the American Civil Rights struggle, 19th century Russia, and more.
Same as: CSRE 159I, ENGLISH 159A

AFRICAAM 160J. Conjure Art 101: Performances of Ritual, Spirituality and Decolonial Black Feminist Magic. 2 Units.

Conjure Art is a movement and embodied practice course looking at the work and techniques of artists of color who utilize spirituality and ritual practices in their art making and performance work to evoke social change. In this course we will discuss the work of artists who bring spiritual ritual in their art making while addressing issues of spiritual accountability and cultural appropriation. Throughout the quarter we will welcome guest artists who make work along these lines, while exploring movement, writing, singing and visual art making. This class will culminate in a performance ritual co-created by students and instructor.
Same as: CSRE 160J, DANCE 160J

AFRICAAM 165. Identity and Academic Achievement. 3 Units.

How do social identities affect how people experience academic interactions? How can learning environments be better structured to support the success of all students? In this class, we will explore how a variety of identities such as race, gender, social class, and athletic participation can affect academic achievement, with the goal of identifying concrete strategies to make learning environments at Stanford and similar universities more inclusive. Readings will draw from psychology, sociology, education, and popular press. This class is a seminar format.
Same as: CSRE 165, PSYCH 165

AFRICAAM 165G. Afro-German Art Forms. 3-5 Units.

The past few years has seen a growth in scholars investigating the complex identities and histories of Black/Afro-Germans. While other groups in the African Diaspora have one common story (i.e. slavery in the context of the Americas), the same cannot be said for Afro-Germans. Their stories are varied and cannot be explained with one narrative. nnThis course seeks to introduce students to varied Afro-German voices and experiences through literature, film, and theory. Students in this course can expect to:n- develop skills in literary, art and performance analysisn- weigh the historical, political, social, cultural and ideological aspects of race in Germanyn- think about the way Afro-Germans complicate German national identityn- recognize contributions of Afro-GermansnThis course will be taught in English, but German-speaking students are encouraged to read in the original.
Same as: CSRE 165I, GERMAN 165

AFRICAAM 169B. Introduction to Intersectionality. 4 Units.

"Intersectionality" is so popular, it's almost impossible to avoid: it was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in 2017, it was painted on signs at the Women's Marches, and it guides modern day social movement organizers. But what does intersectionality mean? What can intersectionality offer And what does it mean for research and social movements to be truly intersectional? The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the concept of intersectionality. First, we will delve into the works (chiefly from Black feminist scholars) that provide the foundation for today's concept of intersectionality. We will then explore, compare, and critique sociological research that applies (or fails to apply) an intersectional lens to its objects of study. Finally, we will investigate the use of intersectionality in social movements and outside academia. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research.
Same as: FEMGEN 169, SOC 169

AFRICAAM 176B. Documentary Fictions. 4 Units.

More and more of our best fiction, plays, and comics are being created out of documentary practices such as in-depth interviewing, oral histories, and reporting. Novels like Dave Egger¿s What is the What and plays like Anna Deavere Smith¿s Let Me Down Easy act as both witnesses and translators of people¿s direct experience and push art into social activism in new ways. This course takes a close look at a diverse range of these contemporary works and explores how to adopt their research and aesthetic strategies for work of your own. We start with a brief look back at the recent origins of this trend and look at excerpts from forerunners such as Richard Wright, Truman Capote, and Bertolt Brecht. We then turn to the rise of documentary fictions in the last few decades and read works by Eggers, Adam Johnson, G.B. Tran, Maria Hummel, and Daniel Alarcon and watch performances by the Tectonic Theater Project and Elevator Repair Service. Students write one analytic essay and then conduct or study interviews to design a work of their own. The course will feature class visits by a number of our authors and a special half-day workshop with Smith.

AFRICAAM 179D. Empire and Revolution: Joseph Conrad and Ng¿g¿ wa Thiong'o. 5 Units.

This class juxtaposes the works of two landmark experimental novelists: Joseph Conrad, one of the first major modernist writers of the early 20th century; and Ng¿g¿ wa Thiong'o, the first East African novelist published in English and a leading voice of political activism in Kenya. Novels will include, among others, Conrad's Under Western Eyes and Nostromo; Ng¿g¿ wa Thiong'o's A Grain of Wheat and Petals of Blood..

AFRICAAM 181. Art, Gentrification, & Intersectional Racial Politics. 4-5 Units.

This course addresses the role of artists and art bureaucracies in the gentrification of minority neighborhoods, examining contested sites in New York, Oakland, East LA, and New Orleans. Students consider histories of underdevelopment and displacement, asking what these processes may reveal about greater contests over space, aesthetics, power, and knowledge. The course serves as an opportunity to engage urban cultural politics from the perspectives of critical race theory, queer studies, and feminist critique as well as through encounters with works by William Pope.L, Laura Aguilar, Paul Chan, and others.
Same as: ARTSINST 181, URBANST 181A

AFRICAAM 181Q. Alternative Viewpoints: Black Independent Film. 4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Do you want to learn more about independent film as it was practiced in major urban centers by young filmmakers? This class focuses on major movements by groups such as the Sankofa Film Collective and the L.A. Rebellion. Learn how to analyze film and to discuss the politics of production as you watch films by Spike Lee, Julie Dash, Melvin Van Peebles, Ngozi Onwurah and more. We will discuss representation, lighting, press material, and of course the films themselves. This course includes a workshop on production, trips to local film festivals and time to critique films frame-by-frame. It matters who makes film and how they do so. When you have completed this class you will be able to think critically about "alternative viewpoints" to Hollywood cinema. You will understand how independent films are made and you will be inspired to seek out and perhaps produce or promote new visions.
Same as: FILMSTUD 181Q

AFRICAAM 188. Who We Be: Art, Images & Race in Post-Civil Rights America. 2-4 Units.

Over the past half-century, the U.S. has seen profound demographic and cultural change. But racial progress still seems distant. After the faith of the civil rights movement, the fervor of multiculturalism, and even the brief euphoria of a post-racial moment, we remain a nation divided. Resegregation is the norm. The culture wars flare as hot as ever.nnThis course takes a close examination of visual culture¿particularly images, works, and ideas in the contemporary arts, justice movements, and popular culture¿to discuss North American demographic and cultural change and cultural politics over the past half-century. From the Watts uprising to the #BlackLivesMatter movement, from multiculturalism through hip-hop to post-identity art, we will deeply explore the questions: How do Americans see race now? Do we see each other any more clearly than before?.
Same as: ARTHIST 154B, CSRE 88

AFRICAAM 189. Black Life and Death in the Neoliberal Era. 5 Units.

Professor Robin Kelley will teach this course. Of course, this is a history/genealogy of how we got to this place - precarity, mass incarceration, privatization and (re)dispossession of black lives, and the movements that erupted ¿ all since the early 1970s. It is as much an intellectual history as it is a political and cultural one since I will circle back to the roots of "neoliberal thinking¿ in 18th and 19th century liberalism, colonialism, imperialism, social Darwinism in the so-called ¿Gilded Age.¿ Will also touch on the rise of social democracy and its recasting of ¿liberal¿ as the welfare state, the ascendance of military Keynesianism, and Hayek¿s and Milton Freidman¿s Cold War resuscitation and revision of 19th century liberalism. Much of our reading and discussion will examine the global economic crisis of the 1970s, and the subsequent restructuring of the political economy, the state, and culture (not limited to the U.S. but looking at the ¿Third World¿ or Global South¿issues of debt, austerity and structural adjustment policies, environmental destruction, and military intervention. But the main focus is on how neoliberalism assaulted most black lives while enriching a handful of others; how is spawned a level of state violence that sometimes feels unprecedented and against which many movements emerged.

AFRICAAM 192. Sexual Violence in America. 4-5 Units.

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores the history of sexual violence in America, with particular attention to the intersections of gender and race in the construction of rape. We discuss the changing definitions of sexual violence in law and in cultural representations from early settlement through the late-twentieth century, including slavery, wartime and prison rape, the history of lynching and anti-lynching movements, and feminist responses to sexual violence. In addition to introducing students to the literature on sexual violence, the course attempts to teach critical skills in the analysis of secondary and primary historical texts. Students write short weekly reading responses and a final paper; no final exam; fifth unit research or CEL options.nnLimited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Submit application form (available in course syllabus or History department main office, 200-113) by November 15, 2016 and indicate interest in CEL option. Priority admission to History, FGSS, CSRE, AFRICAAM, and AMSTUD declared majors and minors. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Same as: AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358

AFRICAAM 194. Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Contemporary Black Rhetorics: Black Twitter and Black Digital Cultures. 4 Units.

Does not fulfill NSC requirement. This course will examine Black engagements with digital culture as sites for community building, social action and individual and collective identity formation. By studying phenomena like #BlackTwitter, memes, Vine, selfie culture, blogging, "social watching," and more, we will explore how Black technology use addresses questions like identity performance and expression, hyper visibility and invisibility of Black lives, Black feminisms, misogynoir and Black women/femme leadership in social movements, the roles and influence of Black Queer cultures online, and social activism and movements in online spaces. nnFrom #YouOKSis, #BlackLivesMatter and #AfroLatinidad to the Clapback, roasts and "reads," we will work from the serious to the silly, from individuals to collectives, from activism to everyday life, and from distinct Black cultures to diasporic connections and exchange. Participants in the course will create a social media autobiography, a "read/ing" of a Black cultural practice or phenomenon online, host an online discussion, and prepare a pitch for a longer research project they might pursue as a thesis or an ongoing study. Bring your GIFs, memes, and emoji, and a willingness to be in community both online and off for this new course! Prerequisite: first level of the writing requirement or equivalent transfer credit. For topics, see https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/pwr/courses/advanced-pwr-courses.
Same as: PWR 194AJ

AFRICAAM 194A. Topics in Writing & Rhetoric: Freedom's Mixtape: DJing Contemporary African American Rhetorics. 4 Units.

Black music in all its genres, styles and eras has always been about freedom and transformation. About both Black people and the whole society. About the US Black experience, the African continent and the diaspora. These musical forms and the social movements they reflect and help shape are therefore central to the study of African American rhetoric. From overtly translating the ideas of social movements for mass audiences, to capturing the mood of a moment or move, to reflecting and influencing the aesthetics and styles that attend public discourse, to simply being a space where debates get worked out in community, music in Black traditions are as important a space of engagement as political speeches, sermons, websites, or even #BlackTwitter. This course will use Black music and its relationship to both social movements and everyday dialogue and debate to introduce study in African American Rhetoric as a field of study.
Same as: PWR 194AB

AFRICAAM 195. Independent Study. 3-5 Units.

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AFRICAAM 199. Honors Project. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

AFRICAAM 200N. Funkentelechy: Technologies, Social Justice and Black Vernacular Cultures. 5 Units.

From texts to techne, from artifacts to discourses on science and technology, this course is an examination of how Black people in this society have engaged with the mutually consitutive relationships that endure between humans and technologies. We will focus on these engagements in vernacular cultural spaces, from storytelling traditions to music and move to ways academic and aesthetic movements have imagined these relationships. Finally, we will consider the implications for work with technologies in both school and community contexts for work in the pursuit of social and racial justice.
Same as: STS 200N

AFRICAAM 200X. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar. 5 Units.

Required for seniors. Weekly colloquia with AAAS Director and Associate Director to assist with refinement of research topic, advisor support, literature review, research, and thesis writing. Readings include foundational and cutting-edge scholarship in the interdisciplinary fields of African and African American studies and comparative race studies. Readings assist students situate their individual research interests and project within the larger. Students may also enroll in AFRICAAM 200Y in Winter and AFRICAAM 200Z in Spring for additional research units (up to 10 units total).

AFRICAAM 200Y. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research. 3-5 Units.

Winter. Required for students writing an Honors Thesis. Optional for Students writing a Senior Thesis.

AFRICAAM 200Z. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research. 3-5 Units.

Spring. Required for students writing an Honors Thesis. Optional for Students writing a Senior Thesis.

AFRICAAM 201F. Race & Technology. 1-2 Unit.

The program in African & African American Studies will be offering a weekly lecture series to expose and introduce underrepresented groups to the world of technology by creating a space where the idea of starting can lead to a "Start Up". The AAAS "Race & Technology" course endeavors to de-code the language of technology creation, how to build a team, problem solving, pitching an idea, leveraging the work of all disciplines in creating an entrepreneurship mindset. nnnScholars and industry people will cover topics such as the digital divide, women in technology, and social media.
Same as: AFRICAAM 101F

AFRICAAM 202. New Archives in African American and African Diaspora Studies. 5 Units.

How do you speak the unspoken, or the unspeakable? How do you tell the untold, or that which has been deemed not valuable enough to tell? How can the histories and experiences of marginalized and oppressed people ¿ those that have been silenced, suppressed, or erased ¿ be retrieved and recovered? This course considers these epistemological and methodological questions, and explores the qualitative research methods involved in African American Studies and African Diaspora Studies.

AFRICAAM 205K. The Age of Revolution: America, France, and Haiti. 4-5 Units.

(HISTORY 205K is an undergraduate course offered for 5 units; HISTORY 305K is a graduate course offered for 4-5 units.) This course examines the "Age of Revolution," spanning the 18th and 19th centuries. Primarily, this course will focus on the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions (which overthrew both French and white planter rule). Taken together, these events reshaped definitions of citizenship, property, and government. But could republican principles-- color-blind in rhetoric-- be so in fact? Could nations be both republican and pro-slavery? Studying a wide range of primary materials, this course will explore the problem of revolution in an age of empires, globalization, and slavery.
Same as: HISTORY 205K, HISTORY 305K

AFRICAAM 211. Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa. 3-5 Units.

Policy making in Africa and the intersection of policy processes and their political and economic dimensions. The failure to implement agreements by international institutions, national governments, and nongovernmental organizations to promote education. Case studies of crowded and poorly equipped schools, overburdened and underprepared teachers, and underfunded education systems.
Same as: AFRICAST 111, AFRICAST 211

AFRICAAM 218. Musics and Appropriation Throughout the World. 3 Units.

This course critically examines musical practices and appropriation through the amplification of intersectionality. We consider musics globally through recourse to ethnomusicological literature and critical race theories. Our approach begins from an understanding that the social and political contexts where musics are created, disseminated, and consumed inform disparate interpretations and meanings of music, as well as its sounds. Our goal is to shape our ears to hear the effects of slavery, colonialism, capitalism, nationalism, class, gender difference, militarism, and activism. We interrogate the process of appropriating musics throughout the world by making the power structures that shape privileges and exclusions audible.
Same as: CSRE 118D, MUSIC 118

AFRICAAM 219. Novel Perspectives on South Africa. 2-3 Units.

21st-century South Africa continues its literary effervescence. In this class we'll sample some recent novels and related writings to tease out the issues shaping the country (and to some degree the continent) at present. Is `South African literature' a meaningful category today? What are the most significant features we can identify in new writings and how do they relate to contemporary social dynamics? The course will appeal to anyone interested in present-day Cape Town or Johannesburg, including students who have spent a term in BOSP-Cape Town or plan to do so in future. Both undergraduate and graduate students are welcome. 2-3 units. Course may be repeated for credit.nn nnAll students will write short analyses from the prescribed texts. Students taking the course for three units will write an extended essay on a topic agreed with the instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 119, AFRICAST 119, AFRICAST 219, CSRE 119

AFRICAAM 226. Mixed-Race Politics and Culture. 5 Units.

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? This course approaches issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st-century U.S. Issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation, and racial prejudice in American society. Topics include the political and social formation of race; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of census categories and the rise of the multiracial movement.
Same as: AMSTUD 152K, CSRE 152K, ENGLISH 152K

AFRICAAM 233A. Counseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective. 3-5 Units.

In an era of globalization characterized by widespread migration and cultural contacts, professionals face a unique challenge: How does one practice successfully when working with clients/students from so many different backgrounds? This course focuses upon the need to examine, conceptualize, and work with individuals according to the multiple ways in which they identify themselves. It will systematically examine multicultural counseling concepts, issues, and research. Literature on counselor and client characteristics such as social status or race/ethnicity and their effects on the counseling process and outcome will be reviewed. Issues in consultation with culturally and linguistically diverse parents and students and work with migrant children and their families are but a few of the topics covered in this course.
Same as: CSRE 233A, EDUC 233A

AFRICAAM 236. Constructing Race and Religion in America. 4-5 Units.

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Same as: AMSTUD 246, CSRE 246, HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346

AFRICAAM 236B. Casablanca - Algiers - Tunis : Cities on the Edge. 3-5 Units.

Casablanca, Algiers and Tunis embody three territories, real and imaginary, which never cease to challenge the preconceptions of travelers setting sight on their shores. In this class, we will explore the myriad ways in which these cities of North Africa, on the edge of Europe and of Africa, have been narrated in literature, cinema, and popular culture. We will look at the historical development shaping their respective architecture and why they became the three major urban centers in North Africa. Home to Muslims, Christians, and Jews, they are an ebullient laboratory of social, political, religious, and cultural issues, global and local, between the nineteenth and twenty-first centuries. We will look at mass images of these cities, from films to maps, novels to photographs, sketching a new vision of these magnets as places where power, social rituals, legacies of the Ottoman and French colonial past, and the influence of the global economy collude and collide. Special focus on class, gender, and race. Open to both undergrad and grad students!.
Same as: CSRE 140S, FRENCH 236, FRENCH 336, HISTORY 245C, URBANST 140F

AFRICAAM 238J. The European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates. 4-5 Units.

Why and how did Europeans claim control of 70% of African in the late nineteenth century? Students will engage with historiographical debates ranging from the national (e.g. British) to the topical (e.g. international law). Students will interrogate some of the primary sources on which debaters have rested their arguments. Key discussions include: the British occupation of Egypt; the autonomy of French colonial policy; the mystery of Germany¿s colonial entry; and, not least, the notorious Berlin Conference of 1884-1885.
Same as: HISTORY 238J, HISTORY 338J

AFRICAAM 241. Race, Justice, and Integration. 3 Units.

Recent philosophical research on injustice, race, and the ideal of racial integration.
Same as: EDUC 241, PHIL 142, PHIL 242

AFRICAAM 241A. Gentrification. 5 Units.

Neighborhoods in the Bay Area and around the world are undergoing a transformation known as gentrification. Middle- and upper-income people are moving into what were once low-income areas, and housing costs are on the rise. Tensions between newcomers and old timers, who are often separated by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, can erupt; high rents may force long-time residents to leave. In this class we will move beyond simplistic media depictions to explore the complex history, nature, causes and consequences of this process. Students will learn through readings, films, class discussions, and engagement with a local community organization. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center).
Same as: CSRE 141, URBANST 141

AFRICAAM 241J. African Americans in Germany. 1-5 Unit.

In this class, we will wrestle with the question: How have African Americans understood their experiences with race outside of the United States? African Americans have been migrating and circulating the globe for centuries, and it is only recently that scholars have considered the ways in which an abroad experience has been transformative for African Americans. In this seminar style class, we will explore why and how African Americans have used their experiences in Germany to express a new understanding of their Black identity in the United States. We will also explore processes of oversexualization, stereotyping, and translation (of Black culture in Germany) in addition to interrogating the politics of identity in our examination of Blackness in Europe. Taught in English. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: GERMAN 241

AFRICAAM 245. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore the impact and relative salience of racial/ethnic identity on select issues including: discrimination, social justice, mental health and academic performance. Theoretical perspectives on identity development will be reviewed, along with research on other social identity variables, such as social class, gender and regional identifications. New areas within this field such as the complexity of multiracial identity status and intersectional invisibility will also be discussed. Though the class will be rooted in psychology and psychological models of identity formation, no prior exposure to psychology is assumed and other disciplines-including cultural studies, feminist studies, and literature-will be incorporated into the course materials.
Same as: CSRE 245, EDUC 245

AFRICAAM 250J. Baldwin and Hansberry: The Myriad Meanings of Love. 4 Units.

This course looks at major dramatic works by James Baldwin and Lorraine Hansberry. Both of these queer black writers had prophetic things to say about the world-historical significance of major dramas on the 20th Century including civil rights, revolution, gender, colonialism, racism, sexism, war, nationalism and as well as aesthetics and politics.
Same as: AMSTUD 250J, CSRE 250J, FEMGEN 250J, TAPS 250J

AFRICAAM 252C. The Old South: Culture, Society, and Slavery. 5 Units.

This course explores the political, social, and cultural history of the antebellum American South, with an emphasis on the history of African-American slavery. Topics include race and race making, slave community and resistance, gender and reproduction, class and immigration, commodity capitalism, technology, disease and climate, indigenous Southerners, white southern honor culture, the Civil War, and the region's place in national mythmaking and memory.
Same as: CSRE 252C, HISTORY 252C

AFRICAAM 255. Racial Identity in the American Imagination. 4-5 Units.

From Sally Hemings to Barack Obama, this course explores the ways that racial identity has been experienced, represented, and contested throughout American history. Engaging historical, legal, and literary texts and films, this course examines major historical transformations that have shaped our understanding of racial identity. This course also draws on other imaginative modes including autobiography, memoir, photography, and music to consider the ways that racial identity has been represented in American society. Most broadly, this course interrogates the problem of American identity and examines the interplay between racial identity and American identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 255D, CSRE 255D, HISTORY 255D, HISTORY 355D

AFRICAAM 258. Black Feminist Theater and Theory. 4 Units.

From the rave reviews garnered by Angelina Weld Grimke's lynching play, Rachel to recent work by Lynn Nottage on Rwanda, black women playwrights have addressed key issues in modern culture and politics. We will analyze and perform work written by black women in the U.S., Britain and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: sexuality, surrealism, colonialism, freedom, violence, colorism, love, history, community and more. Playwrights include: Angelina Grimke, Lorriane Hansberry, Winsome Pinnock, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan- Lori Parks, Ntzoke Shange, Pearl Cleage, Sarah Jones, Anna DeVeare Smith, Alice Childress, Lydia Diamond and Zora Neale Hurston.).
Same as: CSRE 258, FEMGEN 258X, TAPS 258

AFRICAAM 261E. Mixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa. 5 Units.

As scholar Werner Sollors recently suggested, novels, poems, stories about interracial contacts and mixed race constitute ¿an orphan literature belonging to no clear ethnic or national tradition.¿ Yet the theme of mixed race is at the center of many national self-definitions, even in our U.S. post-Civil Rights and South Africa¿s post-Apartheid era. This course examines aesthetic engagements with mixed race politics in these trans- and post-national dialogues, beginning in the 1700s and focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries.
Same as: AMSTUD 261E

AFRICAAM 262C. African American Literature and the Retreat of Jim Crow. 5 Units.

After the unprecedented carnage of WWII, the postwar era witnessed the slow decline of the segregated Jim Crow order and the onset of landmark civil rights legislation. What role did African American literature and culture play in this historical process? What does this shift in racial theory and praxis mean for black literary production, a tradition constituted by the experience of slavery and racial oppression? Focus on these questions against the backdrop of contemporaneous developments: the onset of the Cold War, decolonization and the formation of the Third World, and the emergence of the "new liberalism.".
Same as: AMSTUD 262C, CSRE 262C

AFRICAAM 262D. African American Poetics. 5 Units.

Examination of African American poetic expressive forms from the 1700s to the 2000s, considering the central role of the genre--from sonnets to spoken word, from blues poetry to new media performance--in defining an evolving literary tradition and cultural identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 262D

AFRICAAM 267E. Martin Luther King, Jr. - His Life, Ideas, and Legacy. 4-5 Units.

Using the unique documentary resources and publications of Stanford's King Research and Education Institute, this course will provide a general introduction to King's life, visionary ideas, and historical significance. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will include presentations of documentaries such as Eyes on the Prize. Students will be expected to read the required texts, participate in class discussions, and submit a research paper or an audio-visual project developed in consultation with the professor.
Same as: AMSTUD 267E, HISTORY 267E

AFRICAAM 268. Black Temporality. 5 Units.

Futurity, progress, futurism, and history have become contested ideas within the valence of Black life. This course examines both the speculative imagination and the aspirational and pessimistic stakes of temporality within the Black diaspora. While Afrofuturism often privileges outer space and science fiction as its premier site and grammar, this course seeks to magnify other articulations of Blackness and time that may fall out of its purview. In so doing, this course considers how past and current socio-political movements (e.g., Haitian Revolution and Black Lives Matter), memory, reparations, and geography have informed critical race theory, philosophy, and Black expressive arts.

AFRICAAM 286. The Psychology of Racial Inequality. 3 Units.

Our topic is the psychology of racial inequality - thinking, feeling, and behaving in ways that contribute to racial stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination, and how these processes in turn maintain and perpetuate inequality between racial groups. We will examine how these processes unfold at both the individual and the institutional levels. Throughout this course, you will familiarize yourself with the psychological perspectives, methods, and findings that help explain racial inequality, and we will explore ways to promote racial equality. The course will be conducted as a seminar, but most of what you learn will be through the readings and discussions. That is, this course is minimally didactic; the goal is to have you engage thoughtfully with the issues and readings spurred in part by sharing perspectives, confusions, and insights through writing and discussion. Each student will facilitate at least one class session by providing an introductory framework for the readings (~10-minute presentation with handouts that overviews the concepts, issues, and controversies). Together, we will broaden our knowledge base on the subject and explain, from a psychological perspective, the pervasiveness of racial inequality. Prerequisites: PSYCH 1 and PSYCH 10.
Same as: CSRE 186, PSYCH 186, PSYCH 286

AFRICAAM 288. Tell Me Why That's (Non-)Human Nature': New Materialism and Black Life. 5 Units.

This course considers various entanglements of blackness and wrestles with the following questions: What is humanism? Why and how is race routinely excluded from discussions of ecological crises? From the vantage of black feminism and Black Studies, is new materialism actually ¿new¿? What are the racial and racist dynamics of quantum physics? How do these discourses help us consider aspects of visual culture and literature anew? This body of work will regularly touch on affect theory, post-humanism, queer theory, science-fiction, animality/animal studies, and disability studies, among other discourses. This course will enable students to consider the material stakes of blackness as they challenge the categories of human, environment, and embodiment.