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Office: Y2E2 Building, Suite 226
Mail Code: 4210
Phone: (650) 723-6117
Email: ampetti@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://eiper.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources are listed under the subject code ENVRES on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Program

The Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources develops the knowledge, skills, perspectives, and ways of thinking needed to understand and help solve the world's most significant environmental and resources sustainability challenges. E-IPER strives to be a model for interdisciplinary graduate education. E-IPER offers a Ph.D. in Environment and Resources, a Joint M.S. exclusively for students in Stanford's Graduate School of Business or Stanford Law School, and a Dual M.S. for students in the School of Medicine or a Ph.D. program in another department. E-IPER's home is the School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences; affiliated faculty come from all seven Stanford schools.

Graduate Programs in Environment and Resources

The University’s basic requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are discussed in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin. The E-IPER Ph.D. and M.S. degrees are guided by comprehensive requirements created with faculty and student input and approved by E-IPER's Executive Committee. To access the current Ph.D. and M.S. degree requirement documents, see the E-IPER web site.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

Completion of the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in Environment and Resources provides students with the knowledge, skills, perspectives, and ways of thinking needed to understand and help solve the world's most significant environmental and resources sustainability challenges.

Master of Science in Environment and Resources

For information on the University's basic requirements for the master's degree, see the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The Master of Science degree, offered as a joint master's degree or a dual master's degree, is an option only for: M.B.A. students in the Graduate School of Business; J.D. students in the Stanford Law School; M.D. students in the School of Medicine; students pursuing a Ph.D. in another Stanford department; and for E-IPER Ph.D. students who do not continue in the Ph.D. degree program.

Joint Master's Degree

Students enrolled in a professional degree program in Stanford's Graduate School of Business or the Stanford Law School are eligible to apply for admission to the Joint M.S. in Environment and Resources Degree program. Enrollment in the joint M.S. program allows students to pursue an M.S. degree concurrently with their professional degree and to count a defined number of units toward both degrees, resulting in the award of Joint M.B.A. and M.S. in Environment and Resources degree or a Joint J.D. and M.S. in Environment and Resources degree.

The joint M.S.-M.B.A degree program requires a total of 129 units: 84 units for the M.B.A. and 45 units for the M.S. (compared to 100 units for the M.B.A. plus 45 units for the M.S. as separate degrees) to be completed over approximately eight academic quarters.

The joint M.S.-J.D. degree program requires a minimum of 113 units; additional units may be necessary to satisfy all requirements. The J.D. degree requires 111 units (minimum of 80 Law units and 31 non-Law units) and the M.S. degree requires 45 units. The joint degree allows up to 43 overlapping units: 31 non-Law units allowed within the J.D. degree plus 12 professional school units allowed within the M.S. degree. The joint M.S.-J.D. may be completed in three years.

Each student's program of study focuses on a specific track (see "Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks" below) and is subject to the approval by the student's faculty adviser and E-IPER staff. The joint degree is conferred when the requirements for both the E-IPER M.S. and the professional degree program have been met.

In addition to requirements for the professional degree, all joint M.S. students are required to complete 45 units within the parameters outlined below and must achieve at least a 'B' average (3.0 grade point average) for all letter-graded courses taken toward the M.S. degree. Professional school letter-graded courses are not included in the E-IPER GPA calculation. The student must complete at least 23 units at the 200 level or above. Courses numbered 1 to 99 are not allowable. For application information, see the Admissions page on the E-IPER website.

  1. Required Courses: An introductory core course and a capstone project seminar: 

    Units
    ENVRES 280Topics in Environment and Resources2
    ENVRES 290Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources *1-3

    * The capstone project integrates the student's professional and M.S. degrees and may be completed in one quarter (3 units required) or across two quarters (for a total of either 3 or 4 units).

  2. Track Courses: A minimum of four letter-graded courses from one M.S. course track. Track courses must be taken for a minimum of 3 units. Specific track courses are listed below in the "Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks" section.
    1. Cleantech
    2. Climate and Atmosphere
    3. Energy
    4. Freshwater
    5. Global, Community, and Environmental Health
    6. Land Use and Agriculture
    7. Oceans and Estuaries
    8. Sustainable Built Environment
    9. Sustainable Design
  3. Elective Courses: At least four 3-5 unit letter-graded elective courses at the 100-level or higher. Elective courses may be taken from the student's selected course track, another course track, or elsewhere in the University, provided that they are relevant to the student's environment and resources course of study.

There are additional restrictions on course work used to fulfill the joint M.S. degree requirements:

  • A maximum of 5 units from courses that are identified as primarily consisting of guest lectures, such as the Energy Seminar, may be counted toward the Joint M.S. degree.
  • A maximum of 5 units of individual study courses, directed reading and/or independent research units (such as ENVRES 398 Directed Reading in Environment and Resources or ENVRES 399 Directed Research in Environment and Resources) may be counted toward the joint M.S. degree. One individual study course, if taken for 3-5 letter-graded units, may be counted as one of the four elective courses.
  • A maximum of 12 units from approved courses related to environmental and resource fields, from any professional school, may be counted toward the joint M.S. degree. One approved professional school course may be counted as one of the four electives.

Dual Master's Degree

Students in the School of Medicine or students pursuing a Ph.D. in another Stanford department may apply to the M.S. in Environment and Resources dual degree program. For the dual degree, students must meet the University's minimum requirements for their M.D. or Ph.D. degree and also complete an additional 45 units for the M.S. in Environment and Resources. Completion of the M.S. typically requires at least three quarters of study in addition to the time required for the student's other degree. For additional information, see the E-IPER web site.

Each student's program of study focuses on a specific track (see "Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks" below) and is subject to the approval of the student's faculty adviser and E-IPER staff. The two degrees are conferred when the requirements for both the E-IPER M.S. and the other degree program have been met. For application information, see the Admissions page on the E-IPER website.

In addition to requirements for the M.D. or Ph.D. degree, students are required to complete 45 units within the parameters outlined below and must achieve at least a 'B' average (3.0 grade point average) for all letter-graded courses taken toward the M.S. degree. The student must complete at least 23 units at the 200-level or above. Courses numbered 1 to 99 are not allowable.

  1. Required Courses: An introductory core course and a capstone project seminar:
    Units
    ENVRES 280Topics in Environment and Resources2
    ENVRES 290Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources (see '2' below)1-3
  2. The capstone project integrates the student's professional and M.S. degrees and may be completed in one quarter (3 units required) or across two quarters (for a total of either 3 or 4 units).

  3. Track Courses: A minimum of four letter-graded courses from one M.S. Course Track. Track courses must be taken for a minimum of 3 units. Specific track courses are listed below under Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks.
    • Cleantech
    • Climate and Atmosphere
    • Energy
    • Freshwater
    • Global, Community, and Environmental Health
    • Land Use and Agriculture
    • Oceans and Estuaries
    • Sustainable Built Environment
    • Sustainable Design
  4. Elective Courses: At least four additional 3-5 unit letter-graded elective courses at the 100 level or higher. Elective courses may be taken from the student's selected course track, another course track, or elsewhere in the University, provided that they are relevant to the student's environment and resources course of study.

There are additional restrictions on course work used to fulfill the dual M.S. degree requirements:

  • A maximum of 5 units from courses that are identified as primarily consisting of guest lectures, such as the Energy Seminar may be counted toward the dual M.S. degree.
  • A maximum of 5 units of individual study courses, directed reading, and independent research (such as ENVRES 398 Directed Reading in Environment and Resources or ENVRES 399 Directed Research in Environment and Resources) may be counted toward the Dual M.S. degree. One individual study course, if taken for 3-5 letter-graded units, may be counted as one of the four elective courses.
  • A maximum of 12 units from approved courses related to the environmental and resource fields, from any professional school, may be counted toward the dual M.S. degree. One approved professional school course may be counted as one of the four electives.

Joint M.S. and Dual M.S. Course Tracks

Students should consult the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site to view the course description, class schedule, location, eligibility, and prerequisites for all courses. Course track information and other recommended courses are also available on the E-IPER web site.

Cleantech

Units
APPPHYS 219Solid State Physics Problems in Energy Technology3
BIOE 355Advanced Biochemical Engineering3
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
CEE 207AUnderstanding Energy3-5
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 272RModern Power Systems Engineering3
CEE 274AEnvironmental Microbiology I3
CEE 274BMicrobial Bioenergy Systems3
CEE 276B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
CEE 277LSmart Cities & Communities3
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ENERGY 253Carbon Capture and Sequestration3-4
ENERGY 267Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties3
ENERGY 269Geothermal Reservoir Engineering3
ENERGY 293CEnergy from Wind and Water Currents3
MATSCI 256Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution3-4
MATSCI 302Solar Cells3
MATSCI 303Principles, Materials and Devices of Batteries3
MATSCI 316Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology3
ME 182Electric Transportation3
ME 260Fuel Cell Science and Technology3
ME 267Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems3

Climate and Atmosphere

Units
BIO 117Biology and Global Change4
BIO 238Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
CEE 172Air Quality Management3
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 263AAir Pollution Modeling3-4
CEE 263BNumerical Weather Prediction3-4
CEE 263CWeather and Storms3
CEE 263DAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions3
CEE 278AAir Pollution Fundamentals3
CEE 278CIndoor Air Quality2-3
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ENERGY 253Carbon Capture and Sequestration3-4
ESS 246AAtmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation3
ESS 246BAtmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation3
MS&E 294Systems Modeling for Climate Policy Analysis3

Energy

Units
APPPHYS 219Solid State Physics Problems in Energy Technology3
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
CEE 207AUnderstanding Energy3-5
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 226EAdvanced Topics in Integrated, Energy-Efficient Building Design2-3
CEE 255Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE3-4
CEE 256Building Systems4
CEE 272RModern Power Systems Engineering3
CEE 276B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ENERGY 101Energy and the Environment3
ENERGY 102Fundamentals of Renewable Power3
ENERGY 104Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion3
ENERGY 120Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering3
ENERGY 204Achieving Universal Energy Access by 2030: Can it be done?2-3
ENERGY 226Thermal Recovery Methods3
ENERGY 227Enhanced Oil Recovery3
ENERGY 253Carbon Capture and Sequestration3-4
ENERGY 267Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties3
ENERGY 269Geothermal Reservoir Engineering3
ENERGY 271Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics3
ENERGY 291Optimization of Energy Systems3-4
ENERGY 293BFundamentals of Energy Processes3
ENERGY 293CEnergy from Wind and Water Currents3
GEOPHYS 208Unconventional Reservoir Geomechanics3
MATSCI 256Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution3-4
MATSCI 302Solar Cells3
MATSCI 303Principles, Materials and Devices of Batteries3
MATSCI 316Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology3
ME 182Electric Transportation3
ME 260Fuel Cell Science and Technology3
ME 370AEnergy Systems I: Thermodynamics3
ME 370BEnergy Systems II: Modeling and Advanced Concepts4
ME 370CEnergy Systems III: Projects3-5
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3

Freshwater

Units
BIO 238Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
CEE 101BMechanics of Fluids4
CEE 174AProviding Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World3
CEE 174BWastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery3
CEE 177Aquatic Chemistry and Biology4
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 260APhysical Hydrogeology4
CEE 260CContaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport3
CEE 262AHydrodynamics3-4
CEE 262BTransport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows3-4
CEE 265ASustainable Water Resources Development3
CEE 265CWater Resources Management3
CEE 265DWater and Sanitation in Developing Countries1-3
CEE 266AWatersheds and Wetlands4
CEE 266BFloods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts4
CEE 270Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters3
CEE 271APhysical and Chemical Treatment Processes3
CEE 271BEnvironmental Biotechnology4
CEE 273Aquatic Chemistry3
CEE 273AWater Chemistry Laboratory3
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5

Global, Community, and Environmental Health

Units
ANTHRO 262Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
ANTHRO 266Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness3-5
ANTHRO 282Medical Anthropology5
BIO 117Biology and Global Change4
BIO 238Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
CEE 174AProviding Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World3
CEE 174BWastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery3
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 260CContaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport3
CEE 263AAir Pollution Modeling3-4
CEE 263DAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions3
CEE 265ASustainable Water Resources Development3
CEE 265CWater Resources Management3
CEE 265DWater and Sanitation in Developing Countries1-3
CEE 270Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters3
CEE 272Coastal Contaminants3-4
CEE 274DPathogens and Disinfection3
CEE 276Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis3
CEE 277SDesign for a Sustainable World1-5
CEE 278AAir Pollution Fundamentals3
CEE 278CIndoor Air Quality2-3
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
HUMBIO 153Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges4
HUMBIO 166Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context4

Land Use and Agriculture

Units
ANTHRO 266Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness3-5
BIO 117Biology and Global Change4
BIO 234Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective3
BIO 238Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 275ACalifornia Coast: Science, Policy, and Law3-4
EARTHSYS 155Science of Soils3-4
EARTHSYS 185Feeding Nine Billion4-5
EARTHSYS 187FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems2-3
EARTHSYS 205Food and Community: Food Security, Resilience and Equity2-3
EARTHSYS 206World Food Economy4
EARTHSYS 276Open Space Management Practicum4-5
EARTHSYS 281Urban Agriculture in the Developing World3-4
EARTHSYS 289AFEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation3-4
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ECON 206World Food Economy4
ESS 164Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS)3-4
ESS 206World Food Economy4
ESS 216Terrestrial Biogeochemistry3
ESS 256Soil and Water Chemistry3
ESS 262Remote Sensing of Land4
ESS 270Analyzing land use in a globalized world3
ESS 280Principles and Practices of Sustainable Agriculture3-4
ESS 281Urban Agriculture in the Developing World3-4
HUMBIO 166Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context4
SUST 210Pursuing Sustainability: Managing Complex Social Environmental Systems3
URBANST 163Land Use Control4
URBANST 165Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning4-5

Oceans and Estuaries

Units
BIO 238Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
BIOHOPK 263HOceanic Biology4
BIOHOPK 272HMarine Ecology: From Organisms to Ecosystems5
BIOHOPK 273HMarine Conservation Biology4
BIOHOPK 274Hopkins Microbiology Course3-12
BIOHOPK 285HEcology and Conservation of Kelp Forest Communities5
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 262DIntroduction to Physical Oceanography4
CEE 272Coastal Contaminants3-4
CEE 274SHopkins Microbiology Course3-12
CEE 275ACalifornia Coast: Science, Policy, and Law3-4
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ESS 241Remote Sensing of the Oceans3-4
ESS 244Marine Ecosystem Modeling3
ESS 246AAtmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation3
ESS 246BAtmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation3
ESS 251Biological Oceanography3-4
ESS 252Marine Chemistry3-4
ESS 258Geomicrobiology3

Sustainable Built Environment

Units
CEE 100Managing Sustainable Building Projects4
CEE 174AProviding Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World3
CEE 174BWastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery3
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
CEE 224XSustainable Urban Systems Fundamentals3-5
CEE 224YSustainable Urban Systems Project1-5
CEE 224ZSustainable Urban Systems Project1-5
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 226EAdvanced Topics in Integrated, Energy-Efficient Building Design2-3
CEE 241AInfrastructure Project Development3
CEE 243Intro to Urban Sys Engrg3
CEE 255Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE3-4
CEE 256Building Systems4
CEE 265ASustainable Water Resources Development3
CEE 276B100% Clean, Renewable Energy and Storage for Everything3-4
CEE 277LSmart Cities & Communities3
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ME 267Ethics and Equity in Transportation Systems3
URBANST 163Land Use Control4
URBANST 165Sustainable Urban and Regional Transportation Planning4-5

Sustainable Design

Units
CEE 226Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems3-4
CEE 277SDesign for a Sustainable World1-5
EARTHSYS 187FEED the Change: Redesigning Food Systems2-3
EARTHSYS 289AFEED Lab: Food System Design & Innovation3-4
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ENVRES 240Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception1-3
ENVRES 380Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations3-4
ME 206ADesign for Extreme Affordability4
ME 206BDesign for Extreme Affordability4
ME 216AAdvanced Product Design: Needfinding3-4
ME 316BDesign Impact Master's Project II2-6
ME 377Design Thinking Studio4
SUST 210Pursuing Sustainability: Managing Complex Social Environmental Systems3

Master of Science

In exceptional circumstances, students in E-IPER's Ph.D. program may opt to complete their training with a Master of Science degree. There is no direct admission to the M.S. degree program. Requirements for the M.S. include:

  1. Completion of a minimum of 45 units at or above the 100-level, of which 23 units must be at or above the 200-level. Courses numbered 1 to 99 are not allowable.
  2. Completion of the E-IPER Ph.D. core curriculum, with a letter grade of 'B' or higher in each course:    
Units
ENVRES 300Introduction to Resource, Energy and Environmental Economics3
ENVRES 315Environmental Research Design Seminar1
ENVRES 320Designing Environmental Research3-4
ENVRES 330
ENVRES 398
Research Approaches for Environmental Problem Solving
and Directed Reading in Environment and Resources
4-13

Additional courses may be chosen in consultation with the student's lead advisers. Students must maintain at least a 'B' (3.0) grade point average in all courses taken for the M.S. degree. The M.S.degree does not have an M.S. with thesis option. Students may write a M.S. thesis, but it is not formally recognized by the University.

Doctor of Philosophy in Environment and Resources

For information on the University's basic requirements for the Ph.D. degree, see the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

E-IPER updates the Ph.D. requirements annually, laying out the structure of advising meetings, core courses, program activities, and milestones that guide students' progress. Each student works with a faculty advising team from different research areas to design a course of study that allows the student to develop and exhibit:

  1. understanding of analytical tools and research approaches for interdisciplinary problem solving, and a mastery of those tools and approaches central to the student's thesis work
  2. depth of knowledge in at least two distinct fields of inquiry; and
  3. interdisciplinary breadth as determined by faculty, advising team, and student.

Program-specific Ph.D. requirements, including a timeline to achieve milestones, are outlined in detail in the current year requirements and are summarized below:

  1. In the first year, completion of the Ph.D. core course sequence:
    Units
    ENVRES 300Introduction to Resource, Energy and Environmental Economics3
    ENVRES 315Environmental Research Design Seminar1
    ENVRES 320Designing Environmental Research3-4
    ENVRES 330Research Approaches for Environmental Problem Solving3
    ENVRES 398Directed Reading in Environment and Resources1-10
  2. Fields of Inquiry: Fulfillment of depth of knowledge in the student's two chosen fields of inquiry through courses, research, and/or independent studies as determined by the student and their two lead advisers and committee members. Fields of inquiry are central to the student's dissertation research. Students have the freedom to define and choose the two fields of inquiry in which they develop depth of understanding throughout their Ph.D. program; the fields must be distinct from one another to ensure that the student's research is interdisciplinary. Each field of inquiry is associated with a specific lead adviser.

As part of the qualifying exam, each student is required to submit a detailed essay describing:

  • the two fields of inquiry, explaining the development of these fields, and their relationship to the larger disciplines from which they are drawn;

  • how rigor is understood and achieved in these fields;

  • the importance and applicability of these fields to the student's research questions; and

  • how the student's work will combine these two fields of inquiry to produce an interdisciplinary research project that demonstrates scholarly rigor.

  1. Demonstration of an interdisciplinary breadth of knowledge that is more broadly related to environment and resources; this may be in the form of courses, independent study, and/or evidence of proficiency through prior course work or other experience. Fulfillment of the interdisciplinary breadth requirement must be certified by the student's lead faculty advisers and committee members.
  2. Completion of quarterly meetings with advisers during the first year, and at minimum, annual meetings thereafter.
  3. Submission of a candidacy plan for review at the second-year committee meeting and subject to the approval of that plan by the student's committee and E-IPER's faculty director. The candidacy plan documents how the student has fulfilled the program requirements to date and includes a summary of research ideas and a list of faculty who might serve as qualifying exam committee members.
  4. Completion of the oral qualifying examination and completion of the requirements for candidacy, including at least 25 letter-graded graduate course units (200 level and above) with at least a 'B' (3.0) average. The qualifying exam committee must include the student's two lead advisers and two to three other faculty members with expertise in the student's research area. The majority of the qualifying exam committee should be members of the Stanford Academic Council; the chair of the committee must be a Stanford Academic Council member and may not be one of the student's two lead advisers. In exceptional cases, the committee may include a member-at-large who is not a Stanford faculty member as a fourth or fifth member.
  5. Completion of a written dissertation, approved by the student's dissertation reading committee consisting of the student's lead advisers and at least one other member and passage of the University oral examination in defense of the dissertation following the guidelines outlined in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. The University oral examination committee comprises the student's two lead advisers, at least two additional members, and a chair whose academic appointment is in a department outside that of the lead advisers. Normally, all committee members are Academic Council members; appointment of a non-Academic Council member must be petitioned and approved by the faculty director.

In addition to the requirements listed above, all Ph.D. students must:

  1. Serve as a teaching assistant (TA) for at least one quarter, as a discussion section leader or with an opportunity to lecture in at least two class sessions, in any department or program, including but not limited to ENVRES 320 Designing Environmental Research or ENVRES 330 Research Approaches for Environmental Problem Solving. Seminars, including Introductory Seminars, may not be used to fulfill this requirement. Students should fulfill the teaching requirement by the end of the third year unless they obtain a firm commitment from a faculty member to TA a future course.
  2. On an ongoing basis, submit grant proposals for external funding, defined as fellowship and/or research funds provided by a government agency, a private foundation, or a University entity other than E-IPER or the School of Earth, Energy and Environmental Sciences.
  3. Participate each year in a Spring Quarter Annual Review in which the student and lead advisers submit progress reports for review by the E-IPER Academic Guidance Committee.

Graduate Advising Expectations

The Program in Environment and Resources is committed to providing academic advising in support of graduate student scholarly and professional development. When most effective, this advising relationship entails collaborative and sustained engagement by both the adviser and the advisee. As a best practice, advising expectations should be periodically discussed and reviewed to ensure mutual understanding. Both the adviser and the advisee are expected to maintain professionalism and integrity.

Faculty advisers guide students in key areas such as selecting courses, designing and conducting research, developing of teaching pedagogy, navigating policies and degree requirements, and exploring academic opportunities and professional pathways.

Graduate students are active contributors to the advising relationship, proactively seeking academic and professional guidance and taking responsibility for informing themselves of policies and degree requirements for their graduate program.

For a statement of University policy on graduate advising, see the "Graduate Advising" section of this bulletin.

Faculty Director: Peter Vitousek

Acting Faculty Director (Autumn 2018) Nicole Ardoin

Associate Director: Susannah Barsom

Anthropology: Lisa Curran, William H. Durham, Anne Ehrlich, James Ferguson, Lynn Meskell, Krish Seetah, Michael Wilcox

Biology: Barbara Block, Larry B. Crowder, Gretchen C. Daily, Giulio De Leo, Rodolfo Dirzo, Paul Ehrlich, Christopher Field, Tadashi Fukami, Elizabeth Hadly, Donald Kennedy, Harold Mooney, Erin Mordecai, Stephen Palumbi, Kabir Peay, Robert Sapolsky, Shripad Tuljapurkar, Peter Vitousek

Business: William Barnett, David Broockman, Dan Iancu, Hau Lee, Dale T. Miller, Erica Plambeck, Hayagreeva Rao, Stefan J. Reichelstein, Dan Reicher, Baba Shiv, Sarah A. Soule

Carnegie Institution: Gregory Asner, Ken Caldeira, Anna Michalak

Civil and Environmental Engineering: Sarah L. Billington, Alexandria Boehm, Craig S. Criddle, Jennifer Davis, Martin Fischer, David Freyberg, Olivier Fringer, Mark Jacobson, Jeffrey Koseff, Michael Lepech, Raymond Levitt, Richard Luthy, Gilbert M. Masters (emeritus), Stephen Monismith, Leonard Ortolano, Ram Rajagopal

Communications:  Jon A Krosnick

Earth System Science: Kevin Arrigo, Marshall Burke, Karen Casciotti, Page Chamberlain, Noah Diffenbaugh, Robert B. Dunbar, Scott Fendorf, Steven Gorelick, James Holland Jones, Julie Kennedy, Eric Lambin, David Lobell, Katharine Mach, Pamela Matson, Rosamond Naylor, Leif Thomas

Earth Systems Program: Patrick Archie, Richard Nevle

Economics: Kenneth J. Arrow (emeritus), Lawrence Goulder, Charles Kolstad

Education: Nicole Ardoin, Daniel McFarland, Walter W. Powell

Energy Resources Engineering: Sally M. Benson, Adam Brandt, Jef Caers, Margot Gerritsen, Anthony Kovscek

English: Mark Algee-Hewitt

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies: Walter Falcon (emeritus), Stephen Stedman

Geological Sciences: Gary Ernst (emeritus)

Geophysics: Jenny Suckale, Mark Zoback

Global Climate and Energy Program: Sally M. Benson

Global Ecology: Gregory Asner, Ken Caldeira, Anna Michalak

History: Zephyr Frank, David Kennedy, Richard White, Mikael Wolfe

Law: Michelle Anderson, Janet Martinez, Deborah Sivas, Barton Thompson, Michael Wara

Management Science and Engineering: Dariush Rafinejad, James Sweeney, John Weyant

Materials Science and Engineering: Michael D. McGehee

Medicine: Michele Barry, Eran Bendavid, Mark Cullen, Christopher Gardner, Jeremy D Goldhaber-Fiebert, Desiree LaBeaud, Stephen P. Luby, Grant Miller, Thomas N. Robinson, Gary Schoolnik, Gary Shaw

Packard Foundation: Margaret Caldwell

Philosophy: Debra Satz

Political Science: Bruce E Cain, Terry Karl, Clayton Nall, Kenneth Schultz, Jeremy Weinstein

Precourt Energy Efficiency Center: James Sweeney, John Weyant

Precourt Institute for Energy: Charles D. Kolstad

Program in Writing and Rhetoric: Emily Polk

Psychology: Brian Knutson

Sociology: Mark Granovetter, Douglas McAdam, Richard Scott, Robb Willer

Stanford Educational Farm: Patrick Archie

Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research: Charles D. Kolstad

Woods Institute for the Environment: Newsha Ajami, Nicole Ardoin, Kevin Arrigo, Shilajeet Banerjee, Michele Barry, Eran Bendavid, Sally M. Benson, Barbara Block, Alexandria Boehm, Adam Brandt, Marshall Burke, Craig S. Criddle, Larry B. Crowder, Mark Cullen, Lisa Curran, Gretchen C. Daily, Jennifer Davis, Noah Diffenbaugh, Rodolfo Dirzo, Robert B. Dunbar, William H. Durham, Paul Ehrlich, Walter Falcon, Scott Fendorf, Christopher B. Field, David Freyberg, Olivier Fringer, Steven Gorelick, Mark Granovetter, Elizabeth Hadly, Mark Jacobson, James Holland Jones, David Kennedy, Donald Kennedy (emeritus), Julie Kennedy (emeritus), Brian Knutson, Charles D. Kolstad, Jeffrey Koseff, Eric Lambin, James Leape, Hau Lee, Michael Lepech, Raymond Levitt, David Lobell, Stephen P. Luby, Richard Luthy, Gilbert M. Masters, Pamela Matson, Michael D. McGehee, Lynn Meskell, Stephen Monismith, Harold Mooney, Rosamond Naylor, Leonard Ortolano, Stephen Palumbi, Erica Plambeck, Stefan J. Reichelstein, Thomas N. Robinson, Gary Schoolnik, Deborah Sivas, Stephen Stedman, Jenny Suckale, James Sweeney, Barton Thompson, Peter Vitousek, Michael Wara, John Weyant, Richard White

Courses

ENVRES 199. Independent study. 1-5 Unit.

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Same as: ENVRES 299

ENVRES 201. Designing and Evaluating Community Engagement Programs for Social and Environmental Change. 3 Units.

Non-profit organizations seeking to achieve social and environmental change often run outreach and education programs to engage community members in their cause. Effective application of social science theory and methods may improve the design and evaluation of such community engagement programs. In this class, we partner with environmental and social justice organizations in the Bay Area to explore two questions: 1) How can recent findings from the social sciences be applied to design more effective community engagement programs ? 2) How can we rigorously evaluate outreach and education programs to ensure they are achieving the desired objectives? The course will include an overview of key theories from psychology, sociology, and education, field trips to partnering organizations, and a term-long community-engaged research project focused on designing and/or evaluating a local outreach or educational program that is meant to achieve social and environmental change.
Same as: EARTHSYS 130

ENVRES 212. Cities and Sustainability: Current Issues, Policy, and Law. 2 Units.

Cities are on the front lines of solving many of society's sustainability problems, from advancing green buildings and clean energy, to preparing for the effects of climate change. With a diminishing role of the federal government on environmental policy and regulation, it is up to sub-nationals like states and cities to lead innovation and deployment of clean energy, resilience strategies, water management, and more. This class will explore the evolving role of cities in advancing sustainability from the lens of law, policy, planning, and governance. Some of the topics we will discuss in-depth include climate mitigation, clean energy, green buildings, climate adaptation and resilience, water supply and reuse, land use and transportation, and more. Case studies will focus on U.S. cities with some emphasis on California. Overarching themes across all content areas include legal constraints of city authority, governance, socioeconomic tradeoffs, and the roles of various types of institutions in developing, advancing, and advocating for local policy change. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Exam. Crosslisted with LAW 2512.

ENVRES 220. The Social Ocean: Ocean Conservation, Management, and Policy. 1-2 Unit.

This interdisciplinary seminar addresses current coastal and marine topics through a series of readings, discussions, and guest lecturer presentations. Through classic and contemporary scientific literature, news articles, and multimedia sources, students will examine the challenges of coastal and marine policy and management and investigate the human dimensions of potential solutions. The course will begin with global scale topics and conclude with the individual stories of human connection to the ocean. This seminar is open to advanced undergraduate and graduate students.

ENVRES 221. New Frontiers and Opportunities in Sustainability. 1 Unit.

Interdisciplinary exploration of how companies, government and non-profit organizations address some of the world's most significant environmental & resource sustainability challenges. Each week we will explore with an experienced sustainability practitioner new frontiers and opportunities in clean tech, policy, energy, transportation, consumer goods, agriculture, food, and sustainable built environments.

ENVRES 222. Climate Law and Policy. 3 Units.

This course offers an interdisciplinary, graduate-level survey of historical and current efforts to regulate emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States. Students will read primary legal documents¿including statutes, regulations, and court cases¿in order to evaluate the forces and institutions shaping American climate policy. Although the class will focus on the intersection of climate policy and the legal system, no specific background in law is necessary.

ENVRES 225. E-IPER Current Topics Seminar. 1 Unit.

For E-IPER Ph.D and Joint M.S. students only. Weekly presentations of E-IPER students' research and other program-related projects. Occasional guest speakers. Individual or team presentation, active participation, and regular attendance required for credit. May be taken for credit a maximum of two times.

ENVRES 226. Energy Law. 3 Units.

Modern energy systems aim to deliver a supply of reliable, low-cost, and clean energy; in turn, they require massive capital investments in infrastructure projects, some of which have the features of a natural monopoly and therefore require ongoing economic regulation. The U.S. energy system today is subject to a complex regime of state and federal laws. We will examine the historical role of state-level electric utility regulation, tracing its evolution into the various forms of regulated and deregulated energy markets now in use in the U.S. electricity and natural gas sectors. Contemporary energy law increasingly involves a delicate federalist balance where state and federal regulators share overlapping authority in contested policy areas that are subject to major technological and economic change, as changes in the supply and costs of renewable and fossil energy resources alike transform the U.S. energy sector. Finally, we will interrogate the contested ideals of regulation and competition, which private, non-profit, and governmental stakeholders all deploy in legal and political fora to advance private gain and public goods¿most recently in a series of transformative proposals to use federal emergency powers to provide financial bailouts to legacy fossil and nuclear power plants. Students who complete the class will gain a historical understanding of how economic regulation of the energy sector has evolved since the early 20th century, a durable conceptual framework for understanding modern energy law and policy debates, and a practical understanding of energy law designed for future practitioners. Non-law students interested in energy issues are highly encouraged to take this course, as energy law literacy is essential to careers in the sector. Elements used in grading: class participation (20%), short written assignments (40%), and a one-day take-home final exam (40%). Cross-listed with LAW 2503.

ENVRES 230. Field Survey Data Collection & Analysis. 3 Units.

In this course we will examine a range of issues related to the collection and analysis of survey data. Topics will include initiating a survey, designing an instrument, conducting enumeration, converting data from questionnaires to digital files, data analysis, empirical modeling and presenting results. Technical components will also be highly focused on application and implementation, and while prior training in econometrics would be useful, it will not be a prerequisite. The course will be tailored so that some of the specific topics covered will be based on the needs and interests of the students.

ENVRES 240. Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception. 1-3 Unit.

Mobilizing successful conservation efforts to mitigate climate change and preserve both local and global ecosystems requires a new way of thinking. This course will investigate the barriers to pro-environmental behavior and the heuristics and biases that cloud our ability to respond effectively to environmental problems, using insights from behavioral economics, neuroeconomics, and environmental risk perception. Emphasis on interdisciplinary applications of recent research, and implications for environmental policymaking and persuasive messaging.

ENVRES 245. Psychological Insights for Science Communication. 2-3 Units.

This course integrates lessons learned from psychology, behavioral economics, marketing, and sociology to the practice of science communication, with practical experience working to create and test new messaging for partner environmental organizations. Students learn about innate biases and heuristics that influence the communication of scientific ideas and data and the public¿s receptiveness to environmental messaging. Topics covered include information framing, attention and salience, public science literacy and numeracy, simplifying complexity and dealing with uncertainty, cultural and political contexts and social norms, and methods to motivate science engagement, evidence-based decision-making, and behavior change. Students will learn how to design new messaging strategies based on social science research and how to analyze their efficacy using basic statistical analyses in R (no prior programming knowledge is required). The course culminates in a project developing and testing new messaging strategies for real-world environmental organizations.

ENVRES 246. Measuring Success in Environmental Messaging. 1-2 Unit.

How do we understand the impacts of environmental messaging on its target audience, and ensure that it provides compelling and informative content for education, outreach, and behavior change? Once different messaging campaigns have been attempted, how do we evaluate their success? This course teaches students practical social science approaches to assess the efficacy of environmental messaging campaigns by real environmental nonprofit organizations. As a continuation of [course # for Psychological Insights for Science Communication], students will work with partner nonprofit organizations to analyze the performance of campaigns designed in the previous quarter, and identify the most salient and motivational aspects of the campaigns that best predicted successful and meaningful outcomes. The course will also focus on how to evaluate outcomes across heterogeneous populations, to better understand how messaging may impact a diverse audience. The statistical computing language R will be used in the course, but prior programming experience is not required. Prerequisite: ENVRES 245 : Psychological Insights for Science Communication or consent of instructor required.

ENVRES 250. Environmental Governance. 3 Units.

How do we work together to solve environmental problems? Across the globe, who has a voice, and who ultimately decides how to balance conservation and development? How do we build governance institutions that facilitate both environmental sustainability and social equity? This seminar on environmental governance will focus on the challenges and opportunities for managing common-pool resources, like fisheries, forests, and water. Because managing environmental resources is often about managing people, we will explore the motivations underlying human behavior towards the environment. We will discuss how institutions encode our cultural values and beliefs, and how we can reshape these institutions to achieve more sustainable outcomes. Coursework includes foundational readings and a pragmatic exploration of case studies. Teaching cases address topics in community-based conservation, international protected areas, market-based approaches, coping with environmental risk, and other themes. Interested undergraduate and graduate students from any discipline are welcome.

ENVRES 270. Graduate Practicum in Environment and Resources. 1-5 Unit.

Opportunity for E-IPER students to pursue areas of specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, governmental agency, non-governmental organization, or multilateral organization. Meets US CIS requirements for off-campus employment with endorsement from designated school official.

ENVRES 276. Water Resources: Culture and Context. 3-5 Units.

Students in this discussion-based seminar will examine both the social and environmental challenges of managing California¿s freshwater resources. The multidisciplinary team of instructors will introduce a range of textual sources - engineering, cartographic, art historical, and ecological, to name a few - and the class will engage directly with Cantor¿s `Art of Water¿ exhibition as well as local feats of water infrastructure. Students will gain historically-grounded insights through tailored weekly assignments and develop creative solutions for freshwater security as the final project.
Same as: AMSTUD 276

ENVRES 280. Topics in Environment and Resources. 2 Units.

Required core course restricted to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. This course functions as a gateway to fundamental concepts in environment, energy and sustainability. Topics include climate change, ecosystem services, life cycle assessment, energy systems, food systems, and others. Students engage with affiliated faculty, and begin to develop ways to integrate science and technology with business, law and other professional skills to solve environment and resource problems.

ENVRES 290. Capstone Project Seminar in Environment and Resources. 1-3 Unit.

Required for and limited to E-IPER Joint M.S. students. Propose, conduct and publicly present final individual or team projects demonstrating the integration of professional (M.B.A., J.D., or M.D.) and M.S. in Environment and Resources degrees. Presentation and submission of final product required. 3 total units required; can all be taken during one quarter or divided over two sequential quarters.

ENVRES 299. Independent study. 1-5 Unit.

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Same as: ENVRES 199

ENVRES 300. Introduction to Resource, Energy and Environmental Economics. 3 Units.

Required core course restricted to first year E-IPER Ph.D. students. Examination of environmental, energy and natural resource management problems through the lens of economics, with an emphasis on hands-on practical problem-solving. Topics include market failure, cost-benefit analysis, finance, risk & uncertainty, non-market valuation, regulation, green accounting, rent, renewable resources, exhaustible resources, including energy, and biodiversity. Prerequisite: proficiency in multivariate calculus. Knowledge of basic microeconomics helpful but not essential.

ENVRES 315. Environmental Research Design Seminar. 1 Unit.

Required core course restricted to first year E-IPER Ph.D. students. Series of faculty presentations and student-led discussions on interdisciplinary research design as exemplars of the research design theories discussed in ENVRES 320. Designing Environmental Research. Topics parallel the ENVRES 320 syllabus. Corequisite: ENVRES 320.

ENVRES 320. Designing Environmental Research. 3-4 Units.

Required core course restricted to first year E-IPER Ph.D. students. Research design options for causal inference in environmentally related research. Major philosophies of knowledge and how they relate to research objectives and design choices. Identification of critical elements within a broad range of research designs. Evaluation of the types of research questions for which different designs are suited, emphasizing fit between objectives, design, methods, and argument. Development of individual research design proposals, including description and justification understandable to a non-specialist.

ENVRES 330. Research Approaches for Environmental Problem Solving. 3 Units.

Required core course restricted to first year E-IPER Ph.D. students. How to develop and implement interdisciplinary research in environment and resources. Assignments include development of research questions, a preliminary literature review, and a summer funding proposal. Course is structured on peer critique and student presentations of work in progress. Corequisite: ENVRES 398 with a faculty member chosen to explore a possible dissertation topic.

ENVRES 340. E-IPER PhD Writing Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

Required core course restricted to second-year E-IPER PhD students. Actively pursue one or more writing goals relevant to this stage in their graduate studies in a structured setting. Set specific writing goals, create and follow a plan for reaching these goals, and receive substantive feedback on their written products from their peers. Examples of writing products include, but are not limited to, the student's dissertation proposal, E-IPER Fields of Inquiry essay, a literature review, or a grant or fellowship application. By the end of the course, students are expected to have completed or have made substantial progress toward their writing goal.

ENVRES 380. Innovating Large Scale Sustainable Transformations. 3-4 Units.

This class establishes innovation of systemic transformations as a crucial leadership modality. It gives students the mindsets, theoretical framework, and hands-on experience in shaping innovative interventions that bring about scaled and profound transformations in the face of complex multi-factorial challenges. Students are immersed in the Deep Change Methodology, which combines systems thinking, strategy, design thinking, behavioral sciences, resilience theory, diffusion theory, decision theory, and a theoretical framework around scaled multistake-holder interventions. Tools and theories introduced in class will be used to structure large-scale transformations that simultaneously create sustainability and resilience on environmental, societal, and economic fronts. This project-based team-based class challenges students to find solutions for complex real world challenges. Consent of instructor required. Class meets Fridays starting week 2 (April 13th), for 8 weeks at 9.30am - 4.20pm. Week 9 presentations (June 1st) 3.00pm - 8.00pm.
Same as: SUST 230

ENVRES 391. Curricular Practical Training. 1 Unit.

Educational opportunities in research and development labs in industry. Qualified students engage in internship work and integrate that work into their academic program. Students register during the quarter they are employed and complete a research report outlining their work activity, problems investigated, results, and follow-on projects they expect to perform. Course may be repeated for credit.

ENVRES 398. Directed Reading in Environment and Resources. 1-10 Unit.

Under supervision of an E-IPER affiliated faculty member on a subject of mutual interest. Joint M.S. students must submit an Independent Study Agreement for approval. May be repeat for credit.

ENVRES 399. Directed Research in Environment and Resources. 1-15 Unit.

For advanced graduate students. Under supervision of an E-IPER affiliated faculty member. Joint M.S. students must submit an Independent Study Agreement for approval.

ENVRES 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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ENVRES 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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