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Residential Programs

Program Director: Warren Chiang 

Office: Sweet Hall, Garden Level

Residential Programs (ResProg) focuses on providing educational coherence for residential based programs, students and faculty.  Integrated Learning Environment  (ILE) and Summer Cohort Program are two primary areas that we integrate academic and residential experience. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture (ITALIC) and Structured Liberal Education (SLE) are two of the ILE programs that are academic year, immersive programs held in themed based dorms. Leland Scholars Program (LSP), is a four-week summer cohort intensive program also held in the residence. It facilitates the transition to college for incoming freshmen through carefully crafted activities, course work, discussions, and trips.

Structured Liberal Education

Director: Joshua Landy (French and Comparative Literature)

Associate Director: Jeremy Sabol

Lecturers: Katherine Kretler, Ery Shin, Greg Watkins, Mary Garcia, Peter Mann

Offices: Sweet Hall, Second Floor, and Florence Moore Hall
Mail Code: 94305-8581
Phone: (650) 725-4790
Email: sle-program@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://sle.stanford.edu

The Program in Structured Liberal Education (SLE) is a year-long residence-based great works course that satisfies several requirements at once: Thinking Matters, Writing and Rhetoric (both PWR1 and PWR2), and four of the Ways requirements. The curriculum includes works of philosophy, literature, art, and music from the ancient world to the present. The program is interdisciplinary in approach; it emphasizes intellectual rigor and individualized contact between faculty and students.

SLE has two fundamental purposes: to develop a student's ability to ask effective questions of texts, teachers, the culture, and themselves; and to develop intellectual skills in critical reading, expository writing, logical reasoning, and group discussion. SLE encourages students to live a life of ideas in an atmosphere that stresses critical thinking and a tolerance for ambiguity. Neither the instructors nor the curriculum provides ready-made answers to the questions being dealt with; rather, SLE encourages a sense of intellectual challenge, student initiative, and originality.

The residence hall is the setting for lectures and small group discussions. SLE enhances the classroom experience with other educational activities, including a weekly film series, writing tutorials, occasional special events and field trips, and a student-produced play each quarter.

Freshmen interested in enrolling in SLE should indicate this preference for their Thinking Matters assignment. SLE is designed as a three quarter sequence, and students are expected to make a commitment for the entire year (8 units each quarter).

SLE Courses Offered in 2017-18

Units
SLE 91Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 92Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 93Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 299Structured Liberal Education Capstone Seminar1
SLE 81Public Service Program1
SLE 99Directed Reading1
SLE 199Teaching SLE1

Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

Faculty Director: Karla Oeler (Art and Art History)

Associate Director: Kim Beil

Faculty: Nicholas Jenkins (English)

Lecturer: Jonathan Berger, Ryan Tacata

Program in Writing and Rhetoric Lecturer: Alexander Greenhough

Offices: Sweet Hall, Garden Level, and Stern Hall
Mail Code: 94305-7000
Phone: (650) 724-3163
Email: italic_ile@stanford.edu
Web Site: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/residential-programs/italic/overview

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for first-year students. Using art as the frame for discussing big ideas, frosh who participate in this yearlong academic program are part of a tight-knit community, living together, attending classes, and making art in Stern Hall’s Burbank House residence.

ITALIC is built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical, and practical purposes of art. The yearlong experience also fosters close exchanges between students and faculty, guest artists and scholars outside of class over meals, in hands-on arts-making workshops, and on excursions to arts events.

In ITALIC, students look closely at the integration of arts across the University and in the world outside, examining how art can illuminate or challenge existing categories of knowledge, including history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century. Immersed in the arts, they analyze major works of the visual, performing, and filmic arts, sharpen perceptual skills, and tap into their own channels of creative expression. Turning an aesthetic lens on life’s ordinary and exceptional features, ITALIC asks: How do the arts provide new ways of thinking about our world and ourselves?

ITALIC Courses Offered in 2018-19

Units
ITALIC 91Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Creating4
ITALIC 92Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Interpreting4
ITALIC 93Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging4
ITALIC 95WImmersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Writing Section4
ITALIC 99Immersion in the Arts: ITALIC Teaching1

Leland Scholars Program

Offices: Sweet Hall, Garden Level
Mail code: 94305-3092
Email: lelandscholars@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://lelandscholars.stanford.edu

In recognizing the need to prepare first year students for the academic, intellectual, social, and personal challenges they will face at Stanford, the Leland Scholars Program (LSP) facilitates the transition to college for incoming freshmen who may be the first in their family to attend college or attended under-resourced schools or communities.  Scholars will participate in a four-week residential program in the summer prior to arrival on campus.  This fully-funded program has a carefully crafted schedule of activities, coursework, discussions, and trips designed to support the transition to Stanford.  During the academic year, Leland Scholars will have access to additional advising and freshman seminars that sustain the community and reinforce the skills and strategies acquired during the program.

Immersion in the Arts Courses

ITALIC 91. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Creating. 4 Units.

Creating, is the first part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. In ITALIC 91 we ask: How do artists innovate? What roles can earlier artworks play in new creations? How do audiences create? In addressing these questions, we will read texts by Viktor Shklovsky, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Susan Sontag, among others. We will attend Tosca at the San Francisco Opera, the Susan Meiselas exhibition at SFMoMA, as well as street art and the home of the conceptual artist David Ireland in the Mission District of San Francisco. We will also have a class visit by the St. Lawrence String Quartet and attend a performance by the musician Nitin Sawhney with the dancer/choreographers WangRamirez on campus. In order to make talking about art a part of daily life, students taking ITALIC live together in Burbank and eat lunch with their professors after class on Tuesdays and Thursdays. The course enhances its academic endeavors with art-making opportunities in section and a two-week practicum with Dan Klein devoted to the art of improv.

ITALIC 92. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Interpreting. 4 Units.

Interpreting, is the second part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. Why do artworks affect us and how do we make sense of them? What makes it difficult to describe works of art and how can we do this well? How do our individual experiences influence our responses and interpretations? To address these questions in the winter quarter of ITALIC, we will read texts by such thinkers as Roland Barthes, Georg Simmel, and Roman Jakobson and attend various exhibitions and performances on and off campus, including a performances of the internationally-recognized Batsheva Dance Company at Memorial Auditorium. In conjunction with a specially-commissioned artwork by Mark Dion at the Cantor Arts Center, we will consider how contemporary artists are re-interpreting museum collections and think of curation as a form of art-making. Again, ITALIC will enhance its academic endeavors with art-making in section and in a two-week practicum with Marisa Galvez on Performing Trobar, which engages students in the literary and performative modes of troubadour lyrics.

ITALIC 93. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Challenging. 4 Units.

Challenging, is the third part of ITALIC, a year-long course that explores the ways people make and encounter a wide range of artworks, including music and performance, the visual arts, literature, film and other media. How does art contest cultural, political, and social assumptions and values? How does it challenge expectations about its form, medium, or content? Why are some art works difficult? How can we tell when art becomes something else, such as propaganda or marketing? To address these questions we will read work by Michel Foucault, Laura Mulvey, Edward Said, Mikhail Bakhtin, and Buckminster Fuller, among others. We will have the unique opportunity to attend a performance by Meredith Monk, as well as other art experiences (TBD) in the Bay Area. The course continues to enrich its academic endeavors with art-making opportunities in section and in a two-week filmmaking practicum with Adam Tobin. The quarter, and the year, culminates in a three-day field trip to Los Angeles where we will attend a music and/or theatrical performance (TBD), visit the Getty Center, the Broad Art Museum, and Watts Towers, among other important art sites.

ITALIC 95W. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Writing Section. 4 Units.

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge--history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law--by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one's perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.

ITALIC 99. Immersion in the Arts: ITALIC Teaching. 1 Unit.

Student-led courses in the arts. Topics change quarterly. Open to ALL students but current ITALIC students and alumni will be given priority.

Structured Liberal Education Courses

SLE 81. Public Service Program. 1 Unit.

This one-unit course is for participation in quarter-long service programs set up by the SLE program and conducted in consultation with the Haas Public Service Center. Available programs will vary by quarter. May be repeat for credit.

SLE 91. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Homer, Sappho, Greek tragedy, Plato, Aristotle, Zhuangzi, Confucius, the Heart Sutra, Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the Aeneid.

SLE 92. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Augustine, the Qur'an, Dante, Rumi, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Las Casas, Descartes, Locke, Mill, Schleiermacher, and Flaubert.

SLE 93. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Du Bois, Eliot, Woolf, Kafka, Brecht, Vertov, Beauvoir, Sartre, Fanon, Gandhi, and Morrison.

SLE 98. Directed Reading. 1 Unit.

Directed reading for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLE 99. Directed Reading. 1 Unit.

Directed reading for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.".

SLE 199. Teaching SLE. 1 Unit.

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SLE 299. Structured Liberal Education Capstone Seminar. 1 Unit.

Senior capstone project for students who were enrolled in SLE their freshman year.