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Office: 285 Santa Teresa St., Ste. 103A
Mail Code: 94305-6151
Phone: 650.498.0826
Email: findbalance@stanford.edu
Web Site: hhp.stanford.edu

Health and Human Performance (HHP) is organizationally housed within the Department of Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation and more specifically within Recreation and Wellness. The program offers experiences for academic credit as well as non-credit opportunities. Its academic pursuits are offered in partnership with the Department of Medicine. The academic units housed within HHP include Kinesiology, Outdoor Education, Physical Education, Wellness Education, and Lifeworks.

Purpose Statement

Through integrating theory, research, and experiential practice we create innovative, transformative learning environments focusing on holistic student development.

Values

Inspiring a healthier Stanford by inviting students into an intentional process grounded in the following values:

Actualization: Supporting self-efficacy through empowerment, learning experiences, and realization of the human potential.

Balance: Creating opportunities for individuals to recognize and utilize the essential elements of well-being.

Community: Providing inclusive opportunities for healthy social engagement and relationship building.

Leadership: Developing change agents who can apply learned knowledge and skills towards active citizenship.

Innovation: Designing effective ways of learning and promoting human flourishing in a hyper-complex, ever-accelerating culture experience.

Kinesiology

Focuses on the anatomy, physiology, and mechanics of human movement and their applications to exercise and lifetime physical activities. Offers 1-3 unit courses using the seminar, laboratory, and workshop as the primary component types.

Leadership Innovations

Fosters transformational leaders of character who through the facilitation of critical collaborative environments are prepared to be agents of positive change. Offers 1-3 unit courses using the lecture, seminar, discussion, and workshop as the primary component types.

Lifeworks

Fosters transformational student leaders and future citizens of character who through the facilitation of creative expression, mindfulness, and collaborative environments are prepared to be agents of positive change. Offers 1-3 unit courses using the lecture, seminar, discussion, and workshop as the primary component types.

Outdoor Education

Develops outdoor leaders who use risk, challenge, and experience as educational tools with a variety of applications. Offers 1-3 unit courses using the lecture, seminar, and workshop as the primary component types.

Physical Education

Provides physical activity courses where knowledge associated with the proper performance of an activity is presented and discussed. Offers 1-2 unit courses using activity as the primary component type.

Wellness Education

Inspires a healthier, more vibrant university through teaching effective wellness theories and practices that promote flourishing and empower students to positively transform their lives and communities. Offers 1-3 unit courses using the lecture, seminar, discussion, and workshop as the primary component types.

Director: Christopher Pelchat (Outdoor Education)

Associate Director: Aneel Chima (Wellness Education)

Associate Director: Tia Lillie (Kinesiology) 

Associate Director: New Hire (Lifeworks)

Lecturers: Diane Boxill (Wellness Education), Russ Carpenter (Writing and Rhetoric), Logan Chapman (Outdoor Education), Orgyen Chowang (Wellness Education), Robert Cusick (Wellness Education), Dustin DiPerna (Wellness Education), Sue Lowley (Outdoor Education), Fred Luskin (Wellness Education), Emily McCune (Outdoor Education), Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu (Wellness Education), Katherine Nobles (Wellness Education), Pamela Paspa (Wellness Education), Carole Pertofsky (Wellness Education),  John Rettger (Wellness Education), Tia Rich (Wellness Education), Jennifer Robinson (Wellness Education), Mikey Siegel (Wellness Education), Antja Thompson (Emergency Medicine), Andrew Toddhunter (Biology), Meag-gan Walters (Wellness Education), Peter Wright, (Outdoor Education), Donnovan Yisrael (Wellness Education)

Instructors: Gong Chen (Physical Education), Maithill Gavankar (Physical Education), Austin Lee (Physical Education), Ying Mitchell (Physical Education),  Erick Schlimmer (Physical Education), Tom Sarsfield (Physical Education), Matt Thornton (Physical Education), Todd Vas Dias (Physical Education), Nick Wooters (Physical Education)

Kinesiology Courses

KIN 1. Student Designed Fitness Programming. 1 Unit.

Students will learn how to design safe, effective, exercise programs based on their individual needs and interest. Through class discussions, assignments and participation, students will learn all the health-related and skill-related components of fitness such as cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, balance, agility, speed, power, and coordination. Prerequisite: All levels and abilities welcome.

KIN 2. Fitness for Life. 1 Unit.

Students will learn how to be physically active for life and its importance. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Identify basic components of health-related physical fitness: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility and body composition (2) Explain important concepts related to fitness and exercise (i.e. biomechanics, exercise nutrition, setting SMART goals, injury prevention, stress management, cardiovascular health, lower back care and principles of weight training. (3) Apply general fitness principles when engaging in a variety of physical activities such as: indoor cycling, weight-training, Pilates, yoga, H.I.I.T, plyometric-training, speed training and TRX. (4) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

KIN 100. Introduction to Human Movement: Mind-Body Performance. 1 Unit.

Investigate the basic principles governing human movement with an emphasis on sports applications and lifelong wellness. Conceptually and experientially examine the latest research and theories on basic anatomy and biology as pertaining to injury prevention, principles of optimal human performance, and the mind-body connection. Topics include periodization, modes of exercises, types of injuries, the healing process, and physiological and psychological factors influencing body movement.

KIN 101. Analysis of Human Movement. 2 Units.

Covers the basic principles governing human movement with an emphasis on sports and performance applications. Examines anatomy and biology (large- and small-scale structure and function); applied anatomy, both anatomy (body structure) and mechanics (force, torque), which together describe macroscopic movement; applied biology, specifically the molecular and cellular basis of movement mechanics (force, torque, etc) together describe macroscopic movement; applied biology, specifically the molecular and cellular basis of movement including muscles contraction, nerves signals, and related topics such as exercise damage, cramping, muscle memory, DOMS and fatigue.

KIN 102. Nutrition for Lifelong Physical Activity. 1 Unit.

Understand the bodies' nutritional needs in all capacities of human movement and daily physical activity is fundamental in achieving health and overall well-being. Learn how to nourish their body to build and maintain their health and well-being throughout their lives. Utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to: identify basic principles of healthy eating to prevent disease and promote optimal health and performance; recognize the role of food and contexts in which food choices are made; and make confident and intelligent eating decisions that will contribute to building and maintaining a well-nourished body, meeting its changing needs.

KIN 111. Psych of Optimal Performance. 1 Unit.

How the psychological skills that athletes and other performers apply in training, preparation, and competition influence optimal performance in multiple life domains. Surveys concepts of motivation, arousal regulation, self-confidence, team dynamics, mental skills training. Applies psychological techniques to enhance balanced performance, enjoyment, and self-satisfaction in sports and life.

KIN 120. Injury Prevention: Prevention & Care of Athletic Injuries. 2 Units.

Introduces the pathology and mechanism of musculoskeletal injury. Current practices and procedures in the prevention and care of injury will be reviewed and discussed. The information and discussion will allow students to identify risks physical injury and make injury risk aversion decisions.

Leadership Innovations Courses

LEAD 95. Ensemble Leadership. 1-3 Unit.

This experiential course allows students to grow as leaders through immersion in leadership positions in the Stanford Band. Topics covered will include traditional leadership and governance concepts, as well as approaches specifically effective in music ensembles.

LEAD 100. Leadership Intensive. 2 Units.

Strengthen your leadership skills in one of Stanford's only purely experiential learning opportunities. Leadership Intensive offers rising juniors a unique and immersive practice of leadership. Leadership Intensive is characterized by, as the name implies, intense exploration of your own leadership skills and abilities (courage required). Design thinking, diverse teams and hands-on practice are integral components of the program.

LEAD 101. Redefining Leadership as Developmental Process. 2 Units.

Examination of sources required for authentic leadership: connections, identity, integrity and personal power. Analysis of effective leadership practices and the application to collaborative environments.

LEAD 105. Art of Facilitation. 1 Unit.

This experiential education style course allows participants to develop and test their group facilitation skills. Students will explore delivering group initiatives surrounding popular leadership topics and learn how to help their group take away valuable learning from an educational experience. Topics include: Group dynamics theories, safety, assessing the physical, human and social environment to improve group effectiveness.

LEAD 110. Mindful Leadership. 1-2 Unit.

An exploration of one's inner life, ways of being in the world, and their expression in how one leads. Addresses the paradoxical task of merely paying attention to enhance our awareness of the socially constructed nature of reality and to feel comfortable to act with simplicity, empathy, and conviction. Through self-reflection, embodied practice, and creative expression through crossing borders students examine us and them. Mindful inquiry in expressed storytelling, collective knowing, appreciative intelligence, and is both scholarly and experiential.
Same as: CSRE 110P

LEAD 199. Selected Topics: Leadership Studies. 1-2 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles, please refer to the notes of each course section.

Lifeworks Courses

LIFE 101. Tools for a Meaningful Life. 3 Units.

Explores the foundational skills for a meaningful life. Features lectures by faculty from across the university and labs for experiential practice. Draws on research and practices from fields related to psychology, philosophy, literature, and neuroscience, as well as wisdom traditions from around the world. Focuses on developing human capacities necessary for a meaningful life including; attention, courage, devotion, resilience, imagination, and gratitude. Exposure to these capacities influences personal growth and its development in communities.

LIFE 102. Body Mapping: Embracing the Embodied Experiences of Your Life. 3 Units.

Utilize an anthropological lens to combine traditional analytic research with experiential contemplative practice to strengthen awareness of the body and embodied experiences. Explore cultural norms around the body as influenced by racial stereotypes, gender hierarchies, and political/economic/religious history. Investigate and express one's own body narrative through written, verbal, and creative methodologies.

LIFE 124. Counterstory in Literature and Education. 3 Units.

Counterstory is a method developed in critical legal studies that emerges out of the broad "narrative turn" in the humanities and social science. This course explores the value of this turn, especially for marginalized communities, and the use of counterstory as analysis, critique, and self-expression. Using an interdisciplinary approach, we examine counterstory as it has developed in critical theory, critical pedagogy, and critical race theory literatures, and explore it as a framework for liberation, cultural work, and spiritual exploration.
Same as: CSRE 141E, EDUC 141, EDUC 341

LIFE 125. The Stillness of the Dunes. 3 Units.

An advanced writing course in nonfiction craft, drawing, and contemplative practice. a significant portion of each class meeting will focus on the development and sharpening of writing craft, especially of the essay, in a hybrid form both scholarly and personal. We will also explore writing as meditative practice, through examples and through short exercises. We will deepen our cultural understanding of the desert and its impact, through art, literature, philosophy, film, and contemplative practice, and the course will build toward a four-day camping trip to the dunes of Death Valley, six weeks into the quarter.

LIFE 145. Trauma, healing, and empowerment. 3 Units.

This course will look at the ways in which humans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Same as: CSRE 145H

LIFE 165. Mindful Citizen. 3 Units.

Our study explores the development of mindfulness and related abilities that lead to mindful citizenship in ourselves and in the world. We examine the intersection of race and ethnicity with the emerging field of contemplative studies through the teachings of leaders whose lives were dedicated to both contemplation and social action. Through self reflection, experiential learning, and creative expression we explore the personal as political. We aim to develop the capacity to move among worldviews, transcending particular identities while simultaneously honoring each of them, finding peace among the component parts of our own psyche, and possessing the inner resources to make peace in a multicultural society.

LIFE 193. LifeWorks Individual Studies. 1-2 Unit.

Translate theoretical knowledge and acquired skills into actionable projects or initiatives that make positive impact within and/or beyond the Stanford community. Students work in collaborative groups or individually under the mentorship of the course instructor(s) to design, deliver, and evaluate an initiative or project.

LIFE 199. Selected Topics: LifeWorks. 1-2 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty/instructor(s) and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles and topics, please refer to the notes of each course section.

Outdoor Education Courses

OUTDOOR 5. Winter Camping and Travel. 1 Unit.

Learn basic skills for winter camping and travel including thermoregulation, avalanche awareness, proper winter weather clothing and equipment, common cold weather medical issues, and LNT for camping and travel. Field experience includes practicing travel techniques, snow shelter construction, snow slope evaluation, use of avalanche beacons, and winter route finding.

OUTDOOR 9. Travel as a Sacred Journey Towards Presence, Practice, and Purpose. 1-2 Unit.

Engage travel and pilgrimage as intentional contemplative practice for exploring one's life purpose. Experientially investigate, both individually and collectively, outer journeying as a support for inner reflection on meaning making and values creation. While immersed in environments ranging from nature settings to retreat communities learn about, contemplate, and practice a range of methods, informed by multiple spiritual and philosophical traditions, meant to enhance insight and human flourishing. All backgrounds and identities welcome.

OUTDOOR 10. Rock Climbing I: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is an introductory course. Students will learn skills necessary to get started exploring the world of indoor climbing. These skills include technical safety skills for bouldering and top-roped climbing, essential physical and mental skills, and strategies for training. Students will be taught with industry standard best practices in regards to safety, and provided with a multi-disciplinary approach to overall health and wellness. No experience necessary.

OUTDOOR 11. Rock Climbing II: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

In this course students will have the opportunity to build upon basic principles associated with rock climbing. Student will further explore variations in climbing efficiency techniques, crack climbing techniques, and training methodologies to enhance their climbing experience and help prevent injuries. Students will be taught with industry standard best practices in regards to safety, and provided with a multi-disciplinary approach to overall health and wellness.nPrerequisites: Rock Climbing 1 or at least 3 months previous climbing experience, current top-rope belay certification at the Stanford Climbing Wall.

OUTDOOR 12. Indoor Lead Climbing. 1 Unit.

Learn technical and safety skills pertaining to sport lead climibing. Apply specific physical and mental training principals to assist improving lead climbing performance and preventing over use injuries.

OUTDOOR 14. Rock Climbing: Gym to CRAG. 1 Unit.

Learn how to transition from indoor climbing facilities to outdoor rock climbing venues. Emphasis will be placed on evaluating risk, along with constructing and assessing safe anchoring systems using natural and bolted anchors.

OUTDOOR 15. Rock Climbing: Intermediate Anchors. 1 Unit.

Explore climbing safety systems as they apply to anchor building, self-rescue, impact forces, and belaying. Emphasis will be placed on constructing and evaluating safe traditional anchor systems as well as learning techniques for self-rescue in the single pitch outdoor rock climbing environment.

OUTDOOR 25. Introduction to Whitewater Kayaking. 1 Unit.

Instructs paddlers in whitewater kayaking techniques. Emphasizes basic skills needed for paddling class II, II whitewater rivers including paddle strokes, boat control, and essential whitewater safety information. Students will have to pass a swimming test to participate.

OUTDOOR 40. Stand Up Paddleboarding: Beginner. 1 Unit.

This course teaches students the basic skills, strokes, maneuvers and water safety skills of Stand Up Paddleboarding in a calm, flat-water setting.

OUTDOOR 41. Stand Up Paddleboarding: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on the development and refinement of the skills needed to paddle effectively in conditions where wind, waves, and current are present. Students will learn more advanced skills, strokes and maneuvers of SUP. This course is also designed to increase knowledge of SUP equipment.nnPrerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to SUP or successful demonstration of equivalent skills.

OUTDOOR 60. Introduction to Flyfishing. 1 Unit.

Introduces students to flyfishing and its constituent components as a sport and an art. Emphasizes basic skills needed to learn how to cast and tie knots. Students will learn basic stream ecology in order to better understand complex aquatic ecosystems, and thus, "read" water and make appropriate fly selections.

OUTDOOR 70. SCUBA Diving Open Water: Beginner. 1 Unit.

Acquire knowledge and skills to safely enjoy and gain limited experience in the diving environment under normal open water diving conditions. This course prepares students for Open Water SCUBA Diving PADI Certification. Topics include diving equipment, diving physics, medical aspects of diving, diving emergencies, the diving environment, diving practices, diving activities, and SCUBA diving skills.

OUTDOOR 71. SCUBA Diving Open Water: Advanced. 1 Unit.

Develop a diver who is confident, safe, relaxed, aware, and more able to enjoy the underwater world. Skills include: confidence to dive to deeper depths; night diving experience; boat diving techniques; river diving; ocean diving, currents, and marine environment; underwater navigation; and search and recovery techniques. This class is an excellent choice for certified divers who have not been diving for a while, and need to regain confidence.

OUTDOOR 72. SCUBA Diving Open Water: Rescue. 1 Unit.

Acquire knowledge and skills for individuals to effectively perform diver rescues and assists, manage diving accident situations, and render proper first aid. Prerequisites: OUTDOOR 70, OUTDOOR 71, EMED 110, EMED 224, or Instructor Permission.

OUTDOOR 100. Sociocultural Dynamics of Adventure. 3 Units.

An examination of the historical, psychological, social, and philosophical foundations of adventure experiences in American culture, folklore, and landscape. Experience adventure in a variety of contexts.

OUTDOOR 101. Introduction to Outdoor Education. 1 Unit.

Examine outdoor adventure activties through the perspective of a trip leader. Discuss risk management, judgment and decision making, group facilitaiton, program standard operating procedures, and legal liability.

OUTDOOR 105. Outdoor Living Skills. 1-2 Unit.

Introduction to essential skills for individual and group sustainability in a backcountry setting including shelter in outdoor environments, equipment selection and use, travel techniques, water and nutrition needs, planning and preparation, and risk management. Course includes the participation in a weekend backcountry experience. Corequisite: OUTDOOR 101.

OUTDOOR 106. Outdoor Leadership Practicum. 1-2 Unit.

Outdoor education and leadership theory integration through intensive field-based experiences. During these field-based experiences, students will engage with critical self-assessment process to better understand their own levels of competence leading others. Co-requisite: OUTDOOR 101, OUTDOOR 105.

OUTDOOR 107. Working with Youth in Recreational Settings. 1 Unit.

Experience youth engagement techniques designed for specific outcomes and useful in outdoor environments. Discuss trends in youth culture through an examination of the social, legal, and political systems of working with youth in recreational programs. Course includes planned and facilitated youth engagement activities. Pre or Co-Requisite: OUTDOOR 101.

OUTDOOR 110. Adventure Experience Management. 1 Unit.

This course covers the effective design and delivery of courses and multi-day outdoor experiences. Students will learn the fundamentals of: emergency action plans; how to manage local operating procedures (LOP); standard operating procedures; Instructional design and delivery. Prerequisite: OUTDOOR 106 or Instructor Permission.

OUTDOOR 119. Outdoor Educator Apprenticeship. 1-2 Unit.

This course provides the student an opportunity to lead a multi-day outdoor experiences in an official capacity. Experience includes: outdoor living skills, planning and logistics, leadership, risk management, environmental integration, and education. Students will plan and co-lead field outings. Prerequisites: OUTDOOR 106.

OUTDOOR 195. Outdoor Education: Assistant Instructor. 1-2 Unit.

Opportunity to work in a field setting under supervision. Supports creation of artifacts for use in instructional portfolio if seeking Outdoor Educator certification. Requires defined student goals/benchmarks prior to field instruction. Pre-requisite: OUTDOOR 106 and instructor approval.

Physical Education Courses

PE 1. Indoor Cycling. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach students basic concepts associated with indoor cycling as well as build cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility through structured individually paced indoor cycling workouts. Instructors motivate participants through intervals, hill climbs and coasts for the ultimate workout. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 2. Cross Training Fitness. 1 Unit.

Cross training fitness class will focus on combining different types of exercises to work the body as a whole to develop cardiovascular fitness, strength and power. All fitness levels are welcome. Class sessions will include exercises such as: indoor cycling, plyometrics, rowing, jump rope, circuit training, and various other exercises.

PE 3. Keep Calm, Jog On. 1 Unit.

Students will learn how to properly prepare, condition and pace themselves throughout a variety of workouts such as tempo runs, easy runs, interval training (speed and hills) and other training methods. At the end of the quarter, students will have the tools to develop their own training programs. Students will also gain knowledge on how to make intelligent choices that contribute to a healthy active lifestyle.Prerequisite: Students should be able to run continuously for at least 1 mile. If students can not run for 1 mile continuously, we recommend taking the following conditioning classes: Prerequisite: Students should be able to run continuously for at least 1 mile. If students cannot run for 1 mile continuously, we recommend taking the following conditioning classes: PE 1: Indoor Cycling, PE 5: TRX, PE 14: FUNctional Fitness Training, PE 7: Core Training, PE 12 or 13: Weight Training, PE16: Circuit Training or PE 17: Total Body Training.

PE 4. Walking for Stress Management. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on understanding the basic components of cardiovascular fitness, and flexibility. This will be achieved by teaching students how to monitor heart rate, record steps, prepare, train and pace themselves throughout a variety of walking workouts. Students will gain knowledge to make intelligent choices that contribute to a healthy active lifestyle.

PE 5. Fundamentals of TRX. 1 Unit.

Students will learn a variety of exercises that focuses on total body resistance exercise. This class allows you to move, stretch and strengthen the entire body. Exercising on the TRX utilizes gravity and movement to generate neuromuscular responses to changes in body position and mechanical advantage. Movements using the TRX integrate strength and balance into a single dynamic format. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 6. Barre Fusion. 1 Unit.

Students will learn a mix of Barre exercises, Pilates exercises, Yoga poses and stretching specifically designed to increase strength and muscle tone in the entire body and overall flexibility. We focus on proper alignment and improving posture. The exercises are intense and effective yet extremely accessible. This course will also utilize class instruction, assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 7. Core Training. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to help students improve their ability to stabilize the torso. A strong core is an essential component for performance in any sport, hobby and for life. Your posture will improve enabling you to breathe more deeply. You will move with the ease and grace that comes from finding balance the fulcrum of your body. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as muscle strength and endurance (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 8. Boot Camp. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on understanding the basic components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility). Students will have the opportunity to engage in a variety of physical activities, which will enhance all aspects of health-related fitness. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 12. Weight Training: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of weight training, including equipment use, exercise technique and safety procedures. By the end of the course, students should be able to safely demonstrate a variety of exercise techniques, as well as have a general appreciation for the benefits of strength training.

PE 13. Weight Training: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course will allow students to expand upon skills learned in Beginning Weight Training. Students will learn to design and develop a balanced weight training program to meet their goals. This course also provides an opportunity to develop skills in specific areas of strength training, endurance, and power. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: muscular strength and endurance, power, and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 14. FUNctional Fitness Training. 1 Unit.

Students will learn how to increase their cardiorespiratory fitness level, boost muscular strength and endurance, and improve flexibility. Class sessions incorporate different modes of activities that focus on core strength and endurance, balance, speed and agility, power, and joint range of motion. A variety of fitness equipment (free weights, weight machines, stability and medicine balls, cardiorespiratory machines, foam roller, TRX, resistance bands, etc.) will be utilized to optimally work the body through multiple movement planes. Through class discussions, assignments, assessments,, and student participation, students will leave with an (1) Understanding of basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Ability to perform activities of daily life effortlessly and without injuries, and improve their overall health, fitness and well-being and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 15. Weight Training for Women. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of weight training, including equipment use, exercise technique, proper stretching, safety procedures and injury prevention. The basics of the physiology of strength training and planning individual programs.

PE 16. Circuit Training. 1 Unit.

This class will focus on full-body conditioning workouts, combining resistance training and high-intensity aerobics. This challenging class provides a great workout as you move through a series of stations designed to elevate your heart rate and challenge your muscles. Stations may include body weight exercises, weights, resistant bands, stability balls, treadmills, etc. Class may be modified for all levels of fitness. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 17. Total Body Training. 1 Unit.

Students will learn a variety of exercises that focuses on the body as a whole. This class allows you to move, stretch and strengthen the entire body. A variety of equipment will be used to target all major muscle groups. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 20. Badminton: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the basic skills necessary to play the game of badminton. Fitness and training principles will be discussed as well as singles and doubles strategy. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 21. Badminton: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

TThis course will introduce the student to more advanced skills and strategies of the game of badminton. Emphasis will be placed on conditioning, shot selection, court positioning, and singles and doubles play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 22. Table Tennis: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Basic counters, topspins, and chops with both the forehand and backhand. Serve and return, emphasizing game situations and match play. All equipment provided.

PE 23. Table Tennis: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This class is intended for players who have experience playing table-tennis including those who have taken the beginning table-tennis class. Students should have prior experience in countering, looping, chopping, and serving.

PE 24. Pickleball: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on posture and control. This course will also cover the biomechanics associated with pickleball, as well as the rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of basic structures of the human anatomy to optimally perform the skills (2) Develop an understanding of exercises, stretches, and conditioning exercises to allow for more efficient movements, and (3) Understand and practice behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 25. Squash: Beginning/Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Techniques, rules and practice matches. Racquets, balls, and eye guards provided.

PE 26. Tennis: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on control. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 27. Tennis: Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with emphasis on control, depth, and direction. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic strategy and tactics. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: 26, or knowledge of rules and scoring and average ability in fundamental strokes but limited playing experience.

PE 28. Tennis: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with more emphasis on depth, direction, and spin. This course will also incorporate basic to advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing cooperative and competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: 27 or average ability in fundamental strokes, and regular playing experience.

PE 29. Tennis: Advanced. 1 Unit.

Students will refine stroke techniques with more emphasis on spin, power, and variety. This course will also incorporate advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 33. Golf: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the golf swing; putting, chipping, and sand play. We will also cover golf etiquette and rules. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 34. Golf: Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to further develop their golf swing and short game. This course will also review golf concepts, rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: PE 33 or golf experience.

PE 35. Golf: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to further develop their golf game by engaging in various golf drills and the opportunity to practice on all facets of golf. Students will learn how to lower scores and manage the game on the course. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: 34 or equivalent.

PE 36. Golf: Advanced. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to refine the golf swing and increase power, distance, and accuracy. This course will also cover topics such as: course management, mental preparation and visualization techniques. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: PE 35 or experience playing and practicing, and the ability to hit shots with relative accuracy and distance.

PE 42. Rock Climbing: Strength and Conditioning. 1-2 Unit.

The course will provide students with a framework to develop a balanced strength and conditioning program specific to training for bouldering and sport climbing. Topics addressed will include mobility training, sport specific strength and conditioning, and injury prevention. Prerequisites: Rock Climbing 1 or at least 3 months previous climbing experience, current top-rope belay certification at the Stanford Climbing Wall.

PE 43. Rock Climbing: Functional Movement for Climbing. 1 Unit.

Students will explore multiple modalities of fitness to learn about functional movements associated with climbing and be able to apply them to other aspects of life. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of basic structures of the human anatomy and assess faulty movement patterns (2) Develop an understanding of exercises, stretches, and soft tissue work to allow for better movement, and (3) Understand and practice behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 46. Sailing: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn skills, theories, and techniques to enable beginners to sail with confidence in small centerboard boats. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 47. Sailing: Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to further development their sailing skills and techniques. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 48. Sailing: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to refine their sailing skills Students will also be introduced to racing. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 50. Swimming: Beginning I. 1 Unit.

This class is for first time swimmers and for individuals who have fear, anxiety or discomfort in water. This class is also designed for individuals who have previously taken beginning swim courses and have had little/no success or who struggle to move through water. A foundation of basic balance and movement skills will be developed through a series of fundamental water exercises. When safety or balance in the water is in question, so is the ability to move, and to some extent, the ability to breathe comfortably. As comfort and balance improves, the easier it is to accept breathing and movement skills. The goal is for a swimmer to become comfortable and in control in both shallow and deep water. The fundamental skills learned in this course will provide a foundation for learning stroke technique, such as freestyle, in an effortless manner. Prerequisites: None.

PE 51. Swimming: Beginning II. 1 Unit.

In this class you will learn how to relax in the water, breath effectively, float and tread, swim 4-5 strokes (freestyle, backstroke, sidestroke, elementary backstroke, and breaststroke, time permitting), jump in the water from the deck, use swimming equipment (kickboards, pull buoys, fins) and swim across a 25- yard pool. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Swim each stroke with proper form and technique (2) Develop an understanding of how to stay healthy and conditioned to further enhance swim strokes and decrease the risk of injuries. (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. nIf you have fear or anxiety in the water, consider taking the PE 128 Confidence in Water class. If you can swim across a 25 yard pool, you should take the PE 52: Intermediate Swim class. Prerequisite: non-swimmer, unable to swim across a 25 yard pool.

PE 52. Swimming: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This class is for those who can swim across a 50-yard pool. In this class you will learn how to: breathe effectively, tread water, dive in from the edge and use swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins). You will be introduced to and gain further development of the 4 competitive swimming strokes (Freestyle, Backstroke, Breaststroke & Butterfly). An introduction to flipturns and intervals (50 yard repeats) will be taught. Underwater videotaping and stroke review and analysis will occur. Prerequisite: Ability to swim across a 50-yard pool continuously. You MUST be comfortable in deep water, if you are uncomfortable in deep water please take PE 50 or 51 Beginning Swim I or II.

PE 53. Swimming: Advanced. 1 Unit.

This class is for those who can swim 100 yards freestyle continuously and have had an introduction to backstroke and breaststroke. In this class you will learn: refinement of the 4 competitive swimming strokes: freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly (review/intro) and efficient breathing techniques. You will gain additional development of flipturns using intervals (100 yard repeats), competitive starts and turns, use of swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins) for fitness, and videotaping with review. nPrereq: Swim 100 yards continuous of freestyle. If you have not had an introduction to Breaststroke or backstroke, we recommend you take PE 52: Swimming Intermediate.

PE 54. Swimming: Stroke Refinement. 1 Unit.

Review and fine tune the 4 competitive strokes (freestyle, backstroke, butterfly, and breaststroke), with a primary emphasis on improving freestyle stroke efficiency. Flipturn refinement. Drill and technique work will be heavily emphasized. On average, 1000 meters will be swum per class. Prerequisite: Ability to tread deep water for 5 minutes, swim 100 meter intervals of freestyle, backstroke, and breaststroke with rhythmic breathing, and swim 200 meters continuously under 5 minutes.

PE 55. Swim Conditioning. 1 Unit.

Improve cardio-respiratory endurance through directed swimming workouts. Technique corrections as needed. Prerequisite: advanced swimmer.

PE 56. Aqua Fitness Training. 1 Unit.

Students will improve their overall health and fitness levels (cardiovascular, muscular endurance, and flexibility) through a variety of structured water workouts. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 65. Horsemanship: Beginning Riding. 1 Unit.

This course explores beginning riding. Topics include, but are not limited to, basic horse care, equitation at the walk/trot and negotiation of simple obstacles. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation. No experience needed.

PE 66. Horsemanship: Advanced Beginning Riding. 1 Unit.

This course will review the basics of horsemanship and provides the necessary foundation for riding. Topics that will be covered include: horsemanship and horse care; work at the walk, trot and the foundations of jumping. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation. Prerequisite: PE 65 within the last three quarters. Please signup for the waitlist on Axess. You will be contacted regarding available section times during the first week of the quarter. Fee $500, meets at Red Barn.

PE 67. Horsemanship: Intermediate Riding. 1 Unit.

Basic veterinary skills and barn management. Riding at all gaits and completing horsemanship patterns (Western) or jumping basic courses (English). Prerequisite: PE 65 or 66.

PE 68. Horsemanship: Student Assistant. 1 Unit.

Students will assist the primary instructor for PE 65 Horsemanship: Beginning Riding, PE 66 Horsemanship: Advanced Beginning Riding, and PE 67 Horsemanship: Intermediate Riding. Students will have the opportunity to assist other students with regards to horse care, horse handling and the foundational skills of riding such as steering, position as well as work at the walk and trot.

PE 70. Introduction to Martial Arts. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on techniques, training methods, history, and culture of Asian martial arts. Throughout the quarter, students will learn proper warm-ups, fundamental techniques, basic application, and conditioning. This course will focus on the development of (1) motor Martial Art skills for physical fitness and positive exercise experience, (2) knowledge of Martial Arts and basic components of health-related physical fitness, and (3) understanding of benefits of Martial Arts toward a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate an active and healthy lifestyle.

PE 71. Taiji Quan. 1 Unit.

Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) is a slow meditative Chinese physical exercise usually used for relaxation, balance, and health. This course will focus on the development of (1) motor Tai chi skills for physical fitness and positive exercise experience, (2) knowledge of Tai Chi and basic components of health-related physical fitness, and (3) understanding of benefits of Tai chi toward a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate an active and healthy lifestyle.nAll levels are welcome.
Same as: Tai Chi

PE 72. Tai Chi: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

At the Intermediate level, students will develop a deeper and more internal understanding of Tai Chi. This course will introduce new concepts and movements that are more challenging. This course will also utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: ATHLETIC 140 or prior practice and courses in Tai Chi.

PE 75. Self-Defense. 1 Unit.

Develop fundamental self-defense awareness, knowledge, and strategies for handling violent crimes under a variety of conditions. Improve physical self-defense skills on different types of common physical attacks and applications via hands-on experience in simulated situations. Incorporate self-defense skill practice in daily physical activity routines for an active lifestyle.

PE 80. Yoga for Stress Management. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to learn ancient yoga/health practices for managing daily stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests in the body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. The focus will be on breathing techniques to calm the nervous system and practicing mindfulness. Hatha, or physical yoga, will also be introduced as preliminary practices to balance the body, relax the breath, stretch and tone muscles, and massage internal organ systems. All practices are meant to provide students new options for gaining inner strength and self-control. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 81. Yoga: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will be introduced to the values and skills of Hatha Yoga (Yoga of exercise). Students will learn how to reduce tension, increase energy levels, move efficiently, reconnect to self-awareness, and learn about the body. The poses and flows are adaptable and can be personalized for any level of fitness. The emphasis of the class will be on asanas (poses) and vinyasa (flow) for increased flexibility, improved health, relaxation, and reduced stress in daily living. Students will also be exposed to the language, philosophy, history, and concepts of Yoga. A typical class will include breathing techniques, meditation and asana practice, including standing, balancing, stretching and some inverted poses. At the end of the quarter students will have: (1) Acquired knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Developed physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 82. Yoga: Asana Practice. 1 Unit.

Yoga offers continual opportunities for growth and balance both physical and nemotional. Challenging yourself with different approaches will help you stay nfocused and keep your practice creative. In Asana Yoga Practice students will learn solid yoga practices that they can enjoy on their own as well as yoga foundations that they can apply in all types of yoga classes around the world.

PE 83. Yoga: Advanced. 1 Unit.

Advanced Yoga is for students who already possess a solid and ongoing yoga practice. This course will move deeper into all aspects of yoga by exploring more advanced postures, pranayama and meditation techniques. This course is designed for students who wish to challenge themselves both physically and mentally.

PE 84. Yoga/Pilates Fusion. 1 Unit.

This class will focus on practicing yoga poses and Pilates exercises to enhance one¿s sense of proprioception, mind-body awareness, and muscular strength and endurance. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 85. Yoga: Intermediate Asana. 1 Unit.

This course is designed for students who already possess an ongoing yoga practice. This course will move deeper into all aspects of yoga by exploring more postures, pranayama and meditation techniques. This course is designed for students who wish to improve themselves both physically and mentally. Intermediate yoga will provide students with information and experience which will enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 86. Power Yoga. 1 Unit.

Power yoga combines dynamic breathing and flowing sequences of asanas that focus on strengthening the entire body. Core muscle activation and stabilization is emphasized to ensure safe body mechanics. Power yoga will provide students with information and practical experience that will enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 87. Essentials of Pilates. 1 Unit.

Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 88. Pilates Mat: Intermediate / Advanced. 1 Unit.

Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 97. Lifeguard Training. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to learn lifeguard characteristics and responsibilities, recognize hazards and emergencies, patron and facility surveillance, interaction with the public, and rescue skills. Students will also learn first aid and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation, both in and out of water, to prepare students to become lifeguards.nnPrereq: 300 yard continuous swim with rhythmic breathing (100 yards of freestyle, 100 yards of breaststroke, and 100 yards of combination of the two); Swim 20 yards, surface dive 7ft, retrieve a 10lb diving brick, and return in one minute and forty seconds.

PE 98. Coaching Corps. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to build practical and educational foundations to prepare students to be instructional leaders (coaches) in sports activities. Students will have the opportunity to make a valuable contribution to youth while developing practical coaching skills. The course will explore topics including practice planning and designing curriculum, how to effectively engage youth in sports, youth development through sports, social issues facing urban youth in sports, the plight of sports programs in urban centers, and how to create a college-going culture among youth in low-income communities. Students will coach off campus at local schools/community-based organizations that offer after school sports programs.

PE 99. Selected Topics: PE. 1 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles, please refer to the notes of each course section.

Wellness Education Courses

WELLNESS 101. Peer Counseling on Comprehensive Sexual Health. 1 Unit.

Explore core topics related to sexual health and learn how to make educated and responsible decisions about sexual interactions. Develop and practice the skills necessary to appropriately advise peers about sexual health. Topics include information on sexually transmitted infections, methods of birth control, communication techniques, societal attitudes and pressures, pregnancy, abortion, and the range of sexual expression. Sex positive, supportive environment uses peer education, discussions, role-plays, and outreach projects that support students in applying knowledge and developing counseling skills. Presented by the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center (SHPRC), class is facilitated by SHPRC trained student counselors and is intended for and required of students who plan to become counselors at the SHPRC, but all interested students are welcome to enroll.

WELLNESS 110. Enhancing Motivation, Decreasing Procrastination. 1 Unit.

Examine the factors that increase motivation and decrease procrastination from a scientific point of view. Investigate research and models of motivation and procrastination in task engagement arising from the fields of psychology, behavioral economics, and cognitive neuroscience. Cultivate and apply cognitive, behavioral, and social tools that enhance motivation and decrease procrastination while supporting balanced and healthy achievement.

WELLNESS 111. Exploring Happiness. 1 Unit.

Explores how research-based happiness theory and principles are applied to enhance daily and life satisfaction. Positions happiness as a cornerstone construct of personal wellness, purpose, and fulfillment. Investigates the science of happiness through lecture, guided practice, dialogue, and course material in order to enhance understanding and implementation.

WELLNESS 113. Stress Less, Sleep Better. 1-2 Unit.

Effectively manage stress and practice positive sleep strategies to enhance clarity, focus, and energy. Presents tools for assessing perceived stress and sleep quality, findings in the science of stress management, current research in sleep studies, and cognitive-behavioral theories and interventions (CBT-i) demonstrated to reduce stress and certain insomnias, while enhancing sleep quality.

WELLNESS 114. Emotional Intelligence: Enhancing Your Effectiveness and Balance. 1-2 Unit.

Examine the science and practice of emotional intelligence and how it increases effectiveness and balance. Utilize leading frameworks and tools for enhancing emotional and social intelligence, including the understanding, managing, perceiving, and use of emotions. Blends lecture with experiential learning to develop theoretical and practical knowledge resulting in enhanced intra- and interpersonal skills.

WELLNESS 115. Why Decisions are Difficult: Making Wise Choices from Love to Lunch. 1 Unit.

Examine why making decisions can be difficult and how making wiser decisions enhances satisfaction, happiness, and life success. Investigate practical decision-making frameworks and skills while building awareness around common decision-making fallacies and pitfalls. Develop skills in topic areas ranging from mindfulness, emotional intelligence, cognitive reframing, self-compassion, empathy, gratitude, and courage. Focus on making wiser decisions, big and small, short-term and long-term.

WELLNESS 116. Resilience: How to Bounce Back. 1 Unit.

Examine the science and practice of resilience. Investigate the emerging field of resilience studies and learn the frameworks and skills that allow people to bounce back more quickly and effectively from life challenges. Topics include mindset and cognitive appraisal, emotional and affect management, central nervous system and vagal system regulation, and perspectives on creating resilient social systems. Harness insights in service rising above life adversity and thriving, even in the midst of tough times.

WELLNESS 117. Behavior Change: Building A Better You. 1-2 Unit.

Change behaviors using evidence-based techniques. Addresses the roles of habit cycles, procrastination mitigation, productivity enhancement, motivational factors, self-compassion, and addiction and addictive processes (both substances and non-substance related) in changing behaviors from maladaptive to adaptive patterns. Drawing from current findings in the neuroscience and psychology of behavior change and habit formation, utilize motivational interviewing, cognitive reframing, peer coaching, and mindfulness meditation models and intervention strategies.

WELLNESS 119. Cultivating Healthy Romantic Relationships. 1 Unit.

Explore the factors that support healthy romantic relationships from psychological, sociological, historical, and cultural perspectives. Investigate the questions, What is a healthy romantic relationship and how do I know if my relationship is healthy? Study the structures of healthy romantic relationships through learning about attraction, attachment, attunement, individuation, cultural scripts, gender roles, and considerations of non-monogamous and non-heteronormative relationships.

WELLNESS 120. Let's Talk About Sex. 1-2 Unit.

TBA.

WELLNESS 121. Performance as Healing. 1 Unit.

TBA.

WELLNESS 122. Meaningful Work: Creating a Career of Impact. 1 Unit.

Dive into how one's purpose, values, interests, and strengths contribute to creating a career of impact. Engage in meaningful conversations and self-reflections that support getting to the heart of what matters. Explore concepts on navigating change, mindfulness, decision-making, and resilience as related to initiating a career path of purpose. Blends lecture, discussion, coaching, and interactive activities that enhance theoretical and practical career competencies.

WELLNESS 123. Finding Your Purpose. 1-2 Unit.

Explore the science and art of purpose finding as it relates to living a more flourishing life at Stanford and beyond. Investigate the psychological, social, neuroscientific, and contemplative factors and tools that promote living authenticity, deepen meaning making, and optimize wellbeing in the present and across the life span. Highly interactive course utilizes lectures, discussions, group meetings, and mini-fieldtrips to ask and clarify basic human questions on how to live an intentional, authentic, and purposeful life.

WELLNESS 124. Intro to Wellness: Nutrition, Movement, Stress, and the Body. 1-2 Unit.

Investigate how physical factors (proper nutrition, adequate exercise, stress management, and effective sleep practices) serve as the foundation for mind-body wellness. Examine current controversies and research in the field of mind-body wellness and holistic health, with specific emphasis on the relationship between physical factors and psychological states. Provides guided practices on using established wellbeing principles to live a healthy and happy life.

WELLNESS 130. Meditation. 1 Unit.

Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance stress management and well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

WELLNESS 131. Compassion Meditation: Strengthening the Heart. 1 Unit.

Investigate evidence-based models of compassion meditation and cultivation based on Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) program and following the Stanford Compassion Training Protocol (CPT). Examine strategies to develop self-compassion, experience genuine happiness, reduce stress and negative thoughts, resolve differences with difficult others, and take compassionate action that makes a difference in the world. Courses mixes direct instruction, meditation, and group discussion on current research and its real world application.

WELLNESS 133. Meditation Retreat: Weekend Campus Intensive. 1 Unit.

Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Selected practices in focused attention, mindfulness, guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, and/or mantra meditation will be offered to enhance focused attention, insight, stress management, and well-being. Takes place in a weekend immersion format (on campus), which allows more immersive exploration of the topic space. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

WELLNESS 134. Forgiveness Practice and Meditation. 1-2 Unit.

Examines forgiveness from a variety of perspectives with an emphasis on its value for physical and mental well-being. Presents forgiveness both as a useful response to interpersonal hurt and a teachable skill, backed by scientific research from preventative medicine and psychology. Explores the idea that forgiveness and grievance are both narrative responses to painful experience, but differ in their adaptability and utility. Spiritual and contemplative approaches to forgiveness will be considered, but the methods are secular and research-tested.

WELLNESS 135. Mindful Self-Compassion, Strength, and Courage. 1 Unit.

Investigate how harsh self-criticism adversely impacts well-being, strength, and performance. In contrast, explore how mindful self-compassion (MSC) enhances emotional well-being, increases resilience and strength in coping with life challenges, and supports positive personal relationships. Using the scientifically validated MSC method (Neff & Germer), learn how to better pursue goals and commitments (academic, personal/social development, community service, and/or activism) with greater inner-peace, confidence, and courage.

WELLNESS 136. Meditation and the Brain: Practicing the Science and Art of Contemplation. 1-2 Unit.

Investigate the power of meditation for training the mind and changing the brain, specifically in focusing attention, enhancing awareness, and generating compassion. Going beyond meditation as a tool for simply reducing stress, this course grounds the theory and practice of meditation in a neuroscientific understanding of how meditation changes brain structures and functioning in service of increasing overall cognitive performance and psychological wellbeing. Learn how to apply specific frameworks and tools for effectively practicing meditation in daily life.

WELLNESS 138. Mindfulness and Stress Management. 1 Unit.

Effectively manage stress through mindfulness meditation strategies (sitting and movement-based) that positively impact the brain-body system to enhance clarity, focus, and energy. Examine tools for assessing perceived stress and mindfulness, current findings in the science of stress management and meditation, and cognitive-behavioral theories and interventions demonstrated to reduce stress and enhance well-being. Course is based on the mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) curriculum.

WELLNESS 150. Introduction to Nutrition. 1 Unit.

Optimize nutrition for health and performance based on established and emerging research. Discern between popular trends and scientific understandings of healthy nutrition and nutritional habits. Topics include evidence-based analysis of macronutrients, fad diets, sugar addiction, low-calorie sweeteners, caloric restriction, disease prevention, and general nutrition with an emphasis on translating research into implementable, day-to-day dietary practices.

WELLNESS 152. How to Eat: Healthy Habits of Eating. 1 Unit.

Explore the both the nutritional and behavioral foundations of positive eating habits and basic medical nutrition practices that enhance mind-body health and optimize performance. Focuses on nutritional science and behavioral practices that promote a healthy relationship with food for enhanced physical and psychological well-being. Covers topics ranging from nutrient density and macro/micro-nutrients to psycho-physiological factors of sleep, exercise, and stress management that impact digestive and metabolic processes to psychological factors that influence eating habits. Emphasizes translating theory and research into lifestyle practices.

WELLNESS 160. Radically Human Technology: Enhancing Connection and Wellbeing. 1-2 Unit.

Explore the present and future relationships between technology, humanity, and the search for happiness & flourishing. Investigate and develop the core questions, concerns, ethical considerations, and broad implications of technologies that shape human culture and consciousness. Course draws from science and technology studies, contemplative science, neurophenomenology, positive psychology, biomedical engineering, central nervous system stimulation, and neurofeedback. Evaluate the latest tech, interact with luminaries in the field, and rapid-design your own consumer tech concept.

WELLNESS 161. Introduction to the Technology of Flourishing: Weekend Campus Intensive. 1 Unit.

Investigate the present and future relationship between technology, humanity, and the search for happiness & flourishing. Explore and develop the core questions, concerns, ethical considerations, and broad implications of technologies that shape human culture and consciousness. Course draws from science and technology studies, contemplative science, neurophenomenology, positive psychology, biomedical engineering, and brain stimulation & neurofeedback. Utilize and evaluate some of the latest tech supporting human flourishing.

WELLNESS 163. Meditation and Technology. 1 Unit.

Challenge the traditional definition of meditation while examining and using the latest meditation technologies that amplify attention and awareness. Learn how these technologies can be integrated into existing practices or help support new meditators. Explore the range of tools, such as brain, heart, and breath sensing/feedback devices, and find what works best in one¿s own practice. Move past traditional boundaries of meditation and experiment with new ways that wearables, apps, and other tech can support meditation practice both in formal sitting practice and day-to-day living in a hyper-connected world.

WELLNESS 164. Designing Wellbeing. 1 Unit.

Design processes and technologies that support wellbeing and human connection. Learn about research-based models of human flourishing, explore existing technologies, and interact with innovators and thought leaders in the field of transformative design and technology. Utilize empathy-driven discovery methods that deepen understanding of existing wellbeing problems and, in interdisciplinary project teams, generate and pitch concepts for next-generation tech solutions. Personal and interpersonal development is essential for designing transformative technologies and this viewpoint is foundational for this design journey.

WELLNESS 180. The Flourishing Activist: Mindfully Being the Revolution. 1-2 Unit.

Explore how to blend the variety of ways social activism is expressed in the world with the mindful cultivation of human flourishing. Enhance mastery, self-acceptance, and personal agency while engaging in activism and the challenges inherent to activism, namely, confrontation with violence, trauma, and related mental and emotional struggles. Use self-reflection, embodied practice, and creative expression for contemplating how personal identity struggles can generate meaning beyond the self, how self-healing can lead to community healing, and how the personal is the political.

WELLNESS 181. Flourishing Leaders and Teams. 1 Unit.

Connect leadership and team performance models to models of human flourishing and well-being in order to broaden and build new definitions of success. Develop and practice leadership skill-sets that enhance human performance and flourishing of individuals and small groups in an engaging experiential format. Integrate leadership and well-being theory and practice through facilitated simulations. Covers topics ranging from resilience and well-being research, neuro-performance, emotional-social intelligence, team dynamics and group flow, communication theory and skills, and human development.

WELLNESS 182. Mindfulness & Yoga: Tools for Future Educators and Leaders. 1 Unit.

Explore the foundations of contemplation, mindfulness, and yoga as they are taught and experienced in educational and leadership settings. As a future educator or leader, learn to instruct basic contemplative, mindfulness, and yoga practices as resources that both increase self-awareness, emotional regulation, and self-care, as well as practices that promote personal, professional, and contemplative development. Topics include the physiological, neurobiological, psychological, social, and philosophical bases of contemplation, mindfulness, and yoga in educational and leadership contexts. The course requires an interest in and dedication to developing one's own practice in order to authentically and appropriately teach the concepts and practices to others.

WELLNESS 183. Financial Wellness for a Healthy, Long Life. 1 Unit.

Utilize a practical, financial planning approach to financial wellness with integrated psychological research and theory in human behavior. Explore critical personal finance concepts connected to long-term financial health, such as credit, debt, saving, and investing for retirement, alongside relevant cognitive and neuroscience studies in behavior and decision-making. Apply a financial analysis and psychological approach to financial wellness leading to enhanced emotional and mental wellbeing, in particular focusing on increasing self-confidence, life satisfaction, motivation, and stress management. Guest speakers include experts and researchers in the fields of finance and psychology.

WELLNESS 193. Applying Wellness Individual Studies. 1-2 Unit.

Translate theoretical knowledge and acquired skills into actionable wellness projects that enhance an aspect of wellness within the Stanford community. Students work in collaborative groups or individually under the mentorship of the course instructor(s) to design, deliver, and evaluate a wellness initiative at Stanford.

WELLNESS 199. Selected Topics: Wellness. 1-2 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles and topics, please refer to the notes of each course section.