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REES 100. Current Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. 1-2 Unit.

Enrollment limited to REEES students. Scholars present analyses of methodologies, challenges, and current issues in the study of Russia, E. Europe, and Eurasia.
Same as: REES 200

REES 128. Literature of the former Yugoslavia. 3-5 Units.

What do Slavoj Zizek, Novak Djokovic, Marina Abramovic, Melania Trump, Emir Kusturica, and the captain of the Croatian national football team have in common? All were born in a country that no longer exists, the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (1945-1992). This course will introduce masterpieces of Yugoslav literature and film, examining the social and political complexities of a multicultural society that collapsed into civil war (i.e. Bosnia, Kosovo) in the 1990s. In English with material available in Serbo-Croatian and Slovenian.
Same as: COMPLIT 128, SLAVIC 128

REES 145D. Jewish American Literature. 5 Units.

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Same as: AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, JEWISHST 155D

REES 185B. Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture. 4-5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, JEWISHST 185B

REES 200. Current Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. 1-2 Unit.

Enrollment limited to REEES students. Scholars present analyses of methodologies, challenges, and current issues in the study of Russia, E. Europe, and Eurasia.
Same as: REES 100

REES 204. Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Same as: HISTORY 223E, HISTORY 323E, REES 304

REES 208. Constitutional Cultures in Transition: Constitutional Identities and Values in the Post-Soviet Space. 3-5 Units.

This course examines post-Soviet constitutional cultures and identities (with a focus on Armenia, Moldova and Ukraine). It explores the role of constitutional identity in post-Soviet transformation, regional integration and `Europeanization processes; analyzes constitutional values in post-Soviet countries; discusses why there is a disharmony between declared values and constitutional reality; and explores the role of the judiciary in the formation and preservation of constitutional identity.
Same as: REES 308

REES 213. US-Russia Relations After the Cold War. 2 Units.

A quarter century ago, the Soviet Union collapsed and the Cold War ended. At the time, Russian leaders aspired to build democratic and market institutions at home. They also wanted to join the West. American presidents Democrat and Republican encouraged these domestic and international changes. Today, U.S.-Russia relations are once again confrontational, reminiscent of relations during the Cold War. This course seeks to analyze shifts in U.S.-Russia relations, with special attention given to the U.S.-Russia relationship during Obama¿s presidency. Readings will include academic articles and a book manuscript by Professor McFaul on Obama's reset policy. Open to students with previous coursework involving Russia.
Same as: POLISCI 213, POLISCI 313

REES 213A. Russia and the West. 5 Units.

(Formerly IPS 231A) Today, American-Russian relations, and Russia¿s relations with West more generally, are tense and confrontational. One has to look deep into the Cold War to find a similar era of confrontation and competition. Yet, relations between Russia and the West were not always this way. The end of the Cold War, for instance, ushered in a period of cooperation. Back then, many believed that Russia was going to develop democratic and market institutions and integrate into Western international institutions. This seminar will examine various explanations for these variations in Russia¿s relations with the West, starting in the 19th century, and briefly examining the Cold War period, but a real focus on the last thirty years. In evaluating competing explanations. the course will focus on balance of power theories, culture, historical legacies, institutional design, and individual actors in both the United States (and sometimes Europe) and Russia.nn** NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please send a one page document to Anya Shkurko (ashkurko@stanford.edu) by March 23rd with the following information: full name, class year, major, contact email, which version of the course you want to enroll in (PoliSci/REES/IPS). In the document please also outline previous associated coursework and/or relevant experience and write why you want to enroll in the seminar. Application results will be announced on March 30th. Any questions related to this course can be directed to Anya Shkurko.
Same as: INTLPOL 231A, POLISCI 213A

REES 225E. From Vladimir to Putin: Key Themes in Russian History. 4-5 Units.

Formative issues in Russian history from Muscovy to the present: autocracy and totalitarianism; tsars, emperors, and party secretaries; multi-ethnicity and nationalism; serfdom, peasantry; rebellions and revolutions, dissent and opposition; law and legality; public and private spheres; religion and atheism; patterns of collapse. Class format will be discussion of one to two assigned books or major articles per class.
Same as: HISTORY 225E, HISTORY 325E

REES 227. All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War. 3-5 Units.

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Same as: HISTORY 227D, HISTORY 327D, REES 327

REES 231B. Understanding Russia: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order. 5 Units.

Russia presents a puzzle for theories of socio-economic development and modernization and their relationship to state power in international politics. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 brought into being the new Russia (or Russian Federation) as its successor in international politics. Russia suffered one of the worst recessions and experienced 25 years of halting reform. Despite these issues, Russia is again a central player in international affairs. Course analyzes motivations behind contemporary Russian foreign policy by reviewing its domestic and economic underpinnings. Examination of concept of state power in international politics to assess Russia's capabilities to influence other states' policies, and under what conditions its leaders use these resources. Is contemporary Russia strong or weak? What are the resources and constraints its projection of power beyond its borders? What are the determinants of state power in international politics in the twenty-first century? Includes lectures, readings, class discussions, films and documentaries.
Same as: INTLPOL 231B, POLISCI 213C

REES 237. Political Exhumations. Killing Sites Research in Comparative Perspective. 3-5 Units.

The course discusses the politics and practices of exhumation of individual and mass graves. The problem of exhumations will be considered as a distinct socio-political phenomenon characteristic of contemporary times and related to transitional justice. The course will offer analysis of case studies of political exhumations of victims of the Dirty War in Argentina, ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia, the Holocaust, communist violence in Poland, the Rwandan genocide, and the Spanish Civil War. The course will make use of new interpretations of genocide studies, research of mass graves, such as environmental and forensic approaches.
Same as: ANTHRO 137D, ARCHLGY 137, ARCHLGY 237

REES 240P. Populism and the Erosion of Democracy. 5 Units.

What is populism, and how much of a threat to democracy is it? How different is it from fascism or other anti-liberal movements? This course explores the conditions for the rise of populism, evaluates how much of a danger it poses, and examines the different forms it takes.
Same as: GLOBAL 106, POLISCI 140P

REES 254. Animism, Gaia, and Alternative Approaches to the Environment. 3-5 Units.

Indigenous knowledges have been traditionally treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as mistaken epistemologies, i.e., un-scientific and irrational folklore. However, within the framework of environmental humanities, current interest in non-anthropocentric approaches and epistemic injustice, animism emerged as a critique of modern epistemology and an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as a (potentially) decolonizing and liberating practice. This course may be of interest to anthropology, archaeology and literature students working in the fields of ecocriticism and the environmental humanities/social sciences, students interested in the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral, bio-, eco- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms and non-human agencies. The course is designed as a research seminar for students interested in theory of the humanities and social sciences and simultaneously helping students to develop their individual projects and thesis.
Same as: ANTHRO 154C, ANTHRO 254C, ARCHLGY 154, ARCHLGY 254, DLCL 254

REES 259C. Ecological Humanities. 3 Units.

What sort of topics, research questions, approaches, theories and concepts lead to an integration of various kinds of knowledges? Ecological Humanities provides a conceptual platform for a merger of humanities and social sciences with earth and life sciences, soil science and forensic sciences. The course will discuss such selected topics as the Anthropocene, geologic/mineral and exhumed subjects/personae, bio- and geosocial collectives, symbiotic life-forms, non-human agencies, and forensic landscapes as examples of this merger.
Same as: ANTHRO 159C, ANTHRO 259C, DLCL 259C

REES 260. History and Politics of Russian Language. 3-4 Units.

How did standard Russian develop? Who determines how the language is spoken and written? How does Russian interact with other languages of the region (such as Ukrainian and Yiddish)? This class examines the development of the standard literary Russian language, focusing on the 19th century, the Soviet period, and post-Soviet language politics. Taught in English, reading in Russian.

REES 299. Directed Reading. 1-12 Unit.

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REES 300. MA Capstone Seminar. 1-3 Unit.

Required for and limited to REEES MA candidates. Colloquia with CREEES Director and Associate Director to assist with refinement of research topic, advisor support, literature review, research, and thesis writing.

REES 301B. History and Politics in Russian and Eastern European Cinema. 5 Units.

From 1945 to the mid-80s, emphasizing Polish, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, and Yugoslav contexts. The relationship between art and politics; postwar establishment of film industries; and emergence of national film movements such as the Polish school, Czech new wave, and new Yugoslav film. Thematic and aesthetic preoccupations of filmmakers such as Wajda, Jancso, Forman, and Kusturica. Permission of instructor required prior to the first day of classes.
Same as: FILMSTUD 245B, FILMSTUD 445B

REES 304. Cities of Empire: An Urban Journey through Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the cities of the Habsburg, Ottoman and Russian empires in the dynamic and turbulent period of their greatest transformation from the 19th century through the Two World Wars. Through the reading of urban biographies of Venice and Trieste, Vienna, Budapest, Cracow, Lviv, Sarajevo, Belgrade, Salonica, and Odessa, we consider broad historical trends of political, economic, and social modernization, urbanization, identity formation, imperialism, cosmopolitanism, and orientalism. As vibrant centers of coexistence and economic exchange, social and cultural borderlands, and sites of transgression, these cities provide an ideal lens through which to examine these themes in the context of transition from imperial to post-imperial space.
Same as: HISTORY 223E, HISTORY 323E, REES 204

REES 308. Constitutional Cultures in Transition: Constitutional Identities and Values in the Post-Soviet Space. 3-5 Units.

This course examines post-Soviet constitutional cultures and identities (with a focus on Armenia, Moldova and Ukraine). It explores the role of constitutional identity in post-Soviet transformation, regional integration and `Europeanization processes; analyzes constitutional values in post-Soviet countries; discusses why there is a disharmony between declared values and constitutional reality; and explores the role of the judiciary in the formation and preservation of constitutional identity.
Same as: REES 208

REES 326. The Russian Revolution: Politics, Society, Culture. 3-5 Units.

The centennial of the Russian Revolution of 1917 serves as the occasion for this course, which surveys the political, social, and cultural upheavals that transformed Russia under the last Tsars and the first Soviet commissars. The course will be offered in conjunction with the exhibition "The Crown under the Hammer: Russia, Romanovs & Revolution," jointly sponsored by the Hoover Institution and the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford and opening at both venues on October 18, 2017. Several class sessions will be held at the Hoover Institution, where students will be invited to examine archival documents, rare books and periodicals, and the visual arts, including propaganda posters, photographs, motion picture film, and paintings in the collections of the Hoover Institution Library & Archives. One class session will be held at the Cantor Arts Center. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students.

REES 327. All Quiet on the Eastern Front? East Europe and Russia in the First World War. 3-5 Units.

Until recently history has been comparatively quiet about the experience of World War I in the east. Far from being a peripheral theater of war, however, the experiences of war on the Eastern Front were central to shaping the 20th century. Not only was the first shot of the war fired in the east, it was also the site of the most dramatic political revolution. Using scholarly texts, literature and film, this course combines political, military, cultural and social approaches to introduce the causes, conduct and consequences of World War I with a focus on the experiences of soldiers and civilians on the Eastern Front. Topics include: the war of movement, occupation, extreme violence against civilians, the Armenian genocide, population exchanges, the Russian Revolution and civil war, and the disintegration of empires and rise of nation-states.
Same as: HISTORY 227D, HISTORY 327D, REES 227

REES 348. Slavic Literature and Culture since the Death of Stalin. 3-5 Units.

The course offers a survey of Soviet and post-Soviet literary texts and films created by Russian, Ukrainian and Belarusian artists and marginalized or repressed by the Soviet regime. The first part of the course will focus on the topics of opposition and dissent, generational conflict, modernization, Soviet everyday life, gender, citizenship and national identity, state-published and samizdat literature, "village" and "cosmopolitan" culture, etc. The second part of it will be devoted to the postmodernist aesthetics and ideology in the dismantlement of totalitarian society, as well in the process of shaping post-Soviet identities. The reading materials range from the fictional, poetic, and publicistic works written by Noble-prize (Solzhenitsyn, Brodsky, Alexievich) and other major writers of the period to the drama, film, and popular culture.
Same as: SLAVIC 148, SLAVIC 348

REES 371B. New Methodologies in the Humanities and Social Sciences. 3-5 Units.

The course will discuss how social virtues are converted into methods of research (hope, friendship, sincerity, trust, utopia), and how they affect processes of knowledge building within the humanities and social sciences in terms of revival of futurity. The concepts will be critically examined in their positive as well as negative potential for practicing prefigurative politics the creation of desirable modes of social relationships of conviviality and co-existence in the world.
Same as: ANTHRO 371B, DLCL 371

REES 409. Iconoclasm. 5 Units.

By the seventh century three large political entities formed in the Mediterranean the Umayyads, the Carolingians, and the Byzantines each competed for legitimacy; all three emerged from the ashes of Late Antique culture, yet each tried to carve out an identity out of this common foundation. In this parting of the ways, the three empires took among others the issue of what constitutes an image and what role it plays in devotion. Eik'n, imago, ura became the basis on which to built differences and accuse the other political players of idolatry. This course explores medieval image theory, especially the phenomena of iconoclasm, iconophobia, and aniconism. The discussions focus on monuments in the Mediterranean as well as objects in the Cantor collection and facsimiles of manuscripts at the Bowes Art Library.
Same as: ARTHIST 209C, ARTHIST 409, CLASSICS 158, CLASSICS 258

REES 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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REES 85B. Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, JEWISHST 85B