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Office: Sweet Hall, Ground Floor, 590 Escondido Mall
Mail Code: 94305-3089
Phone: (650) 723-3558
Email: bospstudy@lists.stanford.edu
Web Site: http://bosp.stanford.edu

Bing Overseas Studies Program

The Bing Overseas Studies Program (BOSP) provides opportunities for Stanford students to broaden their undergraduate education through study in another country and exposure to its culture. Regular quarter-length programs in Australia, Beijing, Berlin, Cape Town, Florence, Istanbul, Kyoto, Madrid, Oxford, Paris, and Santiago offer courses in social and natural sciences, humanities, engineering, and earth sciences with full Stanford credit. Many courses also count toward major requirements and/or fulfill University breadth requirements. Students may enroll for one or more quarters at most locations. Academic or paid internships are available at certain program locations. Research opportunities are available in various formats at different centers. Community-engaged learning and community-based research opportunities are available in Cape Town. Minimum academic and language prerequisites are specific to each program. See the BOSP web site for information on these prerequisites.

While studying overseas through BOSP, students remain registered at Stanford and pay regular tuition, along with an overseas fee, which is based on Stanford on-campus room and board rates. Regular financial aid applies, and may be adjusted to cover additional costs. At many centers, students live in a homestay or a dormitory setting with local and other students.

In addition to the programs offered through BOSP for enrolled Stanford students, the University is a member of the Kyoto Consortium for Japanese Studies (KCJS), where students may enroll while remaining registered at Stanford. Overseas Studies also offers three-week faculty-led overseas seminars in various locations during Summer Quarter, two faculty-initiated programs in Oaxaca, Mexico focusing on community health and biocultural diversity, and occasional other such programs in various locations.

Located on the ground floor of Sweet Hall, Overseas Studies has full-time staff members and student ambassadors to assist in advising and planning for overseas study. Course information, while accurate at the time of publication, is subject to change. Consult the BOSP web site for updated information.

Locations

Courses offered by the Overseas Studies Program are listed on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site under subject codes beginning with OSP. Each BOSP location has its own subject code. Those subject codes, by location, are:

Program Director

Program Director: Ramón Saldívar

Stanford Program in Australia

Director: Ian Tibbetts, School of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland

Faculty-in-Residence: Kevin Arrigo

Program Faculty: Claire Baker, Catherine Lovelock, Brian McIntosh, Christopher Salisbury, Selina Ward

Stanford Program in Berlin

Director: Karen Kramer

Faculty-in-Residence:  Stephen Monismith, Janice Ross, Matthew Smith

Program Faculty: Maria Biege, Diana Boebe, Ulrich Brückner, Martin Jander, Wolf-Dietrich Junghanns, Ingo Klein, Sylvia Kloetzer, Matthias Pabsch, Sylke Tempel, Jochen Wohlfeil

Stanford Program in Cape Town

Director: Adelene Africa

Faculty-in-Residence: Marie-Louise Catsalis, Grant Parker

Program Faculty: Mohamed Adhikari, Adelene Africa, June Bam, Ronelle Carolissen, Stephan Klingebiel, Ruenda Loots, Nomusa Makhubu, Wamuwi Mbao, John Parkington, Helen Scanlon, Mills Soko,  Nolubabalo Tyam, Joseph Warren, Quentin Williams

Stanford Program in Florence

Director: Ermelinda Campani

Faculty-in-Residence: Tomas Jimenez, Katherine Jolluck, Norman Naimark, Jack Rakove

Program Faculty: Elena Baracani, Nigel Bennet, Varusca Costenaro, Veronica De Romanis, Paolo Galluzzi, John Hooper, Michele Papa, Patrizia Pedrini, Fiorenza Quercioli, Filippo Rossi, Augusto Valeriani, Timothy Verdon

Stanford Program in Istanbul

Program suspended for 2017-2018 academic year.

Stanford Program in Kyoto

Director: Mike Hugh

Program Faculty: Paul DeMarinis, Hideo Mabuchi

Program Faculty: William Bradley, Yuka Kanno, Yuko Kawahara, Catherine Ludvik, Yasue Numaguchi, Naoyuki Ogino, Tsukasa Otani, Naoko Shiotani, Kiyoko Tanaka, Jun Tomita, Rie Tsujino, Douglas Woodruff

Stanford Program in Madrid

Director: Pedro Perez-Leal

Faculty-in-Residence: Thomas Fingar, Scott Rozelle, Lisa Surwillo

Program Faculty:  María Almudena Ariza Armada Alberto Bosco, Aida Esther Bueno Sarduy, Miguel Buñuel, María Teresa Camblor Portilla, Pablo Campos Calvo Sotelo, Bernat Castany Prado, Jean Castejon Gilabert, Raul se la Fuente Marcos, Andrés Díez Herrero, Julia Doménech López, Sylvia Hilton, Sheila Klaiber, Miguel Larrañaga Zulueta, Laura Luceño Casals, Eduardo Manzano Moreno, Irene Martin, Antonio Muñoz Carrión, Laura Murcia Cánovas, Alicia Pérez Blanco, Beatriz Perez Galan, Roshan Samtani, Oscar Sánchez Fuster, Isidro Yerba Prada

Stanford Program in Oxford

Director: Stephanie Solywoda

Faculty-in-Residence: Hank Greely, Karen Jusko, Julie Parsonnet, Dean Winslow

Program Faculty: Vanessa Burns, James Forder, Matthew Landrus, Robert McMahon, Amanda Palmer, Scot Peterson, Sebastian Petzolt, Emma Plaskitt, Olivia Reilly

Stanford Program in Paris

Director: Estelle Halévi

Faculty-in-Residence:  Markus Covert, Helen Longino, Valerie Miner, David Palumbo-Liu, Dmitri Petrov

Program Faculty: Marie-Fleur Albecker, Nicolas Baudouin, Jean-Marie Fessler, Benedicte Gady, Sarah Grandin, Patrick Guédon, Choukri Hmed, Tiphaine Karsenti, Louise Lartigot-Hervier, Eloi Laurent, Florence Leca, Jacques Le Cacheux, Elizabeth Molkou, Pauline Prat, Gregoire Quenault, Marie-Christine Ricci, Klaus-Peter Sick, Sylvie Strudel, Fabrice Virgili

Stanford Program in Santiago

Director: Iván Jaksic

Faculty-in-Residence: Eran Bendavid, Hans Gumbrecht

Program Faculty: Mabel Abad, Felipe Agüero, César Albornoz, Andrés Bobbert, Germán Correa, Rolf Lüders, Sergio Missana, Thomas O'Keefe, Iván Poduje, Hernan Pons, Sharon Reid, Pablo Rivano, Gloria Toledo

Overseas Studies in Australia Courses

OSPAUSTL 10. Coral Reef Ecosystems. 3 Units.

Key organisms and processes, and the complexity of coral reef ecosystems. Students explore the Great Barrier Reef from the southern end which demonstrates the physical factors that limit coral reefs, to the northern reef systems which demonstrate key aspects of these high biodiversity ecosystems. Human-related changes. Emphasis is on research experiences and development of analytical skills. Two units only counted for the Biology major.

OSPAUSTL 25. Freshwater Systems. 3 Units.

Integrated water resource management and how this applies across the globe, comparing strategies and results in the developing and more developing world. Ethics, values and politics of water and the management of extremes such as drought and flood. Ecology and hydrology in an urban context, along with important current issues such as stormwater and water sensitive urban design. Construction of a well, a water tank, and a pit latrine. Community service working with a local catchment management group on riparian and wetland restoration work. Field work complements lectures.

OSPAUSTL 30. Coastal Forest Ecosystems. 3 Units.

Prehistory of Australian rainforest and how rainforest structure and biodiversity change with altitude, latitude, and geology. Tropical coastal marine wetlands, mangrove forests, and the relationship between land- and sea-based biota. Biology and ecology of marine plants, mangroves, and tropical salt marsh. Introduction to specialized fields of marine plant biology and ecology including biogeography and evolution, aquatic plant ecophysiology, water quality and bioindicator techniques, pollution and eutrophication, and environmental control of marine plant distribution and productivity. Two units only counted for the Biology major.

OSPAUSTL 40. Australian Studies. 3 Units.

Introduction to Australian society, history, culture, politics, and identity. Social and cultural framework and working understanding of Australia in relationship to the focus on coastal environment in other program courses. Field trips.

OSPAUSTL 50. Targeted Research Project. 4 Units.

Prior to arriving in Australia, students establish a link with University of Queensland faculty to develop project ideas that combine personal interests and career goals with opportunities presented by the Australian Coastal Studies program, such as how mangrove roots find sediment rich zones of the shore, or the dynamics of ecotourism in southern and northern coastal Queensland. Project report and presentation in Australia.

Overseas Studies in Barcelona (CASB) Courses

OSPBARCL 101. Language and Culture in Catalonia. 4 Units.

Preparation for students to function in the academic and social environment of Barcelona. Basic listening, reading, and comprehension in Catalan; review of Spanish with focus on writing academic papers and listening to lectures. Introduction to Barcelona with emphasis on contemporary history, culture, and politics. Bilingualism; multiculturalism; varieties of nationalism and globalization in context of Barcelona.

OSPBARCL 114. The Spanish Civil War and Historical Memory. 5 Units.

The Spanish Civil War's memory and legacy as seen in today's society, culture and politics in the context of Western Europe. Current reality of Spain and Catalonia and the value of history and its construction in the formation of the political culture of a country. Two thematic blocks: historical evolution of Spain from the Second Republic until the end of Franco and the transition to democracy; relationship between history and memory focusing on the Catalan-Spanish case.

OSPBARCL 128. The Sagrada Familia by Gaudi. 5 Units.

Works by Gaudi in Barcelona including Sagrada Família, the Cripta Güell, the Palau Güell, the Casa Batilló, the Casa Milá, and Güell Park. How the Sagrada Família temple represents the synthesis of Gaudi's work.

OSPBARCL 140A. Universitat de Barcelona: Humanities 1. 5 Units.

Student selection from course catalog of Universitat de Barcelona.

OSPBARCL 140B. Universitat de Barcelona: Humanities 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 140C. Universitat de Barcelona: Humanities 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 142A. Universitat de Barcelona: Social Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 142B. Universitat de Barcelona: Social Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 142C. Universitat de Barcelona: Social Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 144A. Universitat de Barcelona: Natural Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 144B. Universitat de Barcelona: Natural Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 144C. Universitat de Barcelona: Natural Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 146A. Universitat de Barcelona: Engineering 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 146B. Universitat de Barcelona: Engineering 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 146C. Universitat de Barcelona: Engineering 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 150A. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Humanities 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 150B. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Humanities 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 150C. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Humanities 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 150D. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Humanities 4. 10 Units.

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OSPBARCL 152A. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Social Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 152B. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Social Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 152C. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Social Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 154A. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Natural Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 154B. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Natural Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 154C. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Natural Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 156A. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Engineering 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 156B. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Engineering 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 156C. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona: Engineering 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 160A. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Humanities 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 160B. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Humanities 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 160C. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Humanities 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 162A. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Social Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 162B. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Social Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 162C. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Social Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 164A. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Natural Science 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 164B. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Natural Science 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 164C. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Natural Science 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 166A. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Engineering 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 166B. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Engineering 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 166C. Universitat Pompeu Fabra: Engineering 3. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 170A. Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya: Engineering 1. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 170B. Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya: Engineering 2. 5 Units.

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OSPBARCL 170C. Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya: Engineering 3. 5 Units.

Student selection from course catalog of Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya.

Overseas Studies in Beijing Courses

Overseas Studies in Berlin Courses

OSPBER 1Z. Accelerated German: First and Second Quarters. 8 Units.

A jump start to the German language, enabling students with no prior German to study at the Berlin Center. Covers GERLANG 1 and 2 in one quarter.

OSPBER 2Z. Accelerated German, Second and Third Quarters. 8 Units.

Qualifies students for participation in an internship following the study quarter. Emphasis is on communicative patterns in everyday life and in the German work environment, including preparation for interviews.

OSPBER 3B. German Language and Culture. 7 Units.

Completion and refinement of First-Year grammar, vocabulary building, reading literature and news, writing skills, esp. journal. Extensive use of current materials, such as local Berlin and national news, and emphasis on building speaking skills for everyday situations and discussions.

OSPBER 17. Split Images: A Century of Cinema. 3-4 Units.

20th-century German culture through film. The silent era, Weimar, and the instrumentalization of film in the Third Reich. The postwar era: ideological and aesthetic codes of DEFA, new German cinema, and post-Wende filmmaking including Run Lola Run and Goodbye Lenin. Aesthetic aspects of the films including image composition, camera and editing techniques, and relation between sound and image.

OSPBER 21B. Intermediate German. 5 Units.

German language skills for Intermediate students. Refinement of German grammar; vocabulary building, writing practice via journal and essays; German culture, including current news and issues, literature and films. Special emphasis on comprehension and speaking skills for discussions, everyday situations, and in-class presentations. Prerequisite: completion of first-year German.

OSPBER 24B. Advanced German Grammar. 2 Units.

Syntax and organizational patters (connectors, structuring and cohesive devices) for various types of texts and arguments, contrastive vocabulary practice, and reading strategies. Skills for writing well-structured critical essays, giving effective presentations, and reading extensively as well as intensively.

OSPBER 30. Berlin vor Ort: A Field Trip Module. 1 Unit.

The cultures of Berlin as preserved in museums, monuments, and architecture. Berlin's cityscape as a narrative of its history from baroque palaces to vestiges of E. German communism, from 19th-century industrialism to grim edifices of the Sachsenhausen concentration camp.

OSPBER 37. Leading from Behind? Germany in the International Arena since 1945. 4-5 Units.

Germany's changing role in European and world politics. Have old principles based on lessons from World War II become obsolete? Can Germany be a leading power in global affairs?.

OSPBER 40M. An Intro to Making: What is EE. 5 Units.

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

OSPBER 49. Directed Reading in German Literature, Theatre, or Film. 1-3 Unit.

Independent study on topics in modern German literature, theatre, or film. Students propose a topic to the instructor who will help craft a reading list and appropriate on-site field trips or archives. Weekly meetings with instructor; outside work tailored to student interest.

OSPBER 50M. Introductory Science of Materials. 4 Units.

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.

OSPBER 51. Dance on the Edge in Germany. 1-2 Unit.

Dance and choreography can be explored in the former East German as a disciplinary and resistive tool. For this independent study course, suggested topics include: How complex themes of nationhood, ideology, resistance and diaspora resonated in uniquely East German dance forms including mass exercise events, national folk dances, Marxist-Leninist visions staged by the armed forces and East Germany's version of Tanztheatre. How dance was used as a form of corporeal utopia, embodied socialist propaganda and indoctrination. Field trips to related venues can also be included. Readings can be chosen from those that examine complex themes of nationhood, ideology, resistance, and diaspora, contrasted with a mix of archival research, critical theory and performance analysis of live dance performances.

OSPBER 54. The Performance of Memory. 4 Units.

The Performance of Memory is a lecture/discussion/field trip class probing how nationalism, memorialization and tourism around trauma have made Germany a landscape of memory. Exploring sites related to WWII, the Holocaust and the Soviet occupation - including a former Stassi Prison and concentration camp - we trace how history and contemporary culture intertwine in Germany and how post reunification tourism to Third Reich and Jewish sites in and around Berlin are transforming locales of trauma into a new type of immersion theatre.

OSPBER 59. Topics in Sustainability in Germany. 1-2 Unit.

Students can choose one of the following topics: Environmental management of the Rhine, water supply, water quality and ecological function; The German energy perspective, how the German energy grid functions and roles of consumption patterns and regulation; De-carbonizing German automobiles, environmental, economic, and societal implications of eliminating fossil-fuel powered cars from German roadways; Fluid mechanics of beer, physics and fluid mechanics of beer, including how this information is used in the design and operation of breweries.

OSPBER 60. Cityscape as History: Architecture and Urban Design in Berlin. 5 Units.

Diversity of Berlin's architecture and urban design resulting from its historical background. Architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and his artistic ancestors. Role of the cultural exchange between Germany and the U.S. Changing nature of the city from the 19th century to the present.

OSPBER 63. Urban Engineering from a Technological and and Environmental Perspective. 3 Units.

Science and engineering issues related to providing a city like Berlin with water and energy, removing its waste, and moving people into, out of, or around the city. Simple analyses focused on mass balances for a city, i.e., how much energy, how much CO2 generated, how much water and for what purpose is it used. "Back-of-the-envelope" calculations typical of much engineering to understand the scale of various issues, problems or the solutions to those problems. Particular challenges faced by the city due to climate change, and to what extent Berlin (and Germany) is engaging in policies designed to adapt to or reverse climate change. What makes a city "sustainable" and livable. Field trips to particular technological and environmental features of the city.

OSPBER 66. Theory from the Bleachers: Reading German Sports and Culture. 3 Units.

German culture past and present through the lens of sports. Intellectual, societal, and historical-political contexts. Comparisons to Britain, France, and the U.S. The concepts of Körperkultur, Leistung, Show, Verein, and Haltung. Fair play, the relation of team and individual, production and deconstruction of sports heroes and heroines, and sports nationalism. Sources include sports narrations and images, attendance at sports events, and English and German texts. Taught in German.

OSPBER 70. The Long Way to the West: German History from the 18th Century to the Present. 4-5 Units.

Battles still current within Germany¿s collective memory. Sources include the narrative resources of museums, and experts on the German history in Berlin and Potsdam. Field trips.

OSPBER 71. EU in Crisis. 4-5 Units.

Challenges confronting Europe as a whole and the EU in particular: impact of the sovereign debt crisis of the Eurozone, mass migration, external and internal security challenges, as well as political and social needs for reform. How the EU and its members respond and if the opportunities of these crises are constructively used for reform - or wasted (Crisis = Danger + Opportunity). Analyse institutions, interests and competing narratives to explain the current situation in Europe. Excursion to Athens or similar to get a non-German perspective on the crises.

OSPBER 99. German Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeat for credit.

OSPBER 101A. Contemporary Theater. 4-5 Units.

Texts of plays supplemented by theoretical texts or reviews. Weekly theater visits and discussions with actors, directors, or other theater professionals. For AUTUMN: In English; German assignments for students with advanced German skills. For SPRING: 5 units only. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.

OSPBER 104. Berlin University Lecture Series 1. 1 Unit.

May be repeat for credit.

OSPBER 105. Berlin University Lecture Series 2. 1 Unit.

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OSPBER 115X. The German Economy: Past and Present. 4-5 Units.

The unsteady history of the German economy in the Wilhelmine Empire, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the post WWII divided and united Germany. Special attention on the economic policy of the Third Reich and the present role of Germany in the world economy.

OSPBER 126X. A People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU. 4-5 Units.

The institutional architecture of the EU and its current agenda. Weaknesses, strengths, and relations with partners and neighbors. Discussions with European students. Field trips; guest speakers.

OSPBER 161X. The German Economy in the Age of Globalization. 4-5 Units.

Germany's role in the world economy: trade, international financial markets, position within the European Union; economic relations with Eastern Europe, Russia, the Third World, and the U.S. International aspects of German economic and environmental policies. The globalization of the world's economy and Germany's competitiveness as a location for production, services, and R&D, focusing on the German car industry.

OSPBER 174. Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective. 5 Units.

Theory and history of mass spectator sports and their role in modern societies. Comparisons with U.S., Britain, and France; the peculiarities of sports in German culture. Body and competition cultures, with emphasis on the entry of women into sports, the modification of body ideals, and the formation and negotiation of gender identities in and through sports. The relationship between sports and politics, including the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. In German. Prerequisite: completion of GERLANG 3 or equivalent.

OSPBER 198D. Humboldt Universitat: Humanities 2. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 198F. Humboldt Universitat: Social Sciences 2. 2-3 Units.

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OSPBER 198H. Freie Universitat: Humanities 3. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 198N. Künste Universität 1. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199A. Directed Reading A. 2-4 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199B. Directed Reading B. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199C. Directed Reading C. 1-3 Unit.

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OSPBER 199D. Humboldt Universitat: Humanities. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199F. Humboldt Universitat: Social Sciences. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199G. Freie Universitat: Social Sciences 1. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199H. Freie Universitat: Humanities 1. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199J. Freie Universitat: Natural Sciences 1. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199K. Freie Universitat: Social Sciences 2. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199L. Freie Universitat: Humanities 2. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPBER 199M. Freie Universitat: Natural Sciences 2. 2-3 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

Overseas Studies in Cape Town Courses

OSPCPTWN 14. Academic Internship. 3-5 Units.

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a school, research institute, university, NGO, ICT4D organizations, or museums/art galleries. Engage with selection of readings relevant to the context of internship, meet weekly with the Engaged Learning Coordinator in small groups, attend group seminars, and complete assignments set by the instructors. Program culminates with a symposium, where students present their internship projects. Units determined by the number of hours per week at the internship. Prerequisite: consultation with BOSP Cape Town Engaged Learning Coordinator to develop internship that links field of study to practical experience and reflection.

OSPCPTWN 16. Sites of Memory. 3 Units.

ey sites of memory in post-apartheid South Africa, in both Cape Town and Johannesburg, that are representative of a diverse range of memorialisation in contemporary South Africa. Consideration of the relevant historical context, contemporary conflicting interpretations and contemporary identity contestations. What is the historical context of the site? By whom is the site remembered and memorialised? How is the site memorialised? What are the diverse interpretations and contestations about the site in terms of contemporary identities and memorialisation in the new South Africa?.

OSPCPTWN 18. Xhosa Language and Culture. 2 Units.

History of the Xhosa language; understanding Xhosa culture and way of life. Listening, speaking, reading and writing, combined with the social uses of the language in everyday conversations and interactions. Intercultural communication. Content drawn from the students¿ experiences in local communities through their service learning/volunteer activities to support the building of the relationships in these communities. How language shapes communication and interaction strategies. Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPCPTWN 24A. Targeted Research Project in Community Health and Development. 3 Units.

Two-quarter sequence for students engaging in Cape Town-sponsored community based research. Introduction to approaches, methods and critical issues of partnership-based, community-engaged research and to the community-based research partners. Qualitative data gathering and analysis methods in community-based research; effective collaboration with community partners and data sources; race and privilege in community-based research. Preparation of research proposals and plans for research carried out during the second quarter through OSPCPTWN 24B.

OSPCPTWN 30. Engaging Cape Town. 2 Units.

Engaged scholarship course inviting students to think critically about core concepts in engaged scholarship. Focus on issues of identity and diversity. Students are called upon to evaluate (and modulate) their time in Cape Town in relation to these concepts. Drawing on their own experiences, identity politics, prescribed reading material, applied reading material and their engagement with informal learning spaces in Cape Town, students will interrogate how their identities and those of fellow South Africans are produced and reproduced.

OSPCPTWN 31. Political Economy of Foreign Aid. 3 Units.

Political economy approach to foreign aid. Context of debate on development: differences between developed and less developed countries, concept of poverty, how to measure development. History of foreign aid; main actors and characteristics of official development assistance. Theoretical and empirical impact of aid with regard to economic growth and governance. Benefits and problems associated with aid.

OSPCPTWN 36. The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers. 4 Units.

Archaeology, history and ethnography of the aboriginal hunter gatherers of southern Africa, the San people. Formative development of early modern humans and prehistory of hunters in southern Africa before the advent of herding societies; rock paintings and engravings of the subcontinent as situated in this history. Spread of pastoralism throughout Africa. Problems facing the descendants of recent hunter gatherers and herders in southern Africa, the Khoisan people.

OSPCPTWN 38. Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective. 3-5 Units.

Genocide as a major social and historical phenomenon, contextualized within African history. Time frame ranging from the extermination of indigenous Canary Islanders in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries to more recent mass killings in Rwanda and Darfur. Emphasis on southern African case studies such Cape San communities and the Herero people in Namibia. Themes include: roles of racism, colonialism and nationalism in the making of African genocides. Relevance of other social phenomena such as modernity, Social Darwinism, ethnicity, warfare and revolution. Comparative perspective to elucidate global dimensions.

OSPCPTWN 43. Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa. 3 Units.

Introduction to concept of public health as compared with clinical medicine. Within a public health context, the broad distribution of health problems in sub-Saharan Africa as compared with U.S. and Europe. In light of South Africa's status as a new democracy, changes that have occurred in health legislation, policy, and service arenas in past 16 years. Topics include: sector health care delivery, current distribution of infectious and chronic diseases, and issues related to sexual and reproductive health in South Africa. Site visits to public sector health services and health related NGOs.

OSPCPTWN 45. Transitional Justice and Transformation Debates in South Africa. 3 Units.

Exploration of transitional justice through critical discussion of contemporary South Africa. Conflicting perspectives of the South African transition through an exploration of the creation of the "rainbow nation" as well as discussions over whether a denial of justice for apartheid-era crimes prevails. Decisions made post-apartheid over how best to confront the large-scale human rights abuses of the past, including South Africa's recent past through the lens of the "pillars" of transitional justice: truth seeking, criminal justice, reparations and institutional reform. Issues of structural violence and the legacies of apartheid in order to question to what extent we can consider South Africa to have realised the promises of its transition.

OSPCPTWN 50. [Independent Study] Conservation & Resources in Sub-Saharan Africa. 2-3 Units.

Independent research and writing on topics related to conservation and resources in Sub-Saharan Africa. Potential topics include climate change and adaption to South Africa, community-based conservation in Sub-Saharan Africa (examining conservation experiments such as the Lewa Conservancy and the Northern Rangeland Trust in Kenya), the provision of energy in South Africa, and citizen rights to healthy environment in African nations.

OSPCPTWN 55. Arts of Change. 2-4 Units.

Required course. What role have the creative arts played in South African society? Using a wide variety of artistic media (literature, the visual and performing arts) study cultural productions that reflect South Africa's social dynamic and that, in some cases, have affected the course of history. Historical perspective (e.g. Soweto 1976) combined with a contemporary one in the week-long National Arts Festival in Grahamstown. Service-learning component in Cape Town. (This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units to satisfy a Ways requirement.).

OSPCPTWN 57. Directed Study in Health Systems and Policy. 1-3 Unit.

Directed study projects focusing on some aspect of health systems and policy in the Southern African context. Example topics include analysis of: local HIV control policies; the South African health care system; health care delivery patterns; investments in health infrastructure as an enabler of health care delivery; health systems strengthening and concomitant improvements in population health; and social networks and influences in disease risk. Students will be expected to write an in-depth term paper that carefully analyzes the problem under consideration. Analyses that include the development of mathematical or analytical models are encouraged.

OSPCPTWN 63. Socio-Ecological Systems. 3 Units.

The global dynamics of biodiversity and ecosystem resilience using the mountains, farmlands and informal settlements as a living classroom. Critical ecosystem services that underpin the well-being of all societal groups and how these ecosystem services can be managed or restored to build resilience and support transitions in complex, interconnected social-ecological systems. Scientific focus on humanity¿s dependence on biodiversity and ecosystems as the third leg of sustainability science research, in addition to climate change and resource depletion. Deep ecology perspectives that value all life irrespective of its human utility as well as consideration of the non-quantifiable benefits of humanity's connection to nature. Limited enrollment.

OSPCPTWN 67. ICT4D: An Introduction to the Use of ICTs for Development. 3 Units.

Overview of selected ICT4D initiatives in Africa and South Africa. Engage critically with the optimism that follows technology invention to evaluate context and the digital knowledge gap. Themes such as the notion of technological colonization, co-design, SDG ICT agenda, policy and frameworks and other fundamentals in the field. Three-day block course with 4 mini-seminars and discussion groups each day.

OSPCPTWN 69. Comparatively Assessing South Africa's Transition to Democracy: Past, Present and Future. 3 Units.

South Africa's transition to democracy, its past, its current political and human rights situation, and what the future might hold. Progress South Africa has made in the areas of constitutional and democratic development, human rights and issues of truth, justice, and reconciliation. Also South African experience from a comparative perspective with the experiences of other countries, including Bangladesh, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Chile, Kenya, Namibia, Peru, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

OSPCPTWN 70. Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement. 3 Units.

Critical thinking about core concepts in community engagement such as community, self, and identity. The course aims to cultivate a critical consciousness about the meaning of charity, caring, social justice and the aims of engagement with communities to enhance self awareness, awareness of others who are different, awareness of social issues, and an ethic of care where students can be change agents. The meaning of youth citizenship as it relates to engagement with communities will be explored.

OSPCPTWN 75. Giving Voice to the Now: Studies in the South African Present. 3 Units.

How to make sense of present-day South Africa, its various forms of cultural expression, and what its common project might be. Through analysis of literature and film, explore the pluralities, intersections and crossings that come together to make up the complex state of being one inhabits in South Africa. Imagining spatial structures (cities, campuses) as imagined forms invested with meaning by the people who occupy them. How spaces (and South Africa itself may be thought of as a space) are affected by people, and vice versa.

OSPCPTWN 78. Postcolonial Modernist Art Movements in Africa. 3 Units.

Introduction to the complexities and contradictions of 'modernity' and 'modernism(s)' in postcolonial Africa. With a focus on ideology-driven interdisciplinary artistic movements in Senegal, Nigeria, Sudan, Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia and South Africa, examine various schools of thought that were part of modern consciousness that characterised the independence decades. Role that art centres, workshops, collectives and mission schools played in histories of European expansion and colonialism. Debates regarding notions of 'appropriation,' 'natural synthesis' and 'assimilation' interpreted in the context of postcolonial theory. Different modes of production and methodological approaches.

OSPCPTWN 79. Creative Cityness in the Global South. 3 Units.

Critical exploration of culture-led urban development in postapartheid Cape Town and beyond. Introduction to the rise of the creative economy in South Africa and Cape Town; current local development of Woodstock. Ways and forms of conflict but also new social interfaces between the new creative tenants and the old established community, on the one hand pointing to problematic issues like lingering gentrification, sociospatial polarisation and lopsided cultural representation while also trying to flesh out some of the opportunities for finding the right frequency of engagement between creative industries and spaces of vernacular creativity within Cape Town's post-apartheid urban realm.

OSPCPTWN 199A. Directed Reading A. 2-4 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPCPTWN 199B. Directed Reading B. 1-5 Unit.

Course may be repeated for credit.

Overseas Studies in Florence Courses

OSPFLOR 1A. Accelerated First-Year Italian, Part 1. 5 Units.

Accelerated sequence that completes first-year Italian in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Italian or with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: advanced-level proficiency in another Romance language Prerequisite: Placement .

OSPFLOR 1F. First-Year Italian, First Quarter. 5 Units.

All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities.

OSPFLOR 2A. Accelerated First-Year Italian, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of ITALLANG 1A. Accelerated sequence that completes first-year Italian in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Italian or with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 1A or consent of instructor. Fulfills the University language requirement.

OSPFLOR 2F. First-Year Italian, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of ITALLANG 1. All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 2.

OSPFLOR 3F. First-Year Italian, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of ITALLANG 2. All-in-Italian communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of appropriate discourse in contemporary cultural contexts. Interpretation of authentic materials, written and oral presentations, and plenty of conversational practice. Language lab, multimedia, and online activities. Prerequisite: Placement Test, ITALLANG 2 or consent of instructor. Fulfills the University language requirement.

OSPFLOR 8. Migration and Cultural Diversity in Contemporary Italy. 5 Units.

Exploration of the media as an arena where Italian national and individual identities (of both migrants and natives) are being redefined in an age of globalization, massive migration flows and increasing social diversity. Over the last thirty years, Italy has been transformed from a country of exclusive emigration into a country where recent immigration is becoming one of the most controversial issues faced by Italian society and the political system today.

OSPFLOR 11. Film, Food and the Italian Identity. 4 Units.

Food in Italian cinema staged as an allegory of Italy¿s social, political and cultural milieu. Intersections between food, history and culture as they are reflected in and shaped by Italian cinema from the early 1900s until today. Topics include: farmer's tradition during Fascism; lack of food during WWII and its aftermath; the Economic Miracle; food and the Americanization of Italy; La Dolce Vita; the Italian family; ethnicity, globalization and the re-discovery of regional culinary identity in contemporary Italy. Impact of cinema in both reflecting and defining the relationship between food and culture.

OSPFLOR 15. An Introduction to Contemporary Italy. 3 Units.

Today's Italy through a series of thematic lectures covering a wide range of subjects, from politics to contemporary art and from sexual mores to the Mafia. Nature of contemporary Italian society, insights into the economic challenges facing Italy, as well as keys to deciphering Italian politics, and the elements required to make sense of what can be read, seen and heard in the Italian media. Assesing modern Italian culture in terms of the society that has produced it.

OSPFLOR 19. Florence for Foodies: Discovering the Italian Culinary Tradition. 1 Unit.

A look at modern Florentine and Italian cuisine in light of historical heritage and foreign influences. Hands-on participation in three cooking classes with professional chefs. Understanding of the past and present of Italian food culture and its most important governing principles: the Mediterranean Diet, fresh and local ingredients, the market culture, and the Slow Food philosophy.

OSPFLOR 21F. Accelerated Second-Year Italian, Part A. 5 Units.

Review of grammatical structures; grammar in its communicative context. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills practiced and developed through authentic material such as songs, newspaper articles, video clips, and literature. Insight into the Italian culture and crosscultural understanding. Prerequisite: one year of college Italian if completed within two quarters of arriving in Florence, or ITALLANG 21.

OSPFLOR 22F. Accelerated Second-Year Italian Part B. 5 Units.

Grammatical structures, listening, reading, writing, speaking skills, and insight into the Italian culture through authentic materials. Intermediate to advanced grammar. Content-based course, using songs, video, and literature, to provide cultural background for academic courses. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 21 within two quarters of arriving in Florence or ITALLANG 21A or OSPFLOR 21F.

OSPFLOR 23. Immigration, Race, and Nation in Europe and the United States. 4 Units.

Meaning of belonging in world where mass international migration challenges notions of race, ethnicity, and nation. Focus on the United States and Europe, with an emphasis on Italy. Concepts of race, ethnicity and nation; how immigration challenges categories of race and ethnicity in both sending and receiving societies; how migration shapes the nation as both a formal political entity and an informal cultural community. Field trips for firsthand view of how course material plays out in and around Florence.

OSPFLOR 24. Topics in Race and Ethnicity or Refugees in Europe. 2-3 Units.

Possible topics include: Refugees in Europe and/or Italy; Cross-border Virtual Networks; Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary Italian Popular Culture.

OSPFLOR 26. The Politics of the European Crisis: from the Maastricht Treaty to the Greek Crunch. 5 Units.

Discussion and analysis of the European Crisis, which started in Greece in 2009 and continues. Critical comprehension of the inner functioning of the European Union's economics, politics and institutions, understanding of the reasons for the crisis and the solutions undertaken. Comparative analysis with the United States to show the complexity entailed in having one monetary policy and nineteen distinct national budgets. Discussion of key challenges in Europe and next steps in the progress of European integration.

OSPFLOR 28. Between Art and Science: the Evolution of Techniques from Antiquity to Leonardo da Vinci. 4 Units.

Revival of technical activity that began in the late fourteenth century, notably in Italy, and lasted, through the fifteenth century. New perspective on the Renaissance through focus on the careers and the most significant achievements of the "artist-engineers" active before Leonardo.

OSPFLOR 31F. Advanced Oral Communication: Italian. 3 Units.

Refine language skills and develop insight into Italian culture using authentic materials. Group work and individual meetings with instructor. Minimum enrollment required. Prerequisite: ITALLANG 22A, 23 or placement.

OSPFLOR 32. Critical Strategies in Contemporary Photographic Practice: Florence Through a Lens. 4 Units.

Technical knowledge and the evolved analytical and conceptual skills required to begin producing complex, reflexive, innovative and challenging photographic work. Workings of the camera, classical rules of aesthetic creation and the nature of light. History of the medium and its relationship to society as a whole. Ethical issues at the heart of photographic practice; examination of the scientific and philosophical foundations of photography itself.

OSPFLOR 34. The Virgin Mother, Goddess of Beauty, Grand Duchess, and the Lady: Women in Florentine Art. 4 Units.

Influence and position of women in the history of Florence as revealed in its art. Sculptural, pictorial, and architectural sources from a social, historical, and art historical point of view. Themes: the virgin mother (middle ages); the goddess of beauty (Botticelli to mannerism); the grand duchess (late Renaissance, Baroque); the lady, the woman (19th-20th centuries).

OSPFLOR 38. Human Trafficking in Europe. 3 Units.

Human trafficking in post-communist Europe. Can tailor to the interests of students, with varying levels of emphasis on sex trafficking, labor trafficking, and organ trafficking; Western and Eastern Europe; degree of historical versus current phenomena.

OSPFLOR 41. The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum. 4 Units.

The ever-changing and multifaceted scene of contemporary art through visual and sensorial stimulation. How art is thought of and produced in Italy today. Hands-on experience. Sketching and exercises on-site at museums and exhibits, plus workshops on techniques. Limited enrollment.

OSPFLOR 42. Academic Internship. 1-5 Unit.

Mentored internships in fashion, education, engineering, the fine arts, health, media, not-for-profit organizations, and publishing (among others). May be repeated for credit.

OSPFLOR 43. Machiavelli. 3-4 Units.

This course examines the complex and innovative character of Machiavelli's political thinking, situating his writings in the tumultuous context of Florentine and Italian politics, and comparing his radical approach to the statecraft of The Prince with his seminal contributions to the republican political ideas that eventually culminated in the American Revolution.

OSPFLOR 45. The State of the Union: Challenges and Opportunities in Europe Today. 2 Units.

Learn about, debate, and analyze the most pressing and critical issues that Italy and the EU are facing today. As former Prime Minister, and in current capacity as head of the Democratic Party, the instructor has been dealing with these issues firsthand for a number of years. On questions such as the current migrant/refugee crises, issues of citizenship and national identity, the Euro, and Brexit (just to name a few), the approach will be informed by political and economic theories and will be presented in an objective academic context; the instructor will also share not only his take on these questions but also his experiences in addressing them as an insider.

OSPFLOR 46. Images of Evil in Criminal Justice. 5 Units.

Iconographic component of criminal law; reasons and functions of the visual representation of criminal wrongdoing. Historical roots of "evil typecasting;" consideration of its variations with respect to common law and civil law systems. Fundamental features of the two legal systems. Sources, actors, enforcement mechanisms of the criminal law compared; study of cases in the area of murder, sex offences, organized crime and terrorism. Different techniques of image typecasting highlighted and discussed. International criminal law, which takes the burden to describe, typecast and punish forms of "enormous, disproportionate evil," such as genocide and other mass atrocities.

OSPFLOR 48. Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition. 4 Units.

The city's art and theories of how art should be presented. The history and typology of world-class collections. Social, economic, political, and aesthetic issues in museum planning and management. Collections include the Medici, English and American collectors of the Victorian era, and modern corporate and public patrons.

OSPFLOR 49. On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II. 5 Units.

Structural and ideological attributes of narrative cinema, and theories of visual and cinematic representation. How film directors have translated history into stories, and war journals into visual images. Topics: the role of fascism in the development of Italian cinema and its phenomenology in film texts; cinema as a way of producing and reproducing constructions of history; film narratives as fictive metaphors of Italian cultural identity; film image, ideology, and politics of style.

OSPFLOR 50M. Introductory Science of Materials. 4 Units.

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.

OSPFLOR 53. Italy and Italians at War: 1939-1945. 3 Units.

Dimensions of World War II in Italy. Military and diplomatic events, as well as the dramatic shifts in Italian fortunes at war. Social and personal dimensions of the Italian experience at war will be a major focus. The experiences of Italians fighting on the eastern front and in the Balkans, and of those who suffered multiple occupations and German reprisals at home. The fate of the Italian Jews, and the gendered character of the home front and partisan warfare. Florence as the focal point for understanding the character of the war.

OSPFLOR 54. High Renaissance and Mannerism: the Great Italian Masters of the 15th and 16th Centuries. 4 Units.

The development of 15th- and early 16th-century art in Florence and Rome. Epochal changes in the art of Michelangelo and Raphael in the service of Pope Julius II. The impact of Roman High Renaissance art on masters such as Fra' Bartolomeo and Andrea del Sarto. The tragic circumstances surrounding the early maniera: Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino and the transformation of early Mannerism into the elegant style of the Medicean court. Contemporary developments in Venice.

OSPFLOR 55. Academy of Fine Arts: Studio Art. 1-5 Unit.

Courses through the Academia delle Belle Arti. Details upon arrival. Minimum Autumn and Winter Quarter enrollment required; 1-3 units in Autumn. May be repeated for credit.

OSPFLOR 56. University of Florence Courses. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPFLOR 58. Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change. 4 Units.

A thousand years of intentional change in Florence. Phases include programmatic enlargement of ecclesiastical structures begun in the 11th century; aggressive expansion of religious and civic space in the 13th and 14th centuries; aggrandizement of private and public buildings in the 15th century; transformation of Florence into a princely capital from the 16th through the 18th centuries; traumatic remaking of the city¿s historic core in the 19th century; and development of new residential areas on the outskirts and in neighboring towns in the 20th and 21st centuries.

OSPFLOR 67. The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema. 4 Units.

Film in the social construction of gender through the representation of the feminine, the female, and women. Female subjects, gaze, and identity through a historical, technical, and narrative frame. Emphasis is on gender, identity, and sexuality with references to feminist film theory from the early 70s to current methodologies based on semiotics, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Advantages and limitations of methods for textual analysis and the theories which inform them.

OSPFLOR 69. Abstract Art: Creativity, Self-Expression and Depicting the Unimaginable. 4 Units.

Overview of the birth and evolution of abstract art with visual background necessary to produce works of art free of a realistic representation. Movements and trends in abstract art; experimentation with different media and techniques.

OSPFLOR 71. A Studio with a View: Drawing, Painting and Informing your Aesthetic in Florence. 4 Units.

Recent trends in art, current Italian artistic production, differences and the dialogue among visual arts. Events, schools, and movements of the 20th century. Theoretical background and practical training in various media. Work at the Stanford Center and on site at museums, exhibits, and out in the city armed with a sketchbook and camera. Emphasis is on drawing as the key to the visual arts. Workshops to master the techniques introduced. Limited enrollment.

OSPFLOR 78. The Impossible Experiment: Politics and Policies of the New European Union. 5 Units.

Institutional design of EU, forthcoming changes, and comparison of the old and new designs. Interactions between the EU, member states, organized interests, and public opinion. Major policies of the EU that affect economics such as competition or cohesion policies, market deregulation, and single currency. Consequences of the expansion eastwards. The role of institutions as a set of constraints and opportunities for the economic actors; relationships between political developments and economic change in the context of regional integration; lessons for other parts of the world.

OSPFLOR 85. Bioethics: the Biotechnological Revolution, Human Rights and Politics in the Global Era. 4 Units.

Birth and development of the philosophical field of bioethics based on advances in several fundamental fields of science and technology, including molecular and cell biology, information technology, neurosciences and converging technologies. Challenges for society and ethical and political issues created by new advances and opportunities for individuals and populations. Philosophical approaches developed in the Italian as well as in the European debate; special attention to controversy about the freedom of scientific research, new conditions of procreation, birth, cures, and death. Complexity of the challenges posed by the `biotechnological revolution¿.

OSPFLOR 97. Independent Study: Heretics to Headscarves. 1-3 Unit.

Independent reading on the history of religious toleration, to combine some general works on the problem of religious diversity in Europe, with a special emphasis on topics of special importance to Italy. The history of the Inquisition, the suppression of Protestant tendencies in Italy, the rise of the ghetto and the treatment of Jews, and our contemporary debates over the integration of Moslems into a post-Christian Europe will all be considered.

OSPFLOR 111Y. From Giotto to Michelangelo: The Birth and Flowering of Renaissance Art in Florence. 4 Units.

Lectures, site visits, and readings reconstruct the circumstances that favored the flowering of architecture, sculpture, and painting in Florence and Italy, late 13th to early 16th century. Emphasis is on the classical roots; the particular relationship with nature; the commitment to human expressiveness; and rootedness in the real-world experience, translated in sculpture and painting as powerful plasticity, perspective space, and interest in movement and emotion.

OSPFLOR 115Y. Building the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization. 4 Units.

The history, history of art, and symbolism of the two principal monuments of Florence: the cathedral and the town hall. Common meaning and ideological differences between the religious and civic symbols of Florence's history from the time of Giotto and the first Guelf republic to Bronzino and Giovanni da Bologna and the Grand Duchy.

OSPFLOR 199A. Directed Reading A. 1-4 Unit.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPFLOR 199B. Directed Reading B. 1-4 Unit.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPFLOR 199C. Directed Reading C. 1-5 Unit.

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Overseas Studies in Istanbul Courses

Overseas Studies in Kyoto (KCJS) Courses

OSPKYOCT 103A. Third-Year Japanese I. 12 Units.

Preparation for function beyond basic level in a Japanese-speaking environment by developing and enhancing communicative competence through: review of basic grammar; new grammar; reading short essays and articles with help of dictionary; short writing and speaking assignments using formal style to describe, explain, and discuss sociocultural topics; enhancing listening comprehension.

OSPKYOCT 103B. Third-Year Japanese II. 12 Units.

Preparation for function beyond basic level in a Japanese-speaking environment by developing and enhancing communicative competence through: review of basic grammar; new grammar; reading short essays and articles with help of dictionary; short writing and speaking assignments using formal style to describe, explain, and discuss sociocultural topics; enhancing listening comprehension.

OSPKYOCT 104A. Fourth-Year Japanese I. 12 Units.

Emphasis on applications of correct grammar and strengthening academic communication skills through: reading longer essays, articles, and novels with some dictionary work; reading and writing assignments in paragraph format using formal style to describe, explain and discuss sociocultural topics; developing listening comprehension.

OSPKYOCT 104B. Fourth-Year Japanese II. 12 Units.

Emphasis on applications of correct grammar and strengthening academic communication skills through: reading longer essays, articles, and novels with some dictionary work; reading and writing assignments in paragraph format using formal style to describe, explain and discuss sociocultural topics; developing listening comprehension.

OSPKYOCT 105A. Fifth-Year Japanese I. 12 Units.

For students with advanced proficiency. Goals include advanced command of grammar, composition, and stylistics. Emphasis is on academic Japanese preparing students to audit classes at a Japanese university.

OSPKYOCT 105B. Fifth-Year Japanese II. 12 Units.

For students with advanced proficiency. Goals include advanced command of grammar, composition, and stylistics. Emphasis is on academic Japanese preparing students to audit classes at a Japanese university.

OSPKYOCT 128. Families and Work in Post-war Japan. 6 Units.

Factors that promoted both change and continuity in the social division of labor between the interdependent spheres of work and family. How cultural strategies for organizing contemporary Japanese social life were conditioned 1) by rapid industrialization and growth and 2) by later economic stasis. Class, gender, and regional variations; role of social psychology in Japanese responses to work-family conflicts.

OSPKYOCT 131. International Business Strategies in Japan and Asia. 6 Units.

Regional as opposed to national approaches for business strategies. Interconnectedness of the region's economies an businesses. International business strategies with particular relevance to Japan and Asia; key players in Asian business; how to utilize knowledge of Japan in greater Asian international business context.

OSPKYOCT 146. Postwar Japanese Cinema and Visual Culture. 6 Units.

Films of Japanese directors Ozu Yasujiro, Mizoguchi Kenji and Kurosawa Akira from the late 1940s and 1950s and their focus on the human condition and the perception of truth, history, beauty, death in the postwar period. Connections to other visual media such as painting, photography, and printmaking.

OSPKYOCT 180. The Arts of Japan. 6 Units.

Introduction to the major artistic traditions of Japan, from the Neolithic period to the present. How arts developed in and through history and how art and architecture were used for philosophical, religious and material ends. Topics include: places of Shinto and impact of Buddhism; narrative illustration; changing roles of aristocratic, monastic, shogunal and merchant patronage.

Overseas Studies in Kyoto Courses

OSPKYOTO 2K. First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of JAPANLNG 1. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write, and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 1 if taken 2012-13 of later (JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 3K. First-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 9K). Continuation of 2K. First-year sequence enables students to converse, write, and read essays on topics such as personal history, experiences, familiar people. Fulfills University Foreign Language Requirement. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 2 or OSPKYOTO 2K if taken 2012-13 or later (JAPANLNG 8 if taken 2011-13 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 5A. Independent Study in Japan's Energy Crisis. 1 Unit.

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OSPKYOTO 13. Contemporary Religion in Japan's Ancient Capital: Sustaining and Recasting Tradition. 4 Units.

Japanese attitudes to religion and popular forms of religiosity. Syncretic nature of beliefs and practices drawn on a variety of interwoven concepts, beliefs, customs and religious activities of native Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Indian origins as background. Topics include: pursuit of worldly benefits, religion and healing, fortune-telling, ascetic practices, pilgrimage, festivals (matsuri), new religions and their image, impact of the internet, response of religion in times of crisis.

OSPKYOTO 18. Ceramic Art and Technology, from Ancient to Modern. 3 Units.

Evolution of Japanese ceramics, beginning with the archeological record of the Jomon Period and ending with modern Kyoto-localized engineering (e.g., product development by the Kyocera Corporation & Group) and artistic movements (e.g., the mid-Twentieth Century Sodeisha). Topics include: materials science of silicate ceramics; ancient ceramic technology development in East Asia; geology of Japan's indigenous clay; roles of ceramics in the Japanese tea ceremony and culinary culture; engineered ceramic materials and their present-day applications; and modern developments in the Kyoto ceramic arts scene. Field trips to Kyoto-area museums, galleries, and academic and industrial laboratories.

OSPKYOTO 21K. Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, First Quarter. 5 Units.

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 17K.) Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 3 if taken 2012-13 or later (JAPANLNG 7 if taken 2011-12 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 22K. Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 18K). Continuation of JAPANLNG 21. Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 21 if taken 2012-13 or later (JAPANLNG 17 if taken 2011-12 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 23K. Second-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Formerly OSPKYOTO 19K). Goal is to further develop and enhance spoken and written Japanese in order to handle advanced concepts such as comparison and contrast of the two cultures, descriptions of incidents, and social issues. 800 kanji, 1,400 new words, and higher-level grammatical constructions. Readings include authentic materials such as newspaper articles, and essays. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 22 or OSPKYOTO 22K if taken 2012-13 or later (JAPANLNG 18 if taken 2011-12 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 27. Japanese Popular Culture. 4 Units.

Introduction to forms and categories of Japanese popular culture including: Japanese movies and television, animation and manga, magazines, newspapers and other printed materials, characters and product brands, sports and other entertainment industries, music and idols, fashion, food and drink, consumer goods, shopping malls and other places for consumption. Using a cultural studies framework, analyze these various forms of popular culture considering the following: different groups in society; historical variability; industry, government and media interests; and advertising policies.

OSPKYOTO 29. The Culinary Arts of Japan. 2 Units.

Focusing on Kyoto's culinary heritage, introduction to the principle ingredients and methods used in Japanese cuisine. Field trips to select local producers and purveyors organized around related food groups including tea and wagashi; dashi; tofu, miso and shoyu; seasonal vegetables and seafood; tsukemono and rice. Visits to shops and artisan workshops specializing in culinary tools such as cutlery, kitchen utensils and tableware are also scheduled, as is a final hands-on cooking lesson with one of Kyoto's leading chefs. Enrollment limited.

OSPKYOTO 37. Kyoto Artisans in the 21st Century. 2 Units.

Introduction to the multiple arcs of innovation within Kyoto's world of crafts and the reverence for materials and techniques in such a way that each enterprise reflects a recognizable template from which students can better assess their relative merits (or demerits) while gaining first-hand insights into the resilience and remarkable staying-power of these multigenerational heritage operations.

OSPKYOTO 39. Capturing Concepts: A Photographic Exploration of the Origins of Kanji. 2 Units.

Under guidance of official photographer for KYOTOGRAPHIE International Photography Festival, photograph scenes from everyday life in Kyoto to portray contemporary versions of the ancient forms and original meanings of ten different kanji. Develop observational, interpretive and creative abilities as well as improve technical skills (including picture composition and image editing).

OSPKYOTO 40M. An Intro to Making: What is EE. 5 Units.

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

OSPKYOTO 41. Queer Culture and Life in Japan. 4 Units.

Exploration of queer lives and cultural practices in Japan through diverse materials from film, literature, theater, art, as well as newspapers and personal testimonies. What it means to be queer in Japan and how it might signify differently from a US context. Looking at each text, examine how gender norms and sexual politics intersect and operate in Japanese society.

OSPKYOTO 42. Gardens of Kyoto: Spaces of Aesthetic and Spiritual Contemplation. 1-2 Unit.

Chronological stroll through Japanese gardens of different types and functions, spanning from the Heian period (794¿1185), when the ancient capital of Kyoto was established, through to contemporary times. Weekly field trips to a selection of Kyoto gardens and garden-related activities, in order to gain an understanding of the historical development and functions of Japanese gardens, including their design principles, techniques, and elements.

OSPKYOTO 44. The Zen of Japanese Design: Wa Concepts and their Creative Application. 4 Units.

Links between successful Japanese design innovations and Japan¿s traditional `Wa¿ (lit. ¿harmony¿) principles that underpin them. Wa as a codified conceptual framework; how Japanese creatives continue to directly apply Wa principles to enhance their designs. Through a combination of classroom study and hand-on creative assignments as well as field trips throughout Kyoto, explore the relationship between Zen and Wa thinking and how it is applied in Japanese design. Students will gain significant experience developing their own original designs for products, business models or services, utilizing Wa principles.

OSPKYOTO 45. Japan's Energy-Environment Conundrum. 4 Units.

Japan's energy-environment challenges and their consequences for Japan¿s wider society and economy. Question of how Japan's policy makers will balance energy and environmental needs and how the answers will affect the country's future as a leading regional power. Students will gain a sound understanding of the structure of Japan's energy-environment challenges and a practical analytical framework by which they can evaluate these challenges and develop their own balanced assessments.

OSPKYOTO 58. A Journey into the Buddhist Visual Arts of Japan. 4 Units.

Impact of Buddhism on the arts and culture of Japan as seen in the ancient capital of Kyoto. Image production, iconography, representational strategies, as well as the ritual and visual functions of Buddhist sculpture and painting with a focus on selected historical temples and their icons. Also examination of architectural and landscape elements of temple layouts, within which iconographic programs are framed, images are enlivened, and practices centered on these devotional and ritual art.

OSPKYOTO 74. In the Air of Kyoto: Sound, Site and Image. 4 Units.

Developing a creative relationship with the sonic environment through investigation and exploration. The nature of sound as it exists in physical space and social space; as it emanates from and penetrates the listening body. Special attention to the acoustic sites of Kyoto with regard to both the historical and contemporary ways in which sound functions. Technical skills for recording, editing and mixing sounds; new ways of listening; collaborative projects for public presentation. Three main creative projects constitute the core of the practicum.

OSPKYOTO 103K. Third-Year Japanese Language, Culture, and Communication, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

(Formerly OSPKYOTO 119K). Continuation of 118K. Goal is to express thoughts and opinions in paragraph length in spoken and written forms. Materials include current Japanese media and literature for native speakers of Japanese. Cultural and social topics related to Japan and its people. Prerequisite: JAPANLNG 102 or OSPKYOTO 102K if taken 2012-13 or later (JAPANLNG 118 if taken 2011-12 or earlier).

OSPKYOTO 199. Directed Reading. 1-4 Unit.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPKYOTO 210K. Advanced Japanese. 5 Units.

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Overseas Studies in Madrid Courses

OSPMADRD 8A. Cities and Creativity: Cultural and Architectural Interpretations of Madrid. 4 Units.

Architecture and the city, with a focus on recent currents in the progress of both, such as sustainability, environmentalism and the relationship with nature. Topics underpinned by discussion of theory, and illustrated by a study of the city of Madrid: an example of a hybrid architectural/planning experiential environment that looks to the future with an ambition for modernization.

OSPMADRD 8B. Debating Design: Spanish and International Fashion. 2 Units.

Culture and society in Spain as viewed through the lens of the fashion industry. Social changes, trends, and the evolution of life styles. Industrial, commercial and media involvement in the internationalization of the industry.

OSPMADRD 8C. Appreciating Spanish Music. 2 Units.

Unique aspects of Spanish art music. Participation in concert outings and field trips for live performances of studied repertoire. No previous knowledge of music required.

OSPMADRD 11. Directed Reading on Spanish Language. 1-5 Unit.

Expand knowledge of Spanish language by doing research on a specific linguistic topic from any perspective (e.g. grammar, phonology, history, sociolinguistics, dialectology, etc.). A Directed Reading Proposal must be submitted to the Overseas Studies Office and to the Program Director at least two months prior to the quarter of intended study. A directed reading may be taken only in addition to twelve units of regular coursework offered directly by the Center. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 102 or equivalent placement. Approval of instructor.

OSPMADRD 12M. Accelerated Second-Year Spanish I. 5 Units.

Intensive sequence integrating language, culture, and geo/sociopolitics of Spain. Emphasis is on achieving advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse, including formal and informal situations, presentational language, and appropriate forms in academic and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish or 11 or 21B more than two quarters (six months) prior to arriving in Madrid, or equivalent placement.

OSPMADRD 13M. Accelerated Second-Year Spanish II. 5 Units.

Intensive sequence integrating language, culture, and geo/sociopolitics of Spain. Emphasis is on achieving advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse, including formal and informal situations, presentational language, and appropriate forms in academic and professional contexts. Prerequisite: 11 or 21B within two quarters (six months) of arriving in Madrid or 12 or 22B, or equivalent placement.

OSPMADRD 14. Introduction to Spanish Culture. 2 Units.

Required for all Madrid students. Lectures and activities covering a wide selection of culturally and academically significant topics to understand Spain, as well as its international context. Requirements include orientation, study trip, and language pledge compliance.

OSPMADRD 15. Flamenco Dance. 1 Unit.

Practical instruction. The rhythms and styles of flamenco and the expression of feelings proper to this art form which synthesizes song, music, and dance. Zapateado (footwork), braceo (arm positions and movement technique), and choreographies, including Rumba flamenca and Sevillanas. Enrollment limited. May be repeated for credit.

OSPMADRD 17. Directed Reading on Catalan, Galizian, or Basque Languages. 1-5 Unit.

For students interested in studying one of the languages spoken in Spain other than Spanish. A Directed Reading Proposal must be submitted to the Overseas Studies Office and to the Program Director at least two months prior to the quarter of intended study. This directed reading may be taken only in addition to twelve units of regular coursework offered directly by the Center.

OSPMADRD 18. Theory and Practice of Flamenco. 3 Units.

Origins and history of flamenco and its place in Spanish culture, including both theory and actual dance instruction.

OSPMADRD 22. Spain on Stage: Theater and Performance in 2018. 5 Units.

Spanish theater and society through its contemporary repertoire. Focus on developing a critical voice for appreciating theater as an art form while assessing the relationship between the present theater season and current events on a local, regional and global scale. Attend theater and analyze works currently in performance in a wide variety of venues in Madrid. Works include canonical plays as well as those at smaller historical and alternative theaters. Skills and strategies for reading dramatic works as literature and analyzing all scenic languages of performance.

OSPMADRD 27. Canarian Night Skies. 4 Units.

Exploration of night skies in Spain's Canary Islands as well as those seen from California. Science for non-majors. Constellations, Solar System, Galactic and Extragalactic objects. Unique characteristics of the Canary Islands as astronomical reserve studied prior to field trip to the Canary Islands. Comparison of naked-eye Canarian and Californian night skies. Study and exploration of relevant astronomical instrumentation as well as representative celestial objects. Astrophotography-related activities. Enrollment limited.

OSPMADRD 32. Economics of Development. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to cutting-edge economic thinking about development issues. Macro and micro economic questions addressed. Tools and language of economics to explain observed patterns of development and the economic activities of people in a diversity of settings. Field studies in migration, small business development, housing and other institutions in poor parts of Madrid and surrounding areas.

OSPMADRD 34. Sociology of Art. 5 Units.

Concepts related to the process of creation, mediation, reception and consumption of art as well as lifestyles, artistic circuits, and the field of art as a whole using a sociological approach in analyzing artistic practice. Sociological methods for the creation and critique of art. Using an external, sociological approach, contemplate art as a social phenomenon, not addressing the aesthetic and psychological aspects of art, but rather its group features and its value as a political and economic act. Offered at Universidad Complutense.

OSPMADRD 35. Sociology for Design. 5 Units.

Communicative approach to the products of design, allowing for understanding of the temporary and social circuits of Design and their creation. Practices of creation and consumption of design, and on the social framework surrounding the production of objects and images in different cultures. Methods of sociological and anthropological analysis applied to Design.,,Three ways of making objects and images or three "logics of creation,"drawing from Cultural Sociology and the Sociology of Art when classifying objects and images from different periods and latitudes as examples of ways of thinking, creating and using artificial elements according to two criteria: 1st, mythical-unwritten compared with the scientific-written; 2nd, Western versus non-Western origin. Offered at Universidad Complutense.

OSPMADRD 36. Directed Readings on Global Issues/Economic Development. 3-4 Units.

Directed reading/tutorial on a wide range of Economic Development topics including China's rise, Africa today, South Asia's successes and challenges, EU integration and migration, inequality in the EU, etc. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of key ideas, core issues, and possible implications of alternative hypotheses. Choice of topic will determine whether a paper is required or mastery of subject can be demonstrated through discussion alone.

OSPMADRD 38. Global Trends: Anticipating the Future in Order to Shape It. 4-5 Units.

Examination of "megatrends" such as globalization and interdependence, demographic change, the rise of new powers, increasing prosperity and inequality, demand for limited resources, diffusion of power, and demands on governments everywhere; how they interact, and possible implications for the international system. Also examination of potential "game changers" such as climate change, new technologies, the global economy, and what the United States does/does not do. Goal is enhanced understanding of the challenges we face, how they interact, and what can/must be done to preserve peace and prosperity, maximize benefits, and minimize risks.

OSPMADRD 42. A European Model of Democracy: The Case of Spain. 4 Units.

Current Spanish political system, its main judicial and political institutions, outstanding actors' and the political process of the last decade. Historic antecedents; immediate precedents; and the current political system and life. Relation between the elements that constitute a political system; results of the process of democratization; integration to the EU.

OSPMADRD 43. The Jacobean Star Way and Europe: Society, Politics and Culture. 5 Units.

The Saint James' Way as a tool to understand historic dynamics from a global perspective. Its effect on the structures that form a political and institutional system, and its society, economy, and ideology. Enrollment limited; instructor approval required.

OSPMADRD 45. Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums. 4 Units.

Viewing the collections at the Prado Museum through study and analysis of the representations of women. Contemporary literary texts and images that situate paintings in the historical, social, and political conditions that produced the works.

OSPMADRD 46. Drawing with Four Spanish Masters: Goya, Velazquez, Picasso and Dali. 4 Units.

Approaches, techniques, and processes in drawing. Visits to Madrid museums to study paintings and drawings by Goya, Velázquez, Picasso, and Dalí and to explore the experience of drawing. Subject matter: the figure, still life, interiors, landscape, and non-representational drawing. No previous experience required. Enrollment limited.

OSPMADRD 47. Cultural Relations between Spain and the United States:Historical Perceptions and Influences, 1776-2. 4 Units.

Critical historical thinking about international cultural relations, using Spain and U.S. as case studies examples, with references to Atlantic world contexts, from 1776 to the present. Insights into the continuing social and political relevance of their contested legacies. interpretive perspectives grounded in different ideologies, interests and collective identities within both societies. Introduction to pertinent social scientific theory regarding identity formation, self-image, and perceptions of and interactions with ethnic and cultural otherness. Differences between history, historiography and memory through consideration of diverse forms of expression and vehicles of transmission of collective memory.

OSPMADRD 48. Migration and Multiculturality in Spain. 4 Units.

Dimensions of recent migratory phenomena in Spain. Changes in past decades from a country of emigration to one of immigration, and vice versa. North Africa, Latin America, and Eastern Europe on the one side and the rest of Europe on the other. Social concern and public debate resulting from these changes.

OSPMADRD 51. Directed Reading on Global Issues/International Relations. 3 Units.

Directed reading/tutorial on a wide range of international relations topics including China's rise, grand strategy, nuclear proliferation, and climate change. Students will be expected to demonstrate understanding of key ideas, core issues, and possible implications of alternative hypotheses. Choice of topic will determine whether a paper is required or mastery of subject can be demonstrated through discussion alone.

OSPMADRD 54. Contemporary Spanish Economy and the European Union. 4 Units.

Concepts and methods for analysis of a country's economy with focus on Spain and the EU. Spain's growth and structural change; evolution of Spain's production sectors, agriculture, industry, and services; institutional factors such as the labor market and public sector; Spain's economic international relations, in particular, development of the EU, institutional framework, economic and monetary union, policies related to the European economic integration process, and U.S.-EU relationship.

OSPMADRD 55. Latin Americans in Spain: Cultural Identities, Social Practices, and Migratory Experience. 4 Units.

Shift in recent decades from Spain being a country of emigration to one attractive for immigration, especially for people coming from Latin America. Transnational processes of interculturality, integration and assimilation as illustrated by the different ways that immigrant Spaniards relate to Spanish society in Spain.

OSPMADRD 57. Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.. 4 Units.

History of health care and evolution of the concept of universal health care based on need not wealth. Contrast with system in U.S. Is there a right to health care and if so, what does it encompass? The Spanish health care system; its major successes and shortcomings. Issues and challenges from an interdisciplinary perspective combining scientific facts with moral, political, and legal philosophy.

OSPMADRD 60. Integration into Spanish Society: Service Learning and Professional Opportunities. 4 Units.

Engagement with the real world of Madrid through public service work with NGOs and public service professions such as teaching. Depending on availability, topics relevant to present-day Spain may include: the national health plan, educational system, immigration, prostitution, refugees, youth, and fair trade. Fieldwork, lectures, and research paper. Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: completion of SPANLANG 11 or 21B or placement.

OSPMADRD 61. Society and Cultural Change: The Case of Spain. 4 Units.

Complexity of socio-cultural change in Spain during the last three decades. Topics include: cultural diversity in Iberian world; social structure; family in Mediterranean cultures; ages and generations; political parties and ideologies; communication and consumption; religion; and leisure activities.

OSPMADRD 72. Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures. 4 Units.

Ethical dilemmas concerning the autonomy and dignity of human beings and other living creatures; principles of justice that rule different realms of private and public life. Interdisciplinary approach to assessing these challenges, combining scientific facts, health care issues, and moral philosophy. Sources include landmark bioethics papers.

OSPMADRD 74. Islam in Spain and Europe: 1300 Years of Contact. 4 Units.

Primary problems and conflicts in the contemporary Islamic world and it relations with the West, as well as the relationship between Spain and Islam throughout history. Special attention to the history of al-Andalus, an Islamic state in the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages, evaluating the importance of its legacy in Europe and in contemporary Spain. Spain¿s leading role in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic states from the Modern Era to the present day.

OSPMADRD 75. Sefarad: The Jewish Community in Spain. 4 Units.

The legacy of Sefarad, the Jewish community in Spain. Historical evolution of the Sephardic community, under both Muslim and Christian rule, including the culmination of Anti-Semitism in 1492 with the expulsion of the Jews. Cultural contribution of the Hebrew communities in their condition as a social minority, both in al-Andalus, the peninsular Islamic State, and in the peninsular Christian kingdoms.

OSPMADRD 79. Earth and Water Resources' Sustainability in Spain. 3-4 Units.

Interdisciplinary focus on the relationship between earth systems and human activities. Nature and distribution of natural resources, their uses and exploitation, environmental impacts associated with exploitation, and sustainable development initiatives, including the restoration and rehabilitation of the land affected by extraction activities. Water management: understanding of the resource and its location; the development of efficient tools; an associated regulatory apparatus; and economics.

OSPMADRD 80. Word, Image and Power. 4 Units.

Relationships and uses of oral discourse, art, and iconography in politics in different countries through history. Case studies from ancient Egypt, the Greek Paideia, Cesar Augustus, medieval Europe, Spanish modern empire, French revolutionary discourse, and proletarian national identity in Russia and China.

OSPMADRD 83. Narrating the Nation: National and Post-National Spanish and Latin American Literature. 4 Units.

Basic themes and issues required to understand the connections between literature and nationalism in modern Spain and Latin America: main political and philosophical concepts and theories about national identity; narrative, stylistic and conceptual strategies that conform the rhetoric of nationalism, as well as those that try to lead to a postnational paradigm. Textual and discourse analysis of Spanish and Latin American journalistic and literary works related to nationalism and postnationalism, with attention paid to real historic and political contexts. Readings in Spanish.

OSPMADRD 84. Madrid Through My Eyes: A Theoreticl/Practical Documentary Film Workshop. 4 Units.

Theoretical and practical view of Spanish language documentary cinema; potential of this type of film making as a form of personal expression. Tools for understanding and analyzing this type of cinema. Creative and analytical reflection on student 's Madrid experience; develop individual visual discourse to portray life in the city by filming a short documentary.

OSPMADRD 86. Literature and Philosophy of Travel. 4 Units.

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OSPMADRD 88. Independent Study in Spanish Literature and History. 1-3 Unit.

Independent study offered on topics in Spanish literature or modern history. Students propose a topic to the instructor who will help craft a reading list and appropriate on-site field trips or archives. Student and instructor will meet weekly; outside work will be tailored to student interest.

OSPMADRD 102M. Composition and Writing Workshop for Students in Madrid. 3-5 Units.

Advanced. Writing as craft and process, emphasizing brainstorming, planning, outlining, drafting, revising, style, diction, and editing. Students choose topics related to their studies. Prerequisite: 13, 23B, or equivalent placement.

OSPMADRD 199A. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

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Overseas Studies in Oxford Courses

OSPOXFRD 14. Ind Stdy:RAF and Anglo-Amer Air Battles in WWII or Military Med in Iraq and Afghanistan. 1-5 Unit.

Independent Study topics related to any of the following: the World War II Battle of Britain; air operations supporting D-day invasion of Normandy; evolution of air campaigns from Korea, Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Kosovo, to the air wars in Afghanistan and Iraq; aerospace medicine contributions to the NASA space program; military medicine in Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom/New Dawn.

OSPOXFRD 16. Creative Writing and Human Rights. 5 Units.

Human rights concepts through their emergence in literary form(s), using creative writing, including nonfiction, fiction and poetry, to explore empathy and the most effective ways of inducing it in readers.

OSPOXFRD 18. Making Public Policy: An Introduction to Political Philosophy, Politics, and Economics. 4-5 Units.

UK and U.S. What should society look like? How should incomes be distributed? How should it be taxed? How much inequality is acceptable? The overlap of economics with practical politics through political philosophy behind the government decisions; how public policy ought to be formulated. Issues include poverty, environmental policy, trade and globalization, and transport.

OSPOXFRD 19. Constructing Natures: Science and Technology in the British Landscape. 5 Units.

How concepts of Nature develop through scientific practice and technological innovation. How science and technology, influenced human-nature relations through three pivotal movements in British history: the British naturalist tradition; the industrial and agricultural revolution; and the scientific turn of the late C19th and early C20th. Emphasis on how the legacy of scientific and technological practice during these historic periods continues to influence contemporary frameworks and practices.

OSPOXFRD 22. British Politics Past and Present. 4-5 Units.

The political system of the United Kingdom; contemporary scholarly debates about UK politics and the UK constitution; and critical analysis of these debates and of current issues in UK politics (including constitutional reform), using contemporary political science and political theory.

OSPOXFRD 28. Oxford and Abroad: Travel Narratives and Historiography of an Academic City. 5 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 32. Philosophy of Language. 5 Units.

Introduction to contemporary analytic philosophy of language, examining some of its central concepts, including reference, meaning, and context. Students explore these concepts, by studying some of the major questions in the field, including: How do expressions esp. names secure their referents? What are the connections and differences between literal meaning and speaker meaning? What is the role of context in language? How philosophy of language impacts other areas in philosophy, by covering such topics as Meaning Externalism (metaphysics), Contextualism about 'know' (epistemology), and Propositional Attitudes (philosophy of mind).

OSPOXFRD 41. Western Thought: Origins of Twentieth Century Semiotics. 5 Units.

Story of semiotic exploration, its contributions to literary critical theory, Marxist critique and feminist critique, in development of twentieth century thought. Close look at principle authors and circumstances that engendered their writings. Questions about the relationship between thought and environment, and between ideology and action raised by looking at the way twentieth century events influenced thinkers to consider the purposes of language in society, in identity , and in authority.

OSPOXFRD 45. British Economic Policy since World War II. 5 Units.

Development of British economic policy making from 1945, focusing on political economy including: ideological motives of governments; political business cycle; and the influence of changing intellectual fashions. Policy areas: attitude to the pound; control of the business cycle; and the role of the state in the economy. Prerequisite: ECON 50.

OSPOXFRD 52. Shakespeare and Performance. 5 Units.

Examination of various aspects of the role of performance in Shakespeare. Alongside considering the aesthetics of the Elizabethan stage and how to read Shakespeare's texts for performance, the module will also look at how different types of performances and performance mediums generate different meanings for audiences. Theoretical ideas of the performance of gender and identity will also be discussed.

OSPOXFRD 57. The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-1860. 5 Units.

Emergence and rise of the professional woman writer from playwright and Royalist spy Aphra Behn (1640-89) to novelist and proto-feminist Charlotte Bronte (1816-55). How women writers dealt with criticism for writing publicly, placing each author and text in its historical and literary context. Range of poets, playwrights, and novelists including Eliza Haywood, Frances Burney, and Mary Elizabeth Braddon. Topics: gender roles and proto-feminism, the public versus the private sphere, sexuality, courtship and marriage.

OSPOXFRD 58. Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues in the Biosciences: Comparative Perspectives. 3 Units.

Questions raised by advances in the biosciences and how different governments answer these questions differently. Among issues to be discussed: in vitro fertilization, embryo selection through preimplantation genetic diagnosis, human germline genome editing, mitochondrial transfer, human cloning, genetically modified non-human organisms, defining death, neuroimaging in the criminal system, human stem cell research, and human-non-chimeras. One major question will underlie the seminar ¿ what leads different countries to reach their own, different answers?.

OSPOXFRD 59. Independent Study on Ethical, Legal, and Policy Issues in the Biosciences and Medicine. 2-4 Units.

Research in depth and write an original research paper on some aspect of an ethical, legal, or policy issue brought up by advances in the biosciences or medicine. Student and instructor will define a topc and the instructor will suggest readings. Applications beyond the United States are encouraged. Possible topics include: revival of extinct species, regulation of genetically modified organisms, the role of neuroimaging in one or more legal systems, regulation of assisted reproduction, physician-assisted dying, health care rationing, control of pharmaceutical pricing, and possible changes to the definition of death. Weekly meetings.

OSPOXFRD 65. Plagues and the History of Great Britain. 4 Units.

Influence of epidemics on world history and specifically the infectious diseases that transformed Great Britain. Topics include: the Black Death, the end of middle ages and the reformation; the bubonic plague of 17th century London; cholera and the birth of epidemiologic sciences; tuberculosis and the rise of public health; plagues of the British Raj; epidemics, politics and political cartooning; epidemics of war; and the enormous British contribution to identification, prevention and treatment of epidemics from the discovery of smallpox vaccine to the discovery of penicillin.

OSPOXFRD 82. Politics of Inequality:Implications of Electoral Geography for Democratic Representation Quality. 5 Units.

Distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies: Beginning with an analysis of the early distribution of income within the city of London (and England, more generally), examine how electoral institutions interact with the electoral geography of income to create (or undermine) parties' and candidates' incentives to mobilize and represent the interests of voters from different social groups. How the electoral geography of income affects democratic representation at the national level of government, in the US and UK. Politics of social policies, especially anti-poverty policies, and the extent to which cross-national differences in policies reflect differences in the electoral power of low-income voters, the quality of partisan representation, and other factors.

OSPOXFRD 93. Collecting the World. 4-5 Units.

The art, science, and culture of the creation, transmission and collection of valuable, useful and informative objects and texts before the twentieth century, and the associated theories, purposes, and methods for collecting `worldly' goods and other valuables. Means by which local academic practices engaged with global developments in the arts and sciences through examination of primarily early modern material and intellectual culture in and around Oxfordshire. Assessments of quality, meaning, usage, cultural significance and the reception of material ¿treasures¿ in the storage rooms, vaults, and on display in museums, galleries, and libraries.

OSPOXFRD 117W. Gender and Social Change in Modern Britain. 4-5 Units.

Changes in the social institutions, attitudes, and values in Britain over the past 20 years with specific reference to shifts in gender relations. Demographic, economic and social factors; review of theoretical ideas. Men's and women's shifting roles in a fast-moving society.

OSPOXFRD 195A. Tutorial in Anthropology. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195B. Tutorial in Biology. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195C. Tutorial in Classics. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195E. Tutorial in Drama. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195F. Tutorial in Economics. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195G. Tutorial in Economic History. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195H. Tutorial in Engineering. 6-7 Units.

May be repeat for credit.

OSPOXFRD 195J. Tutorial in Jurisprudence. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195L. Tutorial in Health Care. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 195M. Tutorial in History of Science. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195N. Tutorial in Human Biology. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195P. Tutorial: Interdisciplinary. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195R. Tutorial in International Relations. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195S. Tutorial in Computer Studies. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195T. Tutorial in Literature. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195U. Tutorial in Music. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195V. Tutorial in Philosophy. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195W. Tutorial in Physics. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 195Z. Tutorial in Political Science. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 196A. Tutorial in Psychology. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 196B. Tutorial in Religion. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196C. Tutorial in Sociology. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196E. Tutorial in History. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196F. Tutorial in History of Art. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196G. Tutorial in Chemistry. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196J. Tutorial in Interdisciplinary Area Studies. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196K. Tutorial in Zoology. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196M. Tutorial in Public Policy. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196N. Tutorial in Mathematics. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196Q. Tutorial in Computer Science. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 196R. Tutorial in Geography. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197A. Tutorial in Anthropology. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197B. Tutorial in Biology. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197C. Tutorial in Classics. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197E. Tutorial in Drama. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197F. Tutorial in Economics. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197J. Tutorial in Jurisprudence. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197L. Tutorial in Health Care. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197M. Tutorial in History of Science. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197N. Tutorial in Human Biology. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197P. Tutorial: Interdisciplinary. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197R. Tutorial in International Relations. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197S. Tutorial in Computer Studies. 6-7 Units.

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OSPOXFRD 197T. Tutorial in English Literature. 6-7 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197U. Tutorial in Music. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197V. Tutorial in Philosophy. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 197Z. Tutorial in Political Science. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198A. Tutorial in Psychology. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198B. Tutorial in Religion. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198C. Tutorial in Sociology. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198E. Tutorial in History. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198F. Tutorial in History of Art. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198K. Tutorial in Zoology. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198M. Tutorial in Public Policy. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 198N. Tutorial in Mathematics. 6-7 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 199A. Directed Reading A. 2-4 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 199B. Directed Reading B. 2-5 Units.

Course may be repeated for credit.

OSPOXFRD 199D. Directed Reading. 1-3 Unit.

Course may be repeated for credit.

Overseas Studies in Paris Courses

OSPPARIS 1A. Accelerated First-Year French, Part 1. 5 Units.

Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. All-in-French communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis on the development of French in a contemporary cultural context. Interpretation of diversified materials, written and oral presentations.

OSPPARIS 2A. Accelerated First-Year French, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of FRENLANG 1A. Completes first-year language sequence in two rather than three quarters. All-in-French communicative and interactive approach. Emphasis is on the development of French in a contemporary cultural context. Interpretation of diversified materials, written and oral presentations. Prerequisite: French 1A.

OSPPARIS 10A. Engineering Research Internship. 6 Units.

For Paris Program students with academic experience in electronics, telecommunications or signal and image processing. Under direct guidance of researchers at Institut Supérieur d¿Electronique de Paris (ISEP), and where applicable, in collaboration with other French and international graduate students, contribute to the ISEP's ongoing research projects.

OSPPARIS 10B. Biology and Bio-Engineering Research Internship. 6 Units.

Biology research opportunity at the Brain & Spinal Cord Institute (ICM) located within the Hospital Pitié-Salpetrière. Team focuses on understanding the disease mechanism of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS or Lou Gehrig's disease). Direct access to patient samples. Cutting-edge experimental methods. Prior research experience in biology lab work required. Students will be expected to work actively two full days a week in the lab, and provide a research report to the instructor at the end of the quarter. Language of instruction: French.

OSPPARIS 10H. Refugee NGO Internship. 4 Units.

Intern with Konexio, an association working to integrate refugees into French professional life through technology and innovation. Konexio offers regular workshops, a project incubator and a sponsorship program, all using an innovative pedagogy model based on inclusive and collaborative learning. Interact with Konexio community, including refugee participants, communicate with nation and international partners, and help develop existing initiatives. Take part in the global fight against exclusion of refugees, while developing practical skills such as communication, social media, crowd-fund, partnership development, projects coordination.

OSPPARIS 11. Special Internship. 1-6 Unit.

Often initiated by special contacts between students and professionals in France. Involvement may be based more on field work, and activity, rather than on fulfilling traditional academic requirements. Prerequisites: Written permission from the program director.

OSPPARIS 12. Paris Photography Workshop. 3 Units.

Exploration of Paris through camera and lab techniques. Both theoretical and practical aspects of creative photography. Extensive field work. Students must bring camera or phone with camera. Enrollment limited. Taught in English.

OSPPARIS 14. Media Internship. 3 Units.

Case studies and independent research as groundwork for comparative analysis of media on both sides of the Atlantic. Nature of media in the U.S and in France. Media as a means for understanding culture.

OSPPARIS 15. Hospital Internship. 3 Units.

Observation of medical services in Paris hospitals. How hospital teams work in France; how medical decisions are made; how patients are treated by nurses and doctors.

OSPPARIS 16A. French Schooling Internship. 2-3 Units.

Working with French schoolchildren in one of three settings: a neighborhood support association in the outskirts of Paris; or two after-school support association in the city. Commitment for a minimum of three hours a week on site plus meetings with internship instructor and a final paper. Number of placements depends on the needs of the sponsoring institutions. Previous work with children advised.

OSPPARIS 19. Arranged Internship 1. 3-6 Units.

Two-quarter stay required unless student places into French 23P or above upon arrival. Internships can be arranged in a number of areas including the arts, architecture, politics, engineering, marketing and PR, media and journalism, health and psychological services, IT, NGO's, research, and hospitality administration.

OSPPARIS 22P. Intermediate French I. 5 Units.

Prerequisite: one year of college French if completed within two quarters of arriving in Paris, or FRENLANG 21C.

OSPPARIS 23P. Intermediate French II. 5 Units.

Prerequisite: FRENLANG 21C within two quarters of arriving in Paris, or FRENLANG 22C or OSPPARIS 22P.

OSPPARIS 24. Introduction to French Society. 2 Units.

Required for Paris program participants. Exploration of meaningful aspects of French society and culture through lectures on history of France, participation in on-site cultural projects with French students, and a series of special encounters, venues and activities through the quarter. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 30. The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater. 4 Units.

Multiple artistic trends and esthetic theories from Baudelaire to the Nouveau Roman, from the Surrealists to Oulipo, from the theater of cruelty to the theater of the absurd, from the Impressionists to Yves Klein. Interdisciplinary approach to reflect on the meaning of avant garde and modernity in general, and on the question of why revolutionary artists in France remained in search of institutional recognition, nonetheless.

OSPPARIS 31. The Art of Eating in France. 2 Units.

Institutions and discourses of French gastronomy from the birth of cookbooks in the 17th century to the rise of the restaurant in the 18th century and the emergence of food writing in the 19th century. Eating in France as participation in ritual, encounter with regional tradition, engagement with history and consumption of art. Outings and food samplings to help forge links between history, place and taste.

OSPPARIS 32. French History and Politics: Understanding the Present through the Past. 5 Units.

Key aspects of French politics including the constitutional framework, institutions, political parties and ideology, elections, political cultures, religion and politics, political elites and public policy-making, grass-root citizen participation, decentralization and local politics, and the major issues that structure and inform public debate, including attitudes and policies vis-à-vis the US.

OSPPARIS 34. Franco-American Encounters: Paris-New York in the 20th Century. 4 Units.

Double vision of American artists and intellectuals of Paris, as well as their French counterparts of New York, throughout the 20th century. Exploration of Franco-American relations through two very problematic itineraries. Superposing the two will create a rich and complex image of the interaction between the two cultures. Migration of American artists and intellectuals to Paris in the 1920¿s and of French artists and intellectuals to New York during the Second World War. Through study of films, texts and images, view the two cities through eyes of immigrants, both temporary and permanent. Major figures such as Hemingway, Josephine Baker, and Louis-Ferdinand Céline.

OSPPARIS 36. French Writing Workshop. 3 Units.

Offered upon request for students who have completed an Advanced French course. Focus on French writing style, enabling students to understand and master the subtleties of French writing.

OSPPARIS 40M. An Intro to Making: What is EE. 5 Units.

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

OSPPARIS 41. EAP: Perspective, Volume, and Design. 2 Units.

Mastering the techniques of spatial representation and developing a good visualization of volume. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the "Ecole d'Arts Plastiques" (EAP). Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 41E. EAP: Sculpture. 2 Units.

Control of volume through use of materials such as clay or plaster in order to master three dimensioned representations. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the ¿Ecole d¿Arts Plastiques¿ (EAP).Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 42. EAP: Drawing with Live Models. 2 Units.

Solid foundation in drawing; concepts of proportions, composition and analysis through observation. Perception of space, movement and forms. Techniques include: graphite, charcoal, chalk, pastel, watercolor, monotype, markers. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the "Ecole d'Arts Plastiques" (EAP). Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 43. EAP: Painting and Use of Color. 2 Units.

Different painting techniques for pictorial representation through various themes supporting the development of creativity. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the "Ecole d'Arts Plastiques" (EAP). Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 44. EAP: Analytical Drawing and Graphic Art. 2 Units.

Focus on observation of a model to be copied. Analysis of one aspect of a general structure while using various materials and techniques in a limited amount of time. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the "Ecole d'Arts Plastiques" (EAP). Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 44E. EAP: Computer Art. 2 Units.

Learn and develop efficient technique of modern graphic design. Offered by a major studio arts school in Paris, the "Ecole d'Arts Plastiques" (EAP).Preference for Art Practice, Art History, Product Design, Architecture or STS majors or minors with good language skills. In French. May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 45. Comparative Politics in the Contemporary Arab World. 4 Units.

Basic data and concepts of comparative politics applied to the contemporary Middle East and North African region. Key probing questions from a sociological and historical perspective, based on recent academic literature, fieldwork research and media reports: issue of state-building and welfare state; surviving authoritarian rule; role of political opposition and civil society; nature of political transitions; spread of social movements and uprisings in the Maghreb and the Mashrek; key role of Arab-Israeli conflict in transnational politics; Jihadism and terrorism and the threat of the Islamic State; the Rentier state; role of state and private armies.

OSPPARIS 50M. Introductory Science of Materials. 4 Units.

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.

OSPPARIS 53. Electricity, Magnetism and Optics with Laboratory. 5 Units.

How are electric and magnetic fields generated by static and moving charges, and what are their applications? How is light related to electromagnetic waves? Represent and analyze electric and magnetic fields to understand electric circuits, motors, and generators. Wave nature of light to explain interference, diffraction, and polarization phenomena; geometric optics to understand how lenses and mirrors form images. Workings and limitations of optical systems such as the eye, corrective vision, cameras, telescopes, and microscopes. Discussions based on the language of algebra and trigonometry. An integrated version of PHYSICS 23 and 24, targeted to premedical students who are studying abroad with integrated labs. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 21 or 21S.

OSPPARIS 54. The Artist's World: The Workshop, Patronage and Public in 19th and 20th Century France. 4 Units.

Synergy between artists, their workshops, patrons, models and the public in 19th and 20th century France. Weekly sessions in museums, artists' studios, and special venues within and around Paris, attempting to understand the world of the artist, and how, in many cases, this world became not only a place of refuge, but a metaphor of the artistic creation itself.

OSPPARIS 58. Reading the Origin of Species in the Age of Genomics. 4 Units.

Read the Origin of Species as the book of its time and consider the arguments, natural history examples, and difficulties that Darwin faced given the state of his knowledge of biology and geology. Consider how these arguments change now that we live in the world of modern genetics and genomics. How we can learn about deep history before there were recognizable fossils and how we can think of cancer and HIV as diseases of evolution.

OSPPARIS 68. France: Birthplace of Human Rights. 5 Units.

How French society has negotiated ethnic, racial, and religious difference within the context of international human rights. Basic documents of human rights, including readings on the ideas behind human rights, as found in the political philosophy of Locke and Mill; centrality of the droits de l'homme, placed within historical context.; and the Dreyfus affair as a key moment in human rights discourse. Visits to the archives of the Bibliothèque Nationale, as well as other museums, to view textual, graphic and artistic representations of that period. Establishment of international human rights discourse that followed the Second World War, locating its emergence in the context of decolonization and new nationalisms; North African independence and the impact of immigration to France. US notions of "multiculturalism" and French "integration.".

OSPPARIS 69. Independent Study on Human Rights. 3 Units.

Possible opportunities for community engaged learning with NGOs in Paris. If unable to participate in a community-engaged learning experience, students can work on local independent study topics attached to the issue of rights. For example, a project might entail the study of indie French music, art, or poetry slams, and connect those topics of ideas of protest and resistance; a student interested in educational issues might view the films "Jonas qui aura 25 ans en l'an 2000 (Jonah, who will be 25 in the year 2000). dir Tanner, and "Entre les murs" (The Class), dir. Cantet, to think of how the right to education appeared during the aftermath of Mai '68 and then most recently, under the historical situation of increased immigration.

OSPPARIS 72. The Ceilings of Paris. 4 Units.

Seventeenth century transformation of the ceilings of Paris, private and public. Itinerary of this transformation from artists' initial drawings to their finished work. Under the guidance of the curator of 17th century French Drawings in the Louvre Museum, study the original drawings as well as the venues in and around Paris. Sites vary from the most illustrious (Versailles) to the lesser known (Hotel Lauzun). Reflection on the changing social and political aspirations as represented in these new artistic forms. Language of instruction: French.

OSPPARIS 77. Literature and Philosophy of Place. 4-5 Units.

Themes of place and displacement in literature and philosophy of the larger French-speaking world, focusing on diasporic writers. Paris as a magnet for artists and thinkers seeking freedom from restrictive environments. Contrast the experiences of characters who are at "home" and those who are "away," the anxieties of exile and of colonialism, how one person's claim on home can be another's experience of being invaded,. Philosophers' analyses of the interdependence of place and identity, place and belonging, the sometimes contradictory nature of 'home,' as they pertain to the literary (fiction, essay, poetry) texts we will read.

OSPPARIS 78A. Independent Study Topics in Philosophy. 2-4 Units.

French feminist philosophy: Reading and understanding the contributions to feminist thought of Beauvoir, Wittig, Irigaray, and others.

OSPPARIS 78B. Independent Study Topics in Literary (Creative) Writing. 1-2 Unit.

Spirit of Place in Short Fiction/ Spirit of Place in Memoir. Students are invited to work with the professor developing such skills as characterization, plot, dialogue, figurative language, structure and pacing. All narratives will, of course, explore place (Paris and other parts of France) in new and interesting ways.

OSPPARIS 81. France During the Second World War: Between History and Memory. 5 Units.

French politics and society from the causes of the collapse of the French Third Republic and the emergence of the French State at Vichy. The political and cultural measures of this regime in the shadow of Nazi Germany. Anti-Jewish laws and action; deportations by Vichy, the Germans, the French Fascists, and reactions to the fate of the Jews. Visions of the Resistance, the combat for liberation, and WW II in the collective memory of France.

OSPPARIS 86. Measuring Well-Being and Sustainability in Today's World. 5 Units.

Explore well-being and sustainability through the lens of the new indicators that are being developed in all corners of social sciences and at the frontier with natural and physical science. Lab to learn how to build an indicator of well-being or sustainability. Historical perspective on well-being and sustainability thinking since Aristotle; overview of standard economic indicators and their limits. Well-being indicators focusing on health, education, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. New research in sustainability indicators. How building new indicators changes policy at the global, national and local level. In French.

OSPPARIS 91. Globalization and Its Effect on France and the European Union. 5 Units.

Economic and political impact of globalization on France and the EU and influence of France and the EU on the process of globalization. Issues of sovereignty and national identity for France; protection from versus integration into the network of globalization.

OSPPARIS 92. Building Paris: Its History, Architecture, and Urban Design. 4 Units.

The development of Parisian building and architecture from the 17th century to the present. Interaction of tradition and innovation in its transformation and its historical, political, and cultural underpinnings. Visits and case studies throughout Paris illustrate the formation of the city landscape and its culture.

OSPPARIS 97. Le Grand Paris: Paris of the 21st Century. 4 Units.

Urban change and urban policies in France. Characteristics of the French political, social and administrative model as illustrated by the city of Paris. As the capital, Paris is a concern of the State and has been progressively transformed into a complex and conflictual political arena. As a world city, Paris is undergoing social and economic changes that are shaping the future of the entire metropolitan area. Students will explore these two trends (global and national) throughout the course.

OSPPARIS 98. Global Health Systems: the Future. 5 Units.

Globalization of health the world over and consideration of its development in the future. Need to develop a system that protects the global community rather than compare different systems. Risks, illnesses, epidemics, chronic diseases and crises go beyond countries¿ frontiers and require countries to cooperate and coordinate their operations with one another. Best practices of each country in the fields of public health policies, medical and information technologies, health economics, social makeup and society, epistemology and ethic. Countries to be studied selected from the following: USA, Canada, Brazil, Germany, UK, Spain, Italy, Czech Republic, France, Russian Federation, South Africa, India, China and Singapore.

OSPPARIS 102. The Intimate Louvre. 1 Unit.

In the Louvre, the largest museum in the world, focus on smaller paintings. Objectives: first, to see paintings from a fresh perspective, contemplating sketches, artists¿ first drafts before seeing the final version; secondly, to approach art freely and without complex, exploring details, texture and expression rather than official representation; finally, to come to terms with the museum itself, transforming this enormous palace into a visual ¿home¿ over the quarter. Each session devoted to a different period of French art from the 17th to the 19th century. Course enrollment limited to 15 (first come, first served basis).

OSPPARIS 103A. French Lecture Series 1. 1 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 104A. French Lecture Series 2. 1 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 105A. Sorbonne Lecture Series. 1 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 122X. Challenges of Integration in the European Union. 4-5 Units.

European integration is now an economic, social, and political reality. This integration has a history of mutation and a transformation of its very foundation. Topics: the evolution of welfare states, elites, political parties, and systems in Europe; lobbies, trade unions, voluntary associations, social movements, popular protest, citizenship, democracy.

OSPPARIS 180. Paris Special Topics. 1-6 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 186F. Contemporary African Literature in French. 4 Units.

Focus is on African writers and those of the diaspora, bound together by a common history of slave trade, bondage, colonization, and racism. Their works belong to the past, seeking to save an oral heritage of proverbs, story tales, and epics, but they are also contemporary.

OSPPARIS 195C. Paris University: Health and Science 1. 1-6 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 196C. Paris University: Humanities 1. 1-6 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 196D. Paris University: Humanities 2. 1-6 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPPARIS 197C. Paris University: Social Science 1. 1-6 Unit.

.

OSPPARIS 198A. International Design and Construction Project. 4 Units.

Working as part of a French team of designers and engineers, invent a new product and present it to a jury of professors from French Institutes. While engineers insure the product functions and designers insure ease of use, Stanford students additionally help assess whether product will be used locally or globally. Language of instruction: French.

OSPPARIS 198C. Paris University: Engineering 1. 1-6 Unit.

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OSPPARIS 199A. Directed Reading A. 1-6 Unit.

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OSPPARIS 199B. Directed Reading B. 1-6 Unit.

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OSPPARIS 199C. Directed Reading: C. 1-6 Unit.

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Overseas Studies in Santiago Courses

OSPSANTG 12S. Accelerated Second-Year Spanish, Part I: Chilean Emphasis. 5 Units.

Intensive sequence integrating language, culture, and sociopolitics of Chile. Emphasis is on achieving advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including formal and informal situations, presentational language, and appropriate forms in academic and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish, or 11 or 21B if taken more than two quarters prior to arriving in Santiago.

OSPSANTG 13S. Accelerated Second-Year Spanish, Part II: Chilean Emphasis. 5 Units.

Intensive sequence integrating language, culture, and sociopolitics of Chile. Emphasis is on achieving advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including formal and informal situations, presentational language, and appropriate forms in academic and professional contexts. Prerequisite: 11 or 21B within two quarters of arriving in Santiago, or 12 or 22B.

OSPSANTG 14. Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century. 4-5 Units.

Key figures in poetry, narrative fiction, theater, and testimonio, such as Mistral, Garro, Lispector, Poniatowska, Valenzuela, Eltit and Menchú. Close reading technique. Issues raised in literary texts that reflect the evolution of the condition of women in Latin America during the period. Topics include gender differences and relationships, tradition versus transgression, relationship between changes in the status of women and other egalitarian transformations, and women writers and the configuration of literary canons.

OSPSANTG 29. Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America. 4-5 Units.

Energy and environmental challenges resulting from the growing size and complexity in Latin American cities. Key issues: way in which public authorities deal with the dynamics of urban growth and complexity; related environmental and energy issues, particularly related to different public transportation models. Systemic approach as seen in Curtiba, Bogota, Santiago, and Medellin. Analysis centering on different approaches used to tackle these related issues; different institutional strategies.

OSPSANTG 30. Short Latin American Fiction of the 20th Century. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to short narrative fiction produced in Latin America during the 20th Century. Key features of the short story genre, as defined by Chekhov in the 19th Century and redefined by Kafka and Borges in the 20th Century. Main literary movements of the period in Latin America, including Regionalism, Social Realism, the Avant-Garde, the Boom of the 1960s and Magical Realism, the Post-Boom, etc. Close reading course with strong emphasis on analysis and discussion of the required texts. Readings placed in the context of the main developments in Latin American history and culture in the period.

OSPSANTG 33. Spanish Language Tutorial. 2 Units.

Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish or equivalent placement.May be repeated for credit.

OSPSANTG 40. Academic Internship. 2 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

OSPSANTG 49. Chile - Another "End of the World"?. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the identity of Chilean culture and the Chilean nation (within South America) from an unusual perspective. Focus on the history and the multiple dimensions of the still very popular Chilean self-perception as "the country of the end of the world," the country characterized by the extreme geographical shape between the Southern Pacific and the mountain range of the Andes. This motif is connected both to a tradition of cultural self-perception in the Christian Middle Ages and to a recent methodological "turn" in the Humanities, a turn that explores, for the first time, the relationship between space and cultural identity.

OSPSANTG 50. Independent Study: Topics in the History and Present of South American Culture. 1-5 Unit.

Weekly meetings with instructor to either develop and work through a reading list or to identify, shape, and pursue an individual research topic. Possible areas: Literature, philosophy, art, and music in different South American nations since the 18th century [above all Chile, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, and Brazil]; Sport as institution and event; Cultural geography; Political history and analysis of present-day political situations; The specific role of "intellectuals" in South America.

OSPSANTG 52. Energy and Climate Cooperation in the Americas: The Role of Chile. 5 Units.

Overview of current political dynamics in each of the major fossil fuel producing countries in the Western Hemisphere and impact on local energy exploration and production. Potential for development and integration of markets for renewable energy resources within the Americas, and how this might affect the environment, food prices, and land use. Ways to facilitate hemispheric initiatives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, focusing on efforts in Chile. Possibilities of reviving the Energy and Climate Partnership of the Americas or ECPA, launched by the Obama administration at the Fifth Summit of the Americas in Trinidad in April 2009.

OSPSANTG 58. Living Chile: A Land of Extremes. 5 Units.

Physical, ecological, and human geography of Chile. Perceptions of the Chilean territory and technologies of study. Flora, fauna, and human adaptations to regional environments. Guest lectures; field trips; workshops.

OSPSANTG 60. Microbes and Society. 3 Units.

The spread of microbial species is associated with the spread of human beings across the planet. Role of microbial species in shaping human history and society. What role did microbial diseases play in early human migration and the spread of humans across the continents? How can we explain the uneven spread of diseases such as flu or HIV? Which human behaviors enhance, and which thwart, the spread of microbial species?.

OSPSANTG 61A. Independent Study: Health and Environment. 1 Unit.

Life expectancy and healthy life years have increased dramatically over the past 100 years, at the same time as anthropogenic climate change and environmental degradation. Where and how can we see the effects of environmental changes on health? What are the health implications of rising temperatures, of land-use changes, of urbanization?.

OSPSANTG 61B. Indep. Study: Global Health, Epidemiology and History. 1 Unit.

What ails whom, where, and how did we get here? Why is malaria the major killer of children in Western Africa, but has disappeared from the United States and most of South America? Where did smallpox go, and why is it so hard to make measles history? As the world ages, what diseases have we managed to do away with in old ages, and which ones are facing our parents ¿ and us?.

OSPSANTG 62. Topics in Chilean History. 4-5 Units.

Independent study topics concerning any aspect of Chilean history such as independence and nation building, social and economic development, ideas and culture, dictatorship and democracy. Research paper based on primary and secondary sources.

OSPSANTG 68. The Emergence of Nations in Latin America. 4-5 Units.

Major themes of 19th-century Latin American history, including independence from Spain, the emergence of nation states, and the development of a new social, political, and economic order.

OSPSANTG 71. Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment. 4-5 Units.

Santiago's growth and development over time and in comparison to other mega cities in the world; impact of urban highways on the built environment; shopping malls and the development of new urban sub-centers. Topics: brief history of the city, from 1541 to1940; urban development since 1940; the 1960 Inter-communal Urban Plan; planning and the configuration of modern Santiago; housing policy as an instrument to combat poverty; social housing policy and Santiago's built environment.

OSPSANTG 102S. Composition and Writing Workshop for Students in Santiago. 3-5 Units.

Advanced. Writing as craft and process: brainstorming, planning, outlining, drafting, revising, style, diction, and editing. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics related to their studies. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, 13R, 13S, 23B, or equivalent.

OSPSANTG 116X. Modernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century. 5 Units.

Chile's strides towards becoming a developed country have engendered high levels of alienation and disaffection among significant sectors of the population. The roots of this apparent paradox of modernization, focusing on newly emerging actors in the Chilean political scene: Mapuche organizations, women's groups, the environmental movement, and new features of the established ones like trade unions and human rights activists.

OSPSANTG 118X. Artistic Expression in Latin America. 5 Units.

Elite, mass-media, and popular cultural changes in Chile under conditions of economic and political liberalization. The reception of cultural meanings from the center of the world social system (U.S., EU, and Japan), reformulation to respond to local conditions, and export in the shape of cultural artifacts. Innovative elements rooted in the regional and local culture.

OSPSANTG 119X. The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies. 5 Units.

The Chilean economy in five stages, taking into account: the international economic position of Chile; internal economic structures closely related to the inherited historical conditions and to the changing international economic position of the country; and the economic strategies prevalent during the period and the concrete development policies conducted by government authorities.

OSPSANTG 129X. Latin America in the International System. 4-5 Units.

Latin America's role in world politics, with emphasis on the history of and models for explaining U.S.-Latin American relations. Latin America's evolving relationship in the international system.