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Office: Medical School Office Building (MSOB), 1265 Welch Road, #X3C30
Mail Code: 94305-5411
Phone: 650-725-7946
Web Site: chpr.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Stanford Prevention Research Center within the Department of Medicine are listed under the subject code CHPR on the Stanford Bulletin’s ExploreCourses website.

The Master of Science (M.S.) in Community Health and Prevention Research (CHPR) covers the study and treatment of leading risk behaviors (e.g., poor diet, physical inactivity, tobacco use, stress, distress) to prevent the prevailing causes of morbidity and mortality (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, lung disease, mental illness) with a focus on engaging and advancing health in diverse communities.  

Community health and prevention research are complementary fields increasingly integrated to promote health and prevent chronic diseases in individuals, families, local communities, states, and countries, globally.  Community health refers to the scientific discipline of safeguarding and enhancing the wellbeing of diverse communities and populations through education, the promotion of healthy lifestyle habits, and the extensive study of disease and disease determinants.  Prevention research is a multidisciplinary scientific field that aims to enhance the health of populations through the study of genetic, behavioral, lifestyle, environmental, and policy factors that lead to disease or vitality. 

The M.S. in CHPR is designed for students pursuing health-related careers focusing on chronic disease prevention, health and wellness promotion, and the pursuit of health equity.  We anticipate the M.S. in CHPR will be attractive to Stanford’s current (coterminal) undergraduates and graduate students, students in the health professions (e.g., medical students), health care providers seeking a second degree, and individuals who will later seek advanced degrees in medicine, nursing, or health/science-related doctoral programs.

The M.S. in CHPR is available to:

  1. Current Stanford undergraduates (who must complete the M.S. as a coterminal master’s program)
  2. Current Stanford graduate students (i.e., master’s, doctoral, and medical students)
  3. External applicants.

All students in the program must complete the M.S.’s core curriculum and program requirements.

The University requirements for the M.S. degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Master of Science in Community Health and Prevention Research

The Stanford Prevention Research Center within the Department of Medicine offers a Master of Science (M.S.) in Community Health and Prevention Research (CHPR). The M.S. in CHPR is available to external applicants, to current undergraduates via the coterminal master's program, and to graduate students at Stanford. 

The purpose of the M.S. in CHPR is to:

  • engage students from a range of backgrounds in didactic and experiential learning opportunities with the goal of gaining an in-depth understanding of community health and prevention research applications in diverse practice settings
  • prepare future public health professionals to responsibly and effectively address health challenges faced by diverse communities across the life course.

In the M.S. in CHPR, students:

  • study patterns of chronic diseases in diverse communities and settings and examine how prevention can optimize health and promote health equity at the individual, family, community, and population level
  • critically interpret and evaluate research on community health and prevention
  • become involved in research teams that encourage health equity promotion and social responsibility
  • gain and hone methodological skills including research study design, study implementation, and data analysis related to community health and prevention research
  • utilize course work and implementation science in a community-based research internship with the expectation that they design, implement, and assess health and wellness solutions addressing preventable community health challenges
  • complete a master’s thesis.

Admission for External Applicants

The application deadline for Autumn 2017-18 entry into the M.S. program is January 17, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST). As part of their program application, all applicants (not including coterminal applicants) must submit the following required application materials. Instructions on how to submit these application materials can be found on Stanford's Graduate Admissions web site.

  • 3 letters of recommendation
    • At least one letter of recommendation should be from a faculty member at the last school you attended as a full-time student (unless you have been out of school for more than five years).
  • GRE scores (valid MCAT or DAT scores may be submitted in lieu of GRE scores)
  • TOEFL scores (if necessary)
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Statement of purpose
    • The statement of purpose should describe succinctly your reasons for applying to the proposed program at Stanford, your preparation for this field of study, research interests, future career plans, and other aspects of your background and interests which may aid the admissions committee in evaluating your aptitude and motivation for graduate study.
  • Official transcript(s) from all postsecondary institutions you have attended as a full-time student for one year (i.e., three quarters or two semesters) or longer.
    • You must upload one scanned version of your official transcript(s) in the online application and mail one official copy to the Stanford Prevention Research Center within the Department of Medicine.
  • $125 application fee
    • This application fee is assessed regardless of admission decision.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken three quarters prior to the first graduate quarter, or later, are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Coterminal Admission

The application deadline for Autumn 2017-18 entry into the M.S. program is January 17, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST).

Stanford undergraduates may apply to the M.S. program once the following conditions have been met:

  • Applicants must have earned 120 units toward graduation (UTG) as shown on the undergraduate unofficial transcript. This includes allowable Advanced Placement (AP) and transfer credit.
  • Applicants must have a major(s) declared.
  • Applicants must have completed six non-Summer quarters at Stanford (or two non-Summer quarters at Stanford for transfer students).

As part of their program application, applicants must submit the following required application materials. Instructions on how to submit these application materials can be found on the Current Stanford Students page of the Graduate Admissions web site.

  • Application for admission to coterminal master's program
  • Statement of purpose
    • The statement of purpose should describe succinctly your reasons for applying to the proposed program at Stanford, your preparation for this field of study, research interests, future career plans, and other aspects of your background and interests which may aid the admissions committee in evaluating your aptitude and motivation for graduate study.
  • Resume or curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Preliminary program proposal
  • Two letters of recommendation from Stanford professors
  • 1 copy of your Stanford transcript (unofficial transcripts are acceptable)
  • $125 application fee (this fee is assessed by the Registrar's Office to those accepted and matriculated into the program).

Admission for Current Stanford Graduate Students

  • Current Stanford graduate students include master’s, doctoral, and medical students who are currently enrolled in a graduate degree program at Stanford. Current Stanford postdoctoral scholars must apply as external applicants.
  • The application deadline for Autumn 2017-18 entry into the M.S. program is January 17, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time (PST).
  • On a case-by-case basis, current Stanford graduate students may be allowed to apply to the program after the application deadline.

Required Application Materials: Instructions on how to submit these application materials can be found on the CHPR program web site.

  • Completed Current Graduate Student Online Application Form
  • Resume/CV
  • Transcript (unofficial transcripts are acceptable)
  • Valid GRE, MCAT, or GMAT scores (i.e., the test scores students submitted to their original graduate program at Stanford)
  • Statement of Purpose
    • The Statement of Purpose should describe succinctly the reasons for applying to the proposed program at Stanford, preparation for this field of study, research interests, future career plans, and other aspects of the applicant's background and interests which may aid the admissions committee in evaluating aptitude and motivation for graduate study.
  • 2 letters of recommendation from Stanford professors
  • $125 application fee

Core Curriculum and Program Requirements (45 units)

To complete the M.S. in CHPR, students must complete a minimum of 45 units, conduct a two-quarter community-based research internship, and write a master’s thesis. All students in the M.S. in CHPR must also fulfill the course requirements below. Students are advised to check the prerequisites for all CHPR courses, especially the Biostatistics  and Research Methods courses.

Units
CHPR Foundation Core
Take 5-6 courses, 13-14 total units
Students are only required to take CHPR 201 if they have not taken CHPR 226/HUMBIO 126 or equivalent.
CHPR 201Introduction to Science of Healthy Living (Autumn)1
CHPR 225The Role of Causal Inference, Study Design, & Outcomes in Community Research (Autumn)3
CHPR 228Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials (Autumn)3
CHPR 240Prevention Research: the Science of Healthy Living (Autumn)3
CHPR 255The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers (Autumn, Spring)1
CHPR 260Prevention Across Medical Disciplines: Evidence-based Guidelines (Spring)3
Biostatistics and Research Methods
Take 3 of the 6 courses or other approved Biostatistics and Research Methods courses, minimum 9 total units
CHPR 206Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis (Winter)3
CHPR 247Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (Spring)3
CHPR 254Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health (Autumn)4
CHPR 290Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies (CHPR students must take course for 3 units) (Spring)2-3
HRP 258Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Clinical Research (Spring)3
HRP 259Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology (Autumn)3-4
Weekly Internship Course
Take course for 3 quarters, 3 total units
CHPR 239Program Internship and Engagement (Autumn, Winter, Spring)1
Community-Based Research Internship
Take course for 2 consecutive non-summer quarters, 6 total units
CHPR 299Community-based Research Internship (Autumn, Winter, Spring)1-18
Master's Thesis
Take course for 1 or more quarters, minimum 3 total units
CHPR 399Community Health and Prevention Research Master's Thesis Writing (Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer)1-18

Community-Based Research Internship

Students must complete a consecutive two-quarter long community-based research internship under the supervision of an SPRC faculty mentor. Students will receive 6 total units for their internships, which are all unpaid positions. The primary learning goal of these internships is for students to apply their coursework and implementation science in a community or lab setting by engaging community members and faculty to create innovative, research-based, chronic disease prevention solutions addressing community health challenges.

  1. CHPR students (not including coterminal students) must enroll in CHPR 239 Program Internship and Engagement during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters and CHPR 299 Community-Based Research Internship during the Winter and Spring quarters.
  2. Coterminal students must fulfill the following requirements in order to enroll in CHPR 299 Community-Based Research Internship:
    1. Complete or be enrolled in one of the following courses:
      1. CHPR 225 The Role of Causal Inference, Study Design, & Outcomes in Community Research
      2. CHPR 228 Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials
    2. Complete or be enrolled in at least 1 approved Biostatistics and Research Methods course.
    3. Enroll in CHPR 239 Program Internship and Engagement concurrently with CHPR 299 Community-based Research Internship
  3. For the 2016-17 academic year, the earliest that incoming students may begin their community-based research internships is in the Winter Quarter.
  4. For incoming coterminal students who plan to begin their community-based research internships in the Winter Quarter 2017, it is highly recommended that they follow the below sequence:
    1. Autumn Quarter:
      1. Take both of the following courses:
        1. CHPR 225 The Role of Causal Inference, Study Design, & Outcomes in Community Research
        2. CHPR 228 Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials
      2. Take the following Biostatistics and Research Methods course:
        1. CHPR 254 Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health
    2. Winter Quarter:
      1. If a Biostatistics and Research Methods course was not taken in the Autumn quarter, students must take the following Winter Quarter course:
        1. CHPR 206 Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis.
      2. Students must take CHPR 239 Program Internship and Engagement while enrolled in CHPR 299 Community-Based Research Internship.

Master's Thesis

Students are required to complete and present a master’s thesis. The master’s thesis allows students to demonstrate knowledge, application, and thoughtful scholarly communication of theoretical principles central to community health interventions, study design, research and analytic methods, as well as depth in a substantive area of community health and prevention research. The thesis is intended to be 30 pages in length (i.e., article-length), double-spaced, including supporting tables, figures, and references. The thesis can take one of the following forms:

  1. Analysis of original data collected via a student’s internship
  2. Comprehensive literature review with meta-analysis of data or critical reanalysis of data
  3. Evaluation of a methodological problem using data
  4. Comprehensive literature review with a grant proposal (NIH-style format) for a new study to bridge a gap in existing knowledge
  5. Organizational health improvement and evaluation plan written for a student’s internship organization
  6. Faculty mentor approved, independently designed thesis.

The program encourages students to use extant data sets for their projects. Students are not limited to quantitative data sets; many SPRC faculty possess qualitative data sets that may be analyzed for an M.S. thesis project. Students also have the option of collecting original data, for example, through the use of surveys. Students are encouraged to develop their thesis into a manuscript for publication or a credible research grant application, and mentorship is provided to do so.

Director of the Stanford Prevention Research Center: John Ioannidis

Core Faculty and Academic Staff

Professors: John Ioannidis, Randall Stafford, Marcia Stefanick

Associate Professors: Judith J. Prochaska (Program Faculty Director)

Assistant Professors: Mike Baiocchi, Sanjay Basu

Senior Research Scientists: Wes Alles, Michaela Kiernan

Instructors: Lisa Goldman Rosas, Sonoo Thadaney (Program Staff Director)

Courses

CHPR 113. Healthy/Sustainable Food Systems: Maximum Sustainability across Health, Economics, and Environment. 4 Units.

Focus on problems with and systems-based solutions to food system issues. Four particular settings are addressed: University, worksite, hospital, and school food. Traditional vs. disruptive food system models compared and contrasted. The goal is to determine how best to maximize sustainability across several dimensions, including health, economics, and the environment. Underlying class themes include social justice and the potential for changing social norms around food production and consumption. Discussion-based seminar. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 113S

CHPR 130. Human Nutrition. 4 Units.

The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 130

CHPR 166. Food and Society: Exploring Eating Behaviors in Social, Environmental, and Policy Context. 4 Units.

The material in this course is an introduction to the field and the target audience is undergraduates. It may be of interest to graduate students unfamiliar with the field. The class examines the array of forces that affect the foods human beings eat, and when, where, and how we eat them, including human labor, agriculture, environmental sustainability, politics, animal rights/welfare, ethics, policy, culture, economics, business, law, trade, and ideology, and psychology. The class addresses the impact of current policies and actions that might be taken to improve human nutrition and health; macro-scale influences on food, nutrition, and eating behavior. . Undergraduate Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 166

CHPR 199. Undergraduate Research. 1-18 Unit.

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CHPR 200. SPRC/GMD Research Seminar. 1 Unit.

Focus is on research on prevention of chronic disease and related topics. Guest speakers present material. May be repeat for credit.

CHPR 201. Introduction to Science of Healthy Living. 1 Unit.

This introduction to the science of healthy living (primarily U.S.) highlights preventable causes of mortality, i.e. modifiable risk factors, national lifestyle recommendations and behavioral change principles for reducing chronic disease risk. A life course perspective is presented as a trajectory from fetal/neonatal to childhood and adolescence to young, middle-ages and older adults, with recognition of the importance of social determinants of health. Sex & gender differences are also presented. Unless otherwise noted, all lectures are presented by Course Director, Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must take the course for a letter grade.

CHPR 202. FUNDAMENTALS OF R. 1 Unit.

This course is a practicum in which students will use the R programming language to analyze datasets by application of classical statistical methods. No prior experience with R (or other programming languages) is required, but a familiarity with basic descriptive and inferential statistics is assumed. Class sessions will include some lecture content but will emphasize coding demonstrations by the instructor and hands-on coding by each student on their own computers. Students will practice using R with open-source and simulated datasets. The primary goal of the course is to equip students with a fundamental understanding of R's capabilities, experience using R with practice datasets, and the ability to extend their facility with R as their needs dictate.

CHPR 206. Meta-research: Appraising Research Findings, Bias, and Meta-analysis. 3 Units.

Open to graduate, medical, and undergraduate students. Appraisal of the quality and credibility of research findings; evaluation of sources of bias. Meta-analysis as a quantitative (statistical) method for combining results of independent studies. Examples from medicine, epidemiology, genomics, ecology, social/behavioral sciences, education. Collaborative analyses. Project involving generation of a meta-research project or reworking and evaluation of an existing published meta-analysis. Prerequisite: knowledge of basic statistics.
Same as: HRP 206, MED 206, STATS 211

CHPR 212. Methods for Health Care Delivery Innovation, Implementation and Evaluation. 2 Units.

Preference given to postgraduate fellows and graduate students. Focus is on implementation science and evaluation of health care delivery innovations. Topics include implementation science theory, frameworks, and measurement principles; qualitative and quantitative approaches to designing and evaluating new health care models; hybrid design trials that simultaneously evaluate implementation and effectiveness; distinction between quality improvement and research, and implications for regulatory requirements and publication; and grant-writing strategies for implementation science and evaluation. Students will develop a mock (or actual) grant proposal to conduct a needs assessment or evaluate a Stanford/VA/community intervention, incorporating concepts, frameworks, and methods discussed in class. Priority for enrollment for CHPR 212 will be given to CHPR master's students.
Same as: HRP 218, MED 212

CHPR 223. Obesity in America: Clinical and Public Health Implications. 3-4 Units.

Interdisciplinary clinical, research, and policy approaches. The prevalence, predictors, and consequences of obesity and diabetes; biological and physiological mechanisms; clinical treatments including medications and surgery; and the relevance of behavioral, environmental, economic, and policy approaches to obesity prevention and control. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HumBio students must enroll in HUMBIO 123. CHPR Master's students who are not medical students enroll in CHPR 223 for a letter grade. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR master's students.
Same as: HUMBIO 123

CHPR 225. The Role of Causal Inference, Study Design, & Outcomes in Community Research. 3 Units.

Provides foundational concepts and principles of epidemiology and other disciplines as they pertain specifically to research on the prevention of chronic disease. Focuses on application of this perspective in multiple disease and health behavior contexts to diverse communities across the life course. Provides foundational skills in epidemiology, including the measurement of disease and health behaviors, measures of association, and study design with close attention to minimizing error. Readings focus on the need and opportunity for interdisciplinary prevention and treatment approaches and illustrates how to conduct innovative research.

CHPR 226. Promoting Health Over the Life Course: Multidisciplinary Perspectives. 3 Units.

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 126. CHPR students must enroll in CHPR 226 for a letter grade.) Disease prevention and health promotion topics pertinent to different stages of the life span emphasizing healthy lifestyle and reducing risk factors in both individuals and communities. Focus is on scientific investigation, the application of behavioral science to risk reduction strategies, and the importance of health promotion as a social and economic imperative. Topics include: epidemiology of chronic diseases; social determinants of health, behavior change; obesity, nutrition, and stress; children, young adult, mid-life and aging health issues; health care delivery and public health system; workplace wellness programs; and other additional issues. Students enrolled in CHPR 226 must complete additional assignments appropriate for its Masters level listing.
Same as: HUMBIO 126

CHPR 228. Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials. 3 Units.

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities.

CHPR 239. Program Internship and Engagement. 1 Unit.

Enrollment limited to students in Master of Science in Community Health and Prevention. This course is designed to provide students in the Master of Science In Community Health & Prevention Research program with supervision and guidance as they conduct their Internships. Focus is on skills which will help students conduct productive Internships with community partners and faculty. Provides a space where students can reflect on their internship experiences and consider how they may connect with their coursework and/or future career aspirations. Students in this course engage regularly in peer learning and mentoring and receive feedback from PIE course instructors. Guest speakers and professional development workshops also an important component of this course.
Same as: PIE

CHPR 240. Prevention Research: the Science of Healthy Living. 3 Units.

Features the research of faculty in the Stanford Prevention Research Center and focuses on key health issues over the life course (prenatal through childhood, young to middle-aged, older and elderly adults). Topics include chronic disease (global and U.S.) epidemiology; application of behavioral science to risk reduction; nutrition; weight management; physical activity; stopping smoking; public health; community health and community-based prevention; national prevention strategy; applying communication technology to health promotion.

CHPR 247. Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research. 3 Units.

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Same as: MED 147, MED 247

CHPR 254. Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health. 4 Units.

This course teaches engineering, operations research and modeling techniques to improve public health programs and systems. Students will engage in in-depth study of disease detection and control strategies from a "systems science" perspective, which involves the use of common engineering, operations research, and mathematical modeling techniques such as optimization, queuing theory, Markov and Kermack-McKendrick models, and microsimulation. Lectures and problem sets will focus on applying these techniques to classical public health dilemmas such as how to optimize screening programs, reduce waiting times for healthcare services, solve resource allocation problems, and compare macro-scale disease control strategies that cannot be easily evaluated through randomized trials. Readings will complement the lectures and problem sets by offering critical perspectives from the public health history, sociology, and epidemiology. In-depth case studies from non-governmental organizations, departments of public health, and international agencies will drive the course. Prerequisites: A course in introductory statistics, and a course in multivariable calculus including ordinarily differential equations. Open to upper-division undergraduate students and graduate students. Human Biology majors enroll in HUMBIO 154A.
Same as: HRP 234, HUMBIO 154A

CHPR 255. The Responsible Conduct of Research for Clinical and Community Researchers. 1 Unit.

Engages clinical researchers in discussions about ethical issues commonly encountered during their clinical research careers and addresses contemporary debates at the interface of biomedical science and society. Graduate students required to take RCR who are or will be conducting clinical research are encouraged to enroll in this version of the course. Prequisite: research experience recommended.
Same as: MED 255C

CHPR 260. Prevention Across Medical Disciplines: Evidence-based Guidelines. 3 Units.

Coordinated seminar series presenting evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by research and clinical faculty of multiple divisions of Stanford's Department of Medicine, including cardiovascular medicine, oncology, nephrology, immunology and rheumatology, infectious diseases, endocrinology, gerontology and metabolism, gastroenterology and hepatology, hematology, blood and marrow transplantation, pulmonary and critical care medicine, general medical disciplines (including family medicine). Key prevention issues addressed in primary care and outcomes research, biomedical informatics research and the Stanford Prevention Research Center also presented. Enrollment priority given to CHPR Master's students. CHPR students must enroll for letter grade. Prerequisite: HUMBIO 126/CHPR 226 or CHPR 201 or consent of instructor.

CHPR 271. Human Molecular Genetics. 4 Units.

For genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and postdoctoral fellows interested in the practice of medical genetics and genomics. Gene structure and function; the impact of mutation and polymorphism as they relate to developmental pathways and human disease; mitochondrial genetics; approaches to the study of complex genetic conditions; GWAS and genome sequencing technologies; variant interpretation; gene therapy, stem cell biology, and pharmacogenetics. Undergraduates require consent of instructor and a basic genetics course.
Same as: GENE 271

CHPR 272. Introduction to Medical Genetics. 2-3 Units.

For genetic counseling students, graduate students in human genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows; undergraduates with consent of instructor. Principles of medical genetics practice, including taking a family history, modes of inheritance and risk assessment, and mathematical principles of medical genetics (Bayes theorem, population genetics). An additional problem set is required for 3 units.
Same as: GENE 272

CHPR 274A. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics. 2 Units.

For genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents and fellows. Case-based scenarios and guest expert lectures. Students learn skills in case preparation, management, and presentation, as well as content around common genetic disorders.
Same as: GENE 274A

CHPR 274B. A Case Based Approach to Clinical Genetics. 2 Units.

For genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows. Case-based scenarios and guest expert lectures. Students learn skills in case preparation, management, and presentation, as well as content around common genetic disorders. This course is a continuation of GENE 274A, but may be taken individually with instructor permission.
Same as: GENE 274B

CHPR 278. Prenatal Genetic Counseling. 1 Unit.

Internet-based course for genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows; genetic counseling students should take this course in conjunction with their initial prenatal genetics rotation. Topics include prenatal genetic screening and diagnosis in the first and second trimesters, ultrasound, teratology, and genetic carrier screening.
Same as: GENE 278

CHPR 279. Pediatric and Adult Genetic Counseling. 1 Unit.

Internet based course for genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows; genetic counseling students should take this course in conjunction with their initial general genetics rotation. Topics include: common genetic conditions, assessment of child development and medical history in the context of a genetic workup, the pediatric genetics medical examination, dysmorphology, introduction to laboratory genetic testing, development of a differential diagnosis, and resources for case management and family support.
Same as: GENE 279

CHPR 280. Metabolic Genetic Counseling. 1 Unit.

Internet based course for genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows genetic counseling students should take this course in conjunction with their metabolic genetics rotation. Topics include: overview of metabolic diseases; common pathways; diagnosis, management, and treatment of metabolic disorders; and newborn screening.
Same as: GENE 280

CHPR 281. Cancer Genetic Counseling. 1 Unit.

Internet based course for genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellows; genetic counseling students should take this course in conjunction with their initial cancer genetics rotation. Topics include: cancer biology and cytogenetics; diagnosis and management of common cancer genetic syndromes¿ predictive testing; psychology of cancer genetic counseling; and topics recommended by ASCO guidelines.
Same as: GENE 281

CHPR 284. Medical Genetics Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

Presentation of research and cases. Students enrolling for 2 units also attend and report on external seminars. May be repeated for credit. Non-GC students: please contact the instructor when you enroll.
Same as: GENE 284

CHPR 287. CARDIOVASCULAR GENETICS. 1 Unit.

Internet-based course for genetic counseling students, graduate students in genetics, medical students, residents, and fellow; genetic counseling students should take this course in conjunction with their cardiovascular genetics rotation. Topics include: Basic cardiology principles, including relevant anatomy and physiology; diagnosis, management and genetic testing as it relates to common inherited cardiovascular conditions in both the pediatric and adult setting; predictive genetic testing issues specific to inherited cardiovascular conditions; psychologic issues related to sudden death conditions. This course is designed for genetic counseling students, medical students, residents, post-doctoral fellows and nurses interested in inherited cardiovascular conditions.
Same as: GENE 287

CHPR 290. Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies. 2-3 Units.

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, instrumental variables, graphical models, marginal structural models. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: HRP 261 and 262 or STAT 209 (HRP 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/.
Same as: EDUC 260B, STATS 266

CHPR 291. Assessing the Health Effects of Economic Change. 3 Units.

This practicum will involve students as managers of real-time study of the health effects of minimum wage changes in the Bay Area. A long-held economic theory suggests that increased income should have secondary benefits to health, particularly for mental health and adverse health behaviors (e.g., binge drinking). Recent increases in the minimum wage in the Bay Area provide a rare opportunity to test this theory. Students in this course will participate in organizing, executing and directing a community-based study of the health effects of minimum wage increases among local cities, under close guidance and supervision of Stanford faculty in medicine, health economics and sociology. Students will engage in class meetings one hour per week to learn classical and novel methods for the analysis of natural experiments in health policy and economics (e.g., different-in-differences methods, synthetic control analysis), and are expected to participate in directed field-based group projects for several additional hours per week. Priority will be given to students with interest and experience in community-based research on social determinants of health and with bilingual English/Spanish speaking skills. Prerequisites: A course in statistics. Students will be expected to travel off campus to area of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties accessible via Marguerite shuttle, BART/Caltrain or VTA bus. The group work involves recruiting and surveying low-income community members, and requires tenacity to conduct field-based studies.

CHPR 298. Directed Reading. 1-18 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Before the end of the second week of the quarter, enrolled students must submit a description of the expected learning outcomes and deliverables for each unit to the CHPR office. One unit= three hours of work per week (10 hours for the quarter).

CHPR 299. Community-based Research Internship. 1-18 Unit.

Prerequisite: one quarter of CHPR 239 Program and Internship Engagement. CHPR masters students enroll for a letter grade in your mentor's section and also enroll in CHPR 239 Program Internship and Engagement. Before the end of the second week of the quarter, enrolled students must submit a description of the expected learning outcomes and deliverables for each unit to the CHPR office. One unit= three hours of work per week (30 hours for the quarter).

CHPR 399. Community Health and Prevention Research Master's Thesis Writing. 1-18 Unit.

Thesis writing for Community Health and Prevention Research Program. Prerequisite: one quarter of CHPR 299 Community-based Research Internship. Students enroll in thesis advisor's section. Non-medical students enroll for a letter grade. Before the end of the second week of the quarter, enrolled students must submit a description of the expected learning outcomes and deliverables for each unit to the CHPR office. One unit= three hours of work per week (30 hours for the quarter).

CHPR 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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