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School of Law

Courses offered by the School of Law are listed on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site under the subject codes LAW and LAWGEN.

The School of Law, established in 1893, provides a legal education for students who are fitted by their maturity and academic training to pursue professional study under University methods of instruction. The curriculum leading to the first professional degree in law, the Doctor of Jurisprudence (J.D.), constitutes an adequate preparation for the practice of law in any English-speaking jurisdiction. Graduate work leading to the degrees of Master of Laws (L.L.M.), Master of the Science of Law (J.S.M.), and Doctor of the Science of Law (J.S.D.), and a non-professional degree, Master of Legal Studies (M.L.S.), is also offered. For the full curriculum, see the Course Schedule & Description on the Law School web site. Stanford Law School offers joint or dual degree options in combination with other Stanford graduate departments and universities across the country; see the "Joint and Dual Degrees in Law" section of this bulletin.

The school is on a three-term academic calendar. For a complete list of academic dates see the Academic Calendar on the Law School web site.

For further information about admission, programs, curriculum, and faculty, see the Law School web site.

Joint and Dual Degrees in Law

Formal admission to both the Law School and to the other cooperating school or department in accordance with the established admission standards of each school or department is required. In addition to the established joint degree programs offered, the school considers requests for a dual program on an individually designed basis. For additional information on Law School joint or dual degree programs, see the Law School web site. See relevant web sites or department sections of this bulletin for degree requirements.

Graduate School of Business

School of Earth Sciences

  • J.D./M.S. Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER)
  • J.D./Ph.D. Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER)

School of Education

J.D./M.A. Education

School of Engineering

  • J.D./M.S. Bioengineering
  • J.D./Ph.D. Bioengineering
  • J.D./M.S. Computer Science
  • J.D./M.S. Electrical Engineering
  • J.D./M.S. Management Science and Engineering (MS&E)
  • J.D./Ph.D. Management Science and Engineering (MS&E)

School of Humanities and Sciences

  • J.D./M.A. Economics
  • J.D./Ph.D. Economics
  • J.D./M.A. History
  • J.D./Ph.D. History
  • J.D./M.A. in degree granting programs in Stanford Global Studies (SGS):
    • African Studies
    • East Asian Studies
    • Latin American Studies
    • Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
  • J.D./M.A. in International Policy Studies
  • J.D./Ph.D. Philosophy
  • J.D./Ph.D. Political Science
  • J.D./Ph.D. Psychology
  • J.D./M.P.P. Public Policy
  • J.D./Ph.D. Sociology

School of Medicine

  • J.D./M.S. Health Research and Policy (HRP)

Cooperative Programs with Other Universities

Stanford J.D. students have also pursued degrees at other universities such as the Harvard Kennedy School, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, and Princeton Woodrow Wilson School. The approval process for such a cooperative program begins after the student has been admitted, independently, to both programs. Students may enroll in either a joint degree among schools at Stanford or in a degree from an external university, but a student may not enroll in both a Stanford JDP and a cooperative program with another university.

Courses in Law

Some Law courses have special enrollment instructions and restrictions, but many Law courses are open to qualified graduate students in other departments of Stanford University with instructor consent. Non-Law students may not enroll in courses that are part of the required first-year J.D. curriculum. Stanford non-Law students intending to enroll in any course with a LAW subject code must consult the Office of the Law School Registrar in the Stanford Law School Administration Building, room 100, or see the Stanford Law School, Office of the Registrar web site.

Emeriti: (Professors):  Janet Cooper Alexander, Barbara Allen Babcock, Wayne G. Barnett, Paul Brest, Gerhard Casper, William Cohen, Lance E. Dickson, Marc A. Franklin, Jack H. Friedenthal, Ronald J. Gilson, Robert A. Girard, William B. Gould IV, Thomas C. Grey, Thomas C. Heller, Miguel A. Méndez, John Henry Merryman, Margaret Jane Radin, Kenneth E. Scott, Byron D. Sher, William H. Simon, Michael S. Wald

Dean: M. Elizabeth Magill

Vice Dean: Mark G. Kelman

Associate Dean for Public Interest and Clinical Education: Juliet M. Brodie

Associate Dean for Clinical Education: Juliet M. Brodie

Associate Dean for Curriculum: Jenny Martinez

Associate Dean for Executive Education and Special Programs: F. Daniel Siciliano

Associate Dean for Graduate Studies: Deborah R. Hensler

Associate Dean for Strategic Planning: George Triantis

Senior Associate Dean and Chief Financial Officer: Frank Brucato

Associate Deans: Diane Chin, Faye Deal, Julia Erwin-Weiner, Catherine Glaze, Sabrina Johnson, Susan Robinson

Professors: Michelle Wilde Anderson, Joseph Bankman, R. Richard Banks, Joshua Cohen, G. Marcus Cole, Richard Craswell (on leave), Mariano-Florentino (Tino) Cuéllar, Robert M. Daines, Michele Landis Dauber, John J. Donohue III, George Fisher, Richard T. Ford, Barbara H. Fried, Lawrence M. Friedman, Paul Goldstein, Robert W. Gordon, Henry T. Greely (on leave spring), Joseph A. Grundfest, Deborah R. Hensler, Daniel E. Ho, Pamela S. Karlan (on leave), Mark G. Kelman (on leave autumn), Amalia D. Kessler, Daniel P. Kessler, Michael Klausner (on leave winter/spring), Mark A. Lemley, Robert MacCoun, M. Elizabeth Magill, Lawrence C. Marshall, Jenny S. Martinez, Michael W. McConnell (on leave autumn), Michelle Mello, Bernadette Meyler, Alison D. Morantz, Nathaniel Persily, Joan Petersilia, A. Mitchell Polinsky, Robert L. Rabin, Deborah L. Rhode, Jane Schacter, David A. Sklansky, Norman W. Spaulding, James F. Strnad II, David Studdert, Barton H.Thompson (on leave spring), Jr., George Triantis, Barbara van Schewick, Robert Weisberg

Associate Professor: David Freeman Engstrom, Nora Freeman Engstrom, Michael Wara

Assistant Professors: Lisa Larrimore Ouellette, Shirin Sinnar

Professors (Teaching): Juliet M. Brodie, James Cavallaro, Jeffrey L. Fisher, William S. Koski, Phil Malone, Jay A. Mitchell, Deborah A. Sivas, Jayashri Srikantiah

Associate Professors (Teaching): Ronald C. Tyler

Senior Lecturers: Margaret R. Caldwell, Janet Martinez, Allen S. Weiner

Professors of the Practice of Law: Lucas Guttentag, Erik G. Jensen, David W. Mills, Dan Reicher, F. Daniel Siciliano

Professors (by courtesy): Jennifer Eberhardt, Michael Genesereth, David Larcker, Jose Maldonado, Paul C. Pfleiderer, Madhav Rajan, Jack Rakove, Frank Wolack

Visiting Professors: Michael Asimow, Binyamin Blum, Ryan Bubb, Siegfried Fina, Ariela Gross, Avishai Margalit, Mariana Pargendler, Rogelio Perez-Perdomo, Alan O. Sykes, Chantal Thomas, Beth Van Schaack, Tess Wilkinson-Ryan, Jonathan Zittrain

Distinguished Visitors from Practice: Douglas Melamed, Richard Morningstar, Robert Pozen, Brian Wolfman

Legal Research and Writing Instructors: Abbye Atkinson, Andrew Gilden, Thea Johnson, Courtelyou Kenney, Jeanne Merino, Justin Weinstein-Tull

Lecturers: Simao Avila, Marilyn Bautista, Jeanine Becker, Richard Brand, Viola Canales, Lanhee Chen, Diane Chin, Laurent Cohen-Tanugi, Allison Marston Danner, Michael E. Dickstein, Lisa Douglass, Bonnie Eskanazi, Randee G. Fenner, Bertram Fields, Jay Finkelstein, David Forst, Laurence Franklin, Steven Franklin, Michelle Galloway, Mei Gechlik, Tracy Genesen, Benjamin Ginsberg, Jennifer Granick, Jonathan Greenberg, Thomas Griffith, Margaret Hagen, Timothy H. Hallahan, Adam Halpern, David Hayes, Jared Haynie, Todd Hinnen, David Johnson, Danielle Jones, Sean Kaneshiro, Julie Matlof Kennedy, Sallie Kim, Jason Kipnis, Jeffery W. Kobrick, Robin John Lee, Stuart Lipton, Goodwin Liu, Paul Lomio, Suzanne Luban, Thomas Lue, Diego Gil McCawley, Beth McLellan, Jeanne Merino, Shawn Miller, Nader Mousavi, Carly Munson, Linda Netsch, Jessica Notini, Jef Pearlman, B. Howard Pearson, Lisa M. Pearson, Vabessa Casado Perez, Galia Phillips, John G. Quigley, Stephan Ray, Susan Robinson, John Rodkin, Dave Rogers, Michael Romano, Stephen Rosenbaum, Tom Rubin, Jacob Russell, Richard Salgado, Rachel Samberg, Matthew Sanders, Ticien Sassoubre, Jeff Schox, Stephanie Smith, James Sonne, Stephan Sonnenberg, Michelle Sonu, Jory Steele, Sergio Stone, Dan Tan, Alicia Thesing, Claret Vargas, Roland Vogl, Lisa Weissman Ward, Erika V. Wayne, Katherine C. Wright, Joseph Yang, James Yoon

Affiliated Faculty: Alexandria (Ali) Boehm (Civil and Environmental Engineering), Kate Bundorf (Health Research and Policy), Amir Goldberg (GSB), Benoit Monin (GSB), Stefan Reichelstein (GSB), Abraham Sofaer (Hoover), Francis "Vic" Stanton (GSB), Leon Szeptycki (Woods Institute)

Law, Nonprofessional Courses

LAWGEN 209Q. Community Police Academy. 1 Unit.

Course description: This nine-week course aims to demystify public safety, build trust, and develop partnerships between the police department and the community it serves. Each session is taught by a different deputy and is designed to expand each participant¿s knowledge of the duties, responsibilities, decisions, and constraints that law enforcement officers face. Topics include laws of arrest, search and seizure, alcohol laws (as seen in a DUI wet lab), patrol procedures, officer safety, vehicle stops, CSI vs. reality, emergency communications, defensive tactics, and deadly force. In addition to the weekly class, participants are invited to attend field trips for more in-depth experiences. Past field trips have included the coroner's office, Palo Alto Communications dispatch center, pursuit driving simulators, and the San Jose Main Jail. The course is open to all Stanford students, staff, and residents over 18 years of age. While this course is open to all students throughout the University, the units will not count toward the requirements for a law degree. Special Instructions: Live Scan Check.

Law Courses

LAW 224. Federal Litigation: Coursework. 2 Units.

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated public interest case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure, privacy, and first amendment law. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions for dismissal, class action certification, and preliminary injunctive relief. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and constitutional law. Attendance, class participation and written assignments. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.

LAW 229. Equal Protection: Race and the Law. 3 Units.

This course will examine the application of constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination law to race related controversies across a variety of settings. The course will begin with an exploration of the historical developments that led to antidiscrimination law, and with an introduction to the competing frameworks that define current antidiscrimination law: the discriminatory purpose and anti-classification approaches that feature prominently in equal protection doctrine, and the disparate impact framework that is incorporated into some statutory law. After some exploration of the historical origins of antidiscrimination law and its alternative formulations, the course will then turn to the specific contexts in which controversies arise. The settings that will be examined include criminal justice, college admissions, political participation, primary/secondary education, employment, housing, hate speech, and the formation of family relationships. In each of these settings, we will devote close attention to the role of antidiscrimination law in specific controversies. Throughout, our intellectual goals will be twofold: to understand the special challenges that race poses, and to appreciate more generally some of the dilemmas of legal regulation.

LAW 238. Administrative Law. 4 Units.

Law made by administrative agencies dominates the modern legal system and modern legal practice. This course examines the legal and practical foundations of the modern administrative state. Topics include rationales for delegation to administrative agencies; the legal framework (both constitutional and statutory) that governs agency decision-making; the proper role of agencies in interpreting statutory and regulatory law; and judicial review of agency action. The course will cover these topics through a combination of cases and examples drawn primarily from separation of powers doctrine; the constitutional law of due process; health, safety, and environmental policy; criminal justice; and national security law. The central theme of the course is how administrative law balances "rule of law" values (procedural regularity, substantive limits on arbitrary action) against the often competing values of political accountability, democratic participation, and effective administrative governance. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final exam.

LAW 242. Corporations. 4 Units.

This course is an introduction to the law of organizations with a focus on business corporations. The course is the foundation for advanced business courses. We will examine how organizational law mitigates the conflicts among owners, managers, and creditors and facilitates enterprise. Topics covered will include the law of agency, fiduciary duties, voting rights, and mergers and acquisitions. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Exam.

LAW 253. Advanced Civil Procedure. 3 Units.

This course will address several major areas of civil procedure that are discussed only briefly in the basic civil procedure course as well as broader questions of procedural design. We will address the joinder of claims and parties; claim and issue preclusion (also known as res judicata and collateral estoppel); and the basics of class actions and other forms of aggregate litigation. Expanding beyond the rules, we will also spend considerable time exploring questions of procedural design: for instance, how does the U.S. procedural regime compare to civil procedure in foreign legal systems? How does federal civil procedure compare to the processes of alternative dispute resolution? What are the consequences of contemporary procedural reform on civil rights and social justice litigation? Elements used in grading: Exam.

LAW 255. Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment. 3 Units.

This course examines various aspects of the Fourteenth Amendment, with special attention to equal protection, substantive due process, and state action. Topics addressed will include equal protection in relation to race, gender, and sexual orientation, and substantive due process in relation to procreation, sexuality, and relationships. Elements used in grading: Class participation and exam.

LAW 262. Corporate Finance I. 3 Units.

There are many contexts in which lawyers need an understanding of finance. For example, many of the disputes that give rise to litigation center on the financial valuation of firms and the securities they issue. In addition, an understanding of firms' capital structures and the design of corporate securities is necessary in analyzing many legal issues, especially those arising in corporate transactions, executive compensation, and bankruptcy proceedings. This course is designed to provide students with a rigorous conceptual understanding of finance and to give students the analytical tools needed to make financial decisions and value financial securities. The course stresses problem solving and includes problem sets, cases, and a midterm and final examination. The course is designed to be accessible to students with a fairly limited mathematical background. In general we will not assume any knowledge of mathematics beyond high-school algebra. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Exam.

LAW 272C. Organizations and Transactions Clinic: Clinical Coursework. 4 Units.

The O&T Clinic is targeted at both students planning to do M&A, finance, securities, IP licensing or other corporate or transactional work at major firms and those seeking to explore a non-litigation, advisory-oriented practice. In the clinic, students develop legal advice, learn to review and write contracts and governance materials, meet with client executives, examine commercial relationships, and receive extensive feedback about their work. No prior experience in business, finance, or corporate law is necessary. Students work on structural, programmatic, contractual, affiliation, and governance matters for corporate entities. Students typically represent multiple clients during the term, interact with client CEOs, CFOs, board members, and general counsels, and work in teams with other students and the instructors. Students receive detailed comments about the design, content, and execution of work-products and client communications, and about their performance in client meetings and calls. Students regularly assess their own work throughout the quarter and prepare a self-evaluation at the end of the term. O&T clients are all established Northern California nonprofit corporations. Most of the clients generate annual revenues in the range of $1 - $25 million, and some are considerably larger. We focus on these organizations because they are corporations that typically have substantial governance and external disclosure obligations, active boards of directors, audited financial statements, complex programs, varied collaborations, and diverse funding sources and contractual relationships -- all of which are relevant to and productive of corporate work -- yet are small enough that the clinic's contact is a senior executive. We think they provide excellent material for students learning about organizational representation and institutional corporate practice. The course includes a seminar that generally meets twice a week. Seminar meetings focus on student-led workshops regarding client projects, and on orientation to corporate practice, including discussion of core commercial relationships such as acquisition, credit, and licensing, and practice skills such as transaction planning and management. Evaluation and grading are based on detailed points of emphasis that reflect ways of working we believe characterize an effective lawyer and responsible colleague. Course design and operation reflect the instructors' combined 40+ years of corporate practice representing consumer products, finance, technology, and life science companies, in both law firm and senior in-house roles. Information about prior projects is available from the instructors and on the SLS website. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: The syllabus includes specific expectations and criteria relating to methodical analysis, close reading, efficient writing, effective collaboration, and crisp execution, applicable across client and seminar work. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 276. Employee Benefits Law. 3 Units.

Employee benefits law focuses on the various forms of benefits and compensation employers provide to their employees: cash and equity compensation, retirement plans, and health and welfare benefits. The field lies at the intersection of a number of different legal disciplines, including employment and labor law, tax, health care law and even corporate and securities law. As such it is an uniquely challenging field of law, one which offers insight into many of the major issues our society currently faces: fears about the adequacy of retirement savings, struggles over the new health care law, and attempts to rein in outsize executive compensation arrangements.nnnElements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final paper.nnnWriting (W) credit is for 3Ls only.

LAW 278. The Article III Judge. 2 Units.

The contemporary debate over the proper role of a federal judge under the Constitution turns, in large measure, on what it is we think an Article III judge is doing when she is called upon to resolve a "case or controversy." Is she looking for the fair result? If so, by whose lights? Is she a political actor, or is she instead looking for a rule of decision that has been previously established by law (a "mere translator" of the law, in Justice Frankfurter's words). If so, by natural law or positive law? These are some of the questions we will consider in discussing what role a federal judge plays when she exercises "the judicial Power of the United States" conferred by Article III of the Constitution. Readings will include books and articles by some of the leading legal thinkers in the nation's history. Special Instructions: This class will meet the first three weeks of the quarter only. Elements used in grading: Class attendance and participation, reading the assigned material, and a 10-15 page paper that uses the readings to analyze a significant judicial opinion. Special Instructions: This class will meet the first three weeks of the quarter only.

LAW 279. Advanced Organizations and Transactions Clinic. 2-7 Units.

Advanced clinic allows students who have taken the Organizations & Transactions Clinic to work on ongoing projects. Advanced clinic may be taken for 2-7 units. Students may not enroll in any clinic (basic or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. Students must have taken Organizations & Transactions Clinic (Law 272). Writing (W) credit is for 3Ls only. Elements used in grading: Written assignments and client interactions.

LAW 283. Federal Courts. 4 Units.

This course addresses the role of the federal courts in the American system of federalism and separation of powers, as well as their role in the development of substantive federal law and constitutional rights. A central premise of the course is that the institutional, political, and constitutional features of federal court litigation cannot be understood without engaging the historical context, especially the social, political, and legal movements, in response to which the federal courts have developed. Thus while many of the traditional aspects of federal court jurisprudence will be covered (e.g., federal common law including implied rights of action, justiciability doctrines and other doctrines of restraint, congressional power to limit the jurisdiction of the federal courts and to create "legislative courts" outside of Article III, Supreme Court review of judgments, state sovereign immunity, litigating against the government, and federal habeas corpus), doctrine will be placed alongside interdisciplinary readings on social, political, and theoretical accounts that reveal how the courts and ordinary Americans have come to understand the distinctive role of the federal courts, as well as claims for expansion or contraction of their powers. The course is strongly recommended for students interested in pursuing a career in litigation and/or judicial clerkships in the federal courts. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, class participation, take home exam and short paper.

LAW 291. Advanced Evidence. 3 Units.

Public interest lawyers often spend much of their time in the courtroom. Yet, prosecution, defender, and legal aid offices usually do not have the resources to train their lawyers in trial work. This course seeks to help remedy this deficiency by helping students who plan to do public interest work develop witness interrogation skills. Students will apply their theoretical grasp of evidence to concrete trial problems involving the direct and cross examination of lay and expert witnesses, the introduction of documentary evidence, and the use of illustrative evidence in California and federal courts. The goal is to train students in the art of examining friendly and hostile witness and in the use of documentary and illustrative evidence. The text will be Méndez, Evidence: The California Code and the Federal Rules -- A Problem Approach (West 5th ed. 2012) and additional course materials. Special Instructions: The course will be limited to 6 students who will be selected by the professor. Credit is contingent on attending all classes and participating in all exercises. Participation is crucial to the success of the course, as students will be working in teams of three. Do not take this course unless you are willing and able to participate fully and can accept criticism. Evidence (Law 290) is a prerequisite. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance and class participation.

LAW 301. Labor Law. 3 Units.

This course will consider the fundamental legal principles affecting collective labor relations in the private sector workplace, with particular attention to the National Labor Relations Act. Students will consider the strategies adopted by labor groups, employers, and legal actors in response to evolving economic and social conditions. The course will emphasize union organizing, the collective bargaining process, and related topics, including the scope of statutory coverage, interference with union rights, elections, negotiations, strikes, picketing, secondary boycotts, arbitration, and individual employee rights in the labor-management context. There is no prerequisite for the course. Special Instructions: Regular, punctual attendance is required. If you expect (or are unexpectedly forced) to miss more than two classes, please consult with the instructor as soon as possible, as exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Early Add/Drop Deadline: Add/Drop decisions must be made the first week of class. Exceptions are at the instructor's discretion and will be considered on a case-by-case basis. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.

LAW 304. Law and the Rhetorical Tradition. 3 Units.

In this interdisciplinary seminar we will explore the rhetorical underpinnings of legal argument. In the first half of the course, we will acquaint ourselves with relevant elements of the rhetorical tradition. In the second half, we will analyze a variety of legal texts (both written and oral) with an eye to the use and function of rhetorical principles, as well as the ways form and content are mutually constitutive. This course aims both to increase students' understanding of rhetoric as readers and interpreters of legal texts and to develop students' skills as writers and speakers. Students will be expected to participate in class discussion in addition to completing a series of writing assignments including the rhetorical analysis of legal and non-legal texts and the revision of students' legal writing. Special Instructions: This course can satisfy either the Writing "W" or Research "R" requirement. The instructor and the student must agree whether the student will receive "W" or "R" credit. For "R" credit, the paper is substantial and is based on independent research. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments, final paper. Automatic grading penalty waived for writers. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 327. Introduction to Organizational Behavior. 3 Units.

Why are some organizations more successful than others? Is it their emphasis on innovation and risk taking? Their founders' eccentric and visionary personalities? Or perhaps their bureaucratic discipline and effectiveness? We will explore these questions by reviewing existing theory and research on organizational problems in a number of areas including: individual motivation and behavior; decision making and leadership; interpersonal and intergroup communication, influence and conflict; organizational culture; and inter-organizational competition and cooperation. The course focuses on the reasons for organizational founding and failure, the variety of organizational forms and the ways in which organizations and their members affect one another. You will participate in a number of group exercises to illustrate the theoretical and practical implications of addressing organizational problems and increasing overall performance. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper.

LAW 343. Intellectual Property: Scientific Evidence in Patent Litigation. 3 Units.

(Same as GENE 243). This seminar will explore the role of scientific experts in patent infringement litigation. The class will have a mix of law students and doctoral candidates from the sciences and engineering. The law students must have some familiarity with United States patent law from classes or work experience. The graduate students must have completed their required coursework and have TGR status. In other areas of the law where scientific experts are used -- medical malpractice, environmental law, criminal law -- the science itself is often in dispute. In patent cases, however, the parties generally agree on the science. This affects the relationship between the lawyer and the expert and the substantive content of their interactions. Patent experts need to be able to explain science to the judge and jury, of course. But they also must help the litigators to choose which legal issues to press and which to concede, and to be aware of how the complications of the science might help, hurt, obscure or reveal how the law should be applied to the facts. Thus, both the lawyer and the scientist must educate the other about their specialties.nnFor the first several weeks, the class will examine judicial decisions and trial documents involving scientific evidence in patent litigation. The rest of the quarter is largely devoted to work on the final projects: simulations of expert testimony in a patent case. Students will work together in teams an will meet regularly with the instructor in order to: select suitable patents; identify a balanced issue on either validity or infringement; prepare claim charts and materials for testimony; and give short, illustrated talks to inform their classmates about their projects. Finally, they will choose sides (patent owner or accused infringer) and finetune their presentations. The simulations will be performed at the end of the quarter before panels of practicing patent lawyers.

LAW 352. International Tax. 2 Units.

This course examines the United States federal income taxation of international operations and transactions, including international joint ventures and M&A transactions. Income source, foreign tax credits and Subpart F are important. International transfer pricing rules also will be addressed. Elements used in grading: Final Exam.

LAW 372. Legal History Workshop. 2-3 Units.

The Legal History Workshop is designed as a forum in which faculty and students from both the Law School and the History Department can discuss some of the best work now being done in the field of legal history. Every other week, an invited speaker will present his or her current research for discussion. This year the theme of the Workshop will be Conservative Legal Movements from 1950 to the Present. Speakers will include Reva Siegel, the Nicholas deB. Katzenbach Professor of Law at Yale Law School, and Thomas Sugrue, the David Boies Professor of History and Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, as well several other scholars of law, the social sciences and humanities writing about this topic. In the week prior to a given speaker's presentation, the class will meet as a group to discuss secondary literature relevant to understanding and critiquing the speaker's research. Students will then read the speaker's paper in advance of the following week's workshop presentation. Special Instructions: Students are required to write a brief response to each speaker's paper. There will be a total of four speakers, and thus four papers. Guidance will be provided concerning how to frame these response papers, which will be due every two weeks - i.e., on the day before speaker presents and students will receive "W" writing credit. Students taking the course to receive "R" research credit are required to write a research paper on a legal history topic that they choose (in consultation with the professor). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Enrollment will be limited to 30 students -- 20 from SLS who will be selected by lottery and 10 from H&S. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, assignments and final paper. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 307A).

LAW 388. Technological, Economic and Business Forces Transforming the Private Practice of Law. 2 Units.

The private commercial practice of law is undergoing fundamental change. Modern technological, economic and business forces are placing extreme pressure on the traditional private attorney law firm model. These forces will transform, eliminate or replace virtually every aspect of legal services provided by attorneys. Traditional foundations of the large law firm model such as "billable" hours, summer associate programs, large staffs (e.g., paralegals and secretaries) and high associate-to-partner ratios are becoming (or have already become) relics of a bygone era. Today, the business need for clients to select a one-stop, full-service law firm for their important legal work has, in a variety of circumstances, disappeared. Sophisticated clients are utilizing a wide range of legal services firms and companies for their legal work. As a result, the diversity of legal business models and manner of providing legal services has greatly expanded. Often individual lawyers (or very small firms) can provide high-level legal services by assembling "virtual" teams in which each team member handles a different constituent part of the representation. "In-sourcing," "out-sourcing" and the transferring of large portions of work to non-lawyer legal support vendors are all becoming fixtures of the legal economy. This rapid increase in diversity on both the supply and demand side of the legal economy will greatly alter the skills and prerequisites required for the successful private practice of law. The course is composed of two parts. In part one, the technological, economic and business practices transforming the legal profession are identified and their impact on the traditional approaches to private practice law firms will be examined. In part two, the course focuses on how individual lawyers can adapt to or embrace the forces transforming law to improve their practice and succeed in the new environment. Part two of the course will additionally focus on how specific skills such as project management, social networking and information management will be crucial to a successful legal career. Part two of the course will also discuss how the changing legal environment creates new ethical and professional challenges for attorneys. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation and written assignments. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 397. Law and Economics of Death Penalty Seminar. 2-3 Units.

This seminar will examine the legal and policy aspects of a capital punishment regime. Students will have the option to take the seminar alone or to combine it with a practicum. This seminar component will explore three primary issues: 1) the Supreme Court's forty-year effort to define what cases can permissibly receive the death penalty and the procedures under which it must be imposed; 2) the arguments for and against the death penalty, with a major focus on whether the death penalty deters, is administered in a racially biased way, or is otherwise implemented in an arbitrary and capricious manner; and 3) what the U.S. and international status of the death penalty is today and what the prospects are for the future. The readings on deterrence and racial discrimination will entail some substantial statistical analysis, although a background in statistics, though helpful, will not be required. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012. Elements used in grading seminar: Written assignments and final paper. Students who take the practicum component must attend the 9 seminar class meetings and do all reading and writing assignments of the seminar except that instead of writing a final paper of their choosing they will focus on actual policy or litigation work that will be arranged with various death penalty abolition groups. I expect that there will be an opportunity to work on policy relevant research that will be of assistance in the repeal movement (as well as attending the 9 seminar class meetings and doing the readings for each class).

LAW 402. Moot Court. 1 Unit.

The major moot court activity at Stanford Law School is the Marion Rice Kirkwood Memorial Competition, which takes place each year during Autumn and Winter terms. Autumn term will be dedicated to brief writing and completion of the written portion of the Competition; the oral portion of the Competition will be conducted during the first four weeks (approx.) of Winter term. Students on externship and in clinics may enroll if permitted by their respective programs as class attendance is not required Autumn or Winter term and students must only participate in scheduled oral arguments Winter term, which are in the evenings or late afternoons. Prior to the Competition itself, materials and lectures are provided on research, brief writing, and oral advocacy techniques. Registration for the Kirkwood Competition is by team. Each team is required to submit an appellate brief of substantial length and quality, and to complete at least two oral arguments, one on each side of an actual case. The first draft of the brief is reviewed and critiqued by the course instructors. The final draft of the brief is scored by the course instructors and members of the Moot Court Board. The course also offers digital recording and critiques of practice oral arguments. Panels of local attorneys and judges serve as judges who score the oral argument portion of the Competition. Teams are selected for the quarterfinal, semifinal and final round of the Competition based on their brief score and oral advocacy scores. The final round of the Competition is held before a panel of distinguished judges and the entire Law School community is invited to attend. Special Instructions: In order to maintain academic standards, enrollment in the Kirkwood Competition is limited to 20 two-person teams. This limit will be strictly enforced. Registration forms will be distributed Spring term. If the program is oversubscribed, a lottery will be held to determine participating teams and to establish a waiting list. The final drop deadline for the course will be Friday of the first week of classes. Enrollment in both Autumn (2 units) and Winter (1 unit) terms is required. The final grade for both Autumn and Winter terms and the Writing and Professional Skills credit will be awarded upon the completion of the course requirements. Registration and Consent Instructions: Instructions on how to register for the Moot Court competition are sent out to students each year in Spring term for the coming academic year. The registration process is separate from the regular class registration process. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory completion of appellate brief and oral arguments. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012. Early application and drop deadlines.

LAW 404B. Foreign Legal Study: Bucerius Law School. 9-14 Units.

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS): Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU): Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po): Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS): Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU): Beijing, China, or the Waseda University Law School (WLS): Tokyo, Japan. See SLS Foreign Legal Study Exchange Program at http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/stanford-program-in-international-and-comparative-law/the-foreign-legal-study-program. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.

LAW 404S. Foreign Legal Study: National University of Singapore. 9-14 Units.

This course is for J.D. students who have been approved by the Law School to study at one of the following schools: Bucerius Law School (BLS): Hamburg, Germany, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU): Jerusalem, Israel, Institut d'Etudes Politiques de Paris (Sciences Po): Paris, France, National University of Singapore (NUS): Singapore, Peking University Law School (PKU): Beijing, China, or the Waseda University Law School (WLS): Tokyo, Japan. See SLS Foreign Legal Study Exchange Program at http://www.law.stanford.edu/organizations/programs-and-centers/stanford-program-in-international-and-comparative-law/the-foreign-legal-study-program. Elements used in grading: Satisfactory evaluation of course work at the exchange institution.

LAW 406. Research Track. 9-12 Units.

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements Used in Grading: Paper.

LAW 408A. Criminal Defense Clinic: Clinical Practice. 4 Units.

Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic will represent indigent criminal defendants in a wide range of misdemeanor cases in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Students will be California Bar Certified and thus will be bound by the rules and ethics of the profession, notably zealous advocacy on behalf of clients. Students will take the lead role in all aspects of case development, including interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating facts, developing case strategy, negotiating with the prosecutor, drafting and arguing motions, and trying cases before judges and juries. Common charges include drug possession, public order offenses, assault, theft, and weapons possession. While students will have primary responsibility for all aspects of their cases, all trial work will be closely supervised. In addition to casework, there will be weekly workshop sessions. These classes will focus both on case-rounds and on broader systemic issues. The goal of the clinic is to train students how to try a criminal case from beginning to end while engaging in thoughtful reflection on the role of the criminal defense attorney in the criminal justice system. While the work is often challenging and sometimes heartbreaking, it offers students a unique opportunity to put their skills, intellect and compassion to use by serving people in a moment of great need. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and case work and professionalism. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 409. Introduction to Intellectual Property. 4 Units.

This is an overview course covering the basics of intellectual property law -- trade secrets, patents, copyrights, and trademarks, as well as selected other state intellectual property rights. This course is designed both for those who are interested in pursuing IP as a career, and those who are looking only for a basic knowledge of the subject. There are no prerequisites, and a scientific background is not required. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam (4-hour, open-book, in-class final).

LAW 413C. Policy Practicum: Improving Bone Marrow Donation Programs. 2-3 Units.

The National Bone Marrow Donation Program (NMBD) operates the "Be the Match Registry." Individuals who register with Be the Match may be identified as potential donors of hematapoietic cells (most typically bone marrow) to patients facing life-threatening disorders such as leukemia, lymphoma, and aplastic anemia who do not have family members who are good matches to serve as donors. (Family members are appropriate for only 30% of patients needing these transplants.) The NBMD is considering whether the procedures that it uses to attract people to enroll as potential donors in the registry could be improved, and also wants to investigate the further possibility that the proportion of potential donors who actually donate cells once it is discovered that they are a match for a particular patient could be increased. Social psychologists here at Stanford are interested in working with the NBMD to examine some of the organization¿s practices, taking advantage of the sorts of social psychological insights often employed by those interested in marketing products or increasing charitable donations. There are questions, of course, about the efficacy of the techniques that they might recommend in terms of increasing ultimate donation levels, but there are also significant questions about whether some of the techniques might run afoul of existing legal regulation or pose other sorts of problems for the organization. Law students who choose to work on this practicum will almost surely work (in teams with other law students and in conjunction with social psychologists working on this issue and the NBMD) on the following issues: -- To what extent is it consonant with existing medical privacy law (or laws that the NBMD might press to adopt) to reveal personal information about donees to potential donors, assuming that donors are more likely to donate to those with whom they feel a greater personal connection? -- To what degree can NBMD simplify the process of registering potential donors without running afoul of current (or ideal) regulation protecting people against undergoing medical procedures in the absence of informed consent? -- What sorts of material incentives for donation, if any, are permissible under current (or ideal) law and what stance should the NBMD take on the use of material incentives? There may well be other related topics upon which students will work as well. Students may normally receive no more than four units for a Policy Lab practicum and no more than a total of eight units of Policy Lab practicums and Directed Research projects combined may be counted toward graduation unless additional units for graduation are approved in advanced by the Petitions Committee. A student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors at mkelman@stanford.edu and lmarshall@law.stanford.edu. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Written Assignments, Class Participation, Group Work.

LAW 413H. Policy Practicum: State Law Enforcement Access to Customer Records of Communication Companies. 2 Units.

If California Senate Bill SCR 54 is enacted, as seems likely, the California Law Revision Commission will be tasked with modernizing California statutory law on law enforcement access to customer records of cell phone providers, internet service providers, social media companies, and other mobile and internet-based communication providers. The Commission would like us to prepare a thorough and balanced background study of the relevant legal and policy concerns, including civil liberties, public safety, and the scope of federal preemption in the area, with an emphasis on new and emerging communication services. This is likely to be a high profile project, with close attention from the Legislature and many interest groups. nThis project involves complex issues under the Fourth Amendment and such statutory structures as the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Completion of the course in Criminal Investigation is a prerequisite, with exceptions only for those with demonstrable alternative background in Fourth Amendment law.nElements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 413X. Policy Practicum: Designing a Social Impact Bond for Santa Clara County Mental Health. 3 Units.

Social impact bonds, also called "Pay for Success" initiatives, are an innovative finance mechanism through which investors provide the funds for organizations to provide social services at the request of a government entity. These investors may be repaid, with interest, depending on the organizations' success in achieving specified outcomes. The most noteworthy examples to date involve pay-for-success schemes to reduce recidivism in the UK, Massachusetts, and New York City prisons. Santa Clara County will soon issue a request for proposals for a social impact bond to reduce the hospitalization of mentally ill patients at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. It has retained Third Sector Capital Partners as an advisor and Keith Humphreys, Ph.D., Professor and Section Director for Mental Health Policy in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University, as the evaluator. Students in this Policy Lab practicum will work with Dr. Humphreys, the Santa Clara County Counsel's Office, and Third Sector to develop the scheme, including designing clear metrics for success and undertaking a cost-benefit analysis of the de-institutionalization of mental health patients. It is likely that we will collaborate with faculty and students from other schools and departments having particular expertise in cost-benefit analysis and evaluation. Special Instructions: Total enrollment in this course will be limited to 12 (4 SLS students, 4 Medical School students & 4 other). A preference will be given to students who can enroll for both the Autumn and Winter quarters. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Cross-listed with Psychiatry (PSYC 213).

LAW 414E. Policy Practicum: Legal and Policy Tools for Preventing Atrocities. 2-4 Units.

In 2012, at the U.S. Holocaust Museum and Memorial, President Obama announced the adoption of a comprehensive global strategy to prevent atrocities. This strategy is based on a set of recommendations generated by an interagency review of the U.S. government's capabilities mandated by Presidential Study Directive 10 (PSD-10) of 2011. In unveiling this major new initiative, President Obama underscored that Preventing mass atrocities and genocide is a core national security interest and a core moral responsibility of the United States. Foundational to the PSD-10 recommendations was the creation of a high-level interagency Atrocities Prevention Board (APB) to monitor at-risk countries and emerging threats in order to coordinate the U.S. government's responses thereto. Since being established in 2012, the APB has worked to amass and strengthen a range of legal, diplomatic, military, and financial tools for atrocity prevention. This policy lab would support the APB primarily through one of its constitutive entities, the Office of Global Criminal Justice (GCJ) in the U.S. Department of State. GCJ is headed by an Ambassador-at-Large (Assistant Secretary equivalent) and advises the Secretary of State and the Under Secretary for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights on U.S. policy addressed to the prevention of, responses to, and accountability for mass atrocities. Students enrolled in the lab will pursue a range of projects devoted to (a) strengthening existing tools (such as hybrid accountability mechanisms and commissions of inquiry), (b) developing new capabilities (such as a global atrocities prevention sanctions regime), (c) evaluating the efficacy of past efforts in order to glean lessons learned, and (d) gathering best practices from other states and entities engaged in similar endeavors, all with an eye toward developing concrete recommendations for future action. The client is the Office of Global Criminal Justice in the State Department. Students may have the opportunity to travel to Washington to meet with the client and other government agencies involved in the APB and to present preliminary findings for feedback and additional direction. This is designed as a two quarter policy lab, although students may enroll for a single quarter (WINTER OR SPRING). Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for contact information and submission deadline.

LAW 414H. Policy Practicum: Preparing for Transition in Syria: Head of State Exile. 1 Unit.

Syria is in the midst of a devastating civil war, during which almost 200,000 persons have been killed, many more have been injured, and millions have been displaced. One major coalition of Syrian opposition groups, known as the National Coalition for Syrian Revolution and Opposition Forces, or the Syrian National Coalition, seeks to replace the current Syrian government, led by President Bashar al-Assad. As the Coalition plans for a post-Assad transition, it has encountered a number of legal and policy challenges that implicate international law, international relations, and administrative problems. Students in this Practicum will work to support the Public Interest Law and Policy Group PILPG), a pro bono international law firm, which in turn is providing advice to the Coalition on these issues. Students in the Practicum will focus in particular on potential head of state exile arrangements. Many observers imagine that no political solution to the Syria conflict is possible unless arrangements are put in place to permit President Assad to safely depart the country for resettlement outside Syria. A threshold challenge will be to analyze whether any such exile arrangement for President Assad would be legally permissible under international law in light of his alleged responsibility for serious international humanitarian law violations. The project would also explore pragmatic questions, such as how head of state exile arrangements fit into the overall peace negotiation process, and under what circumstances head of state exile is a successful component of a peace agreement. Finally, the project could consider the role that third-party states play in head of state exile arrangements. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Written Assignments. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT: Contact Professor Weiner at aweiner@stanford.edu.

LAW 436C. Supreme Court Litigation Clinic: Clinical Coursework. 4 Units.

The Supreme Court Litigation Clinic will expose students to the joys and frustrations of litigation before the Supreme Court of the United States. The bulk of the clinic will be run as a small law firm working on live cases before the Court. Students will participate in drafting petitions for certiorari and oppositions, merits briefs, and amicus briefs, compiling joint appendices, and preparing advocates for oral argument, as well as commenting (the technical term is "kibbitzing") on drafts of briefs being filed by lawyers in other cases. The precise nature of the cases will depend on the Court's docket, but in recent Terms, the clinic's cases have involved federal criminal law and procedure, habeas corpus, constitutional and statutory antidiscrimination and employment law, bankruptcy law, and the First Amendment. Our aim is to involve students as fully as possible in this type of litigation. The Clinic begins with an intensive introduction to the distinctive nature of Supreme Court practice, including the key differences between merits arguments and the certiorari process, the role of amicus briefs, and the Supreme Court Rules. After that, seminar meetings will be devoted primarily to collaborative work on the cases the clinic is handling. While students will be primarily responsible for working in teams on one case at a time, they will also be expected to acquire familiarity with the issues raised in other students' cases and will both edit each others' substantive work and assist each other and the instructors with the technical production work attendant on filing briefs with the Supreme Court. The course will involve substantial amounts of legal research. The Supreme Court operates on a tight, and unyielding deadline, and students must be prepared both to complete their own work in a timely fashion and to assist one another and the instructors on other cases. The instructors will not ask students to do any kind of "grunt work" that they themselves will not also be handling, but grunt work there will be: proofreading, cite-checking, dealing with the joint appendix, and the like. The nature of the work product means that while students will average thirty hours per week on their case-related work, that work will surely be distributed unevenly across the quarter. Unlike most other courts, the Supreme Court has no student practice rules. Thus, students will not be able to argue cases before the Court. But they will participate in moot courts on their cases, as both advocates and Justices. Each student will also have the opportunity to travel to Washington to see the Court in session, preferably with respect to a case on which the student has worked. Ideally students will already have experience with persuasive doctrinal writing, through a course like Federal Pretrial Litigation or through intensive supervision during their summer jobs or other clinics. Admission to the Clinic is by consent of the instructors. Students will need to submit a writing sample that reflects their facility with doctrinal legal arguments and the name of at least one reference who can comment on their legal analytic ability. - - Special instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Written work, editing of other student's written work, attendance, class and moot court participation. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 439. Mind the Gap: Exploring Selected Areas of American Inequality, A Policy Practicum. 2 Units.

This course will explore the equity of resource distribution and opportunity in the United States in the 21st century. We will explore and evaluate the common critique that the contemporary structure of various entities (such as schools, courts, andnthe legislature) contributes to increased inequality. Some of the likely topics to be covered in class, along with their concomitant impact on equity, include: language and identity; trade-offs between equality of opportunity and equality of outcome; stereotype threat; felon disenfranchisement; labor market inequality; urban vs. rural poverty; the erosion of mental health services; and how factors such as race, ethnicity, gender, and income can contribute to academic achievement gaps. The class will explore the substantive issues related to equality and inequality as well develop written and oral skills for advocacy, including drafting op-eds, position papers, and other written materials and preparing for oral presentations. Each student will be responsible for leading at least one class at San Quentin State Prison to a mixed class composed of Stanford and San Quentin prisoner students. Students will be also be expected to write weekly reflection papers in response to the assigned reading and to attend and participate heavily in each class discussion; they will also be expected to edit and provide individual feedback on the written assignments of the San Quentin students. In addition, attendance at a one day training conducted by the Prison University Project is mandatory. Class will meet on Fridays from 3:00 - 5:00pm. Grades will be based on a combination of active class participation and preparation, consistent attendance, and several written assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form to the instructors; the form is available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (See Registration and then Law Students). See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 441. European Legal History. 3 Units.

This seminar will explore major topics in European legal history from ancient Rome through the present: Roman law, canon law, feudalism, sixteenth- and seventeenth-century constitutionalism, modern natural law, the age of absolutism and the rise of the centralized, administrative state, the structure of Old Regime law and society and the radical changes brought about by revolution, the German historical school of jurisprudence, and the rise of the European Union and a new culture of international human rights. In exploring these topics, we will focus on certain core, recurring themes that continue profoundly to shape the world in which we live. These include the sources and nature of law (positive law vs. custom), the relationship between law and society, and the relationship between law and history. Classroom discussion will focus on selected primary- and secondary-source texts that we will read as a group. The course will be limited to 12 SLS students with 10 additional slots held for students enrolling in HISTORY 238E/338E. Elements used in grading: Brief analytical paper (6-8 pages, worth 35% of the total course grade) and final exam (worth 65% of the total course grade). Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 238E & HISTORY 338E).

LAW 444. Thinking Like a Policy Analyst: Introduction to Policy Analysis. 2 Units.

This seminar is designed primarily for students working on Policy Lab projects, but will be open to other students as well subject to a total enrollment of 15 students. It will be offered both the Autumn and Winter quarters during 2013-14, with any individual student eligible to enroll only in one quarter. You already know how to think like a lawyer, but if you are interested in policymaking, policy advocacy or policy research¿whether in the public, nonprofit, or corporate sector¿ you need to know how to think like a policy analyst as well. This seminar, designed primarily for students beginning or continuing in Policy Lab practicums, has three purposes. First, it introduces students to the ways in which policy analysts approach public policy problems and controversies, focusing on perspectives that distinguish policy analysis from traditional legal analysis Second, it introduces students to the tools of policy analysis, including approaches to collecting and analyzing information Third, it provides hand-on lessons on communicating with policy makers orally and in writing. There is no text for the course. Readings for the course will include examples of policy analyses conducted to inform public policymaking. Students engaged in policy practicums will use their practicum experience as a basis for assessing the value of various policy analytic perspectives and research approaches. Students not engaged in policy practicums will pick a policy problem they are interested in and develop a plan for conducting a policy analysis relevant to this problem. Elements used in grading (Autumn): Attendance, class participation, three short reflection papers.Elements used in grading (Winter): Course paper and class participation. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 451. European Union Law. 2-3 Units.

The U.S. and the European Union (which comprises 28 European states and 500 million people) have the largest bilateral trade relationship in the world. About 60% of the world's GDP is generated on the Transatlantic Marketplace. U.S. companies rely on the EU market for more than half of their global foreign profits, and U.S. investment in the EU is currently three times greater than U.S. investment in the whole of Asia. The new Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), a free trade agreement currently under negotiation between the EU and the U.S., will further strengthen substantially the economic ties between the EU and the U.S. in the near future. In the past few years, even several proposed mergers between U.S. companies have been killed solely by the EU antitrust authorities, although approved by the U.S. antitrust regulators. In recent years, this has tremendously heightened the need for a sound understanding of the legal system of the EU, especially for business and technology lawyers. Responding to this need, this course will, first, examine the internationally unique legal system of the EU as such, as it is applicable to any field of substantive and procedural EU law. Thus, we will look at the legal nature and the different sources of EU law and its relationship with the national law of the EU Member States. We will cover the relevant EU law enforcement actions including state liability issues as well as the jurisdiction of both European Courts and relevant remedies in national courts. Secondly, we will explore the legal framework of doing business in the EU, from the perspective of a business entity as an internationally operating actor in a European business environment. In this context, we will focus on the most essential fields of EU business law, i.e. (a) the four fundamental economic freedoms of the European Internal Market for goods, services, capital and persons, (b) EU competition/antitrust law, as well as (c) EU e-commerce law. Special attention will be given to the question how companies established outside the EU can efficiently use EU business law to pursue their interests in the EU. Additional education and research opportunities for students in EU law, building on this course, can be found in the course syllabus. Special Instructions: Students have the option to write a research paper in lieu of the response papers (01). After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation, response papers or research paper.

LAW 458. Health Law: The FDA. 3 Units.

This course will examine the Food and Drug Administration. It will focus largely on the FDA's regulation of drugs and biologics, but will also cover its regulation of medical devices, nutritional supplements, and, to some extent, its jurisdiction over special legal, social, and ethical issues arising from advances in the biosciences. Special Instructions: The class is open to all law or medical students. Graduate students may be admitted from other parts of the University by consent of the instructor. Substantial class attendance is required; in addition, the quality of class participation will play a small role in grading. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, and final exam (In-school, open book). (Cross listed with Health Research and Policy (HRP 209).

LAW 473X. "U.S. SEC Law Student Observer Program and Securities Regulation Seminar". 3 Units.

The U.S. SEC, Law Student Observer Program, is a one-semester volunteer/for-credit externship position offered to current law students selected by representatives of the SEC. The program provides exposure to the workings of the SEC and to the regulation of securities markets. Students are assigned to work with SEC staff members on a broad range of projects, including the investigation of industry and issuer practices, litigation of civil enforcement actions, and the drafting of proposed statutes and rules. In addition to working 40-hour weeks, students attend a weekly securities regulation seminar that includes lectures by SEC Commissioners and senior staff, and prominent members of the private bar. The topics for discussion at this seminar are chosen to complement the materials covered in basic securities regulation courses offered at the participating law schools.

LAW 476. Advanced Criminal Practice. 3 Units.

In this seminar, we will discuss the most pressing current issues and cases across the criminal justice spectrum, from arrest through appeal and collateral attack. Our focus will be on the practice of criminal law -- how prosecutors and defense lawyers actually develop and use the latest cases and arguments. The subjects that we will take up will include, for example, ineffective assistance and the death penalty, sentencing, the "drug court" development, public prosecution and white collar crime. Each student will choose a case from the Supreme Court's current criminal docket and write about the issues that either arose or should have arisen during any of the stages of the case. Understanding these issues will require a careful investigation of the case history and the way it is developed for the Supreme Court. Particular attention will be paid to the ethical issues that arise in practice. Our text for the course will be pre-assigned cases from the current Criminal Law Reporter, along with articles and litigation materials in connection with a particular topic. Students should use the class to develop the habit of keeping up with the constantly evolving law in the specialized fields of criminal law and criminal procedure.

LAW 478. IP Advanced Topics: The Future of Online Music and Online Video. 3 Units.

The online music and online video industries are undergoing profound changes. In online video, the rise of Netflix and Hulu are just two examples of this trend. This class will explore how the different technical, economic or regulatory decisions we make today will interact to shape the future of these industries, and what the different options under consideration will mean for specific companies in this space. Class sessions will consist of a mix of guest lectures by industry leaders and class discussions of the assigned readings.nnThroughout the class, the students will work in interdisciplinary groups on problems facing specific companies in the online and online video industry today. For the final project, the groups will address specific policy problems from the perspective of a specific company, with different groups representing companies on different sides of an issue.

LAW 483. Deal Litigation Seminar. 2-3 Units.

This seminar is designed as an introduction to mergers and acquisitions litigation. The course aims to provide both a practical and doctrinal perspective on M&A-related litigation and will rely heavily on readings and issues derived from practice in the Delaware courts where much contemporary deal litigation occurs. Students will be asked to apply cases and legal principles in various practical situations that may arise in a transactional litigation practice. Familiarity with basic corporate law principles is assumed. Classes and readings. The first segment of the course will introduce basic doctrinal principles of M&A law and provide an introduction to the litigator's role in the transactional setting. The remaining sessions will revolve around three detailed M&A case studies, with seminar members divided into group roles. The first week of each case study will involve the negotiation and structuring of an M&A transaction. The second week will involve litigation relating to the transaction. Reading for these sessions will include case scenarios, supporting materials, and additional relevant case law and articles. The attendance and active participation of seminar members is essential. Readings for all classes will be provided in spiral-bound volumes distributed in class. Written assignments and grading. Students will be expected to (i) write a final paper; (ii) prepare two additional short written assignments associated with the case study assignments (such as marking up draft documents or preparing court papers); and (iii) participate actively in class. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Corporations (LAW 242) is a prerequisite. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, written assignments and paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 491. Myth, Law, and Practice. 2 Units.

Collective myths from a variety of traditions and cultures capture enduring psychological truths about human choices and the human condition. Lawyers at various stages in their careers have their own personal myths, sometimes conscious and sometimes not. These personal myths embody key tendencies that determine or heavily influence each lawyer's personal and professional path. This course examines both collective myths that capture relevant archetypal human tendencies and the personal myths along with the associated histories of individual lawyers. It offers a space and time for each student to consider his or her own personal and professional direction through the course materials, class interactions, and a series of reflection papers. The course benefits from the collaboration of Michael Guasperini, a Ph.D. mythologist and lawyer whose primary vocation is working intimately with lawyers and firms during periods of personal and institutional transition. Mr. Guasperini has deep experience with the personal lives of hundreds of lawyers at various ages and levels of professional development. Elements used in grading: A series of reflection papers totaling at least 18-pages. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 492. Multi-Party Litigation. 3 Units.

This introduction to aggregative litigation will cover joinder of claims and parties, class actions, and multidistrict litigation, as well as related topics such as preclusion and brief coverage of remedies and choice of law. The focus will be both doctrinal and practice-oriented, and we will also consider broader questions of how the civil justice system should respond to mass harms as well as proposals for reform.nnThis course is strongly recommended for students planning a practice in private or public civil litigation, managing or supervising litigation, or a judicial clerkship. It provides a basis for advanced courses such as complex litigation.nnElements used in grading: Class participation, assignments and final exam.nnThis course is open to first-year Law School students.

LAW 493. Entrepreneurship, Leadership and the Law Practicum. 2 Units.

Starting or advising a growing social enterprise requires on-the-ground experience. This class brings theory and case studies examined in Entrepreneurship, Leadership and Law in Social Enterprise to use through placements as consultants with local social enterprises. Students will make connections in the community; learn creative and hands-on problem solving skills; teamwork and communication skills; and be inspired to innovate and break away from the traditional lawyer path.

LAW 498. Designing Liberation Technologies. 3-4 Units.

Small project teams will work with selected NGOs to design new technologies for promoting development and democracy. They will conduct observations to identify needs, generate concepts, create prototypes, and test their appropriateness. Some projects may continue past the quarter towards full-scale implementation. Taught through the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (d.school.stanford.edu). This course is cross-listed with the Computer Science and Political Science Departments (Same as CS 379L and POLISCI 337T). Enrollment is limited to a total of 16 students (under all course numbers combined), by consent of instructor. Students may enroll for 3 credits or 4 credits with additional assignments. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a consent application available at http://bit.ly/libtech2014. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline and additional course information. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in all phases of the team project, from conception through execution. (Cross-listed as CS 379L and POLISCI 337T).

LAW 500. Modern American Legal Thought. 3 Units.

The course is a survey of the theories of law and adjudication that have been most important in this country since the Civil War, concluding with an introduction to presently significant schools of legal thought. The past schools of thought we treat are Formalist Legal Science, Sociological Jurisprudence, American Legal Realism, and Legal Process. The more recent and still active movements include such as Law and Moral Philosophy, Law and Economics, Critical Legal Studies, Feminist Jurisprudence, Public Choice Theory, and Neo-formalism. The readings are drawn primarily from primary materials - the important contemporary manifestos and critiques of the schools of thought studied, along with writings that involve their application or reveal their influence. Among the recurring issues treated are: How political is law? How objective? How much do and should courts legislate? Is law mostly rules? Principles? Policies? Decisions? How much should law be bound up with other intellectual disciplines? What should legal education be like? Elements used in grading: Final Exam.

LAW 504. International Business Negotiation. 3 Units.

This course is structured around a quarter-long, simulated negotiation exercise which is intended to provide an in-depth study of the structuring and negotiating of an international business transaction. This class will be taught in counterpart with a class at Berkeley Law School. Students in this class will represent a U.S. pharmaceutical company, and the students in the class at Berkeley will represent an African agricultural production company. The two companies are interested in working together to exploit a new technology developed by the pharmaceutical company that uses the cassava produced by the African agricultural production company. The form of their collaboration could be a joint venture, a licensing agreement or a long term supply contract. The negotiations between the two classes will take place through written exchanges and through real-time negotiation which will be conducted both in-person and via videoconferences. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an opportunity (i) to experience the sequential development of a business transaction over an extended negotiation, (ii) to study the businesses and legal issues and strategies that impact the negotiation, (iii) to gain insight into the dynamics of negotiating and structuring international business transactions, (iv) to learn about the role that lawyers and law play in these negotiations, (v) to give students experience in drafting communications, and (vi) to provide negotiating experience in a context that replicates actual legal practice with an unfamiliar opposing party (here, the students at Berkeley). Students will also learn about the legal and business issues that may arise in joint ventures, supply agreements and licensing agreements. The thrust of this course is class participation and active involvement in the negotiations process. Students are expected to spend time outside of class, working in teams, to prepare for class discussions involving the written exchanges, as well as preparing for the live negotiations. Class discussions will focus on the strategy for, and progress of, the negotiations, as well as the substantive legal, business and policy matters that impact on the negotiations. In addition to the regular Monday class, classes will meet for the live negotiations on two Thursday evenings on-campus at 7:00 PM (10/16 and 10/30) and three Saturday mornings at 10:30 AM (10/11, 10/25 and 11/15) in the San Francisco office of DLA Piper (555 Mission Street; close to Montgomery St. BART station). Due to the Thursday and Saturday classes, this class will conclude on November 17. The course will be limited by lottery to eight (8) law students (additional students from engineering or business may also participate). Attention Non-Law Students: You must complete and submit a Non-Law Student Course Add Request Form to the Law School Registrar's Office (Room 100). See Stanford Non-Law Student Course Registration on the SLS Registrar's Office website. Prerequisites: A course in basic negotiations (e.g., Law 615) or comparable prior experience is recommended. A primer on basic negotiations skills will be offered at a time TBD as an alternative for students who have not had a prior negotiations class or experience. Elements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments and final paper.

LAW 509. Facilitation for Attorneys. 2 Units.

This course is designed to help students develop an understanding of the practice of facilitation in the legal context and to develop skills as facilitators. As the practice of law becomes more complex, it includes more and more situations where groups of people need to work together. Common examples include: planning complex legal strategies, developing firm policies, coordinating work among attorneys and staff, working with corporations or other multi-person clients, shareholder meetings, public commissions and councils, corporate and non-profit Board of Directors meetings. Countless hours are spent in meetings - a typical lawyer in the United States can expect to spend at least 10,000 hours in meetings during his or her working life. This course will help students improve the quality of both the processes and products of meetings, as a facilitator, leader, or meeting participant. Class Schedule dates: Sunday Oct 26 from 8:30 - 5:30, Friday Oct. 31 from 1-6, and Sunday Nov. 9 from 8:30 - 5:30. Elements used in grading: Class attendance, participation and final paper.

LAW 512. Intellectual Property: Licensing. 2 Units.

In this course we cover the major aspects of intellectual property licenses. We will cover patent, copyright, trademark and trade secret licenses in a variety of industries. We will focus on agreements governed by US federal and state law, but will cover select issues in cross border transactions. Topics include: grant language, upstream and downstream immunities, change of control events, indemnities, and insolvency. Using a case law-based approach, we will examine the interrelationship between contract language and background law. Introduction to Intellectual Property or consent of the instructor is a prerequisite for this course.

LAW 517. Why Intellectual Property?: Rationales and Critiques of IP Law. 2 Units.

Why do societies decide to grant special legal protection to various types of creative works? A number of answers have been given over the years. Some are utilitarian: we grant these rights because doing so maximizes social welfare. Some are deontological: we grant rights because this is morally required in a just society. We will examine these various justifications, as well as variants on them. We will also ask how a society, having decided to grant some version of IP rights, ought best structure them. Should they be true property rights, with all or most of the powers this implies (creator control over uses, right to compensation from exploitation, etc.), or something else? Would a state-backed reward system work better, so that compensation is divorced from individual control? Should compensation for successful creators be limited or capped, as part of a wider attempt to moderate the distributional impacts of granting individual property rights; or must we tolerate ¿big winners¿ as an inducement or symbolic reward for other creators? We will address these and related questions by reading two sets of materials: (1) classic treatments of property rights (Locke, Kant, etc.) and social justice (Rawls); and (2) material from the contemporary literature on IP theory. We may also host some of the most interesting scholars working in the field of IP theory today, to come and explain their thinking and their work.

LAW 543. Entrepreneurship, Leadership and Law in Social Enterprises. 2 Units.

Many believe that society's greatest challenges have already been solved by social entrepreneurs and the challenge is how to take their ideas to scale. However, it has become increasingly difficult to start and sustain social ventures. The lines between the public and private sectors have become increasingly blurry as best practices in the social sector now include innovation, strategy and accountability. This course will expose students to the work of social entrepreneurs in social enterprises - focusing primarily on domestic non-profit organizations. Using the "case study method" typically used in MBA programs, students will examine the challenges of starting, counseling, serving, funding and scaling social ventures through the eyes of the entrepreneur, investor, attorney and community leader. The course will explore the intricacies of remaining mission driven, talent, board relations, managing and sustaining growth, the changing role of corporate governance, and leveraging private sector partnerships and resources. Students will also explore innovative public / private sector partnerships and the challenges and opportunities of engaging diverse partners with differing agendas. The course will include guest speakers from the fields of law, business and the social sector. Throughout, students will explore the valuable roles that attorneys can and have played in such ventures. Students will be expected to attend, participate actively, present to the class and write reflection papers. Elements used in grading: Reflection Papers.

LAW 557. Direct Democracy. 2-3 Units.

In recent years, the use of ballot measures has sharply risen, and initiatives and referenda have featured prominently in contested debates over immigration, affirmative action, abortion, same sex marriage and term limits. This seminar will focus on direct democracy as a method of lawmaking. Our principal focus will be on initiatives and referenda, but we will allocate some time to the recall, as well. We will consider the history, practice, theoretical justifications, and constitutional dimensions of direct democracy, as well as how direct democracy interacts with representative democracy. We will also explore many legal questions that have arisen in as ballot measures have been used as instruments of governance and policy. Topics will include whether direct democracy comports with the federal constitution; judicial review and interpretation of ballot measures; minority rights under direct democracy; election rules relating to signature gathering, qualifying ballot measures and campaign finance; and the role of interest groups. I anticipate one or more guest lecturers.nnEach student will present on one particular ballot measure that is linked to that week's topics. Students will write either multiple response papers (for W credit) or a final research paper (for R credit) on a topic to be worked out with the instructor.nnSpecial Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the seminar for R credit can take the seminar for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length.nnnElements used in grading: Class participation, written assignments, multiple response papers or a final paper.nnnWriting (W) credit is for 3Ls only.

LAW 562. Comparative Civil Rights. 4 Units.

This course will compare civil rights laws in the United States to those in several other countries in Europe and the developing world. We will focus on how differing national histories, priorities, politics and demographics have led to distinct approaches to anti-discrimination as well as on how civil rights movements have influenced and borrowed from each other. Special Instructions: The course will be taught using a "flipped classroom" format: students will complete a series of on line class segments that include video interviews with experts from around the world, texts and quizzes. The on line materials will allow flexibility so that students can focus in greater depth on areas of interest as well as review foundational material on American anti discrimination law, international law and international human rights. Classroom time will be dedicated to discussion and questions. Students have the option to write papers for either Writing (W) or Research (R) credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and final paper. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 591. Securities Regulation: Raising Capital in U.S. Markets, from Start-up through IPO and Beyond. 4 Units.

A complex web of securities regulations governs the process by which businesses raise capital in the United States. This course reviews the legal regime governing capital formation, from angel financing and venture capital rounds that fuel start-up activity in Silicon Valley, through the initial public offerings (IPOs) by which companies "go public" (with special reference to the recent Alibaba IPO), and reporting obligations that arise once firms are publicly traded. The course also considers the evolving role of on-line securities placement markets, such as Angel List. In addition, the course examines the "Rule 144A market" through which many of the world's largest entities raise billions of dollars a year in U.S. markets, without ever becoming subject to SEC public disclosure requirements. Elements used in grading: Final exam.

LAW 610. Trial Advocacy Workshop. 5 Units.

This lawyering skills course gives students an orientation to and constant practice in most basic pretrial and trial advocacy skills areas. Topics include: taking and defending depositions, motion practice, trial evidence, including admission of trial exhibits in evidence and use of prior witness statements to refresh and impeach a witness, jury selection and voir dire, opening statements, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, and closing arguments. Students will try a full jury case through to verdict with use of jurors and before a real judge in the Superior Court in Palo Alto at the end of the course. Students will also have a chance to watch the jurors deliberate and talk with them after their verdict. The course takes place during seven weeks of the Autumn Quarter with two classes (one lecture and one workshop) per week on most weeks from 4:15-9:00 (these usually occur on T, W, or Th, plus an occasional M), plus two Saturday workshops and the final weekend of jury trials, Saturday and Sunday November 15 and 16. Each day's ending time will vary; most sessions will end before 9:00. For a detailed schedule, contact Stephanie Basso at sbasso@law.stanford.edu. The format for each topic begins with a lecture/discussion featuring video vignettes of various techniques and a live demonstration by an expert trial lawyer. Following the discussion portion of each topic are small group sessions during which each student practices the skills involved. Constructive feedback is given after each exercise by two of our faculty of very experienced Bay Area litigators and judges. Most exercises are also videoed for further one-on-one critique by another faculty member. The course ends with full jury trials. The central philosophy of the workshop is that skills are best acquired in an experiential manner by seeing and doing. Frequent short, well-defined exercises followed by immediate constructive feedback in a non-competitive, non-threatening atmosphere provide the core of the program. The workshop directors are Tim Hallahan, Sallie Kim and Jeff Kobrick. Tim has taught similar programs at Harvard Law School, the University of San Francisco School of Law, Boalt Hall, the California Continuing Education of the Bar, and in private and public interest law firms around the country. Sallie is a partner in a civil litigation firm and taught a class at SLS previously and served as Associate Dean for Student Affairs previously. Jeff is a partner in a civil litigation firm and has taught practical litigation skills courses at Harvard and Stanford Law Schools for a number of years. Special Instructions: If you haven't taken Evidence you must contact Mr. Hallahan before the course begins for some brief pre-course reading assignments. There are no papers or tests, but attendance at every session is required. Since we will begin our trial advocacy exercises on the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking the course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the professor.) Add-drop decisions need to be resolved at the first class; no drops will be permitted thereafter. Exceptions to this rule will be made by petition only. Mandatory attendance. Elements used in grading: Attendance and in-class assignments.

LAW 621. Sentencing and Corrections. 3 Units.

This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing and corrections system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. Corrections deals with the implementation and evaluation of criminal sentences after they are handed down. In fact, the two subject areas are inseparable. The course will examine sentencing and corrections from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will explore sentencing theories and their application, the nature, scope and function of corrections, the impact of mass incarceration on crime and communities, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, the relationship between sanctions and crime, and the consequences of prisoner reentry. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may include presentations by legal professionals, victims, offenders, and correctional leaders. We also plan to visit a correctional facility. This course is open to ILs, 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation and (1) weekly reflection papers of 3-5 pages each week for each of our speakers/topics or (2) a long research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the research (R) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Weekly reflection papers or research paper.

LAW 622C. Environmental Law Clinic: Clinical Coursework. 4 Units.

Students enrolled in the Clinic provide legal assistance to national, regional and grassroots non-profit organizations on a variety of environmental issues, with a focus on complex natural resource conservation and biodiversity matters at the interface of law, science and policy. Working under the direct supervision of practicing environmental attorneys, Clinic students help screen new matters and potential clients; formulate strategies; research and develop factual and legal issues; and prosecute administrative and litigation proceedings. During the term, students may meet with clients, opposing counsel or agency decision-makers; review administrative records; develop expert testimony; draft comment letters, petitions, pleading or briefs; and/or attend and participate in administrative and court hearings. In regular one-on-one meetings with supervising faculty, there is a heavy emphasis on learning how to write persuasively and present oral arguments. In addition, students participate in a regular seminar where we examine strategic, ethical and substantive issues arising out of the Clinic's work. The Clinic is a particularly good place to learn how to conduct effective legal research, marshal facts in support of legal arguments, and, above all, write well. We practice at all levels of state and federal court and before many local, state and federal administrative agencies. Our work involves extensive motions practice and brief writing, and often involves administrative petitions and policy papers. Our work is inherently cross-disciplinary. No prior environmental experience or background is necessary, but an interest in learning about environmental and natural resources law is important. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses - - The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third, over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend approximately five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Attendance and participation in class, professionalism, timeliness, initiative, and follow-through on project work and other class requirements. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 623. Advanced Environmental Law Clinic. 2-7 Units.

The Advanced Environmental Law Clinic provides students who have already taken the Environmental Law Clinic the opportunity to continue intense individual project work. Advanced students often work on matters they worked on as full-time students, but they also have the chance to work on new matters and develop new skills. Advanced students work closely with supervising faculty on their designated projects and are expected to take increasing responsibility for managing their work and representing clients. In addition, advanced students often serve as mentors to less experienced full-time students and thereby receive training in basic team building and supervision. Advanced students may arrange to receive between two and seven credits. No student may receive more than 27 total clinical credits during the course of the student's law school career. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 628B. Oral Argument Workshop. 1 Unit.

This course is offered in conjunction with "OAP" (Law 628-A-01). All students registered in Law 628-A-01 have the option to take an additional unit. The focus of this component will be on oral presentation skills and will consist primarily of interactive exercises designed to enhance voice and body control, increase poise, reduce anxiety, and improve overall effectiveness in public speaking. Doree Allen, the Director of the Oral Communication Program at Stanford's Center for Teaching and Learning, along with guest lecturers from throughout the university, will lead these classes with the goal of giving students an opportunity to improve their oral presentation skills in a supportive and fun environment.

LAW 639. Lawyering and Social Intelligence. 3 Units.

Building a successful legal career or practice involves both technical expertise as well as relational skills. Becoming a trusted advisor or effective advocate is essentially an interpersonal process that relies upon social and emotional skills, such as listening in ways that gain client trust and engagement or delivering tough messages in ways that reduce defensiveness and increase mutual problem solving. These skills can be learned. Unlike conceptual knowledge, they are acquired through practicing new behaviors that expand skills or undo old habits. Adult learning is strengthened through experiencing the concept in action, reflecting upon the experience and practicing it. I will construct such exercises for use in class as well as in workgroups outside of class. This course will introduce students to simple frameworks that raise awareness and understanding of social intelligence and expose them to a process of learning they can employ in their everyday interactions for continued growth and development.nSpecial Instructions: This course develops student skills and not simply conceptual knowledge. Learning will come from consistent class attendance and a willingness to participate actively - not only in occasional role plays but primarily as one's self, practicing new behaviors that build skill sets. Written assignments will be brief weekly reflections on personal learning. Since I will establish workgroups following the first day of class, all students who are interested in taking this course (whether enrolled or on the wait-list) need to be present for the first class. (Students who are not present will be dropped from the class or waiting list unless they have made previous arrangements with the professor.) Add-drop decisions need to be made at the conclusion of the first class; no drops will be permitted thereafter as learning will depend upon intact workgroups throughout the quarter. Once you commit to the class, you must complete it or receive a failing grade. Exceptions to this rule will be made by petition only. nElements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments.

LAW 640B. Community Law Clinic: Clinical Methods. 4 Units.

The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering tasks necessary to advance their clients' interests, including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact investigation, legal research, and representation in the court and agency settings that hear the clients' cases. Skills emphasized include those trial lawyering skills, as well as time management and developing client-centered lawyering practices. Students may also have the chance to participate in outreach or policy-level projects, such as representing the clinic on a state or regional committee on a substantive issue, doing community education workshops at sites around the Peninsula, and/or legislative research and advocacy. In the clinic seminar and in regular supervision, students are encouraged to interrogate the effectiveness of the legal system at delivering "justice" for their clients and to explore creative ways that legal knowledge can be deployed to attack the social problems attendant to low wages, substandard and unstable housing, and other features of low-income life in Silicon Valley. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend four or five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Clinical case/project work, seminar preparation and participation, attendance, reflection papers and project. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 640C. Community Law Clinic: Clinical Coursework. 4 Units.

The CLC is the closest thing to a general legal services office among Stanford's clinical offerings. Based in East Palo Alto, the CLC provides students with the opportunity to provide direct legal services to low-income residents, while thinking critically about the role of lawyers and lawyering in addressing the problems of America's so-called "working poor." The Clinic's practice is in four areas: (1) housing (eviction defense and Section 8 termination); (2) wage and hour and related workers' rights; (3) social security and disability benefits; and (4) criminal record expungement. Each student handles his or her own caseload, which is comprised of cases matters in all of the practice areas. The practice areas are selected and designed to lie at the intersection where the community's unmet legal needs and students' learning needs correspond. The clinic's docket is fundamentally a trial docket. Students have first-chair responsibility for their cases, and perform all of the lawyering tasks necessary to advance their clients' interests, including interviewing, counseling, negotiation, fact investigation, legal research, and representation in the court and agency settings that hear the clients' cases. Skills emphasized include those trial lawyering skills, as well as time management and developing client-centered lawyering practices. Students may also have the chance to participate in outreach or policy-level projects, such as representing the clinic on a state or regional committee on a substantive issue, doing community education workshops at sites around the Peninsula, and/or legislative research and advocacy. In the clinic seminar and in regular supervision, students are encouraged to interrogate the effectiveness of the legal system at delivering "justice" for their clients and to explore creative ways that legal knowledge can be deployed to attack the social problems attendant to low wages, substandard and unstable housing, and other features of low-income life in Silicon Valley. Special Instructions: General Structure of Clinical Courses -- The Law School's clinical courses are offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits. This allows students to immerse themselves in the professional experience without the need to balance clinical projects with other classes, exams and papers. Students enrolled in a clinic are not permitted to enroll in any other classes, seminars, directed research or other credit-yielding activities within the Law School or University during the quarter in which they are enrolled in a clinic. Nor are they allowed to serve as teaching assistants who are expected to attend a class on a regular basis. There is a limited exception for joint degree students who are required to take specific courses each quarter and who would be foreclosed from ever taking a clinic unless allowed to co-register. These exceptions are approved on a case-by-case basis. Clinic students are expected to work in their clinical office during most business hours Monday through Friday. Students are also expected to be available by e-mail or cell phone when elsewhere during those hours. Because students have no other courses (and hence no exams or papers), the clinical quarter begins the first day of classes and runs through the final day of the examination period. Students should not plan personal travel during the Monday to Friday work week without prior authorization from the clinical supervisor. The work during a typical week in a clinic is divided into three components. First, as they are for practicing attorneys, most of the hours of any week are taken up by work on client matters or case work (this time includes meetings with instructors to discuss the work). Again, as is the case for practicing lawyers, in some weeks these responsibilities demand time above and beyond "normal business hours." Second, students will spend approximately five-to-seven hours per week preparing for and participating in weekly discussions or other group work in their individual clinic (scheduling varies by clinic). Third over the course of the quarter each clinic student (with the exception of those enrolled in the Criminal Prosecution Clinic) is required to prepare for and attend four or five inter-clinic group sessions. Students will be awarded three separate grades for their clinical quarter, each reflecting four credits. The three grades are broken into the following categories: clinical practice; clinical methods; and clinical coursework. Grading is pursuant to the H/P system. Enrollment in a clinic is binding; once selected into a clinic to which he or she has applied, a student may not later drop the course except in limited and exceptional cases. Requests for withdrawal are processed through the formal petition and clinical faculty review process described in the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Students may not enroll in any clinic (full-time or advanced) which would result in them earning more than 27 clinical credits during their law school career. The rules described here do not apply to advanced clinics for students who are continuing with a clinic in which they were previously enrolled. For information about advanced clinics, please see the course descriptions for those courses. For more information about clinic enrollment and operations, please see the clinic policy document posted on the SLS website. Elements used in grading: Clinical case/project work, seminar preparation and participation, attendance, reflection papers and project. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 664. Advanced Legal Writing: Business Transactions. 3 Units.

This course offers students practical preparation in the skills needed to be an effective transactional lawyer. Students will learn to draft clear, effective, plain language contracts and to analyze other transactional writing used to manage complex business transactions. The class will appeal to students interested in working in a law firm and practicing transactional law (of any type) and those interested in business litigation who would like to gain an understanding of contract provisions. The course offers a wide range of realistic drafting problems--completed both inside and outside of class. Students will also (i) develop sensitivity to the expectations of the attorneys and clients with whom they will be working, (ii) learn how to research the applicability of contract provisions, and (iii) sharpen their analytical skills in the context of contracts. SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS: Students on the waitlist for the course will be admitted if spots are available on the basis of priority and Degree of Study. Early drop deadline: Students may not drop this course after first week of class. Corporations (LAW 242) is a prerequisite for all but LLM (CGP) students. A substantial mark-up of a contract is due on the last day of class. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 671. Critical Theory. 3 Units.

This course will review the most important developments in critical theory as it relates to law and jurisprudence. It will begin with a brief review of the critical tradition in Western philosophy including thinkers such as Friedrich Nietzsche, Karl Marx, Max Weber, Jean Paul Sartre and Michel Foucault. We will then look at the influence of this critical tradition in American legal theory, tracing the critical turn through the American legal realists, Critical Legal Studies and the emergence of identity based critical movements such as Critical Race Theory, Critical Feminist Theory and Critical Approaches to Sexual Orientation. The class will conclude by examining the theories of Giorgio Agamben, Jacques Rancière, and Niklas Luhmann and considering their possible legal implications. Special Instructions: The paper for this course will satisfy the Writing requirement. Students also have the option to write an independent research paper for Research credit. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final paper. Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 677. Professional Responsibility. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the goals, rules and responsibilities of the American legal profession and its members. The course is designed around the premise that the subject of professional responsibility is the single most relevant to students' future careers as members of the bar. These issues come up on a constant basis and it is critical that lawyers be alert to spotting them when they arise and be educated in the methods of resolving them. As such, the course will address many of the most commonly recurring issues that arise, such as confidentiality, conflicts of interest, candor to the courts and others, the role of the attorney as counselor, the structure of the attorney-client relationship, issues around billing, the tension between "cause lawyering" and individual representation, and lawyers' duty to serve the underrepresented. In addition, we will delve into some more personal ethical issues that reflect on why students have chosen law as a profession and how lawyers compose careers that promote or frustrate those goals. Students will be responsible for submitting a reflection paper (three-to-five pages each) after each week of the course. Each memo will be due by the Friday of the following week. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on the papers submitted, with the instructor retaining the right to take class participation into account. Attendance is mandatory and students must seek instructor approval for any absences not due to illness. This course is offered to foreign graduate students. It is taught on an accelerated basis over the course of three weeks between September 2, 2014 and September 19, 2014. Thus, the course meets on average nine hours per week. The exact meeting times will be set once the graduate students' schedules are set. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation and written memos. Limited to LLMs, JSMs and exchange students. Required for LLMs.

LAW 681E. Human Rights and Film. 1 Unit.

This 'Discussion' group will focus on the treatment of human rights issues in films. After reviewing brief, selected readings that provide essential background, the group will view a film (one per session, for five sessions) that focuses on issues of social conflict and human rights. The film showings will be held at Prof. Cavallaro's home (near campus). Afterwards, students will consider the human rights matters addressed in the film. Films include 'Battle of Algiers' and 'La Historia Oficial' (The Official Story, Argentina 1985). Winter Quarter. Class meeting dates: To be determined by instructor. Elements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students and then see Consent of Instructor Forms). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline.

LAW 681K. Confidence, Influence and Leadership. 1 Unit.

For the past two years, the name of this reading group was Why are People So Sure? For this year, we have changed the name--and the emphasis to a degree. As in the past, we will discuss books that address the phenomenon of people having great confidence in their beliefs or opinions, even when there is a reasonable possibility that they are wrong. For example, many arguments about politics or policy involve highly complex factual assumptions and predictions. Despite the difficulty of assessing the validity of factual assumptions and forecasting the consequences of any particular decision, many people maintain great confidence in the correctness of their beliefs. Why is that? In addition, some people are very successful in influencing other people with respect to such beliefs or opinions. How do they do that, and what makes their audience susceptible to being convinced? In the extreme, what allows this sort of person to be a leader or at least a "thought leader" (to use what regrettably seems to be a new entry into our lexicon)? In this discussion group, we will read books that engage these questions in diverse ways. Students that join the group will be expected to be full participants in the discussion. Neither of us is an expert in the topic and neither of us expects to have any more to say than you will. So please join us only if you find this format appealing. Another requirement of the group will be to create a written log, or summary, of what we read and discuss. We will all share responsibility for writing this. Begin in Autumn Quarter and run through Winter Quarter. Class meeting dates: To be determined by instructor. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students and then see Consent of Instructor Forms). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline.

LAW 681M. Legal Fictions. 1 Unit.

This discussion group will look at questions of value and meaning in the lives of lawyers through the window of works of fiction. We will discuss one book each evening. Subject to change, the list includes: Russell Banks, The Sweet Hereafter; Albert Camus, The Fall; James Gould Cozzens, The Possessed; Leo Tolstoy, The Death of Ivan Ilyich; and Scott Turow, Presumed Innocent.nClass meeting dates: To be determined by instructor.nElements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.nDiscussions in Ethical and Professional Values Courses Ranking Form: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline.

LAW 681N. Law and Performance. 1 Unit.

From the rhetorical fireworks of the classic American trial scene to the band Pussy Riot's "aesthetic resistance" in Russia, law and performance have been entangled in more and less officially sanctioned ways. This discussion seminar will address questions at the intersection of law and performance, such as: What are the ethical implications of performance in the legal context?; When does or should freedom of performance come into conflict with the norms of a well-ordered society?; Can examining methods of musical interpretation help us to adjudicate between originalism and living constitutionalism?, and; What can drama reveal to us about the law? Among other readings will be included Jack Balkin's work on opera and constitutional interpretation, Kenji Yoshino's "The City and the Poet," Hannah Arendt's Eichmann in Jerusalem, and Desmond Manderson's "Making a Point and Making a Noise: A Punk Prayer."nSpring Quarter.nClass meeting dates: To be determined by instructor.nElements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.nDiscussions in Ethical and Professional Values Courses Ranking Form: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students and then see Consent of Instructor Forms). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline.

LAW 681P. Personal Satisfaction in Legal Practice. 1 Unit.

This discussion group will explore satisfaction in professional practice. Readings will explore the conditions of current practice, with an emphasis on law firms, and what can be learned from research on happiness. Books to be excerpted may include Nancy Levit and Douglas Linder, The Happy Lawyer, Steven Harper, The Lawyer Bubble, Sonja Lyubomirsky, The How of Happiness, Daniel Gilbert, Stumbling on Happiness, Martin Seligman, Authentic Happiness, Bryant Garth, After the JD, Milton Reagan, Eat What You Kill, and Nash and Stevenson, Just Enough.nBegin in Winter Quarter and run through Spring Quarter.nClass meeting dates: To be determined by instructor.nElements used in grading: Class attendance at all sessions and class participation.nDiscussions in Ethical and Professional Values Courses Ranking Form: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students and then see Consent of Instructor Forms). See Ranking Form for instructions and submission deadline.

LAW 690. Advanced Topics in Administrative Law. 2 Units.

This seminar will cover advanced topics in administrative law, including the law of government information, the role of cost benefit analysis, and schools of regulatory reform. Students electing "W" credit will write a series of response papers; students electing "R" credit will write a research paper pertaining to administrative law. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructors. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline. Prior course in Administrative Law required. Writing (W) credit is for 3Ls only. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper.

LAW 693. Law and Politics Workshop. 2-3 Units.

This workshop will feature guest speakers who are political scientists or law professors specializing in the legal regulation of politics. Students will be responsible for response papers to each scholarly paper presented. On weeks without guest speakers, topics to be covered will include election law, administrative law, legislation, judicial behavior and public opinion, as well as the political science relevant to those areas of law. The final grade will be determined by class participation (10%), response papers (30%) and final research paper (60%). Students can take the course for R credit for either 2 or 3 units, depending on paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation (10%), Response papers (30%) and final paper of no less than 18 pages for 2 units of credit and 26 pages for 3 units of credit (60%). (Cross-listed as POLISCI 321).

LAW 694. The Law of War. 3 Units.

The course explores the international law regime governing war, including the law that regulates when states may resort to force and the constraints on the conduct of warfare itself. We will begin by considering when states may permissibly use force, and how changing security threats, including terrorism, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the commission of widespread humanitarian atrocities challenge and are reshaping the legal framework on recourse to force. We will then explore the rules governing the conduct of military operations, including the constraints on the means and methods of war, the rules governing the treatment of detainees, and the protections extended to civilians and noncombatants in armed conflict. A particular focus of the class will be the application of these rules in non-traditional, asymmetric conflicts between states and terrorist and other non-state groups. Special Instructions: Any student may write a paper in lieu of the final exam with consent of instructor. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements Used in Grading: Class participation, written assignments, research paper or final exam.

LAW 697. Comparative Law and Society. 2 Units.

By the mid 20th century, the legal map of the world recognized four main traditions: civil law, common law, socialist, and Islamic law. In early 21st century, the main socialist countries have disappeared and globalization has produced a pronounced convergence between common law and civil law. We also became aware that comparative law has to compare more than law and has to include the social and political context of the law. The comparative method is important, but the substance to be compared has changed. This course introduces students to the main historical experiences of law using the comparative method and law and society materials. They will find a new way of looking at Roman, medieval, or 19th century law because its "monuments" are placed in social perspective. The method will be used to reconstruct the contemporary ideas of human rights and rule of law in the context of specific countries. Students will have two writing obligations: (1) brief reflective essays on assigned readings and (2) a research paper. Starting in session 2, students will prepare brief reflective essays on the required reading (or readings) for the session and submit them to the professors and other students 24 hours prior to the beginning of the session. Assigned readings will all be in English. Additional readings may be in other languages. For the research paper the student will, with professorial approval, choose a country and a topic and discuss the work in progress with the professors at least twice during the quarter. It should not exceed 5.000 words. Special Instructions: After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: The short essays or article presentations will be one leg of the students' evaluation (50%). The other leg will be the final research essay (50%). Writing (W) credit is for students entering prior to Autumn 2012.

LAW 701. SPILS Law and Society Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar is restricted to students who are in the SPILS program. The seminar deals with the relationship between legal systems and the societies in which they are embedded. The materials are drawn from studies of many different societies. Among the issues dealt with are: What influence does culture have on the operation of legal systems? What are the social forces which produce particular forms of law? What impact do legal interventions have on society and on human behavior? Elements used in grading: Exam. Enrollment is restricted to SPILS program students.

LAW 703. Corporate Governance and Practice Seminar. 2 Units.

The seminar on corporate governance meets in the Autumn and Winter quarters and forms the core of the LL.M. Program in Corporate Governance & Practice. Attendance and active participation are important to the success of the seminar and an important factor in the overall grade. Students are expected to have carefully read and reviewed assigned materials in advance of each session. Students may be also asked to prepare brief presentations to help guide discussions. Students will be required to submit reflection papers (2 to 3 pages in length) that evaluate, critique, and discuss some or all of the key topics reviewed in the previous week's session. Elements use in grading: Class participation, attendance and assignments. This course is required for and limited to students in the Corporate Governance and Practice LL.M. Program.

LAW 707. SPILS Research Methods Workshop. 2 Units.

This is a mandatory course for SPILS Fellows as part of the program's core curriculum. Its main goal is to offer students an interdisciplinary perspective about socio-legal research, and research tools for implementing their individual research projects. This Winter term workshop will complement the Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies Seminar taken in the Autumn by 1) expanding and elaborating on some of the methods analyzed during the seminar; and 2) assisting students in using such methods towards their individual research project. The workshop will consist of specialized sessions, most of them tailored towards the work of empirical research that occurs after the data collection phase. During the quarter the fellows are expected to submit drafts of different chapters of their thesis. If appropriate, the workshop may also include group and/or individual sessions designed to address the very specific needs of the research undertaken by the SPILS Fellows. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance and written assignments. Enrollment is restricted to SPILS fellows. The seminar is required for JSM graduation.

LAW 712. Research Design for Empirical Legal Studies. 3-4 Units.

Empirical legal studies have become popular in the U.S. and are now spreading to non-U.S. law faculties as well. Usually the term applies to analyses of quantitative data and the researcher relies on data collected by others. But the term "empirical" properly encompasses both qualitative and quantitative data, including interviews, legal documents, survey research and experimental results. Analysts interested in using such data need to understand how they were collected, in order to decide what data can appropriately be used to answer different kinds of questions. Often to answer the questions of interest, a researcher needs to collect new data, which poses challenging questions about how to design an empirical research study. Answering these questions appropriately is important to ensure publication in a peer reviewed journal, which are becoming increasingly important to legal academia. This seminar will introduce students to the wide range of research methods that can be used to answer empirical questions, provide a framework for choosing among methods, and explain how to use the methods. The project for the quarter is to design an empirical research study on a topic of your choice. Special Instructions: JD students can take the class for 3-4 units. SPILS students must take this class for 4 units. Students taking the course for 4 units must attend the additional session on Thursday, which is option for others. After the term begins, JD students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which can potentially satisfy the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Consent Application for JD students: To apply for this course, JD students must e-mail Professor Hensler at dhensler@stanford.edu. This course is REQUIRED for all SPILS fellows and BY CONSENT for all other students. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments and final paper.

LAW 721. Private Equity Investing: Quantitative Skills Seminar. 1 Unit.

This course has been created to supplement Law 522, Private Equity Investing. The focus will be on the quantitative aspects of private equity investing. The primary pedagogical objective is to have students learn the skills required to do financial analysis and spreadsheet modeling. Students will develop a thorough understanding of "the time value of money" and the concepts of present value, internal rates of return, and the discounting of cash flows and annuity streams. The key principles of entrepreneurial finance and deal arithmetic will be presented, including the implied valuation of an investment, blended returns, the math of multitiered capital structures, contingent claims analysis, DCF valuation techniques, investment fund economics, option mechanics and variable pricing mechanisms. Mastery of these fundamentals will allow students to develop and strengthen their ability to prepare forecasts, craft deal structures and run the numbers on real world transactions. Special Instructions: In order to enroll in PEI: Quantitative Skills students must concurrently enroll in Private Equity Investing (LAW 522). In other words, no student may enroll in either Law 522 or LAW 721 without also enrolling in the other. Students accepted to enroll in Private Equity Investing (for which a Consent Application Form is required) will automatically be able to enroll in LAW 721. LAW 721 will be graded on a Mandatory Pass/Restricted Credit/Fail (MP/R/F) basis. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.

LAW 724. Ethics On the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals. 2 Units.

The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government, and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change...), leadership, and the law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: Ebola; Facebook's mood manipulation research and teen suicides from social media bullying; Google's European "right to be forgotten" and China policy and driverless cars; Space X (Elon Musk's voyages to Mars); ISIS' interaction with international NGOs; sexual assault on US University campuses and in the US military; the ethics of corporate social responsibility (through companies such as Loreal, Whole Foods and Wal-mart); immigration reform; corporate and financial sector scandals; and non-profit sector ethics challenges. Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on critical thinking and testing ideas in real world contexts. There will be a limited number of openings above the set enrollment limit of 40 students. If the enrollment limit is reached, students wishing to take the course should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. The course offers credit toward Ethics in Society, Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with Public Policy 103F), and Science, Technology, and Society and satisfies the Ways of Thinking requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. NOTE: This course does not meet the SLS Ethics requirement. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, and Final Paper. Ethics in Society (ETHICSOC 234R), Public Policy (PUBLPOL 134, PUBLPOL 234).

LAW 726. Negotiation on the Ground: Discussions at the Intersection of Theory and Practice. 1 Unit.

We can read any number of books about negotiation, but how do the concepts and principles play out in the real world? This dinner colloquium will meet with distinguished negotiators working in a variety of fields to reflect on and draw lessons from their deep and diverse experience. Guests for this year will speak on: studio and talent perspectives in entertainment negotiations, business and legal perspectives in biotechnology companies, public/private policy negotiations in natural resource management, criminal justice, and California health policy. Pre-Requisite: Negotiation Seminar or substantial equivalent. Schedule: Wednesday, 5:30-8:00pm. There will be five presentation/dinner discussion sessions during the Winter Quarter, of which students are required to attend four. Elements used in grading: Class Participation and Attendance.

LAW 731. Current Issues in Network Neutrality. 2 Units.

Do we need network neutrality rules and, if yes, what should they be? After more than ten years, this question is still hotly debated around the world. Network neutrality rules limit the ability of Internet service providers to interfere with the applications, content and services on their networks; they allow users to decide how they want to use the Internet without interference from Internet service providers. In the US, the recent decision by the Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit in Verizon v. FCC has re-opened the debate. In December 2010, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted the Open Internet Order, which enacted binding network neutrality rules for the first time. In January of this year, the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit struck down the core provisions of the Open Internet Order - the rules against blocking and discrimination. As a result of this ruling, Internet service providers like Verizon, AT&T or Cox Cable that connect users to the Internet are now free to block any content, service or application they want. They can slow down selected applications, speed up others, or ask application or content providers like Netflix or Spotify to pay fees to reach their users. These practices would fundamentally change how we experience the Internet. In the wake of the Court's decision, policy makers, stakeholders and observers in the US are debating how to best ensure that the Internet remains open and free. In February, the Federal Communications Commission opened a new docket to collect public input on the best way to proceed. In Europe, the European Commission, the European Parliament and the member states are currently considering which approach to network neutrality they should take. The Brazilian Parliament is in the process of adopting network neutrality rules. This seminar aims to enable students to participate in the ongoing policy debates over network neutrality in the US and abroad. Class sessions will explore whether there is a need for network neutrality rules and, if yes, what kind of rules a network neutrality regime should include. For example, should network neutrality rules only ban blocking, or also discrimination? And if yes, what kind of differential treatment should be banned? Should Internet service providers be allowed to charge application or content providers for prioritized or otherwise enhanced access to their Internet service customers? How can we find network neutrality rules that allow network providers to manage their networks and that allow innovation in the network, while protecting the interests of users and application developers? Does competition in the market for Internet services remove the need for network neutrality rules? And finally, what is the best way to move forward in the US? Students will work in groups on written assignments that explore specific questions from the perspective of particular Internet companies or interest groups. Students are expected to attend all sessions of the class and participate in the class discussion. Special Instructions: Students may submit consent applications to enroll in the "Current Issues in Network Neutrality" seminar and the "Next Steps in Network Neutrality" policy lab practicum. Students concurrently accepted in the seminar and the policy practicum will research and write parts of white papers and comments to the Federal Communications Commission that will help policy makers assess the available options. Students will be required to attend the seminar and participate in the discussion, but will not do any of the written assignments for the seminar. Students enrolled in the seminar and the practicum will have the option to write papers for W, PW, or R credit in the practicum, with instructor consent. The class is open to law students and students from other parts of the university. It does not require any technical background. Elements used in grading: Class participation, attendance, written assignments. Writing (W) credit is for 3Ls only. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Consent Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration and Selection of Classes for Stanford Law Students) to the instructor. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 735. Cities in Distress. 2-3 Units.

In 2013, the City Detroit became the 28th city to declare municipal bankruptcy or to enter a receivership for fiscal crisis since late 2008, a window of time that has seen five of the six largest municipal bankruptcies in American history. This course will focus on these cities and the legal tools available to facilitate their restructuring and recovery. Subjects will include: (1) the basics of local finance; (2) an introduction to the primary causes of local fiscal distress; and (3) tools for state and federal governance of city finances and financial distress (including audits and other oversight mechanisms, state regulation, municipal bankruptcy, and state receiverships). The course will feature readings focused on law and cities across the country, including in California, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and North Carolina. A special unit in the course will focus squarely on the city of Detroit's bankruptcy. Grades will be based on class participation and (1) weekly reflection papers of 3-5 pages each week for each of our speakers/topics or (2) a long research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Students taking the course for R credit can take the course for either 2 or 3 units, depending on the paper length. Elements Used in Grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper.

LAW 738. American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the War on Poverty. 3 Units.

American Constitutional History from the Civil War to the Cold War. This course will address U.S. constitutional history from the post-Civil War Reconstruction period through the mid-20th century. Because of the breadth of the subject matter, the view will necessarily be partial. In particular we will take as our focus the way the Constitution has provided a point of political mobilization for social movements challenging economic and social inequality. Topics covered include: Civil War Reconstruction and restoration; the rise of corporate capitalism and efforts to constrain it; Progressive Era regulation; the New Deal challenge to federalism and the anti-New Deal backlash; government spending; the World Wars and emergency powers; Civil Liberties including speech and privacy; and the beginning of the Civil Rights Era. Readings will include both legal and historical materials with a focus on the relationship between law and society. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper. Paper extensions will be granted with instructor permission. No automatic grading penalty for late papers. Cross-listed with History (HISTORY 155).

LAW 748. Comparative Class Actions. 1 Unit.

Although many lawyers regard the class action as a quintessential U.S. procedure, more than two dozen countries in North and South America, Northern, Central and Western Europe, Australia, Asia, Africa and the Mid-East have adopted some form of modern representative class action, and the number of jurisdictions with class actions is continuing to increase. Although the U.S. Supreme Court has steadily narrowed the scope for U.S. class actions, other jurisdictions see the procedure as appropriate for resolving securities, antitrust, consumer and personal injury claims. Some jurisdictions have invited business to resolve trans-national claims against them in their own domestic courts, and plaintiff attorneys who cannot obtain class certification in U.S. courts coordinate non-class mass actions with class action attorneys outside the U.S. Stanford is collaborating with the University of Windsor (Ontario) and Tilburg University (the Netherlands) law schools to offer a 1-credit seminar on these developments. Using a combination of synchronous and a-synchronous on-line communication, faculty and students at the 3 law schools will describe and analyze differences and similarities among the 3 countries (quite different) class action regimes. The class will meet weekly (sometimes separately by school and sometimes with faculty and students from the 3 schools together virtually) and SLS students will work with students at the other 2 institutions to research issues that cut across all three jurisdictions. This is a great opportunity to discover how lawyers in non-U.S. jurisdictions think about problems that arise trans-nationally, and some of the student you encounter in the seminar may be the practitioners you will litigate besides or against in future global litigation. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: Students interested this course should contact Professor Hensler directly via email at dhensler@stanford.edu.

LAW 750. Topics in Complex Litigation. 1 Unit.

This course is an introduction to complex litigation and institutional design in the contemporary American legal system including the general move away from regulation and toward litigation in recent decades, the legal and policy implications of that trend, and contemporary efforts to retrench or remake the system.

LAW 755A. Deals in Latin America: Field Study. 1 Unit.

This is the São Paulo component of Deals in Latin America (Law 755). The course will be held at FGV Law School in São Paulo (FGV Direito SP), and will consist of meetings with local lawyers, clients, and regulators to discuss Brazilian deals in joint sessions with students from FGV Law School. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, and will be graded on the basis of participation and a short reflection paper. See Law 755 for enrollment instructions. APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and e-mail the Application Form available on the SLS Registrar's Office website (see Registration) to the SLS Registrar's Office. See Application Form for submission deadline.

LAW 756. Sentencing and Policy. 3 Units.

This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. The course will examine sentencing from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will also explore sentencing theories and their application (in both federal and state structures), the impact of sentencing policy on mass incarceration, and the relationship between sentencing and crime. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may include presentations by legal professionals, victims, and offenders. This course is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. NOTE: Students who previously took Sentencing and Corrections (621) should not enroll in this course, as it would be duplicative. Elements used in grading. Students are asked to write two reflection papers (dates specified in the syllabus). Those two reflection papers constitute 50% of the grade; the final one-day take home exam constitutes the other 50%. Class participation will be used as a "tipping factor.".

LAW 758. Introduction to Financial Institutions. 3 Units.

Introduction to financial institutions reviews a broad range of institutions that accept money from savers and invest that money in stocks, bonds or other assets. The course will explain how each of these institutions provide services to their clients and how each is regulated by government agencies. The course will cover pass-through institutions where the savers receive the return on their investments minus management expenses -- mutual funds, hedge funds and sovereign funds. It also covers institutions offering savers some form of guaranteed returns -- banks, insurance companies and Fannie Mae. Finally, the course will cover pension plans, both defined contribution and defined benefit plans. The course is geared to the non-financial expert with background notes as well as case studies on actual institutions. The course is taught from the viewpoint of someone advising or dealing with these institutions, as well as a public official deciding upon regulatory policy. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Exam. The instructor will bring to the course years of experience as head of two global financial companies.

LAW 760. Law and Visual Culture. 3 Units.

Why doesn't the Supreme Court allow video cameras in oral argument? Why do jurors find video recordings more believable than live testimony? Is a computer generated re-enactment evidence? This course tracks the legal reception of modern visual representation from the confusion about the admissibility of photographs in the late 19th century (is it like a drawing? is it like eyewitness testimony?) to the debate about cameras in the courtroom in the late 20th century (do judges and jurors decide differently when the proceedings are subject to public scrutiny?) to the frequent and strategic deployment of visual media in pretrial and litigation practice today. We will pursue a variety of approaches to the topic, ranging from the discussion of film theory to guest lectures by practicing attorneys. Elements Used in Grading: Class Participation. Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Paper.

LAW 764. Current Issues in Insurance Law. 2 Units.

This seminar will consider a range of important issues involving tort and contact aspects of insurance law. Each week will focus on a different topic. Topics may include the application of contra proferentem and reasonable expectations doctrines, bad faith litigation, duty to settle, prominent issues in asbestos litigation, remedies for misrepresentation, limitations on insurability, and the proper role for regulation of insurance policies. Readings will consist of a mix of important cases and academic articles. After the first week, students will take the lead in class discussion of each topic. Grading will be based on a combination of class participation and, at the student's option, (1) weekly response papers or (2) a single longer paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments or Final Paper.

LAW 766. Going Global: Advising Clients in a Global Economy. 3 Units.

Lawyers are increasingly asked to advise clients with global operations. This course will provide a foundation for understanding the challenges faced by business entities that operate around the world and that are therefore subject to multiple and sometimes inconsistent national laws. We will review the types of laws that apply to cross-border and multinational transactions, as well as how variations in culture and legal systems affect the substance and application of those laws. We will also examine how treaties, international agreements and informal or political norms can constrain or supplement these laws and review the risks of doing business in communities whose laws are ineffective or unreliable. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments, Final Exam.

LAW 782. U.S. Human Rights NGOs and International Human Rights. 1 Unit.

Many US human rights non-government organizations, including the US philanthropic sector, work on international human rights. The US government also engages with the private sector in "partnerships" that twins US foreign aid human rights action with corporate expertise. This weekly series will feature speakers who lead these human rights NGOs, philanthropic enterprises, and corporate partnerships, and also policy experts and scholars, to explore the pro's and con's of this scenario. Cross-lsited with Ethics in Society (ETHICSOC 15R), International Policy Studies (IPS 271A), Medicine (MED 225) and Political Science (POLISCI 203).

LAW 785. Current Issues in Tax Practice. 2 Units.

This course will introduce students to major issues in tax practice. Each class will be co-taught by one or more leading practitioners in the tax bar, with other members of the bar attending. Subjects include international tax, intellectual property and tax, tax litigation, state and local taxation, working for the government in tax, tax lobbying and working in a corporate tax department. Class will meet at my home (with take-out dinner provided). The class offers students a good opportunity to connect their SLS tax courses to real-world tax issues and practitioners. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Written Assignments.

LAW 788. Race, Policing and Prosecutors: Perspectives, Problems, and Possibilities. 1 Unit.

Prompted by the killings of Tamir Rice in Cleveland, Ohio, Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner in Staten Island, New York, this 1 unit mini-course will draw on a wide array of materials to examine the challenges and injustices that arise at the intersection of race and policing in the United States. The first part of the course will consider alternative accounts of the central problems at the intersection of race and law enforcement, and will explore the roots of distrust between minority communities and law enforcement agencies. The course will examine the social, psychological, historical and institutional roots of these problems. The second part of the course will survey various reform proposals. What are the possibilities and limits of civil rights actions? Is reform best undertaken by courts or legislatures? By the federal government or by states? Some reforms focus on prosecutors, e.g. limiting prosecutorial discretion, eliminating grand juries. Other reforms focus on policing, e.g. racial sensitivity or procedural justice training, requiring body cameras, creating more racially representative police forces. To what extent should solutions be pursued through new forms of democratic oversight and accountability (such as police civilian review boards) or through community organizing efforts. Does racially just and effective policing require controlling and constraining the police, or working collaboratively with law enforcement agencies? This 1 unit course is Mandatory Pass/Fail, and will meet only three times during the course of the quarter. Attendance and participation at each class session is required. Prior to each class session, each student will post questions, observations or reflections that will provide the basis for class discussion. The class will meet from 2-5 pm the following Fridays: January 16, February 6, and February 27. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance & Written Assignments.