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Office: Building 120, Room 160
Mail Code: 94305-2047
Phone: (650) 723-3956
Web Site: http://sociology.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Sociology are listed under the subject code SOC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Sociology seeks to understand all aspects of human social behavior, including the behavior of individuals as well as the social dynamics of small groups, large organizations, communities, institutions, and entire societies. Sociologists are typically motivated both by the desire to better understand the principles of social life and by the conviction that understanding these principles may aid in the formulation of enlightened and effective social policy. Sociology provides an intellectual background for students considering careers in the professions or business. Students may pursue degrees in sociology at the bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral levels. The department organizes its courses by areas of study to assist students in tailoring their education and research to their academic interests and career goals.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Sociology

The mission of the undergraduate program in Sociology is to provide students with the skills necessary to understand and address social problems and inequalities in global, institutional, and interpersonal social relations. At its core, the curriculum in the major is rooted in social theory and the scientific method. Sociology majors are given opportunities to develop a broad understanding of core sociological theories and the methodological skills used to evaluate human behavior and social organizations. Sociology provides an intellectual background for students considering careers in business, social services, public policy, government service, international nongovernmental organizations, foundations, or academia.

The Sociology major consists of a core curriculum plus elective courses intended to provide breadth of exposure to the variety of areas encompassed by sociology.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an understanding of core knowledge within the discipline of sociology.
  2. the ability to communicate ideas clearly and persuasively in writing.
  3. the ability to analyze a problem and draw correct inferences using qualitative and/or quantitative analysis.
  4. the ability to evaluate theory and critique research within the discipline of sociology.

Graduate Programs in Sociology

The Department of Sociology offers three types of advanced degrees:

  • the Doctor of Philosophy
  • the coterminal Master of Arts in Sociology which is restricted to currently enrolled Stanford undergraduates
  • the Master of Arts in Sociology which is available to Stanford students who are currently enrolled in other advanced degree programs.

The department does not have a terminal M.A. program for external applicants.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the master's program is to further develop knowledge and skills in Sociology and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through completion of courses, in the primary field as well as related areas, and experience with independent work and specialization.

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in Sociology. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to make original contributions to the knowledge of Sociology and to interpret and present the results of such research.

Areas of Study

The Department of Sociology specializes in four general areas of study, allowing students to tailor their education and research to their academic interests and career goals. The five areas of study supported by the department are:

Organizations, Business, and the Economy

Focus is on the arrangements which societies construct for the provision of material goods or services. A formal organization which provides goods or services for profit and sells them through a market is called a business, and the economic system is capitalism. Social needs are also met through government and not-for-profit organizations, such as garden clubs, hospitals, prisons, and the Red Cross; some private and social needs are met outside of organizations, such as health care provided by family members and exchange of favors among friends. Courses stress the factors that determine whether needs that people define are met through markets or non-market allocation, through organizations, or by other means. They also investigate the environmental and technical factors that shape organization structure, the determinants of how efficiently organizations operate, and the interpersonal processes that shape individual behavior within organizations. Careers related to this field include management and administration in business or public settings, management consulting and analysis, and legal studies related to corporations, organizations, and business.

Social Movements, Comparative Politics, and Social Change

Focus is on the emergence, reproduction, and change of political systems and institutions, especially on why and how different political systems and social movements appear in different times and places, and how differences in political regimes and economic systems influence attempts to change these systems. The origins and significance of national and transnational social movements, transition to democracy, including revolution, nationalism, and other forms of collective action, in creating and sustaining these changes analyzed across countries and over time. Careers that are relevant to this field include law, public policy, government service, nonprofit and international nongovernmental organizations, business organizations (especially those with international interests), consulting, and managerial jobs.

Social Psychology and Interpersonal Processes

Focus is on the social organization of individual identity, beliefs, and behavior, and upon social structures and processes which emerge in and define interpersonal interactions. Processes studied include social acceptance and competition for prestige and status, the generation of power differences, the development of intimacy bonds, the formation of expectation states which govern performance in task oriented groups, and social pressures to constrain deviance. Foundation courses emphasize the effect of social processes on individual behavior and the analysis of group processes. This field provides training for careers with a significant interpersonal component, including advertising and marketing, business, education, law, management, medicine and health, or social work.

Social Inequality

Focus is on forms of social inequality, including fields such as: the shape and nature of social inequalities; competition for power; allocation of privilege; production and reproduction of social cleavages; and consequences of class, race, and gender for outcomes such as attitudes, political behavior, and life styles. Many courses emphasize changes in the structure of social inequalities over time, and the processes which produce similarities or differences in stratification across nations. Topics include educational inequality, employment history, gender differences, income distributions, poverty, race, and ethnic relations, social mobility, and status attainment. Careers related to this field include administration, advertising, education, foreign service, journalism, industrial relations, law, management consulting, market research, public policy, and social service.

Race, Gender, Immigration, Identity and Policy

Focus is on population diversity, primarily in the United States, and on how identity is formed and maintained. Classes in this subject area address segregation, integration, and assimilation. What does it mean to cross from one group to another? How has the law treated racial minorities, sexual minorities, and immigrants differently over time? Careers related to this field include social work, teaching, research, law, management, and population studies which can be applied to any industry.

Joint Programs in Sociology with the School of Law

The School of Law and Department of Sociology conduct joint programs leading to either a combined J.D. degree with an M.A. degree in Sociology or to a combined J.D. degree with a Ph.D. in Sociology.

Law students interested in pursuing an M.A. in Sociology apply for admission to the Department of Sociology during the first year of Law school. Once admitted to the Department of Sociology, the student must complete standard departmental master’s degree requirements as specified in this bulletin. Applications for the joint J.D./M.A. degree program must be approved by both the department and the Law school. Faculty advisers from each program participate in the planning and supervising of the student’s academic program.

The J.D./Ph.D. degree program is designed for students who wish to prepare themselves for research or teaching careers in areas relating to both legal and sociological concerns. Students interested in the joint degree program must be admitted to both the School of Law and the Department of Sociology. Interest in the joint degree program must be noted on each of the student’s applications. Alternatively, an enrolled student in either the Law School or the Sociology department may apply to the other program, preferably during their first year of study. Students participating in the joint degree program are not eligible to transfer and receive credit for a masters, or other degree, towards the Sociology Ph.D..

Upon admission, students are assigned a joint program faculty adviser who assists the student in planning an appropriate program and ensuring that all requirements for both degrees are satisfied. The faculty adviser serves in this capacity during the student’s course of study regardless of whether the student is enrolled in the School of Law or the Sociology department.

J.D./Ph.D. students may elect to begin their course of study in either the School of Law or the Department of Sociology. Students must be enrolled full-time in the Law school for the first year of Law school, and must enroll full time in the graduate school for the first year of the Sociology program. After that time, enrollment may be in the graduate school or the Law school, and students may choose courses from either program regardless of where enrolled. Students must satisfy the requirements for both the J.D. and the Ph.D. degrees. Up to 54 quarter units of approved course work may be counted towards both degrees, but no more than 31 quarter units of courses that originate outside the Law school may count towards the Law degree. The Law degree may be conferred upon completion of applicable Law school requirements; it is not necessary to have both degrees conferred simultaneously. Students participating in the joint degree program are not eligible to transfer and receive credit for a master's or other degree towards the Ph.D. Students must complete the equivalent of 183 quarter units to complete both degrees.  Tuition and financial aid arrangements normally are through the school in which the student is currently enrolled.

The Law degree may be conferred upon completion of applicable Law school requirements; it is not necessary to have both degrees conferred simultaneously.

For more information, see the Sociology web site, and the Law School web site on the J.D./Ph.D.

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology

There are two pathways to a Sociology B.A. degree:

  • the Sociology Bachelor's degree, or
  • the  Sociology Bachelor's degree with the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan.

The following requirements  are for the Sociology bachelor's degree. Students interested in the Sociology Bachelor's degree with the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan should see that tab.

Declaring the Major in Sociology

To declare a major in Sociology, students should declare the B.A. in Axess, then download the major declaration form from the department web site. Complete the top portion of the form, sign, and email the Director of the Undergraduate Program in Sociology to set up an entrance advising meeting.

Major Requirements

A 3.0 GPA is required to enter the Sociology major. The B.A. in Sociology requires 60 units of course work. Units applied to the major must be taken for a letter grade (except for independent study or directed reading), and all earned grades must be ‘C’ or better. 

Unit values for courses can vary from year to year. If you have any questions, contact the undergraduate student services officer in Sociology.

Students are encouraged to complete some course work at the 200-level. Sociology majors are encouraged to participate in directed research or undertake independent research with Sociology faculty. See the department web site for additional information.

Requirements

Units required for the Sociology B.A. are:

Units
Sociology Core Courses (4 courses)16
Sociology Foundation Courses (3 courses)12
Social Science Electives (Units sufficient to bring the total # of units to 60--usually 4-6 courses)27
Statistics (1 course)5
Total Units60

Core Courses Required for the Major

The following core courses are required of all Sociology majors.

Units
SOC 1Introduction to Sociology at Stanford5
or SOC 170 Classics of Modern Social Theory
SOC 180AFoundations of Social Research4
SOC 180BIntroduction to Data Analysis4
SOC 200Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors4-5
or SOC 202 Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research
Total Units17-18
  • It is recommended that students take this required course during junior year or as early as possible during senior year. Students pursuing the regular B.A. should take SOC 200 Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors. Students considering honors are encouraged to enroll in SOC 202 Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research instead of SOC 200 Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors.

Foundation Courses Required for the Major

Sociology majors must complete 3 foundation courses; one course in three different areas for a total of three courses. For further information about Sociology areas of study, see the department web site.

Foundation courses, classified by area of study, are as follows:

Organizations, Business, and the Economy

Units
SOC 114Economic Sociology4
SOC 160Formal Organizations4
SOC 162Markets and Governance4

Social Movements, Comparative Politics, and Social Change

Units
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
SOC 130Education and Society4-5

Social Psychology and Interpersonal Processes

Units
SOC 2Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology4
SOC 120Interpersonal Relations4
SOC 121The Individual in Social Structure: Foundations in Sociological Social Psychology5
SOC 127Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction5

Social Inequality

Units
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 141Controversies about Inequality5
SOC 144Inequality and the Workplace5
SOC 149The Urban Underclass4

Race, Gender, Immigration, Identity, and Policy

Units
SOC 142Sociology of Gender5
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 150Race and Political Sociology3
SOC 155The Changing American Family4

Social Science Elective Courses

Social Science electives are required for the major, sufficient to bring the total number of units in the Sociology major to 60. You may take all elective courses in Sociology if you wish. Students may choose their elective courses according to personal interest. Non-Sociology courses must be approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. A maximum of 10 units taken in other Social Science departments (Anthropology, Communication, Economics, Political Science, Psychology) may be counted towards the 60 units required for the Sociology B.A.

Statistics Requirement

Sociology majors are required to take at least one statistics course. The department suggests the courses listed below, or other comparable course with approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Suggested Statistics courses for Sociology majors:

Units
PSYCH 10Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5
SOC 181BSociological Methods: Statistics5
STATS 60Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology with Data Science, Markets, and Management Subplan

There are two pathways to a Sociology B.A. degree:

  • the Sociology Bachelor's degree, or
  • the  Sociology Bachelor's degree with the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan.

The following requirements  are for the Sociology bachelor's degree with the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan. Students interested in the Sociology Bachelor's degree  should see that tab.

Declaring the Major in Sociology with Data Science, Markets, and Management Subplan

To declare a major in Sociology, students should declare the B.A. in Axess, then download the major declaration form from the department web site. Complete the top portion of the form, sign, and email the Director of the Undergraduate Program in Sociology to set up an entrance advising meeting. Then, students declare the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan in Axess.

The subplan prints on the diploma and transcript.

Major Requirements

A 3.0 GPA is required to enter the Sociology major. The B.A. in Sociology requires 60 units of course work. Units applied to the major must be taken for a letter grade (except for independent study or directed reading), and all earned grades must be ‘C’ or better. 

Unit values for courses can vary from year to year. If you have any questions, contact the undergraduate student services officer in Sociology.

Students are encouraged to complete some course work at the 200-level. Sociology majors are encouraged to participate in directed research or undertake independent research with Sociology faculty. See the department website for additional information.

Requirements

Students in the Data Science, Markets, and Management subplan must take the following courses; substitutions may be made only with consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Core Requirements

The core requirements include one class in each of: experimental methods, computer programming, analysis of big data, data analysis and regression, network analysis, and Writing in the Major class, as follows:

Units
SOC 2Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology4
or SOC 120 Interpersonal Relations
CS 105Introduction to Computers3-5
or CS 106A Programming Methodology
or CS 106B Programming Abstractions
or CS 106X Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
MS&E 231Introduction to Computational Social Science3
or SOC 278 Introduction to Computational Social Science
SOC 180BIntroduction to Data Analysis4
SOC 126Introduction to Social Networks2-5
or SOC 224B Relational Sociology
or CS 224W Social and Information Network Analysis
or ECON 291 Social and Economic Networks
or MS&E 135 Networks
SOC 200Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors4-5
or SOC 202 Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research

Foundation Sociology Courses on Economics, Organizations, Business, Labor Markets, and the Economy.

Choose any two of the following courses:

Units
SOC 114Economic Sociology4
SOC 130Education and Society4-5
SOC 160Formal Organizations4
SOC 162Markets and Governance4
SOC 271Organizational Analysis4
THINK 46Why So Few? Gender Diversity and Leadership4

Electives

In addition to the Core classes and the Foundation classes, the Data Science, Markets and Management subplan requires 7 additional courses, as follows:

Units
Four additional Sociology (SOC) courses16
Two additional Computer Science, Math, Statistics, or Quantitative Social Science Courses8
One additional Sociology or Social Science elective4

Honors Program 

Sociology majors who wish to complete an independent scholarly project under the direction of a faculty member are encouraged to apply for admission to the department’s honors program. Admission to the program requires a grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or higher in courses taken within the major, and an overall GPA of 3.3 (B+) or higher in all undergraduate course work. Applicants are required to identify a Sociology faculty member to advise on the research and writing of the essay. With the approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students may work with faculty advisers in other departments.

Students are encouraged to begin planning their honors thesis in their junior year; at this time they should enroll in SOC 202 Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research, or SOC 200 Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors. Students begin designing their honors project in connection with this seminar and in consultation with the seminar leader. To apply for the honors program, students should complete the honors application, obtain an adviser's approval and signature, and submit the application with a brief description of the proposed project, and a copy of the student’s unofficial undergraduate transcript, to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Prospective candidates are asked to submit an honors application as soon as possible in their junior or senior year, ideally no later than the end of the fourth quarter prior to graduation (typically Spring Quarter of the junior year). Honors students may earn up to 12 independent study units for work leading to completion of the required honors thesis, excluding units associated with the Junior/Senior Seminar.

If the student is admitted to the program, students will be directed to declare the B.A.H. in Axess and drop the general B.A. Completion of honors in Sociology requires:

  1. Application and acceptance into the Sociology honors program
  2. Completion of all requirements of the Sociology major or Sociology major with subplan
  3. Completion of an honors thesis with a grade of A- or higher
  4. Participation in the Sociology Honors Colloquium in the Spring Quarter prior to graduation.

If honors program requirements are not met, students must drop the B.A.H. degree program in Axess and declare the B.A. before applying to graduate.

Minor in Sociology

Students must complete a minimum of 35 units in Sociology for the minor. Courses must be taken for a letter grade, and a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 (C) must be achieved.  Students who wish to declare a minor in Sociology must do so no later than the deadline for their application to graduate. Related course work from other departments may fulfill a minor requirement. All course substitutions must be pre-approved by the Sociology student services office and the Undergraduate Program Director; a student may not exceed 5 substitution units for the minor.

Course requirements for a minor in Sociology are as follows:

Units
SOC 1Introduction to Sociology at Stanford5
or SOC 170 Classics of Modern Social Theory
SOC 2Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology4
or SOC 180A Foundations of Social Research
or SOC 180B Introduction to Data Analysis
Two foundation courses: see foundation courses required for the major above10
Additional course work in the department (100- or 200-level courses)17
Total Units36

Coterminal Master of Arts in Sociology

Stanford undergraduates, regardless of undergraduate major, who wish to pursue an M.A. in Sociology may apply for the coterminal master’s program. The coterminal M.A. in Sociology is a flexible, self-designed program. Most students complete their M.A. in a fifth year at Stanford; occasionally students are able to complete their B.A. and coterminal M.A. in the fourth year.

Application and admission

Undergraduates must be admitted to the program and enrolled as a graduate student for at least one quarter prior to their B.A. conferral. A cumulative GPA of at least 3.5 in previous undergraduate work is required for admission; GRE test scores are required. It is highly recommended that applicants have completed at least one Sociology course at the 100 level with a grade of ‘B’ or better.

The department accepts applications once a year; the application deadline is January 15 for admission in the Spring Quarter immediately following. There are no exceptions to this deadline.

All application materials are submitted directly to the Sociology graduate student services office. The department does not fund coterminal M.A. students.

To apply for admission to the Sociology coterminal M.A. program, students must submit the following:

  1. The Application for Admission to Coterminal Masters’ Program
  2. Statement of purpose: should be 2-5 pages double-spaced. Applicants should outline reasons for pursuing the M.A. in Sociology, including career aspirations and/or future plans for additional advanced degrees;
  3. Preliminary program: this is a form in the application packet. Specify at least 45 units of course work relevant to the degree program with at least 40 units in Sociology;
  4. Course Approval form: downloaded from the Registrar's Office web site and submit directly to the Sociology Graduate Student Services Officer.
  5. Current unofficial undergraduate transcript;
  6. Two letters of recommendation from Stanford faculty familiar with the student’s academic work; additional letters from teaching assistants, employers, or other individuals are accepted as supplemental materials but are not required;
  7. GRE scores.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken three quarters prior to the first graduate quarter, or later, are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Program requirements

Coterminal M.A. students are required to take 45 units of course work during their graduate career; 40 of these units must be in Sociology courses. All units for the coterminal M.A. must be taken at or above the 100 level; advanced-level course work is encouraged and a minimum of 20 units must be taken at the 200 level. Students who wish to take courses outside the department must seek prior approval from the Sociology student services office; coterminal master’s students are limited to 5 units from outside of the department; outside courses must be taken in other Social Science departments. Students may transfer a maximum of 10 units from their undergraduate career; to be eligible for transfer, courses must have been taken in the three quarters preceding admission to the M.A. program. Courses cannot be transferred after a student's BA has been conferred.  All units applied to the coterminal master’s degree must be taken for a letter grade, and an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better is required for the degree. Because research methods are an important component of graduate training in the social sciences, coterminal students are encouraged to take SOC 180A Foundations of Social Research,and SOC 180B Introduction to Data Analysis, in sequence when possible. These methods courses provide skills for research opportunities within the department and in academic or professional careers. Coterminal M.A. students should meet with their assigned faculty adviser upon acceptance to the program.

Students are responsible for knowing and adhering to University and Departmental policies, standards, and requirements for coterminal students. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the  Coterminal Degrees section of this bulletin. For additional information regarding the Sociology coterminal M.A. and how to apply, see the Department of Sociology web site.

Master of Arts in Sociology for Current Stanford Graduate Students

The M.A. degree in Sociology is available to current Ph.D. candidates in Sociology and to students in advanced degree programs (Ph.D., J.D., M.D.) from other Stanford departments and schools.

For the M.A. degree, students must complete a minimum of 45 units of Sociology course work with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better. Of these units, 30 units must be taken in courses taught by faculty appointed in the Sociology department. Students may petition to use the remaining 15 units as flex units for courses not offered by faculty appointed in Sociology, but that are highly relevant to the discipline. 5 of these flex units can be taken as an independent study or directed reading with a member of the faculty appointed in Sociology. All flex units applied to courses not taught by faculty appointed in Sociology must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies. All courses must be taken for a letter grade if possible. Workshops and colloquia do not count towards the M.A.

University regulations pertaining to the M.A. are listed in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Students who wish to engage in more in-depth study in a specific area may do so by focusing on course work within an area of study.

No thesis is required.

While formal application to the M.A. program is not required, applicants from outside of the Sociology department must submit:

  1. Graduate Authorization Petition form, available electronically through Axess;
  2. Program Proposal for an M.A. form available for download from the registrar's office website, submitted to Sociology graduate student services officer;
  3. Short statement of purpose; 1 page double-spaced, submitted to Sociology graduate student services officer.

Sociology Ph.D.s may receive their M.A. in their second or third year of graduate study. Interested students from other degree programs should visit the department's web site.

Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology

The Ph.D. curriculum and degree requirements are designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills to become proficient scholars and teachers. Doctoral students in the department taking a substantive sociology course are expected to take “letter grade” whenever possible and are expected to earn a grade of 'B+' or better in each course. Any grade of 'B' or below is considered to be less than satisfactory. Grades of 'B' or below are reviewed by faculty and the following actions may take place: the grade stands and the student’s academic performance is monitored to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made; the grade stands and the student is required to revise and resubmit the work associated with that course; or the student may be required to retake the course.

The following program requirements apply to students who entered the Ph.D program in 2010-11 or later; students admitted prior to 2010 should consult the department or the Bulletin from their year of admission for requirements specific to their cohort.

Students must complete the following department requirements for the Ph.D. degree in Sociology:

  1. Students must enroll in SOC 305 Graduate Proseminar in Autumn Quarter of the first year. The course provides an introduction and orientation to the field of sociology, and to the department and faculty. One unit of credit is given for this course; grading is on a satisfactory/no credit basis.
  2. Students must enroll in SOC 396 Sociology Colloquium in Autumn, Winter and Spring quarters of their first and second years. The Sociology Colloquium is a semimonthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which distinguished scholars lecture about their cutting-edge research findings. Students must enroll for credit and it is required for all first and second year Sociology students.
  3. Students are required to complete 45 units of course work in Sociology in the first academic year, then 15 units of Sociology course work in the second academic year. Course work excludes workshop, independent study, and directed reading units.
  4. Theory: Students are required to take at least two courses in sociological theory. One course should be in either macro-sociological theory (SOC 370A Sociological Theory: Social Structure, Inequality, and Conflict), or micro-sociological theory (SOC 370B Social Interaction and Group Process), in the first year of the program. A second course, in research design, should be taken during the first year in the program SOC 372 Theoretical Analysis and Research Design). 
  5. Methodology: Students are required to complete a series of courses in methodology as well as one methods elective. Students with little background in statistics are encouraged to take an undergraduate statistics course in their first quarter of the program. The required methods sequence, to be taken in order, is listed below.
  6. Survey Courses: Students must complete four broad survey courses to demonstrate command of a range of sociological literature. Each year the department specifies which courses meet this requirement. A list of courses that generally fulfill this requirement is listed below. Students should consult with their adviser to ensure that the combination of courses selected to meet this requirement exhibits sufficient breadth. This requirement is normally completed by the end of the second year of residency and must be met by the end of the third year of residency. The most current list of approved survey courses is available on the department website.
  7. Workshops: Beginning in year two, doctoral students are required to enroll in at least one workshop each quarter. First year students may attend workshops but are not required to enroll. Sociology workshops are offered for 1-2 units on a credit/non-credit basis only and attendance is required to receive course credit. The Director of Graduate Studies may approve a student’s petition to attend a workshop when enrollment is prohibited by unit constraints; such attendance is not noted on the transcript. A list of approved workshops that fulfill this requirement is listed in the requirements section below and also on the department website.
  8. Qualifying Exam #1: The first comprehensive examination is designed to ensure that students enter their second year with a firm reading knowledge of two substantive subfields. Students write two essays in response to questions provided by the examining committee. The questions are due exactly one week later. Students choose one of two questions to write on for each subfield. Examinations are offered in the subject areas below, based on comprehensive readings lists that are available at the beginning of each academic year. Each subject area has one faculty point person or group leader. Group leaders are responsible for assembling essay questions and agree to meet with students as requested.
    Exam subject areas  for 2016 -17 are:
    • Economic Sociology
    • Gender
    • Historical and Comparative Sociology
    • Organizations
    • Political Sociology
    • Population, Family, Demography, and Marriage
    • Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration
    • Social Inequality
    • Social Movements
    • Social Psychology
    Students may work together to read and discuss the materials on the comprehensive reading lists (and in fact they are encouraged to do so). They may consult with faculty members as they study for the exams. However, once the examination questions are released, all such collaboration and consultation should stop, and students should work independently on their essays.
  9. Qualifying Exam #2: The second qualifying examination provides students with a more focused engagement in a specialized subfield or research area, and tests the student’s ability to work and think independently. Exam #2 is due by June 1 of the second year in residence. A two-person committee that includes the primary adviser evaluates the paper. Although the committee is usually comprised of two regular faculty members in the department, emeritus and other faculty outside the department may serve as a committee member with prior approval. Committees and a brief proposal are recorded on the second year qualifying paper form, which the student should complete and submit to the graduate student services officer by December 1 of the second year. Second year students are required to enroll in SOC 385A Research Practicum 1 and SOC 385B Research Practicum II  (both workshops assist in developing the front end of the research paper). Exams are read and graded by both committee members. The grades are an important component of the decision to advance a student to candidacy. Students must submit a one-page proposal to the reading committee and receive its approval by December 1 of the second year. The proposal includes a brief statement of the problem; a preliminary research design; a data source and proof of reasonable access to it; and a short reading list. Students submit the proposal along with second year qualifying paper form to the graduate student services officer. Students should produce a paper that makes an original contribution to sociological knowledge and that is ultimately publishable. That generally means writing a paper that includes data analysis; a full and focused analytic discussion of relevant theory and research; and frame the findings as a contribution to the literature. Students may also produce a paper with a primarily theoretical contribution so long as the prospects for eventual publication are clear to the committee. The paper should contain no more than 8,000 words of text. This paper may not also be employed to meet the Third Year Paper requirement, even in revised form.

  10. Third Year Paper: In preparation for a career of writing scholarly papers, each student must complete a research paper in the third year of residency. This third-year paper may be on any sociological topic, and may address theoretical, empirical, or methodological issues. The paper is expected to reflect original work and be of publishable quality. Students select a committee of at least two Sociology faculty members to serve as third year paper readers.  To ensure that students are making adequate progress on their paper, students are required to provide a first draft of the paper to readers by April 1. The final deadline for paper submission is June 1. The committee provides a review that speaks to (1) whether the paper is publishable and whether the student should therefore invest in attempting to publish it, and (2) what types of revisions, insofar as the paper is publishable, that the student should be pursuing to ready the paper for publication. These comments are shared with the Director of Graduate Studies, and copies of the paper and faculty comments will go in the student file.

  11. TA requirement: Students must complete three quarters of teaching apprenticeship in departmental courses, or in other courses by approval. Students working as either a teaching assistant (TA) under the supervision of a faculty member or as a teaching fellow (TF) fulfills this requirement. Students are required to take SOC 300, Workshop: Teaching Development, in Spring Quarter of the first year. In addition, students are encouraged to take advantage of department and University teacher training programs. Students for whom English is a second language are expected to acquire sufficient facility in English to be an effective teacher.  It is recommended that students complete their research requirements early in their graduate program; the requirement must be completed by the end of the fourth year of residency.
  12. RA requirement: As partial preparation for becoming an accomplished researcher, each student must complete three quarters of research experience, working under the supervision of one or more faculty members, including regular, emeritus, and affiliated faculty. The experience may involve paid (or unpaid) work as a Research Assistant (RA). With the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies, research experience may be acquired by involvement in research projects outside the department. It is recommended that students complete their research requirements early in their graduate program; the requirement must be completed by the end of the fourth year of residency.
  13. Students are required to present at least two papers at a major professional meeting (e.g., ASA) in their first five years of graduate study
  14. Dissertation Prospectus and Prospectus Defense: In order to demonstrate the ability to conduct independent scholarly work, each student must prepare and defend dissertation prospectus by the end of May during the fourth year in residence. Students should have their dissertation committee selected by the end of their third year in the program.
  15. Doctoral Dissertation and Defense: Each student must complete and defend a doctoral dissertation. At the choice of the student (and in consultation with his/her adviser), the dissertation requirement may be met either by (1) submitting a book-length document, or (2) submitting three independent papers. The papers may address the same topic, but should be written as stand-alone, single-authored papers in standard journal format (i.e., AJS or ASR). None of these papers may overlap substantially with one another, and none of them may be co-authored. (The main criterion in judging substantial overlap is whether any standard journal, such as AJS, would regard the papers as too similar to publish both.) The dissertation must be submitted to all committee members at least 30 days in advance of the defense date. The dissertation defense serves as the Oral Examination required by the University. Assessment of satisfactory completion is determined by the student's doctoral committee members. All students are invited to present their dissertation findings at an informal department colloquium.

The faculty are responsible for providing students with timely and constructive feedback on their progress towards the Ph.D. In order to evaluate student progress and to identify potential problem areas, the department’s faculty reviews the academic progress of each first-year student at the beginning of Winter and Spring quarters and again at the end of the academic year. The first two reviews are primarily intended to identify developing problems that could impede progress. In most cases, students are simply given constructive feedback, but if there are more serious concerns, a student may be placed on probation with specific guidelines for addressing the problems detected. The review at the end of the academic year is more thorough; each student’s performance during the first year is reviewed and discussed. Possible outcomes of the spring review include: (1) continuation of the student in good standing, or (2) placing the student on probation, with specific guidelines for the period of probation and the steps to be taken in order to be returned to good standing. For students on probation at this point (or at any other subsequent points), possible outcomes of a review include: (1) restoration to good standing; (2) continued probation, again with guidelines for necessary remedial steps; or (3) termination from the program. Students leaving the program at the end of the first year are usually allowed to complete the requirements to receive an M.A. degree, if this does not involve additional residence or financial support. All students are given feedback from their advisers at the end of their first year of graduate work, helping them to identify areas of strengths and potential weakness.

At the end of the second year of residency, students who are performing well are advanced to candidacy. This step implies that the student has demonstrated the relevant qualities required for successful completion of the Ph.D. Future evaluations are based on the satisfactory completion of specific remaining department and University requirements. Students who are not advanced to candidacy will normally be terminated from the program and awarded an M.A. degree. In some cases, the department may require that a student complete outstanding work or complete unmet requirements before admission to candidacy. The University requires that all students must be admitted to candidacy by the beginning of the third year in residence in order to continue in the Ph.D. program. Therefore all requirements stipulated by the department must be met before registration for the fall quarter of the student’s third year.

At any point during the degree program, evidence that a student is performing at a less than satisfactory level may be cause for a formal academic review of that student.

Degree Requirements

Survey Courses

Students must complete four courses from an approved list. This list is updated and circulated to students at the start of each academic year. Note: class offerings rotate; not all approved survey courses are offered every year. The following courses typically fulfill the survey course requirement:

Units
SOC 310Political Sociology4-5
SOC 314Economic Sociology4-5
SOC 316Historical and Comparative Sociology4-5
SOC 318Social Movements and Collective Action4-5
SOC 320Foundations of Social Psychology4-5
SOC 323Sociology of the Family4-5
SOC 339Gender Meanings and Processes5
SOC 340Social Stratification4-5
SOC 342BGender and Social Structure4-5
SOC 357Immigration and Assimilation3-5
SOC 358Sociology of Immigration1-5
SOC 362Organization and Environment3
SOC 363ASeminar on Organizational Theory5
SOC 366AOrganizational Ecology3
SOC 376Perspectives on Organization and Environment: Social Movement Organizations and Environments3

Research Methods

Required methodology courses are listed below. 

Units
SOC 381Sociological Methodology I: Introduction5
SOC 382Sociological Methodology II: Principles of Regression Analysis4-5
SOC 383Sociological Methodology III: Models for Discrete Outcomes5

Theory

Units
SOC 370ASociological Theory: Social Structure, Inequality, and Conflict5
SOC 370BSocial Interaction and Group Process3-5
SOC 372Theoretical Analysis and Research Design3-5

Workshops

Units
SOC 311AWorkshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems1-5
SOC 311B1-5
SOC 311C1-5
SOC 312WWorkshop: Political Sociology, Social Movements, and Collective Action1-2
SOC 315WWorkshop: Economic Sociology and Organizations1-2
SOC 317WWorkshop: Networks, Histories, and Theories of Action1-2
SOC 321WWorkshop: Social Psychology and Gender1-2
SOC 325WWorkshop: Graduate Family1-2
SOC 338WWorkshop: Sociology of Law1-5
SOC 341WWorkshop: Inequality1-2
SOC 350WWorkshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation1-3
SOC 368WWorkshop: China Social Science1
SOC 375WWorkshop: Morality and Hierarchy1-2

Ph.D. Minor in Sociology

Sociology offers a minor for currently enrolled doctoral students in other Stanford departments and schools. Students must complete a minimum of 30 graduate-level units with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better. All 30 units for the minor must be in courses taught by faculty appointed in the Sociology department. Students must enroll in the SOC course offerings (not cross-listed sections). There are two exceptions: five (5) of these units may be taken as an independent study or directed reading with a member of the sociology faculty; another five (5) units may be taken in a statistics or methods course taught in another department. All units must be taken for a letter grade. Workshops and colloquium do not count towards the Ph.D. minor. The program must be approved by a Sociology adviser and filed with the Sociology student services office. While there is not a formal application process, candidates must submit a short statement of purpose (2 pages), and a completed Application for Ph.D. Minor form to the Sociology student services office. The Application for Ph.D. Minor form must have all Sociology or other courses to be applied to the minor listed, including course number, units, and final grades.

Emeriti: (Professors) Joseph Berger, Michael T. Hannan, James G. March, John W. Meyer, Susan Olzak, W. Richard Scott, Nancy B. Tuma, Morris Zelditch Jr.

Chair: Xueguang Zhou

Professors: Karen Cook, Shelley Correll, Jeremy Freese, Mark Granovetter, David Grusky, Douglas McAdam, Cecilia Ridgeway, Gi-Wook Shin, C. Matthew Snipp, Florencia Torche, Andrew Walder, Robb Willer, Xueguang Zhou

Associate Professors: Tomás Jiménez, Michael Rosenfeld, Robb Willer

Assistant Professors: Corey Fields, Michelle Jackson, Paolo Parigi, David Pedulla, Aliya Saperstein, Cristobal Young

Adjunct Professors: Glenn Carroll, Michele Landis Dauber, Larry Diamond, Daniel McFarland, Walter Powell, Francisco Ramirez, Hayagreeva Rao, Sean Reardon, Jesper Sorensen, Sarah Soule

Adjunct Associate Professors:  Mitchell Stevens, Christine Min Wotipka

Adjunct Assistant Professors: Sharad Goel, Amir Goldberg

Lecturers: Patricia Young

Adjunct Associate Professor: Ruth Cronkite

Overseas Studies Courses in Sociology

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


Units
OSPBER 66Theory from the Bleachers: Reading German Sports and Culture3
OSPFLOR 46Images of Evil in Criminal Justice5
OSPMADRD 61Society and Cultural Change: The Case of Spain4
OSPOXFRD 117WGender and Social Change in Modern Britain4-5

Courses

SOC 1. Introduction to Sociology at Stanford. 5 Units.

This course to get students to think like a sociologist; to use core concepts and theories from the field of sociology to make sense of the most pressing issues of our time: race and ethnicity; gender and sexuality; family; education; social class and economic inequality; social connectedness; social movements; and immigration. The course will draw heavily on the research and writing of Stanford¿s own sociologist.

SOC 2. Self and Society: Introduction to Social Psychology. 4 Units.

(Same as PSYCH 70)Why do people behave the way they do? This is the fundamental question that drives social psychology. Through reading, lecture, and interactive discussion, students have the opportunity to explore and think critically about a variety of exciting issues including: what causes us to like, love, help, or hurt others; the effects of social influence and persuasion on individual thoughts, emotion, and behavior; and how the lessons of social psychology can be applied in contexts such as health, work, and relationships. The social forces studied in the class shape our behavior, though their operation cannot be seen directly. A central idea of this class is that awareness of these forces allows us to make choices in light of them, offering us more agency and wisdom in our everyday lives.

SOC 8. Sport, Competition, and Society. 5 Units.

This course uses the tools of social science to help understand debates and puzzles from contemporary sports, and in doing so shows how sports and other contests provide many telling examples of enduring social dynamics and larger social trends. We also consider how sport serves as the entry point for many larger debates about the morality and ethics raised by ongoing social change.

SOC 14N. Inequality in American Society. 4 Units.

An overview of the major forms of inequality in American society, their causes and consequences. Special attention will devoted to to public policy associated with inequality.

SOC 15N. The Transformation of Socialist Societies. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The impact of societal organization on the lives of ordinary people in socialist societies and in the new societies arising through the processes of political, economic, and social transformation. Do the concepts of democratization and marketization suffice to characterize ongoing changes? Enrollment limited to 16.

SOC 17N. Race and Politics: Perspectives on the 2016 Presidential Election. 3 Units.

This course is intended as a seminar-based exploration of the complex ways that race has informed political behavior and attitudes during the 2016 Presidential election. The class is designed to introduce freshman to sociological ways of understanding the social world, and the rigors of college thinking more broadly. As a group we will explore the mechanisms through which race informs political behavior, while also paying close attention to the ways that politics also informs our understanding of race. The course treats ¿race¿ as multifaceted construct, with multiple (and often times conflicting) influences on political behavior. The course stresses thenconstructed nature of both race and politics. The course will be split into 3 parts. In the first partnwe will explore the relationship between racial identity and political behavior at the individualnlevel. The second part of the course will examine how ideas about racial groups shape politicalnattitudes and behaviors, as well as policy outcomes. The third part of the course will explore hownrace is used to mobilize political and economic actors.
Same as: AFRICAAM 17N, CSRE 17N

SOC 20N. What counts as "race," and why?. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Seminar discussion of how race is conceptualized and how categorizations are determined across a range of disciplines and institutions in U.S. society. Course materials survey approaches from history, demography, law, sociology, psychology, genetics, and medicine. Students will read original social science research, learn to conduct and analyze in-depth interviews, and use library resources to support legal/archival case studies.

SOC 22N. The Roots of Social Protest. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The conditions under which social protest occurs and the emergence, success, and viability of contemporary social movements. Examples include women's civil rights, ecology, and antiwar and anti-globilization movements in the U.S. and elsewhere. Sociological theories to explain the timing, location, and causes of mobilization; how researchers evaluate these theories. Comparison of tactics, trajectories, and outcomes.

SOC 24N. Themes in Political and Historical Sociology: The Political Party. 4 Units.

This class focuses on the political party and on the different scholarly perspectives from which it has been studied. We will study these perspectives analytically¿to find the main elements that characterize them¿and historically¿to understand how the party has operated in different contexts and how scholarly interpretations have changed in time. The emphasis on the party requires a contextualization of two processes that have shaped the functioning of the institutions of the state in the last decades¿one operating below the state and the other operating abovenFrom below the state, the fragmentation of interests has been challenging the traditional identities that used to be embedded in the party. From above, international economic processes have been undermining the role of the state, and thus of the party, as the main vehicle for bringing grievances into the political arena. Thus, part of the agenda of the party is dominated by the activities of organized social movements that only partially follow traditional cleavages (class, status, race, ethnicity, urban/rural), while another part is dominated by multinational firms and banks that only partially represent national interests. Yet, to the extent that the institutions of the state remain relevant, the political party remains a powerful and significant actor of Modern democracies. The fundamental question of this class is to understand the way in which the party continues to shape the functioning of the state.n We will approach this question analytically and historically. Analytically, we will read through various definitions of what a party is. The aim is not to arrive at a ¿correct¿ definition of the party (there is not such a thing!) but to sharpen the differences between the several approaches. Historically, we will study the party in action with the goal of understanding the perspective from which the party was portrayed. Together, in this double exercise you will learn the tools of the trade, so to speak, of political sociology.

SOC 31N. Social Networks. 3 Units.

This Introductory Seminar reviews the history of social network studies, investigates how networks have changed over the past hundred years and asks how new technologies will impact them. We will draw from scholarly publications, popular culture and personal experience as ways to approach this central aspect of the human experience.

SOC 45Q. Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society. 4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Same as: CSRE 45Q

SOC 46N. Race, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. How new identities are created and legitimated. What does it mean to try on a different identity? National groups and ethnic groups are so large that one individual can know only an infinitesimal fraction of other group members. What explains the seeming coherence of groups? If identities are a product of the imagination, why are people willing to fight and die for them? Enrollment limited to 16.

SOC 100ASB. Pre-field Course for Alternative Spring Break. 1 Unit.

Limited to students participating in the Alternative Spring Break program. See http://asb.stanford.edu for more information.

SOC 100D. Organizational Theory. 3 Units.

Schools, prisons, hospitals, universities, restaurants, nations, sports teams - organizations are all around. They employ us, feed us, and provide us with sources of identity. This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and classic theories about organizations. What defines an organization? How should organizations structure themselves to accomplish their goals? When is it most desirable for an organizations merge with another? Lectures and readings will explore such questions, and contemporary examples in the media will bring them to life.

SOC 100SI. Student Initiated Course. 1 Unit.

.

SOC 101D. Interpersonal Relations. 3 Units.

This course examines what happens when people interact together and how that interaction affects the nature of their thoughts, relationships, and behaviors. We will take a look at research from sociology and psychology to explore a diverse set of issues including conformity, stereotypes, and cognitive biases. At times we will look at deeply individual topics like cognition and happiness and at other times we will look at more macro-level issues like how we are affected by our social networks. However, throughout the whole class we will be looking at the dynamic and complex relationship between the individual and the social world.

SOC 102. Between Nation-Building and Liberalization: The Welfare State in Israel. 3 Units.

According to one commentator, the political economy of Israel is characterized by embedded illiberalism. In the context of a national and territorial conflict, the Israeli state fostered comprehensive nation-building projects (such as immigration absorption), via employment and social protection schemes. This course surveys the distinctive development of the Israeli welfare state in comparative perspective, and analyzes its particular politics and outcomes in the form of inclusion but also exclusion of different populations from full citizenship. The course will follow a chronological path from the pre-state crystallization of national welfare institutions to the current neo-liberalization trend that seems to undermine collectivist projects and advance the re-commodification of citizenship. Throughout the course we will discuss issues such as: the role of labor and nationalism in the design of social policy, the production of national, ethnic and gender inequality, and the dynamics of change and continuity following heightened liberalization and internationalization since the 1980s. The course exposes students to key issues of the sociology of the welfare state with particular emphasis on the development and role of the state in a deeply conflicted society, using the Israeli experience. At the conclusion of the course students are expected to understand how welfare state institutions reflect but also reproduce societal schisms and conflicts, and be familiar with central aspects of Israeli politics past and present.
Same as: JEWISHST 132

SOC 102D. Social Movements in the 21st Century: Innovations in Structures and Strategies. 4 Units.

The study of social movements is well developed in sociology, but has largely focused on movements that occurred prior to widespread use of cell phones, the Internet and social media. These technologies have allowed not just new mobilization strategies, but also new tactics and organizational structures. Recognizing the power of new technologies to change the way we interact and organize is integral to understanding the future of social movements as well as more routine organizational structures and interpersonal interactions.

SOC 103. Sociology of Citizenship. 3 Units.

Not only a legal status, citizenship forms a major concern for political sociologists interested in questions of membership, exclusion, redistribution, and struggles over the boundaries of collective identity. Citizenship is in essence membership in a political community that entails rights and duties, and structures a tripartite relationship between the individual, community and state. The institutions of citizenship include formal and bureaucratic rules of eligibility ¿ but also informal institutions such as identity and belonging. Throughout the course, students are exposed to key issues of the sociology of citizenship such as the historically different paths of men, women, minority groups and immigrants into citizenship, the contested development of rights and duties, the regulation of population, as well as insurgency and collective attempts to rearticulate the terms of the ¿contract¿ with the state. Israel, the USA, France and Germany are used as empirical illustrations. At the conclusion of the course students will know how to utilize the analytic framework of citizenship in order to analyze a wide range of political phenomena in contemporary societies.
Same as: JEWISHST 133

SOC 103D. Can Women (and Men) Have it All? Gender and Work in the 21st Century. 3 Units.

This course will cover the current understanding of gender inequality in modern workplaces¿its sources, operationalizations, and consequences. Drawing from gender theories about topics like the motherhood penalty, unconscious bias in interactions, occupational segregation, work-life conflict, sexual harassment, and the backlash against women leaders, this course will explore the fundamental question: why do women continue to suffer in the workplace relative to men? The course will also examine the parallel question: what obstructs men from becoming more involved in the home? As families become less and less ¿traditional,¿ reflecting increasing diversity in.

SOC 104D. U.S. Attitudes to Crime and Policing. 3 Units.

This course examines how social groups, laws, and popular media impact Americans¿ attitudes towards criminal behaviors.  It draws on sociological and psychological research, enabling students to appreciate but also critique academic research.  Among the topics covered are social influence, laws, and media bias.  Students will conduct a research project on a topic of their choosing and present their findings to the class at the end of the quarter.

SOC 105D. Sociology of Health and Illness. 3 Units.

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How docontextual factors (including socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities?In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine. nBy the end of the course, students will: 1) have insight into the various ways of defining and measuring health, including mortality, morbidity, physical functioning, and quality of life; 2) understand how a person¿s socio-demographic characteristics influence his or her health, including his or her ability to access resources vital to maintaining health and receiving treatment; 3) understand how researchersemploy theory and make causal inferences based on observational and experimental data; 4) comprehendhow patients and practitioners understand health and illness and their roles in the health care process; and 5) understand the role of medical care in the distribution of health outcomes across the population.

SOC 107. China After Mao. 5 Units.

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
Same as: SOC 207

SOC 107E. Education and Inequality: Big Data for Large-Scale Problems. 3-5 Units.

In this course, students will use data from the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) to study the patterns, causes, consequences, and remedies of educational inequality in the US. SEDA is based on 200 million test score records, administrative data, and census data from every public school, school district, and community in the US. The course will include lectures, discussion, and small group research projects using SEDA and other data.
Same as: EDUC 107, EDUC 207, SOC 205

SOC 108. Political & Historical Sociology. 5 Units.

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
Same as: SOC 208

SOC 109D. Education and Society. 3 Units.

This course will draw on a range of sociological theories and approaches to explore the relationship between education and society. In particular, the course will focus on themes related to the role of education in social stratification, linkages between education and the economy, polity, and culture, and the organizational contexts of schooling. More specifically, topics within these themes include: dominant sociological theories (functional, conflict, and institutional) of the functions and roles of education in society, education and its relationship to different forms of capital (human, social and cultural), educational inequalities in achievement and attainment by race, class, and gender, the role of tracking and high stakes examinations in different education systemsaround the world, and the role of globalization in shaping educational goals and policy. The content of the course will focus not only on schooling in the United States, but will draw on cross-national and historical comparisons in order to illuminate the distinctive features of different education systems and provide a broad overview of the relationship between education and society.

SOC 111. State and Society in Korea. 4 Units.

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Same as: INTNLREL 143, SOC 211

SOC 111D. Social-Psychology and Economics: The trouble with how economists think you think. 5 Units.

This course will compare and contrast explanations for human behavior; specifically, those derived from economic theory with those from social-psychological research. Rationality, decision-making, happiness, motivation, the persistence of inequality, and evaluation of outputs will be examined. It will also investigate the shortcomings of estimating individual preferences without taking into account macro-level phenomenon, such as hierarchy and justice. For students who lack familiarity with economics, the course will also cover basic economic theory as necessary. The use of economic versus social-psychological theory in determining appropriate public policy will also be explored.

SOC 112. Comparative Democratic Development. 5 Units.

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on the third wave of democratization over the past three decades and contemporary possibilities for democratic change. (Diamond).
Same as: POLISCI 147

SOC 113. Comparative Corruption. 4-5 Units.

Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).
Same as: POLISCI 143S

SOC 113D. Sociology of Sport. 5 Units.

This course is designed to examine sports from a sociological perspective and to develop a greater understanding of the impact of sports on societies and individuals. We will analyze sports and sporting cultures using several theoretical frameworks such as functionalism, conflict theory, critical theory, feminist theory, and an internationalist perspective. This course will address questions such as: What role do sports have in society? How can we understand the importance societies place on sports? How are social inequalities replicated or challenged through sports? How do sports influence individuals and the construction of a social reality?.

SOC 114. Economic Sociology. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Same as: SOC 214

SOC 114D. Sociology of the Great Recession. 5 Units.

The Great Recession (2007-2009), one of the most socially significant events of our time. This course will cover the economic, social, cultural, and political consequences of the recession. We will address its impact on: inequality; job prospects for college graduates; trust in the government; the 2012 presidential election; marriage; child birth; and immigration. We examine the rise of protest movements during the recession period, such as Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party, and explore the idea of "class warfare". Class will feature several guest speakers and will focus on developing a general understanding of trends emerging in these events.

SOC 115. Topics in Economic Sociology. 5 Units.

How does a corporation¿s practice of religion affect your employment? How do your personal data become a corporation's private property? How does corporate behavior reinforce the marginalization of certain populations? The answers to these questions have varied as society's conceptualization of corporations evolved from simple, legal fiction to rights and responsibilities similar to those of humans. In this seminar, we critically examine relationships between corporations and citizens, and analyze the idea of corporation as citizen. Through careful reading, discussion, reflection, and writing, you will understand how corporations are socially constructed and in turn regulate social behavior. We will empower each other to thoughtfully question and possibly change our relationships with these major actors in economic sociology.

SOC 115D. Can Law Fix Race? Race, Law, and Contemporary American Society. 5 Units.

In this Age of Obama, why are we still talking about legal remedies to racial inequality? This course will explore this question from an interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on perspectives from law and social science. Students will read both actual Supreme Court opinions as well as foundational works in the sociology of race and law. Through readings and discussion, students will leave this course with 1) a background in the historical role of the law in relation to race; 2) an understanding in how law¿s role in the maintenance of racial inequality has evolved; and 3) an ability to articulate their own views on why we are and whether we should be still talking about race, using both theory and empirical evidence to support their views. Specifically, students will be able to answer this question: ¿Is it appropriate for law to attempt to remedy racial inequality?¿.

SOC 116. Chinese Organizations and Management. 5 Units.

Seminar for advanced undergraduates and all graduate students.
Same as: SOC 216

SOC 116D. The Sociological Complexities of Human Trafficking. 5 Units.

Human trafficking is more than a crime and a human rights violation; it reveals the complex interactions of social norms, policies, and actions. In this course, we will consider norms of sexuality and morality in relation to sex trafficking and consenting sex workers, politics and labor policy in relation to labor trafficking and day workers, and political consumerism as a form of collective action in relation to fair trade. Specific topics include the impact of legalized prostitution on human trafficking, the effects of the annual US-released Trafficking In Persons report on international migrant labor laws, and the question of whether or not fair trade is fair. This seminar will provide students opportunities to think critically about society and to collaborate as researchers and activists on the issue of human trafficking.

SOC 117A. China Under Mao. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
Same as: SOC 217A

SOC 117D. Recognizing Inequality. 3 Units.

Over the last few years social and economic inequality has become a major topic in the media and public policy. Gaps and inequalities between groups exist across a range of arenas including education, wages and promotions, housing and cultural consumption. In this course we'll bring these big ideas down to the individual level--investigating and analyzing manifestations of inequality in our everyday lives, considering why these inequalities exist and developing strategies to alleviate them. This seminar will call upon students' imagination and analytical savvy to tackle pressing societal problems by considering the dynamics of their own lives. In the process, students will develop skills that can be applied in fields as diverse as public policy, health care, non-profit work and entrepreneurship.

SOC 118. Social Movements and Collective Action. 4 Units.

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Same as: SOC 218

SOC 119. Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s. 5 Units.

The demographic, economic, political, and cultural roots of social change in the 60s; its legacy in the present U.S.
Same as: SOC 219

SOC 120. Interpersonal Relations. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Same as: SOC 220

SOC 121. The Individual in Social Structure: Foundations in Sociological Social Psychology. 5 Units.

Dynamics of the relationship between the individual and social structure, the relationship between the individual and immediate social context, and relationships between individuals. Focus is on the dominant theoretical perspectives in sociological social psychology: social structure and personality, structural social psychology, and symbolic interactionism.

SOC 123. Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society. 3 Units.

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
Same as: FEMGEN 123, SOC 223

SOC 124D. The Intuition of Social Research. 3 Units.

Understanding the intuition behind key statistics in social science research. The focus will be on reverse-engineering statistical tests by starting with asking what information we would need to answer questions about social life. From here, we will find that apparently complicated statistical tests are simply following the same logic necessary to reach conclusions about social life. Nearly all statistical tests start from the foundations of probability sampling, mean group differences, and variability. With these foundational concepts, students will understand the intuition behind (and similarity between) standard t-tests and the mechanics of multivariate regressions. By focusing on providing students with a firm grasp of the basic foundations of statistics, students will be better prepared to understand the purpose and logic of more complex statistical tests, which serve to answer social science¿s most interesting questions.

SOC 125. Sociology of Religion. 5 Units.

The social patterns of religious belief and practice, and the classical and contemporary theoretical approaches to understanding these patterns. Topics: churches, sects and cults, sources of religious pluralism, relationships between religion and aspects of social structures including the economy, class structure, ethnicity, social networks, and the state.

SOC 125D. Sociology of Learning. 3 Units.

Learn how to learn. We spend considerable time learning in school, yet we devote comparatively little time to investigating the learning process. This course uses a variety of learning situations to interrogate how we learn, understand how our social environment shapes the process, and refine our own unique learning styles. We employ project-based, experiential methods to enhance the exploration of core sociological concepts that affect learning, such as status, authority, and norms. Emphasis is placed on the social construction of specific contexts for learning such as school, work, and even the artist¿s studio. Students develop learning skills that are transferable to other classes and non-school contexts.

SOC 126. Introduction to Social Networks. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Same as: SOC 226

SOC 127. Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
Same as: SOC 227

SOC 128. Introduction to Social Network Analysis. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for SOC 228.) Theory and methods of network analysis in sociology (with an emphasis on social movements), anthropology, history, social psychology, economics, political science, and public health. Prerequisite: basic mathematics.
Same as: SOC 228

SOC 129X. Urban Education. 3-4 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 229X

SOC 130. Education and Society. 4-5 Units.

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Same as: EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 230

SOC 132. Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools. 4 Units.

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Same as: EDUC 110, EDUC 310, SOC 332

SOC 132J. Sociology of Jewishness. 3-5 Units.

Examines the place of the Jewish people in society throughout various locales and historical periods to understand how interactions among Jews and with other groups have shaped Jewish identities. Topics include modernism, the Holocaust, Israel/nationhood, race/ethnicity, intermarriage, and assimilation. Uses theoretical, empirical, and historical material from multiple social scientific fields of study and explores the study of Judaism from several major sociological lenses.
Same as: CSRE 132J, JEWISHST 132D

SOC 133. Law and Wikinomics: The Economic and Social Organization of the LegalnnProfession. 1-5 Unit.

(Graduate and Law students enroll in 333.) Seminar. Emphasis is on the labor market for large-firm lawyers, including the market for entry-level lawyers, attorney retention and promotion practices, lateral hiring of partners, and increased use of forms of employment such as the non-equity form of partnership. Race and gender discrimination and occupational segregation; market-based pressure tactics for organizational reform. Students groups collect and analyze data about the profession and its markets. Multimedia tools for analysis and for producing workplace reforms. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 333

SOC 134. Education, Gender, and Development. 4 Units.

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes.
Same as: EDUC 197, FEMGEN 297

SOC 135. Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States. 3 Units.

This course will investigate three main questions: What is poverty? What are its causes? and What do we do in the United States to alleviate it? We will examine these questions by learning about government and private nonprofit social policies. We will also explore arguments for and against those policies. Specifically, we will look at topics like hunger, housing costs, minimum wage, healthcare reform, education, welfare and other income supports. The class will be discussion based with the expectation that you come to class having completed the reading, with reflections and preliminary answers to guiding questions, your own questions in mind, and full participation in activities.
Same as: SOC 235

SOC 136. Sociology of Law. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 236) Major issues and debates. Topics include: historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance; the law in action versus the law on the books; organizational responses to law in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change emphasizing the American civil rights movement.
Same as: SOC 236

SOC 136A. Law and Society. 5 Units.

Law and social inequality. Major sociological perspectives on where the law comes from, what law and justice systems do, and how they work.
Same as: SOC 236A

SOC 136B. Advanced Topics in Sociology of Law. 5 Units.

(Same as LAW 538.) Historical perspectives on the origins of law, rationality and legal sanctions, law on the books versus the law in action, crime and deviance, school desegregation, privitization of prisons, American civil rights, file sharing, jury decision making, the role of lawyers and judges, and cynicism about the American legal system.
Same as: SOC 236B

SOC 137. Global Inequality. 4 Units.

Absolute world poverty has declined considerably in the last twenty years, but elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy, leading to serious concerns about inequality in several countries, as well as in global policy circles. This discussion-based seminar explores how global capitalism affects worldwide inequality. Topics include the evolution, causes, and structure of global inequality, the links between inequality and human development, and potential solutions to global inequality.

SOC 138. American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Same as: NATIVEAM 138, SOC 238

SOC 139. American Indians in Contemporary Society. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Same as: NATIVEAM 139, SOC 239

SOC 140. Introduction to Social Stratification. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Same as: SOC 240

SOC 141. Controversies about Inequality. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 241.) Debate format involving Stanford and guest faculty. Forms of inequality including racial, ethnic, and gender stratification; possible policy interventions. Topics such as welfare reform, immigration policy, affirmative action, discrimination in labor markets, sources of income inequality, the duty of rich nations to help poor nations, and causes of gender inequality.
Same as: SOC 241

SOC 142. Sociology of Gender. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.
Same as: FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 242

SOC 143. Sociology of the Middle Class. 4 Units.

This class focuses on understanding of how social research is conducted, and gaining the ability to evaluate the quality ofnempirical research. The course will focus on the process of designing a research project, including: formulating research questions, developing hypotheses, developing valid and reliable measures, deciding on the types of data needed, making decisions on sampling, choosing research design and data collection methods, the challenges of making causal inferences, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research.

SOC 144. Inequality and the Workplace. 5 Units.

How characteristics of workplaces, such as hiring practices, workforce diversity, organizational policies and legal mandates, produce variation in inequality. Examines the sources, extent, and consequences of workplace inequality across gender, racial and ethnic lines. Topics include earnings, social status, geographical location, and opportunities for people in the workforce.
Same as: SOC 244

SOC 145. Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Same as: CSRE 145, SOC 245

SOC 146. Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. 5 Units.

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Same as: COMPLIT 195, CSRE 196C, ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, TAPS 165

SOC 148. Comparative Ethnic Conflict. 4 Units.

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.
Same as: CSRE 148, SOC 248

SOC 149. The Urban Underclass. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Same as: SOC 249, URBANST 112

SOC 150. Race and Political Sociology. 3 Units.

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
Same as: CSRE 150, SOC 250

SOC 151. From the Cradle to the Grave: How Demographic Processes Shape the Social World. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 251.) Comparative analysis of historical, contemporary, and anticipated demographic change. Draws on case studies from around the world to explore the relationship between social structure and population dynamics. Introduces demographic measures, concepts and theory. Course combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.
Same as: SOC 251

SOC 152. The Social Determinants of Health. 4 Units.

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How do contextual factors (including gender, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities? In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine.
Same as: SOC 252

SOC 155. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 155, FEMGEN 255, SOC 255

SOC 156. Ritual, Politics, Power. 5 Units.

Our everyday lives are made up of multiple routines, some consciously staged and imagined and others unconscious and insidious. Anthropologists call these rituals. Rituals shape every aspect of our lives, creating our symbolic universes and governing the most minute of our practices. nnFor early anthropologists and for those interested in religious and symbolic life, rituals and rites were seen as both one of the most universal features of human existence, and, as that which enables us to reflect upon our human existence. A prominent example are that of the ¿rites de passage¿ found in every culture, from puberty initiation rites, weddings or funerals, which socially signal the change from one status to another. While initially for anthropologists, rituals marked the difference between the sacred and the profane, soon scholars began to see the ubiquity of ritual and the symbolic in shaping even the most mundane activity such as the structure of a meal and why one is not meant to eat dessert before the main course. The first half of the class examines these different debates surrounding the meaning and effects of rituals and rites. The second half of the class takes these debates to think about the question of power and politics. We return to the question of how our symbolic universes are staged and imagined by us through ritual forms such as the annual Presidential ¿pardoning the turkey¿ at Thanksgiving. The question of power however pushes us even further to ask why it is that we obey particular kinds of authority, consent to particular actions, and find ourselves doing things we haven¿t consciously decided to do. Many have argued that these kinds of political questions about how we respond and are shaped by power have something to do with our symbolic worlds and ritual, from the most obvious (the monarchy) to the most subtle (listening in a classroom). Throughout the course, these abstract questions will be grounded in cross-cultural examples and analysis.
Same as: ANTHRO 152

SOC 157. Ending Poverty with Technology. 5 Units.

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities.

SOC 159. Social and Cultural Dimensions of GlobalnIndigeneity. 4 Units.

This course will expose students to the rise of a world-wide indigenous identity, common themes embraced by indigenous people, and common challenges these groups confront when dealing with the larger social environment that surrounds them. Topics to be covered include tribal sovereignty, rights, and recognition; language preservation; the maintenance of cultural integrity and ethnic authenticity; cultural production and the commodification of indigenous culture; literary traditions; indigenous social movements; natural resources and land disputes; and the disadvantaged social position that these groups typically occupy.
Same as: SOC 259

SOC 160. Formal Organizations. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Same as: SOC 260

SOC 161. The Social Science of Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 261.) Who is likely to become an entrepreneur and where is entrepreneurship likely to occur? Classic and contemporary theory and research. Interaction with expert practitioners in creating entrepreneurial opportunities including venture and corporate capitalists. The role of culture, markets, hierarchies, and networks. Market creation and change, and factors that affect success of new organizations. Field projects on entrepreneurial environments such as technology licensing offices, entrepreneurial development organizations, venture capital firms, and corporate venturing groups.
Same as: SOC 261

SOC 162. Markets and Governance. 4 Units.

Social and political forces that shape market outcomes. The emergence and creation of markets, how markets go wrong, and the roles of government and society in structuring market exchange. Applied topics include development, inequality, globalization, and economic meltdown. Preference to Sociology majors and Sociology coterm students.
Same as: SOC 262

SOC 163. Foundations of Organizational Theory. 5 Units.

Foundational material in organizational theory literature.
Same as: SOC 263

SOC 164. Immigration and the Changing United States. 4 Units.

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Same as: CHILATST 164, CSRE 164, SOC 264

SOC 165. Seminar on the Everday Lives of Immigrants. 5 Units.

Everyday experience of immigrants and the immigrant second generation through the ethnographic lens. Ethnographies that focus on the immigrant experience. Limited enrollment.
Same as: SOC 265

SOC 166. Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Chicanos in American Society. 5 Units.

Contemporary sociological issues affecting Mexican-origin people in the U.S. Topics include: the immigrant experience, immigration policy, identity, socioeconomic integration, internal diversity, and theories of incorporation.
Same as: SOC 266

SOC 167A. Asia-Pacific Transformation. 4 Units.

Post-WW II transformation in the Asia-Pacific region, with focus on the ascent of Japan, the development of newly industrialized capitalist countries (S. Korea and Taiwan), the emergence of socialist states (China and N. Korea), and the changing relationship between the U.S. and these countries.
Same as: SOC 267A

SOC 168. Global Organizations: Managing Diversity. 4 Units.

Analytical tools derived from the social sciences to analyze global organizations, strategies, and the tradeoffs between different designs of organizations. Focus is on tribal mentality and how to design effective organizations for policy implementation within and across institutional settings. Recommended: PUBLPOL 102, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Same as: PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 268

SOC 170. Classics of Modern Social Theory. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 270). Preference to Sociology majors. Contributions of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary sociology. Topics: the problem of social order and the nature of social conflict; capitalism and bureaucracy; the relationship between social structure and politics; the social sources of religion and political ideology; and the evolution of modern societies. Examples from contemporary research illustrate the impact of these traditions. Limited enrollment.
Same as: SOC 270

SOC 173. Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives. 4 Units.

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Same as: EDUC 173, EDUC 273, FEMST 173, SOC 273

SOC 177D. Economic Elites in the 21st Century. 3-5 Units.

Elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy over the past two decades, leading to serious concerns about inequality and to protests against the 1% in several countries. This course addresses the role of economic elites in the world economy and their relationship to global inequality. Topics include the evolution and consequences of global inequality, the composition of economic elites in various countries, and economic elites¿ impact on politics, education, culture, and the economy in the US and abroad. We also discuss potential solutions to global inequality.
Same as: SOC 277D

SOC 180A. Foundations of Social Research. 4 Units.

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Same as: SOC 280A

SOC 180B. Introduction to Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology majors.
Same as: SOC 280B

SOC 181B. Sociological Methods: Statistics. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 281B.) Statistical methods of relevance to sociology: contingency tables, correlation, and regression.
Same as: SOC 281B

SOC 190. Undergraduate Individual Study. 1-5 Unit.

Prior arrangement required.

SOC 191. Undergraduate Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

Work on a project of student's choice under supervision of a faculty member. Prior arrangement required.

SOC 192. Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship. 1-5 Unit.

Work in an apprentice-like relationship with faculty on an on-going research project. Prior arrangement required.

SOC 193. Undergraduate Teaching Apprenticeship. 1-5 Unit.

Prior arrangement required.

SOC 194. Computational Undergraduate Research Assistantship. 1-5 Unit.

Computational sociology research assistant working with faculty on an on-going technical research project. Applications for position reviewed on a rolling basis.

SOC 196. Senior Thesis. 1-15 Unit.

Work on an honors thesis project under faculty supervision (see description of honors program). Must be arranged early in the year of graduation or before.

SOC 200. Junior/Senior Seminar for Majors. 4 Units.

For Sociology majors. Capstone course in which sociological problems are framed, linked to theories, and answers pursued through research designs. Independent research. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and methods. Prerequisites: SOC 170, 180B.

SOC 201. Preparation for Senior Project. 5 Units.

First part of capstone experience for Urban Studies majors pursuing an internship-based research project or honors thesis. Assignments culminate in a research proposal, which may be submitted for funding. Students also identify and prepare for a related internship, normally to begin in Spring Quarter in URBANST 201B or in Summer. Research proposed in the final assignment may be carried out in Spring or Summer Quarter; consent required for Autumn Quarter research. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: URBANST 201

SOC 202. Junior Seminar: Preparation for Research. 5 Units.

Required of all juniors in Urban Studies and those juniors in Sociology planning on writing an honors thesis . Students write a research prospectus and grant proposal, which may be submitted for funding. Research proposal in final assignment may be carried out in Spring or Summer Quarter; consent required for Autumn Quarter research.
Same as: URBANST 202

SOC 204. Senior Seminar. 5 Units.

Conclusion of capstone sequence. Students write a substantial paper based on the research project developed in 202. Students in the honors program may incorporate paper into their thesis. Guest scholar chosen by students. Sociology majors who are seniors may take SOC 204 as their sole Writing In the Major class, as a substitute for SOC 200, with no prerequisites required.
Same as: URBANST 203

SOC 205. Education and Inequality: Big Data for Large-Scale Problems. 3-5 Units.

In this course, students will use data from the Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) to study the patterns, causes, consequences, and remedies of educational inequality in the US. SEDA is based on 200 million test score records, administrative data, and census data from every public school, school district, and community in the US. The course will include lectures, discussion, and small group research projects using SEDA and other data.
Same as: EDUC 107, EDUC 207, SOC 107E

SOC 207. China After Mao. 5 Units.

China's post-1976 recovery from the late Mao era; its reorientation toward an open market-oriented economy; the consequences of this new model and runaway economic growth for standards of living, social life, inequality, and local governance; the political conflicts that have accompanied these changes.
Same as: SOC 107

SOC 208. Political & Historical Sociology. 5 Units.

The differences between historical and sociological analysis of past events. The difference between constructing sociological explanations and describing past events. Topics include: the rise of Christianity, the mafia in a Sicilian village, the trade network of the East India Company.
Same as: SOC 108

SOC 211. State and Society in Korea. 4 Units.

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Same as: INTNLREL 143, SOC 111

SOC 212. How To Think About The Charlie Hebdo Attacks : Political, Social and Cultural Contexts. 3-5 Units.

On January 7th and 9th, 2015, two Islamic terrorist attacks claimed 17 deaths in the heart of Paris. On January 11th, more than 4 million people marched to uphold France's «Republican values» and freedom of expression. How can we understand the unfathomable? Can the social sciences help us understand the context, causes and consequences of these events for France's model of secular democracy? Materials include newsreels, films, novels (Houellebecq), and essays (Fassin, Morin, Badiou, Zemmour, Finkielkraut). Readings in English and French. Discussion in English.
Same as: CSRE 252, FRENCH 255, FRENCH 355, SOC 312

SOC 213A. Transformation of Socialist Societies. 3-5 Units.

A quarter-century from the fall of the Berlin Wall, we have gained broad perspective on the challenges of wholesale transformations away from socialism. This course explores the process and social consequences of opening the economies of Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and China to market forces. We will answer questions about how individuals and social systems respond to the particular challenges of rapid economic and political openings, including demographic challenges, corruption, nationalism, and growing inequality. We will compare the Eastern European and Post-Soviet experiences of these issues with the Chinese experience, and highlight the similarities and distinctions between transformations in these societies.
Same as: REES 313, SOC 313A

SOC 214. Economic Sociology. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 214.) The sociological approach to production, distribution, consumption, and markets, emphasizing the impact of norms, power, social structure, and institutions on the economy. Comparison of classic and contemporary approaches to the economy among the social science disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor markets, organization of professions such as law and medicine, the economic role of informal networks, industrial organization, including the structure and history of the computer and popular music industries, business alliances, capitalism in non-Western societies, and the transition from state socialism in E. Europe and China.
Same as: SOC 114

SOC 216. Chinese Organizations and Management. 5 Units.

Seminar for advanced undergraduates and all graduate students.
Same as: SOC 116

SOC 217A. China Under Mao. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 217A.) The transformation of Chinese society from the 1949 revolution to the eve of China's reforms in 1978: creation of a socialist economy, reorganization of rural society and urban workplaces, emergence of new inequalities of power and opportunity, and new forms of social conflict during Mao's Cultural Revolution of 1966-69 and its aftermath.
Same as: SOC 117A

SOC 218. Social Movements and Collective Action. 4 Units.

Why social movements arise, who participates in them, the obstacles they face, the tactics they choose, and how to gauge movement success or failure. Theory and empirical research. Application of concepts and methods to social movements such as civil rights, environmental justice, antiglobalization, and anti-war.
Same as: SOC 118

SOC 219. Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s. 5 Units.

The demographic, economic, political, and cultural roots of social change in the 60s; its legacy in the present U.S.
Same as: SOC 119

SOC 220. Interpersonal Relations. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 220.) Forming ties, developing norms, status, conformity, deviance, social exchange, power, and coalition formation; important traditions of research have developed from the basic theories of these processes. Emphasis is on understanding basic theories and drawing out their implications for change in a broad range of situations, families, work groups, and friendship groups.
Same as: SOC 120

SOC 223. Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society. 3 Units.

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
Same as: FEMGEN 123, SOC 123

SOC 224B. Relational Sociology. 4 Units.

Conversations, social relationships and social networks are the core features of social life. In this course we explore how conversations, relationships, and social networks not only have their own unique and independent characteristics, but how they shape one another and come to characterize many of the settings we enter and live in. As such, students will be introduced to theories and research methodologies concerning social interaction, social relationships, and social networks, as well as descriptions of how these research strands interrelate to form a larger relational sociology that can be employed to characterize a variety of social phenomenon. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Same as: EDUC 312

SOC 226. Introduction to Social Networks. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 226.) Theory, methods, and research. Concepts such as density, homogeneity, and centrality; applications to substantive areas. The impact of social network structure on individuals and groups in areas such as communities, neighborhoods, families, work life, and innovations.
Same as: SOC 126

SOC 227. Bargaining, Power, and Influence in Social Interaction. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 227.) Research and theoretical work on bargaining, social influence, and issues of power and justice in social settings such as teams, work groups, and organizations. Theoretical approaches to the exercise of power and influence in social groups and related issues in social interaction such as the promotion of cooperation, effects of competition and conflict, negotiation, and intergroup relations. Enrollment limited to 40.
Same as: SOC 127

SOC 228. Introduction to Social Network Analysis. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for SOC 228.) Theory and methods of network analysis in sociology (with an emphasis on social movements), anthropology, history, social psychology, economics, political science, and public health. Prerequisite: basic mathematics.
Same as: SOC 128

SOC 229X. Urban Education. 3-4 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212 or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 112, EDUC 212, SOC 129X

SOC 230. Education and Society. 4-5 Units.

The effects of schools and schooling on individuals, the stratification system, and society. Education as socializing individuals and as legitimizing social institutions. The social and individual factors affecting the expansion of schooling, individual educational attainment, and the organizational structure of schooling.
Same as: EDUC 120C, EDUC 220C, SOC 130

SOC 231. World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives. 4-5 Units.

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Same as: EDUC 136, EDUC 306D

SOC 234. Research Seminar on Access to Justice. 1-5 Unit.

The functions and dysfunctions of modern legal systems. Topics include: official statements of the U.S. and the EU about the rights of parties to civil disputes; the roles of lawyers as gatekeepers and facilitators; the filtering process by which injuries and experiences become the basis for legal claims; access to and use of courts; the balance of power and advantage between individual persons and organizations in disputes. Prerequisite: advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 334

SOC 235. Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States. 3 Units.

This course will investigate three main questions: What is poverty? What are its causes? and What do we do in the United States to alleviate it? We will examine these questions by learning about government and private nonprofit social policies. We will also explore arguments for and against those policies. Specifically, we will look at topics like hunger, housing costs, minimum wage, healthcare reform, education, welfare and other income supports. The class will be discussion based with the expectation that you come to class having completed the reading, with reflections and preliminary answers to guiding questions, your own questions in mind, and full participation in activities.
Same as: SOC 135

SOC 236. Sociology of Law. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 236) Major issues and debates. Topics include: historical perspectives on the origins of law; rationality and legal sanctions; normative decision making and morality; cognitive decision making; crime and deviance; the law in action versus the law on the books; organizational responses to law in the context of labor and employment; the roles of lawyers, judges, and juries; and law and social change emphasizing the American civil rights movement.
Same as: SOC 136

SOC 236A. Law and Society. 5 Units.

Law and social inequality. Major sociological perspectives on where the law comes from, what law and justice systems do, and how they work.
Same as: SOC 136A

SOC 236B. Advanced Topics in Sociology of Law. 5 Units.

(Same as LAW 538.) Historical perspectives on the origins of law, rationality and legal sanctions, law on the books versus the law in action, crime and deviance, school desegregation, privitization of prisons, American civil rights, file sharing, jury decision making, the role of lawyers and judges, and cynicism about the American legal system.
Same as: SOC 136B

SOC 238. American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Same as: NATIVEAM 138, SOC 138

SOC 239. American Indians in Contemporary Society. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Same as: NATIVEAM 139, SOC 139

SOC 240. Introduction to Social Stratification. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 240.) The main classical and modern explanations of the causes of social, economic, and political inequality. Issues include: power; processes that create and maintain inequality; the central axes of inequality in contemporary societies (race, ethnicity, class, and gender); the consequences of inequality for individuals and groups; and how social policy can mitigate and exacerbate inequality. Cases include technologically simple groups, the Indian caste system, and the modern U.S.
Same as: SOC 140

SOC 240W. CPI Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

A workshop devoted to presenting ongoing research on poverty and inequality in the United States. Open to all students interested in (a) building a better infrastructure for monitoring poverty and inequality, (b) building cutting-edge models of the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality, and (b) building better policy to reduce poverty and inequality. Required for all National Poverty Fellows funded by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.
Same as: SOC 340W

SOC 241. Controversies about Inequality. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 241.) Debate format involving Stanford and guest faculty. Forms of inequality including racial, ethnic, and gender stratification; possible policy interventions. Topics such as welfare reform, immigration policy, affirmative action, discrimination in labor markets, sources of income inequality, the duty of rich nations to help poor nations, and causes of gender inequality.
Same as: SOC 141

SOC 242. Sociology of Gender. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.
Same as: FEMGEN 142, FEMGEN 242, SOC 142

SOC 244. Inequality and the Workplace. 5 Units.

How characteristics of workplaces, such as hiring practices, workforce diversity, organizational policies and legal mandates, produce variation in inequality. Examines the sources, extent, and consequences of workplace inequality across gender, racial and ethnic lines. Topics include earnings, social status, geographical location, and opportunities for people in the workforce.
Same as: SOC 144

SOC 245. Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Same as: CSRE 145, SOC 145

SOC 248. Comparative Ethnic Conflict. 4 Units.

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.
Same as: CSRE 148, SOC 148

SOC 249. The Urban Underclass. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 249.) Recent research and theory on the urban underclass, including evidence on the concentration of African Americans in urban ghettos, and the debate surrounding the causes of poverty in urban settings. Ethnic/racial conflict, residential segregation, and changes in the family structure of the urban poor.
Same as: SOC 149, URBANST 112

SOC 250. Race and Political Sociology. 3 Units.

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
Same as: CSRE 150, SOC 150

SOC 251. From the Cradle to the Grave: How Demographic Processes Shape the Social World. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 251.) Comparative analysis of historical, contemporary, and anticipated demographic change. Draws on case studies from around the world to explore the relationship between social structure and population dynamics. Introduces demographic measures, concepts and theory. Course combines lecture and seminar-style discussion.
Same as: SOC 151

SOC 252. The Social Determinants of Health. 4 Units.

This course examines the social causes and context of health, illness, and health care in the United States. Who stays healthy and who gets sick? How do individuals experience and make sense of illness? How do contextual factors (including gender, socioeconomic status, race/ethnicity, culture, social networks, and hospital quality) shape health and health care? What constitutes quality medical care and who gets it? To what degree do the spaces we inhabit and the relationships we form shape our health? What avenues exist for improving health care and reducing health disparities? In examining these questions, we will consider how social scientists, epidemiologists, public health experts, and physicians address them in research and in the field. Reflecting both qualitative and quantitative approaches, we will draw on literatures in social science, public health, and medicine.
Same as: SOC 152

SOC 254. Welfare State. 4-5 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the key literature, questions, and debates about the modern welfare state. Emergence, growth, and purported demise of the welfare state. American welfare state in comparative perspective. Social and political factors affecting state development including political parties, labor markets, gender, demographic change, and immigration.
Same as: SOC 354

SOC 255. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 155, FEMGEN 255, SOC 155

SOC 257. Causal Inference in Quantitative Educational and Social Science Research. 3-5 Units.

This course surveys quantitative methods to make causal inferences in the absence of randomized experiment including the use of natural and quasi-experiments, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, fixed effects estimators, and difference-in-differences. We emphasize the proper interpretation of these research designs and critical engagement with their key assumptions for applied researchers. Prerequisites: Prior training in multivariate regression (e.g., ECON 102B or the permission of the instructor).
Same as: EDUC 255B

SOC 258. Applied Quasi-Experimental Research in Education. 3-5 Units.

Course will provide hands-on practice in analysis of data from experimental and quasi-experimental research designs, including a) instrumental variables estimators; b) regression discontinuity estimators; c) difference-in-difference estimators; d) matching estimators; e) fixed effects estimators; and f) panel data methods (including individual fixed effects models, lagged covariate adjustment models, growth models, etc.). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of EDUC 255B, EDUC 257C or SOC 257.
Same as: EDUC 255C

SOC 259. Social and Cultural Dimensions of GlobalnIndigeneity. 4 Units.

This course will expose students to the rise of a world-wide indigenous identity, common themes embraced by indigenous people, and common challenges these groups confront when dealing with the larger social environment that surrounds them. Topics to be covered include tribal sovereignty, rights, and recognition; language preservation; the maintenance of cultural integrity and ethnic authenticity; cultural production and the commodification of indigenous culture; literary traditions; indigenous social movements; natural resources and land disputes; and the disadvantaged social position that these groups typically occupy.
Same as: SOC 159

SOC 260. Formal Organizations. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 260.) The roles of formal organizations in production processes, market transactions, and social movements; and as sources of income and ladders of mobility. Relationships of modern organizations to environments and internal structures and processes. Concepts, models, and tools for analyzing organizational phenomena in contemporary societies. Sources include the literature and case studies.
Same as: SOC 160

SOC 261. The Social Science of Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 261.) Who is likely to become an entrepreneur and where is entrepreneurship likely to occur? Classic and contemporary theory and research. Interaction with expert practitioners in creating entrepreneurial opportunities including venture and corporate capitalists. The role of culture, markets, hierarchies, and networks. Market creation and change, and factors that affect success of new organizations. Field projects on entrepreneurial environments such as technology licensing offices, entrepreneurial development organizations, venture capital firms, and corporate venturing groups.
Same as: SOC 161

SOC 262. Markets and Governance. 4 Units.

Social and political forces that shape market outcomes. The emergence and creation of markets, how markets go wrong, and the roles of government and society in structuring market exchange. Applied topics include development, inequality, globalization, and economic meltdown. Preference to Sociology majors and Sociology coterm students.
Same as: SOC 162

SOC 263. Foundations of Organizational Theory. 5 Units.

Foundational material in organizational theory literature.
Same as: SOC 163

SOC 264. Immigration and the Changing United States. 4 Units.

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Same as: CHILATST 164, CSRE 164, SOC 164

SOC 265. Seminar on the Everday Lives of Immigrants. 5 Units.

Everyday experience of immigrants and the immigrant second generation through the ethnographic lens. Ethnographies that focus on the immigrant experience. Limited enrollment.
Same as: SOC 165

SOC 266. Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and Chicanos in American Society. 5 Units.

Contemporary sociological issues affecting Mexican-origin people in the U.S. Topics include: the immigrant experience, immigration policy, identity, socioeconomic integration, internal diversity, and theories of incorporation.
Same as: SOC 166

SOC 267A. Asia-Pacific Transformation. 4 Units.

Post-WW II transformation in the Asia-Pacific region, with focus on the ascent of Japan, the development of newly industrialized capitalist countries (S. Korea and Taiwan), the emergence of socialist states (China and N. Korea), and the changing relationship between the U.S. and these countries.
Same as: SOC 167A

SOC 268. Global Organizations: Managing Diversity. 4 Units.

Analytical tools derived from the social sciences to analyze global organizations, strategies, and the tradeoffs between different designs of organizations. Focus is on tribal mentality and how to design effective organizations for policy implementation within and across institutional settings. Recommended: PUBLPOL 102, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Same as: PUBLPOL 168, PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168

SOC 270. Classics of Modern Social Theory. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 270). Preference to Sociology majors. Contributions of Marx, Weber, and Durkheim to contemporary sociology. Topics: the problem of social order and the nature of social conflict; capitalism and bureaucracy; the relationship between social structure and politics; the social sources of religion and political ideology; and the evolution of modern societies. Examples from contemporary research illustrate the impact of these traditions. Limited enrollment.
Same as: SOC 170

SOC 271. Organizational Analysis. 4 Units.

Principles of organizational behavior and analysis; theories of group and individual behavior; organizational culture; and applications to school organization and design. Case studies.
Same as: EDUC 288

SOC 273. Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives. 4 Units.

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Same as: EDUC 173, EDUC 273, FEMST 173, SOC 173

SOC 277D. Economic Elites in the 21st Century. 3-5 Units.

Elites have gained disproportionately from the growth of the global economy over the past two decades, leading to serious concerns about inequality and to protests against the 1% in several countries. This course addresses the role of economic elites in the world economy and their relationship to global inequality. Topics include the evolution and consequences of global inequality, the composition of economic elites in various countries, and economic elites¿ impact on politics, education, culture, and the economy in the US and abroad. We also discuss potential solutions to global inequality.
Same as: SOC 177D

SOC 278. Introduction to Computational Social Science. 3 Units.

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas. Prerequisites: introductory course in applied statistics, and experience coding in R, Python, or another high-level language.
Same as: MS&E 231

SOC 279. Law, Order & Algorithms. 3 Units.

Data and algorithms are rapidly transforming law enforcement and criminal justice, including how police officers are deployed, how discrimination is detected, and how sentencing, probation, and parole terms are set. Modern computational and statistical methods offer the promise of greater efficiency, equity, and transparency, but their use also raises complex legal, social, and ethical questions. In this course, we analyze recent court decisions, discuss methods from machine learning and game theory, and examine the often subtle relationship between law, public policy and statistics. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to explore these issues in an empirical or investigative project of their choice. Prerequisite: An introductory course in applied statistics (e.g. MS&E 125). Recommended: experience programming in R or Python.
Same as: MS&E 330

SOC 280A. Foundations of Social Research. 4 Units.

Formulating a research question, developing hypotheses, probability and non-probability sampling, developing valid and reliable measures, qualitative and quantitative data, choosing research design and data collection methods, challenges of making causal inference, and criteria for evaluating the quality of social research. Emphasis is on how social research is done, rather than application of different methods. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology and Urban Studies majors, and Sociology coterms.
Same as: SOC 180A

SOC 280B. Introduction to Data Analysis. 4 Units.

Methods for analyzing and evaluating quantitative data in sociological research. Students will be taught how to run and interpret multivariate regressions, how to test hypotheses, and how to read and critique published data analyses. Limited enrollment; preference to Sociology majors.
Same as: SOC 180B

SOC 281B. Sociological Methods: Statistics. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 281B.) Statistical methods of relevance to sociology: contingency tables, correlation, and regression.
Same as: SOC 181B

SOC 288. Identity is a Skin: Identity Debates in Europe and Latin America from Essence to Appearance. 3-5 Units.

Traditionally, collective identity the identity of countries, peoples, and other human groups has been studied from the viewpoint of the question who or what are they, the question about the specific traits or contents that define identity. This seminar will undertake a radical epistemological turn, understanding identity as a negotiation of external recognition and internal cohesion. The focus switches from contents to container, from essence to form, from the guts to the skin. The seminar will study examples from Latin America and Europe, with their diverse strategies of identity affirmation or invention. It will also take into consideration the current conflict between Catalonia and Spain as an original case of identity consolidation in a developed society. The instructor will provide the readings. Most of them will be available in English and Spanish. Taught in Spanish. INSTRUCTOR: Salvador Cardús.
Same as: CSRE 202A, ILAC 202

SOC 300. Workshop: Teaching Development. 2 Units.

For first-year Sociology doctoral students only. The principles for becoming an effective instructor, adviser, and mentor to undergraduates. Topics: ethics, course organization and syllabus development, test construction and grading, conflict resolution, common classroom problems, and University policies related to matters such as sexual harassment. Technologies and other topics related to making effective presentations, and campus resources to improve classroom performance. Roundtable discussions with faculty and advanced graduate students known for teaching excellence. Students may be asked to give a demonstration lecture.

SOC 304. Experimental Methods in the Social Sciences. 4 Units.

This course will introduce students to the logic, design, and implementation of experiments for social science research. We will begin by developing an understanding of how experimental research designs can address some of the central threats to causal identification, such as selection and omitted variables bias. Students will then engage with scholarship that has utilized experimental research designs to produce theoretical insights about topics ranging from social stratification to the dynamics of cultural markets to political mobilization. This course will also cover techniques for analyzing experimental data, strategies for dealing with noncompliance, and combining experiments with other methods of inquiry. The course will culminate with students developing an experimental research design proposal related to their own scholarly interests. While a basic understanding of statistics is necessary for this course, the emphasis will be on research design.

SOC 305. Graduate Proseminar. 1 Unit.

For first-year Sociology doctoral students only. Introduction and orientation to the field of Sociology.

SOC 308. Social Demography. 4-5 Units.

For graduate students and advanced undergraduates. Topics: models of fertility behavior, migration models, stable population theory, life table analysis, data sources, and measurement problems. How population behavior affects social processes, and how social processes influence population dynamics. Recommended: sociological research methods; basic regression analysis and log linear models.

SOC 309. Nations and Nationalism. 4-5 Units.

The nation as a form of collective identity in the modern era. Major works in the study of nations and nationalism from comparative perspectives with focus on Europe and E. Asia.

SOC 310. Political Sociology. 4-5 Units.

Theory and research on the relationship between social structure and politics. Social foundations of political order, the generation and transformation of ideologies and political identities, social origins of revolutionary movements, and social consequences of political revolution. Prerequisite: doctoral student.

SOC 311A. Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems. 1-5 Unit.

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: EDUC 387

SOC 312. How To Think About The Charlie Hebdo Attacks : Political, Social and Cultural Contexts. 3-5 Units.

On January 7th and 9th, 2015, two Islamic terrorist attacks claimed 17 deaths in the heart of Paris. On January 11th, more than 4 million people marched to uphold France's «Republican values» and freedom of expression. How can we understand the unfathomable? Can the social sciences help us understand the context, causes and consequences of these events for France's model of secular democracy? Materials include newsreels, films, novels (Houellebecq), and essays (Fassin, Morin, Badiou, Zemmour, Finkielkraut). Readings in English and French. Discussion in English.
Same as: CSRE 252, FRENCH 255, FRENCH 355, SOC 212

SOC 312W. Workshop: Political Sociology, Social Movements, and Collective Action. 1-2 Unit.

Faculty and student presentations of ongoing research on topics including: social movement and organizations, and the relationship between them; democracy movements; legislative and policy outcomes; and collective action tactics, strategies, and trajectories. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.

SOC 313A. Transformation of Socialist Societies. 3-5 Units.

A quarter-century from the fall of the Berlin Wall, we have gained broad perspective on the challenges of wholesale transformations away from socialism. This course explores the process and social consequences of opening the economies of Eastern Europe, Eurasia, and China to market forces. We will answer questions about how individuals and social systems respond to the particular challenges of rapid economic and political openings, including demographic challenges, corruption, nationalism, and growing inequality. We will compare the Eastern European and Post-Soviet experiences of these issues with the Chinese experience, and highlight the similarities and distinctions between transformations in these societies.
Same as: REES 313, SOC 213A

SOC 314. Economic Sociology. 4-5 Units.

Classical and contemporary literature covering the sociological approach to markets and the economy, and comparing it to other disciplines. Topics: consumption, labor, professions, industrial organization, and the varieties of capitalism; historical and comparative perspectives on market and non-market provision of goods and services, and on transitions among economic systems. The relative impact of culture, institutions, norms, social networks, technology, and material conditions. Prerequisite: doctoral student status or consent of instructor. Please note: Lecture and discussion section are both required.

SOC 315W. Workshop: Economic Sociology and Organizations. 1-2 Unit.

Theory, methods, and research in the sociology of the economy and of formal organizations, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.

SOC 316. Historical and Comparative Sociology. 4-5 Units.

Theory and research on macro-historical changes of sociological significance such as the rise of capitalism, the causes and consequences of revolutions, and the formation of the modern nation state and global world system. Methodological issues in historical and comparative sociology.

SOC 317W. Workshop: Networks, Histories, and Theories of Action. 1-2 Unit.

Yearlong workshop where doctoral students are encouraged to collaborate with peers and faculty who share an interest in researching the network dynamics, histories and theories of action that help explain particular social phenomena. Students present their own research and provide helpful feedback on others' work. Presentations may concern dissertation proposals, grants, article submissions, book proposals, datasets, methodologies and other texts. Repeatable for credit.
Same as: EDUC 317

SOC 318. Social Movements and Collective Action. 4-5 Units.

Topics: causes, dynamics, and outcomes of social movements; organizational dimensions of collective action; and causes and consequences of individual activism.

SOC 320. Foundations of Social Psychology. 4-5 Units.

Major theoretical perspectives, and their assumptions and problems, in interpersonal processes and social psychology. Techniques of investigation and methodological issues. Perspectives: symbolic interaction, social structure and personality, and cognitive and group processes.

SOC 321W. Workshop: Social Psychology and Gender. 1-2 Unit.

Advanced graduate student workshop in social psychology. Current theories and research agendas, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SOC 323. Sociology of the Family. 4-5 Units.

Sociological research on changing family forms. Topics include courtship, marriage, fertility, divorce, conflict, relationship skills and satisfaction, gender patterns, power relations within the family, and class and race differences in patterns. Enrollment limited to graduate students.

SOC 324. Social Networks. 3-5 Units.

How the study of social networks contributes to sociological research. Application of core concepts to patterns of relations among actors, including connectivity and clusters, duality of categories and networks, centrality and power, balance and transitivity, structural equivalence, and blockmodels. Friendship and kinship networks, diffusion of ideas and infectious diseases, brokerage in markets and organizations, and patronage and political influence in historical contexts.

SOC 325W. Workshop: Graduate Family. 1-2 Unit.

Sociology PhD students will present their own work weekly, and read and critique the research-in-progress of their peers on issues of family, household structure, interpersonal relationships, marriage, demography, survey data, demographic methods, statistical methods, and related fields. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.

SOC 327. Frontiers of Social Psychology. 1-5 Unit.

Advanced topics, current developments, theory, and empirical research. Possible topics include social identity processes, status beliefs and processes, social exchange, affect and social cohesion, legitimacy, social difference and inequality, norms, and social dilemmas.

SOC 330. Sociology of Science. 3-4 Units.

The sociology of science concerns the social structures and practices by which human beings interpret, use and create intellectual innovations. In particular we will explore the claim that scientific facts are socially constructed and ask whether such a characterization has limits. Course readings will concern the formation and decline of various thought communities, intellectual social movements, scientific disciplines, and broader research paradigms. A special focus will be placed on interdisciplinarity as we explore whether the collision of fields can result in new scientific advances. This course is suitable to advanced undergraduates and doctoral students.
Same as: EDUC 120, EDUC 320

SOC 331. The Conduct of Qualitative Inquiry. 3-4 Units.

Two quarter sequence for doctoral students to engage in research that anticipates, is a pilot study for, or feeds into their dissertations. Prior approval for dissertation study not required. Students engage in common research processes including: developing interview questions; interviewing; coding, analyzing, and interpreting data; theorizing; and writing up results. Participant observation as needed. Preference to students who intend to enroll in 327C.
Same as: EDUC 327A

SOC 332. Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools. 4 Units.

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Same as: EDUC 110, EDUC 310, SOC 132

SOC 333. Law and Wikinomics: The Economic and Social Organization of the LegalnnProfession. 1-5 Unit.

(Graduate and Law students enroll in 333.) Seminar. Emphasis is on the labor market for large-firm lawyers, including the market for entry-level lawyers, attorney retention and promotion practices, lateral hiring of partners, and increased use of forms of employment such as the non-equity form of partnership. Race and gender discrimination and occupational segregation; market-based pressure tactics for organizational reform. Students groups collect and analyze data about the profession and its markets. Multimedia tools for analysis and for producing workplace reforms. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 133

SOC 334. Research Seminar on Access to Justice. 1-5 Unit.

The functions and dysfunctions of modern legal systems. Topics include: official statements of the U.S. and the EU about the rights of parties to civil disputes; the roles of lawyers as gatekeepers and facilitators; the filtering process by which injuries and experiences become the basis for legal claims; access to and use of courts; the balance of power and advantage between individual persons and organizations in disputes. Prerequisite: advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, or consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 234

SOC 336. Sociology of Law. 3-5 Units.

Sociological examination of law as a mechanism of social regulation and as a field of knowledge. Explores classical and contemporary theoretical and empirical contributions to the sociology of law. Law and social control, law and social change, social reality of the law, the profession and practice of law, legal mobilization, and the influence of race, gender, and social status in legal decisions and processes.

SOC 338W. Workshop: Sociology of Law. 1-5 Unit.

(Same as LAW 581.) Required for joint degree J.D./Ph.D. students in Sociology in the first three years of program; open to Ph.D. students in Sociology and related disciplines. Empirical, sociological study of law and legal institutions. Topics such as the relation of law to inequality and stratification, social movements, organizations and institutions, political sociology and state development, and the social construction of disputes and dispute resolution processes. Research presentations. Career development issues. May be repeated for credit.

SOC 339. Gender Meanings and Processes. 5 Units.

Current theories and research on the social processes, such as socialization, status processes, stereotyping, and cognition, that produce gender difference and inequality. Intersections of gender with race, class, and bodies. Applications to workplaces, schools, families, and intimate relationships. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student or consent of instructor.

SOC 340. Social Stratification. 4-5 Units.

Classical and contemporary approaches to the unequal distribution of goods, status, and power. Modern analytic models of the effects of social contact, cultural capital, family background, and luck in producing inequality. The role of education in stratification. The causes and consequences of inequality by race and gender. The structure of social classes, status groupings, and prestige hierarchies in various societies. Labor markets and their role in inequality. The implications of inequality for individual lifestyles. The rise of the new class, the underclass, and other emerging forms of stratification. Prerequisite: Ph.D. student or consent of instructor.

SOC 340W. CPI Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

A workshop devoted to presenting ongoing research on poverty and inequality in the United States. Open to all students interested in (a) building a better infrastructure for monitoring poverty and inequality, (b) building cutting-edge models of the causes and consequences of poverty and inequality, and (b) building better policy to reduce poverty and inequality. Required for all National Poverty Fellows funded by the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality. May be repeat for credit starting 8/1/2016.
Same as: SOC 240W

SOC 341W. Workshop: Inequality. 1-2 Unit.

Causes, consequences, and structure of inequality; how inequality results from and shapes social classes, occupations, professions, and other aspects of the economy. Research presentations by students, faculty, and guest speakers. Discussion of controversies, theories, and recent writings. May be repeated for credit. Restricted to Sociology doctoral students; others by consent of instructor.

SOC 342B. Gender and Social Structure. 4-5 Units.

The role of gender in structuring contemporary life. Social forces affecting gender at the psychological, interactional, and structural levels. Gender inequality in labor markets, education, the household, and other institutions. Theories and research literature.

SOC 346. Workshop: Ethnography. 1-2 Unit.

Restricted to doctoral students. Student research employing ethnographic methods. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SOC 348. Advanced Topics in the Sociology of Gender. 3-5 Units.

Seminar for graduate students who have research projects in progress that focus on questions about gender and society. Research projects can be at any stage from the initial development to the final writing up of results. Focus is on questions posed by the research projects of the seminar participants. Readings include relevant background to each other's questions and present their own work in progress. A final paper reports the progress on the seminar member's research project. May be repeat for credit.

SOC 350. Sociology of Race. 4-5 Units.

Emphasis on cultural approaches that focus on meaning and meaning-making in the realm of race and race relations. Issues and complications in conceptualizing and theorizing race. Differentiation, organization, and stratification by race across a range of domains. Identity, political and economic participation, group solidarity. Prerequisite: Sociology doctoral student; otherwise, please email instructor for consent to enroll.

SOC 350W. Workshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation. 1-3 Unit.

Current theories and research, recent publications, and presentations of ongoing research by faculty and students. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SOC 351. Counterfactuals and Causal Inference in the Social Sciences. 3-5 Units.

Questions about causal effects and processes are critical in the social sciences, and range from macro-level concerns such as Does capitalism cause democracy? to micro-level ones such as Does educational attainment increase individual earnings / health /civic participation?. This course trains students in quantitative approaches designed to address causal questions with observational and quasi-experimental data, including propensity score methods, fixed and random effects, instrumental variables, and regression discontinuity, among others. The underlying intuition, statistical formulation, and implementation of each approach will be discussed. The course will also examine topics relevant for researches addressing causal questions such as sensitivity analysis, mediation analysis, and integration of quantitative and qualitative approaches.

SOC 353X. Inequality, Society, and Education. 3-5 Units.

The course will focus on developing students¿ understanding of theory and research on several key issues in the relationship between education and inequality: 1) what are the recent patterns and trends in both economic and educational inequality? 2) what kinds of inequality (from a normative/philosophical perspective) should we worry about? 3) how do we measure educational inequality? 4) how are economic and educational inequality linked? 5) what policies/practices might reduce educational inequality? The course will be a graduate student seminar, with enrollment capped at 20-25.
Same as: EDUC 253

SOC 354. Welfare State. 4-5 Units.

This seminar introduces students to the key literature, questions, and debates about the modern welfare state. Emergence, growth, and purported demise of the welfare state. American welfare state in comparative perspective. Social and political factors affecting state development including political parties, labor markets, gender, demographic change, and immigration.
Same as: SOC 254

SOC 356. Strategy and Organizations. 3 Units.

Why are some organizations more competitive than others?  This is one of the defining questions of the interdisciplinary research field known as strategic management.  In this seminar, we will survey the field of strategic management as seen through the lens of organization theory, touching on the four main theoretical approaches that have developed there.nnMost work in strategic management pays little attention to particular theoretical perspectives, and is organized more by the topic - the phenomenon being studied - such as market exit, growth, performance, mergers and acquisitions, innovation, and the like.  I have catalogued the research in strategic management both according to theoretical perspective and topic, and that structure is developed in this course.  Our goal is to help you to identify theoretical perspectives as you try to understand the strategy field.

SOC 357. Immigration and Assimilation. 3-5 Units.

Major theoretical debates and empirical applications in the study of immigrant assimilation. Topics include racial and ethnic identity, socioeconomic integration, political participation, and national identity. Companion to SOC 358.

SOC 358. Sociology of Immigration. 1-5 Unit.

Topics include: the process of migration; historical perspectives; immigrant integration; transnationalism; immigration policy; labor; nations and nationalism.

SOC 359. Organizations and Uncertainty. 3-5 Units.

Organizations and environments characterized by institutional uncertainty. Beliefs at the roots of shared routines and institutional myths are absent. Institutionalists and neo-institutionalists, organizations facing uncertain institutional environments.

SOC 361. Social Psychology of Organizations. 3 Units.

This seminar focuses on social psychological theories and research relevant to organizational behavior. It reviews the current research topics in micro-organizational behavior, linking these to foundations in cognitive and social psychology and sociology. Topics include models of attribution, decision making, emotion, coordination, influence and persuasion, and the psychology of power and culture. Prerequisites: Enrollment in a PhD program. graduate-level social psychology course.

SOC 361W. Workshop: Networks and Organizations. 1-3 Unit.

For students doing advanced research. Group comments and criticism on dissertation projects at any phase of completion, including data problems, empirical and theoretical challenges, presentation refinement, and job market presentations. Collaboration, debate, and shaping research ideas. Prerequisite: courses in organizational theory or social network analysis.
Same as: EDUC 361

SOC 362. Organization and Environment. 3 Units.

This seminar considers the leading sociological approaches to analyzing relations of organizations and environments, with a special emphasis on dynamics. Attention is given to theoretical formulations, research designs, and results of empirical studies. Prerequisite: Enrollment in a PhD program.

SOC 363A. Seminar on Organizational Theory. 5 Units.

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field.
Same as: EDUC 375A, MS&E 389

SOC 363B. Seminar on Organizations: Institutional Analysis. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. Key lines of inquiry on organizational change, emphasizing network, institutional, and evolutionary arguments.
Same as: EDUC 375B

SOC 366A. Organizational Ecology. 3 Units.

This seminar examines theoretical and methodological issues in the study of the ecology of organizations. Particular attention is given to the dynamics that characterize the interface between organizational populations and their audiences.
Same as: OB 601

SOC 367. Institutional Analysis of Organizations. 3-5 Units.

Reading and research on the nature, origins, and effects of the modern institutional system. Emphasis is on the effects of institutional systems on organizational structure.

SOC 367A. Graduate Seminar on Organizations and Networks. 3-5 Units.

This graduate seminar surveys recent developments in research activities at the intersection of organizations and networks. The goals of the seminar are to examine ongoing research activities, related theoretical ideas and research design, and to identify unresolved intellectual problems for future research. Topics include: (1) networks within organizational hierarchy; (2) inter-organizational networks such as strategic alliance and knowledge diffusion; (3) models of hierarchical networks.

SOC 368W. Workshop: China Social Science. 1 Unit.

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: POLISCI 448R

SOC 369. Social Network Methods. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to social network theory, methods, and research applications in sociology. Network concepts of interactionist (balance, cohesion, centrality) and structuralist (structural equivalence, roles, duality) traditions are defined and applied to topics in small groups, social movements, organizations, communities. Students apply these techniques to data on schools and classrooms.
Same as: EDUC 316

SOC 370A. Sociological Theory: Social Structure, Inequality, and Conflict. 5 Units.

Restricted to Sociology doctoral students.The traditions of structural analysis derived from the work of Marx, Weber, and related thinkers. Antecedent ideas in foundational works are traced through contemporary theory and research on political conflict, social stratification, formal organization, and the economy. Priority is given to first year Sociology students.

SOC 370B. Social Interaction and Group Process. 3-5 Units.

Theoretical strategies for the study of interaction, group, and network processes, including rational choice and exchange theory, the theory of action, symbolic interactionism, formal sociology, and social phenomenology. Antecedent ideas in foundational works and contemporary programs of theoretical research.

SOC 372. Theoretical Analysis and Research Design. 3-5 Units.

Intended for Doctoral students and required for Ph.D. in Sociology. This seminar is designed to deepen students¿ understanding of the epistemological foundations of social science, the construction and analysis of theories, and the design of empirical research.

SOC 374. Philanthropy and Civil Society. 1-3 Unit.

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Same as: EDUC 374, POLISCI 334

SOC 375. The Social Psychology of Cooperation, Morality, and Hierarchy. 3-5 Units.

Social order emerges not only from social forces that are cohesive in nature (cooperation, morality), but also ones that are divisive (hierarchy, inequality). This class reviews past work on these forces, with special attention on their micro-level impacts on interaction, as well as their macro-level impacts on political attitudes. Assignments: Students will complete several short proposed study designs and a final empirical project proposal. Prerequisite: Doctoral student in Sociology, Psychology, or the Graduate School of Business, or consent of instructor.

SOC 375W. Workshop: Morality and Hierarchy. 1-2 Unit.

Advanced research workshop with a focus on new theory and research, recent publications, and current research by faculty and graduate student participants. Topics of relevant research include, but are not restricted to, morality, cooperation, solidarity, politics, status, and power. May be repeated for credit.

SOC 376. Perspectives on Organization and Environment: Social Movement Organizations and Environments. 3 Units.

This course examines the interaction between organizations and their environments. It is given every year by a different faculty member. What follows is the description of the course for the academic year 2012-13: This research seminar explores recent theory and research on social movement organizations and their environments. We'll consider the way in which organizational theories help us to explain social movement phenomena, and the way in which social movement theories help us to explain organizational phenomena.

SOC 377. Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private, and Nonprofit. 4 Units.

For students interested in the nonprofit sector, those in the joint Business and Education program, and for Public Policy MA students. The focus is on the missions, functions, and capabilities of nonprofit, public, and private organizations, and the managerial challenges inherent in the different sectors. Focus is on sectors with significant competition among institutional forms, including health care, social services, the arts, and education. Sources include scholarly articles, cases, and historical materials.
Same as: EDUC 377, GSBGEN 346, PUBLPOL 317

SOC 378. Seminar on Institutional Theory and World Society. 1-5 Unit.

Sociological analyses of the rise and impact of the expanded modern world order, with its internationalized organizations and globalized discourse. Consequences for national and local society: education, political organization, economic structure, the environment, and science. The centrality of the individual and the rationalized organization as legitimated actors.

SOC 380. Qualitative Methods. 3-5 Units.

Priority to Sociology doctoral students. Emphasis is on observational and interview-based research. Limited enrollment.

SOC 381. Sociological Methodology I: Introduction. 5 Units.

Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Basic math and statistics. Types of variables, how to recode and transform variables, and how to manage different types of data sets. How to use and think about weights. Introduction to statistical packages and programming. Introduction to multiple regression, and introduction to the interpretation of regression results.

SOC 382. Sociological Methodology II: Principles of Regression Analysis. 4-5 Units.

Preference to Sociology doctoral students. Required for Ph.D. in Sociology. Enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. Rigorous treatment of linear regression models, model assumptions, and various remedies for when these assumptions are violated. Introduction to panel data analysis. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisites: 381.

SOC 383. Sociological Methodology III: Models for Discrete Outcomes. 5 Units.

Required for Ph.D. in Sociology; enrollment limited to first-year Sociology doctoral students. The rationale for and interpretation of static and dynamic models for the analysis of discrete variables. Prerequisites: 381 and 382, or equivalents.

SOC 384. New Models and Methods in the Social Sciences. 3-5 Units.

Two-week intensive introduction to new statistical approaches. Emphasis is on applications. Topics may include network models, multilevel models, latent class models, mixed methods, new qualitative methods, growth models, geostatistical tools, survey-based experiments, new methods for estimating causal effects, web-based surveys, advanced discrete choice models, and diffusion models.

SOC 385A. Research Practicum 1. 2 Units.

Workshop on research methods for second and third year Sociology doctoral students. Ongoing student research, methodological problems, and possible solutions. Required for second and third year paper.

SOC 385B. Research Practicum II. 2 Units.

Continuation of 385A. Workshop on research methods for second and third year Sociology doctoral students. Ongoing student research, methodological problems, and possible solutions. Required for second and third year paper.

SOC 388. Log-Linear Models. 3-5 Units.

Analysis of categorical data with log-linear and negative binomial models. Measures of fit and hypothesis testing.

SOC 389. Mixed Method Research Design and Analysis. 3-5 Units.

Research designs that incorporate qualitative and quantitative analyses in a single project. The tension between thinking case-wise and variable-wise; how the focus on relationships between variables that is the hallmark of the quantitative approach can be brought into qualitative work.

SOC 390. Graduate Individual Study. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

SOC 391. Graduate Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

SOC 392. Research Apprenticeship. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

SOC 393. Teaching Apprenticeship. 1-15 Unit.

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SOC 396. Sociology Colloquium. 1 Unit.

The Sociology Colloquium is a semimonthly seminar held throughout the academic year, in which distinguished scholars lecture about their cutting-edge research findings. Sociology Students must enroll or credit and it is required for all first and second year Sociology students. May be repeat for credit start 8/1/2016.

SOC 635. Social Movements and Organziations. 4 Units.

This research seminar is intended for students seeking to learn more about how collective action underpins institutional change in organizations and industries, and how the success of collective action, in turn, hinges on organizational structures and processes to recruit and mobilize individuals. The purpose of this course is to provide you a roadmap for you to roam the terrain of movements and organizations, and be prepared to generate original research ideas that extend inquiry in your chosen area of research.

SOC 670. Designing Social Research. 4 Units.

This is a course in the design of social research, with a particular emphasis on research field (i.e., non-laboratory) settings. As such, the course is a forum for discussing and developing an understanding of the different strategies social theorists employ to explain social processes, develop theories, and make these theories as believable as possible. In general, these issues will be discussed in the context of sociological research on organizations, but this will not be the exclusive focus of the course. A range of topics will be covered, for example: formulating and motivating research questions; varieties of explanation; experimental and quasi-experimental methods, including natural experiments; counterfactual models; conceptualization and measurement; sampling and case selection; qualitative and quantitative approaches. This course is particularly oriented toward developing an appreciation of the tradeoffs of different approaches. It is well suited to Ph.D. students working on qualifying papers and dissertation proposals.

SOC 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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