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Contacts
Office: Stanford Campus Office: SIEPR Gunn Building, 366 Galvez Street, Room 105
Mail Code: 94305-6125
Phone: (650) 723-4296
Email: jvizas@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://siw.stanford.edu

Director: Adrienne Jamieson
On Campus Coordinator: Jill Vizas

The Bing Stanford in Washington program provides highly-qualified undergraduates with an opportunity to work and study in the nation's capital. In addition to providing students with an understanding of public policy making, the program offers an opportunity to take advantage of the city's unique cultural resources.

Central in the student's educational experience is a full-time internship. Students serve as interns at such institutions and agencies as the Senate, the House of Representatives, the Office of Management and Budget, the White House, the National Institutes of Health, the Smithsonian Institution, CNN, World Bank, the departments of State, Justice, Treasury, Education, and Health and Human Services.

In addition to the internship, students also complete an academic course of study consisting of small courses taught by policy experts, and weekly seminars taught by Stanford faculty members. Seminars are generally 3-5 units. Past topics have included congressional oversight and the press; economic growth and development patterns, policies, and prospects; critical health issues in the U.S. and abroad; policy making in the Washington community; and criminal justice policy. Speakers from the Washington policy community frequently join students and faculty for discussions. Students often write a major paper related to their internship for 3-5 units of credit. Course and seminar topics vary according to student and faculty interest.

The Bing Stanford in Washington program offers stretch quarters in the Autumn and Spring (early September to mid-December, and late March to the end of June) and a regular quarter in Winter, which focuses on environmental policy, health policy and the arts. The program is designed for students in their junior year or during the first or second quarter of their senior year. Applications must be completed two quarters in advance, and three quarters in advance if a student is overseas or otherwise not on campus during the qualifying quarter.

Students interested in the program should contact the campus office of the Bing Stanford in Washington program; see contact information above.

Courses

SIW 103. Economic Growth and Development Patterns, Policies, and Prospects. 5 Units.

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SIW 104. Congressional Oversight and the Press. 5 Units.

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SIW 105. Education Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 106. Criminal Justice Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 107. Civil Rights Law. 5 Units.

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SIW 109. Trans-Atlantic Relations. 5 Units.

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SIW 110. U.S. Foreign Policy. 3 Units.

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SIW 112. Health Policy Making in the US. 5 Units.

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SIW 113. Critical Health Issues in the U.S. and Abroad. 5 Units.

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SIW 115. Health and Environmental Regulatory Policy. 5 Units.

(Staff).

SIW 116. International Environmental Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 118. Topics in American Politics and Public Policy. 3 Units.

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SIW 119. U. S. and Europe: Cooperation or Competition?. 5 Units.

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SIW 120. Law and Public Policy in the Federal Government. 5 Units.

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SIW 122. Energy, Environment and Security in South Asia. 5 Units.

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SIW 124. The American Presidency: From TR to Nixon. 5 Units.

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SIW 128. Transitions in Energy Policy Speakers Series. 2 Units.

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SIW 129. Women's, Maternal, and Children's Health. 5 Units.

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SIW 130. Security through Partnerships, Partnerships through Security. 5 Units.

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SIW 131. United States and Europe in Comparative Perspective. 5 Units.

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SIW 132. Bridging the gap between environmental science and policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 135. Federal Education Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 136. Enduring Issues in American Politics. 3 Units.

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SIW 137. Energy and Environment: Technology, Economics and Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 138. Game Theory and Mathematical Models of Politics. 5 Units.

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SIW 140. Health and Environmental Policy Speaker Series. 2 Units.

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SIW 142. Images of National Politics from Classics in Political Science. 5 Units.

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SIW 144. Energy, Environment, Climate and Conservation Policy: A Washington, D.C. Perspective. 5 Units.

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SIW 146. Diplomacy in Practice: Security Issues in the South Caucasus. 5 Units.

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SIW 148. Art and the First Amendment: Testing the Limits of Expression. 5 Units.

This course will take place in Washington D.C.
Same as: ARTHIST 148

SIW 151. Banking Regulation 5 Years After the Crisis. 5 Units.

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SIW 153. Energy and Climate Cooperation in the Western Hemisphere. 5 Units.

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SIW 155. Images of National Politics from Classics in Political Science. 5 Units.

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SIW 156. Washington Policymaking: A New Era? Advocacy and Strategy at the Federal Level. 5 Units.

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SIW 164. Debating the Nation. 5 Units.

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SIW 170. DOCUMENTARY: Films of Persuasion, Advocacy and Change. 5 Units.

In recent years, documentaries have shed their identity as the "broccoli" of the film world - they were good for you, but not necessarily palatable. Audiences are now engaged, entertained, and enlightened by the work of Errol Morris, Laura Poitras, Michael Moore, Marshall Curry, and others. Has a documentary film ever provoked you, challenged your beliefs, motivated you to act or changed your mind about something? Was that the goal of the filmmaker? This course offers a conceptual overview of the forms, strategies, and conventions of a documentary film with a particular focus on the social and political documentary, i.e. documentaries that strive to explore issues, construct arguments about the world, and galvanize attitudinal change. A consideration of both form and content will foreground the mutable characteristics of the genre with respect to filmmaker voice and point of view, the objective/subjective conundrum, ethics of representation, aesthetic choices, and the implied contract between filmmaker and audience. Students will hone their critical viewing skills and consider the potential of film to effect attitudinal and behavioral change through a series of case studies of films that represent a wide range of styles and approach.

SIW 171. American Presidential Elections: A Brief History. 5 Units.

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SIW 190. Directed Readings. 1-5 Unit.

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SIW 198Y. Health Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 198Z. International Economic Policy. 5 Units.

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SIW 201A. CSRE Public Policy Seminar. 3-5 Units.

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SIW 201B. CSRE Public Policy Seminar. 3-5 Units.

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SIW 214. From the Pantheon to the Capitol: Architecture, Cosmology, Mathematics and Illusion. 5 Units.

This course traces the history of the dome over two millenia, from temples to the gods to Temples of the State, and from cosmic archetype to architectural fetish. The narrative interweaves the themes of the dome as image of the Cosmos, religious icon, national landmark, and political monument. It examines the dome not only as a venue for structural innovation, but also metaphysical geometry and transcendent illusionism.nIndividual case studies will familiarise you with major architects from Hadrian to Richard Rogers and historical milestones from the Dome of the Rock to the Capitol in Washington DC.
Same as: ARTHIST 214