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Office: Encina Hall West, second floor
Mail Code: 94305-6045
Web Site: http://sgs.stanford.edu

Stanford Global Studies (SGS) supports research and teaching in the cultures and societies of the world, and studies the problems facing developing societies as they seek to end their poverty and social and economic inequalities. SGS promotes new centers of teaching excellence in traditional areas of historical and cultural concerns, as well as promoting interdisciplinary activities related to developing new ideas for dealing with fundamental issues of justice, equality, and growth within nation states, cultures, and regions.

Stanford Global Studies is comprised of research centers, degree granting programs, and religion and cultural centers: Center for African Studies*; Center for East Asian Studies*; The Europe Center; Center for Latin American Studies*; Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies*; Center for South Asia; Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies*; France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies; Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies; Mediterranean Studies Forum; Program in International Relations*; Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies; Taube Center for Jewish Studies; and the WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice.

Degree granting programs are denoted with an asterisk (*).

Center for African Studies

Director: Richard Roberts
Office: 100 Encina Commons
Web Site: http://africanstudies.stanford.edu

The Center for African Studies (CAS) is an interdisciplinary research program. CAS offers a certificate and a Master of Arts (M.A.) degree, in addition to a specialization in African Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor. For further information, see the "African Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for East Asian Studies

Director: Jun Uchida
Office: Knight Building, 521 Memorial Way
Web Site: http://ceas.stanford.edu

The Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) supports teaching and research on East Asia-related topics across all disciplines; disseminates knowledge about East Asia through projects of local, regional, national, and international scope; and serves as the intellectual gathering point for a collaborative and innovative community of scholars and students of East Asia. CEAS works with all schools, departments, research centers, and student groups to facilitate and enhance all aspects of East Asia-related research, teaching, outreach, and exchange across the Stanford campus.

For further information, see the "East Asian Studies" section of this bulletin.

The Europe Center

Director: Kenneth Scheve
Office: Encina Central C243
Web Site: http://europe.stanford.edu

The Europe Center is a multidisciplinary institute committed to the examination of European society, culture, politics, diplomacy, and security. The program also offers a specialization in European Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor.

Center for Latin American Studies

Director: Alberto Díaz-Cayeros
Office: Bolivar House
Web Site: http://las.stanford.edu

The Center for Latin American Studies at Stanford University (CLAS)  is a National Resource Center dedicated to promoting research and community awareness about issues affecting Latin America. The Center offers a master's degree, in addition to a specialization in Latin American Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor.

For further information, see the "Center for Latin American Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies

Director: Pavle Levi
Office: Encina Hall West, second floor
Web Site: http://creees.stanford.edu

The Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (CREEES) offers a one-year master's program in interdisciplinary area studies.

For further information, see the "Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies" section of this bulletin.

Center for South Asia

Director: Thomas Blom Hansen
Office: Encina Hall West, first floor
Web Site: http://southasia.stanford.edu

The Center for South Asia (CSA) serves to coordinate and develop Stanford's resources for the study of South Asia across all the disciplines in the School of Humanities and Sciences. It works closely with departments and other units of the University to increase faculty strength, support research, enhance the curriculum, build the library collection, and sponsor programs and events. The program also offers a specialization in South Asian Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor.

Ford Dorsey Program In International Policy Studies

Director: Kathryn Stoner
Office: Encina Hall West, second floor
Web Site: http://ips.stanford.edu

The Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies (IPS) is a two-year master's program that seeks to train the next generation of policy analysts to solve key global problems.

For further information, see the "International Policy Studies" section of this bulletin.

France-Stanford Center For Interdisciplinary Studies

Director: Amalia Kessler
Office: Building 260, room 122
Web Site: http://francestanford.stanford.edu

The France-Stanford Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, founded in partnership with the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs, aims to bridge the disciplines of the humanities, social sciences, sciences, engineering, business, and law, addressing historical and contemporary issues of significance for France and the United States. The Center brings together Stanford faculty and students and academics in France to advance collaborative research and foster interdisciplinary inquiry. Its programs include conferences, support for collaborative research projects, internships, exchanges, lectures, and seminars.

Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program In Iranian Studies

Director: Abbas Milani
Office: Encina Hall West, second floor
Web Site: http://iranian-studies.stanford.edu

The Hamid and Christina Moghadam Program in Iranian Studies at Stanford fosters the interdisciplinary study of Iran as a civilization, one of the oldest in the world. The program combines pedagogy, policy analysis, and research on all aspects of Iran's past, present, and future. The program organizes lectures and student research conferences on Iran. The program also offers a specialization in Iranian Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor.

Mediterranean Studies Forum

Director: Shahzad Bashir
Office: Encina Hall West, Room 214
Web Site: http://mediterraneanstudies.stanford.edu

The Mediterranean Studies Forum encourages scholars to explore the interplay among societies, cultures, and communities around the Mediterranean Basin from the Middle Ages to the present. Its focus is on all aspects of co-existence and conflict that have marked these encounters in the empires, port cities, nation states, and transregional and transnational social, religious, cultural, and economic contexts of North Africa, Anatolia, the Levant, the Balkans, and Southern Europe. It is also interested in the relations of the Mediterranean with other regions and areas of the world. The central goal of the forum is to contribute to interfield and interdisciplinary dialogue among scholars of these areas through lectures, colloquia, workshops, conferences, and publications. Particular programming fields include Turkish Studies and Sephardic Studies.

Program in International Relations

Director: Mike Tomz
Office: Encina Hall West, second floor
Web Site: http://internationalrelations.stanford.edu

International Relations (IR) is an interdisciplinary undergraduate major focusing on changing political, economic, and cultural relations within the international system in the modern era.

For further information, see the "International Relations" section of this bulletin.

Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies

Director: Shahzad Bashir
Office: Encina Hall West, Room 214
Web Site: http://islamicstudies.stanford.edu

The mission of the Sohaib and Sara Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies is to serve as a forum for interdisciplinary research and teaching in Islamic studies, complemented by seminars, colloquia and public lectures. The program seeks to illuminate Islamic history from its beginnings to the 21st century, the religion of Islam in its many aspects, and the diversity of Muslim cultures and societies, past and present, not only in the Middle East but also including South and Southeast Asia, Africa, Europe, and America. In addition to geographical breadth, the program promotes the use of scholarly resources from both the humanities and the social sciences. Participating faculty and students bring perspectives and methods from academic fields including anthropology, art, economics, history, international relations, languages, law, literature, philosophy, political science, and religious studies. The program offers student grants for research and language training. The program also offers a specialization in Islamic Studies as part of the Global Studies Minor.

Taube Center For Jewish Studies

Director: Charlotte Fonrobert
Office: Building 360, Room 362H
Web Site: http://jewishstudies.stanford.edu

The interdisciplinary Taube Center for Jewish Studies coordinates and promotes the study of all aspects of Jewish life. The center offers an undergraduate minor and an interdisciplinary major through the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

For further information, see the "Jewish Studies" section of this bulletin.

WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice

Director: David Cohen
Office: Encina Hall West, Room 208
Web Site: https://handacenter.stanford.edu/

The WSD HANDA Center for Human Rights and International Justice is dedicated to promoting the rule of law, accountability, and human rights around the world through education, critical scholarship, and policy advocacy. The Center offers an undergraduate minor.

For further information, see the "Human Rights" section of this bulletin.

Minor in Global Studies

The minor in Global Studies is designed to give students an in-depth interdisciplinary study in one of six specializations within a larger global perspective.

Global Studies is centered on the interdisciplinary study of regions and their intersecting cultures, languages, history, politics, and societies. Historically, Global (or Area) Studies have sought ways to understand the distinctiveness of cultures and nations by applying the combined knowledge from the social sciences and humanities to their study. This approach was further developed during World War II and the Cold War to be able to understand both American allies and enemies.

Today, Global Studies examine regions and cultures within the larger context of globalization. It applies more branches of knowledge, from human biology and earth sciences to music and management engineering, to better understand the character of regions, their respective developmental trajectories, and the way those trajectories fit into a larger global context.

Each student chooses one of the six specializations. The specialization appears on the transcript but it does not appear on the diploma.

Admission

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to the Global Studies minor program should consult the relevant center adviser, or Executive Director of Stanford Global Studies <kkuhns@stanford.edu>. To declare the Global Studies minor with one of six specializations, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the appropriate specialization adviser (see appropriate specialization page for contact information).  
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the specialization. Submit the form to the specialization adviser as noted on the relevant tab in this section of this bulletin.

Minor in Global Studies with African Studies Specialization

The minor in Global Studies, African Studies specialization, offers students the opportunity to complement their major course of study with an in-depth, interdisciplinary exploration of the cultures, histories, politics, religions, and societies of Africa.

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to this minor program should consult the minor adviser at the Center for African Studies. Students declare the minor and the African Studies specialization in Axess (see below for detailed instructions).

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make service, research, or study abroad in Africa as part of their Stanford experience.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with African Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with African Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Laura Hubbard, <lhubbard@stanford.edu>, Associate Director for the Center for African Studies. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the African Studies specialization. Submit the form to the minor adviser, Laura Hubbard, in the Center for African Studies office (Encina Hall West, Room 219, 417 Galvez Mall).

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in African Studies enables students to:

  1. develop critical knowledge and skills in African Studies
  2. organize their interest in Africa into a coherent course of study through directed mentorship and participation in  intellectual community.
  3. prepare for research, study, or service in Africa

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for African Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. A minimum of 25 units of Africa-related courses. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements.
  2. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)
  3. At least one quarter's exposure to a sub-Saharan African language. The Center for African Studies and the Special Languages Program of the Language Center can arrange instruction in any of several languages spoken in West, East, Central, and Southern Africa.
  4. One entry level course that covers more than one region of Africa.
  5. A designated focus of study, either disciplinary or regional, through a three course concentration developed with the minor adviser.
  6. A minimum 25-page research paper, with a focus on Africa. This paper may be an extension of a previous paper written for an African Studies course. Other approaches to fulfilling the capstone requirement may be accepted with the approval of the Director of African Studies.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their African Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with European Studies Specialization

The Stanford Global Studies, European Studies specialization, is designed for undergraduates with an interdisciplinary interest in the history, culture, politics, societies, and institutions of Europe, past and present.

The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make Europe-based overseas studies a part of their Stanford experience.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with European Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with European Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the minor adviser Kenneth Scheve, <scheve@stanford.edu>, Faculty Director for The Europe Center to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the European Studies specialization. Submit the form to Karen Haley, <khaley@stanford.edu>, in Encina Hall Central, Rm C243.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in European Studies enables students to:

  1. organize their studies in a coherent and mentored minor

  2. prepare for or follow up on involvement in a Bing Overseas Studies Program in Europe

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by Stanford Global Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. Completion of 28 units that include the following:

    1. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)

    2. INTNLREL 122 Introduction to European Studies (5 units)

    3. 5 unit survey course on European history or culture. The list of course alternatives that fulfill this requirement this year are:
    4. 15 additional units on a coherent theme of interest developed with the minor adviser. This combination of courses can be on any thematic subject with an interdisciplinary and comparative focus on Europe. See the Related Courses tab below for example courses.
    5. At least 13 of the 28 units need to be completed on the Stanford campus.
  2. Advanced proficiency in a modern European language achieved by one of the following:
    1. Completion of six quarters of college-level study of a modern European language
    2. Completion of a course taught in a modern European language at the 100-level or higher and with a letter grade of 'B' or higher. This may be a course on a European language or literature, or other subject as long as it fulfills the above criteria. (This course may fulfill both the minor foreign language requirement and the minor 28 unit minimum requirement.)
    3. Achievement of the advanced proficiency level on the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center
  3. A capstone experience in European Studies, including but not limited to one of the following:
    1. 25-page minimum research paper with a focus on European Studies
    2. Completion of an overseas study program or internship in Europe
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their European Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Iranian Studies Specialization

The Stanford Global Studies, Iranian Studies specialization, is designed for undergraduates with an interdisciplinary interest in the modern history and politics of Iran or the Middle East; Islam, particularly Shiism; the geopolitics of the Middle East; and the religions, ethnicities, and cultures.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan graduate studies, teaching, or research and analysis focused on Iran.

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by Stanford Global Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Iranian Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Iranian Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Roma Parhad, <rparhad@stanford.edu>, Program Manager for the Iranian Studies Program. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the Iranian Studies specialization. Submit the form to the minor adviser Roma Parhad in Encina Hall West, Rm 211.

Requirements

  1. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)

  2. One area-specific entry course that deals with Iran and the Middle East. If a student wants to take a course on a subject matter not directly related to Iran, the consent of the Director of Iranian Studies is required.
  3. A minimum of 25 units of qualifying courses. 15 units must be from the list of core courses. The remaining 10 units can be chosen from the list of approved elective courses.
    • At least 10 of the 25 units must be completed at the home campus; the remaining 15 units could be completed in an approved study abroad programs.
  4. Completion of two quarters of Persian language, or proven proficiency in the language.
  5. A capstone experience in Iranian Studies for up to 5 units. The project offers students the option to conduct a major independent research paper related to Iran under faculty guidance.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Iranian Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Islamic Studies Specialization

The minor in Stanford Global Studies, Islamic Studies specialization, offers students an interdisciplinary and global exploration of Islam and Muslim societies and cultures. Focus is on knowledge of Islam in all its internal complexity, the history of Islam from its beginnings to the 21st century, Islamic social contexts, and the diversity of human experience as seen in literature and the arts originating in societies affected by Islamic civilizations. Students explore the global extent of Islam and the growth of its diasporas by taking courses on geographical regions such as the Middle East, South Asia, Eurasia, Africa, Western Europe, and Americas) and from disciplines such as anthropology, art and art history, comparative literature, history, political science, international relations, and religious studies.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Islamic Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Islamic Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Burcak Keskin-Kozat, <burcak@stanford.edu>, Associate Director for the Islamic Studies Program to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the Islamic Studies specialization. Submit the form to the minor adviser Burcak Keskin-Kozat in Encina Hall West, Rm. 212.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in Islamic Studies enables students to:

  1. organize their studies in a coherent and mentored minor.
  2. gain exposure to the past and present of Islam in diverse social, political, and cultural settings around the globe.
  3. prepare for or follow up on involvement in a Bing Overseas Studies Program such as in Istanbul, France, Germany, or Cape Town.        

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)
  2. One area-specific entry course focusing on the Islamic world. The following courses may be used to fulfill this requirement:
    • ANTHRO 28N Secularism and its Critics (3-5 units)
    • HISTORY 289 The Indian Ocean World: Winds, Merchants & Empires
    • POLISCI 246A Paths to the Modern World: Islam and the West (5 units)
    • COMPLIT 238A Uneasy Modernity: 20th Century Persian Poetry and the Specter of Tradition (3-5 units)
    • HISTORY 83D Global History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times)
  3. Completion of at least 25 units of courses from the Related Courses tab on this page.
  4. At least one course must be from each of the following areas:
    • Islamic Arts, Literatures, and Cultures
    • Islam, History, and Politics
    • Religion of Islam
  5. Completion of three courses in a relevant language such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Ottoman Turkish, Urdu, Pashto, Kazakh, or Swahili.
  6. A capstone project such as a minimum 25-page research paper, directed reading and research with an Abbasi Program faculty member, or an overseas study, internship, or language training program that is approved by the Abbasi Program.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Islamic Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with Latin American Studies Specialization

The minor in Stanford Global Studies, Latin American Studies specialization, consists of a core set of courses surveying the history, politics, society, ecology, and culture of the Latin American region; advanced language training; and in-depth course work.

Students from any major interested in applying for admission to this minor program should consult Stanford Global Studies. Students who wish to complete the minor must declare online (through Axess) and submit a proposal of course work no later than the second quarter of the junior year. The minor must be completed by the second quarter of the senior year. Units taken for a student's major cannot be double-counted towards the minor.

Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs. The minor is especially well-suited for undergraduates who plan to make service, research, or study abroad in Latin America a part of their Stanford experience.

The Global Studies Minor with Specialization in Latin American Studies is open to students in any major.

Upon completion of all requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for Latin American Studies subcommittee on undergraduate programs. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with Latin American Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with Latin American Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with the CLAS associate director to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the Latin American Studies specialization. Submit the form to the minor adviser Elizabeth Saenz-Ackermann in Bolivar House, 582 Alvarado Row.

Requirements

  1. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements. Completion of 28 units as follows: 
    1. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)
    2. A 5-unit course surveying Latin America, either ILAC 131 Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives or an approved substitute.
    3. 20 additional units in courses which together comprise a coherent focus on a theoretical problem or issue of the region, such as but not limited to
      1. culture and identity
      2. political economy
      3. sustainable development.
    4. At least 15 of the 28 units must be completed at Stanford. 
    5. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade.
  2. Foreign Language Requirement. The minimum requirement for completion of the minor in Global Studies with Latin American Studies Specialization is advanced proficiency in Spanish or Portuguese by one of the following:
    1. Completion of seven quarters of college-level study of Spanish or Portuguese.
    2. Completion of a course taught in Spanish or Portuguese at the 100-level or higher, with a letter grade of 'B' or higher. This may be a course on Spanish or Portuguese language or literature, or some other subject.
    3. Achievement of the advanced proficiency level on the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center. Contact the Stanford Language Center for test dates and procedures.
  3. Recommended: experience in Latin America such as study abroad, field research, or an internship.
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their Latin American Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Minor in Global Studies with South Asian Studies Specialization

The minor in Stanford Global Studies, South Asian Studies specialization, offers students a focused study from an interdisciplinary perspective of the cultures, histories, politics, religions, and societies of South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and the Maldives.

The Global Studies Minor with Specialization in South Asian Studies is open to students in any major. Students consult with their minor adviser to develop individual programs.

Declaring the Global Studies Minor with South Asian Studies Specialization

To declare the Global Studies minor with South Asian Studies specialization, students must:

  1. Set up an appointment with Sangeeta Mediratta, <smedirat@stanford.edu>, Associate Director for the South Asian Studies Center to discuss your academic plan. 
  2. Declare the Global Studies minor in Axess.
  3. Complete the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program form in order to declare the South Asian Studies specialization. Submit the form to the minor adviser Sangeeta Mediratta in Encina Hall West, Rm 104.

Learning Outcomes

The SGS minor specialization in South Asian Studies enables students to:

  1. acquire a nuanced and sophisticated understanding of the texts and contexts of South Asian Studies .
  2. work on this geographical and disciplinary area within the broader contours, conversations, and methods of Global Studies.
  3. enhance students’ ability to understand and participate in an increasingly global world.

  4. develop critical  and wide-ranging  insight into a key world area.

Upon completion of requirements, final certification of the minor is made by the Center for South Asian Studies. The minor and the specialization appear on the transcript but they do not appear on the diploma.

Requirements

  1. GLOBAL 101 Global Studies Gateway Course (3 units)
  2. At least 25 units of qualifying courses. Students may not double-count courses for completing major and minor requirements. At least 10 of the 25 units must be completed at Stanford. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade.
    1. A 5-unit core course such as ANTHRO 149 South Asia: History, People, Politics or HISTORY 106A Global Human Geography: Asia and Africa.
    2. 20 units in courses that together represent an area of interdisciplinary focus such as, but not limited to, the following:
      1. immigration and law
      2. urbanization and film
      3. history and culture.Each course (with the exception of BOSP courses) must be at the 100-level or higher.
    3. All courses, with the exception of Overseas Studies courses, must be at the 100-level or higher. For a list of courses, see the "Related Courses" tab in this section.
  3. Foreign Language Requirement. Language requirement: Intermediate proficiency in a South Asian language by one of the following:
    1. Completion of two introductory language courses in a South Asian language such as Urdu, Hindi, Persian, Bengali, Pashto, Tamil, Telugu, Kannada, Gujarati, Malayalam, Garhwali, Nepalese, Tibetan, or Sindhi; other languages may also qualify.
    2. Intermediate proficiency in any of the above languages, as measured by the ACTFL scale in a test administered by the Stanford Language Center.
  4.  A capstone experience in South Asia such as study abroad, field research, an internship, or another example of sustained and serious involvement in South Asia. The approach taken must be approved by the Center for South Asia faculty director..
    • Students present their work in an end-of-year capstone seminar with other SGS minors and led by SGS faculty.

Course List

For a representative, rather than comprehensive, list of courses that count towards the minor, see the Related Courses tab in this section of the Bulletin. Other courses may also fulfill the requirements; students should consult their South Asian Studies minor adviser concerning which courses might fulfill minor requirements.

Director: Jeremy Weinstein

Advisory Committee: Shahzad Bashir (Religious Studies), Thomas Blom Hansen (Anthropology), Kathryn Stoner (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Directors' Committee: Jun Uchida (History), Shahzad Bashir (Religious Studies), Alberto Díaz-Cayeros (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies), Thomas Blom Hansen (Anthropology), Amalia Kessler (Law), Pavle Levi (Art & Art History), Abbas Milani (Hoover Institution), Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science), Kenneth Scheve (Political Science), Kathryn Stoner ( Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies), Mike Tomz (Political Science), Richard Roberts (History), Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies)

The following lists are representative rather than comprehensive lists of courses that may apply to the six specializations in the minor in Stanford Global Studies. Students should consult their adviser to determine courses that apply to their specific program.

African Studies Specialization

The following courses are a selection of courses related to African Studies. This list is updated as additional courses are made available. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, African Studies specialization.

Units
AFRICAST 109Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 131Media and Conflict in Africa3-5
AFRICAST 132Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 138Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention3-5
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 181Media Representations of Africa3-5
AFRICAST 300Contemporary Issues in African Studies1
Related Courses from Other Departments
AFRICAST 119Novel Perspectives on South Africa2-3
AFRICAST 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 145BThe African Atlantic3-5
AFRICAST 199Independent Study or Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAST 220ERenaissance Africa3-5
AFRICAST 229Literature and Global Health3-5
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
ANTHRO 1Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology3-5
ANTHRO 13AIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 41Genes and Identity3
ANTHRO 140Ethnography of Africa3
ANTHRO 141BThe Anthropology of Bits and Bytes: Digital Media in the Developing World5
ANTHRO 147Nature, Culture, Heritage5
ANTHRO 185Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
CLASSICS 24NWhat is a Map?4
COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
ECON 118Development Economics5
HISTORY 46SEconomies of Africa: Entrepreneurialism, Informality and the History of Capitalism, 1400-Present5
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 48The Egyptians3-5
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions4
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 146History of Humanitarian Aid in sub-Saharan Africa4-5
HISTORY 238JThe European Scramble for Africa: Origins and Debates5
HISTORY 244Egyptomania! The Allure of Ancient Egypt Over the Past 3,500 Years5
HISTORY 247JHistory and Memory in Africa4-5
HISTORY 248SColonial States and African Societies, Part I4-5
HISTORY 249SColonial States and African Societies, Part II4-5
HISTORY 283The New Global Economy, Oil and Origins of the Arab Spring4-5
HISTORY 289The Indian Ocean World: Winds, Merchants & Empires4-5
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
ILAC 219Lusophone Africa3-5
LAWGEN 111QIntroduction to International Human Rights3
OSPCPTWN 16Sites of Memory3
OSPCPTWN 18Xhosa Language and Culture2
OSPCPTWN 24ATargeted Research Project in Community Health and Development3
OSPCPTWN 24BTargeted Research Project in Community Health and Development5
OSPCPTWN 30Engaging Cape Town2
OSPCPTWN 31Political Economy of Foreign Aid3
OSPCPTWN 38Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective3-5
OSPCPTWN 43Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa4
OSPCPTWN 50[Independent Study] Conservation & Resources in Sub-Saharan Africa2-3
OSPCPTWN 57Directed Study in Health Systems and Policy1-3
OSPCPTWN 63Socio-Ecological Systems3
OSPCPTWN 70Youth Citizenship and Community Engagement3
OSPCPTWN 75Giving Voice to the Now: Studies in the South African Present3
OSPCPTWN 76(South) Africa Rising: Implications for Conflict, Democracy, and Human Rights5
OSPCPTWN 77Independent Study: Topics in South African Politics and Development2-4
OSPCPTWN 78Postcolonial Modernist Art Movements in Africa3
OSPCPTWN 80Business in Africa2
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
POLISCI 242AWhy is Africa Poor?5
SURG 150Principles and Practice of International Humanitarian Surgery4
THINK 42Thinking Through Africa: Perspectives on Health, Wealth, and Well-Being4

European Studies Specialization

The following courses are a selection of courses related to European Studies. This list is updated as additional courses are made available. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, European Studies specialization.

Units
ARTHIST 101Introduction to Greek Art I: The Archaic Period4
ARTHIST 102Introduction to Greek Art II: The Classical Period4
ARTHIST 105Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 107ASt. Petersburg, a Cultural Biography: Architecture, Urban Planning, the Arts4
ARTHIST 108Virginity and Power: Mary in the Middle Ages4
ARTHIST 111Introduction to Italian Renaissance, 1420-15804
ARTHIST 114Mystical Naturalism: Van Eyck, Dürer, and the Northern Renaissance4
ARTHIST 117Picturing the Papacy, 1300-18504
ARTHIST 118Titian, Veronese, Tintoretto4
ARTHIST 120Living in a Material World: Seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish Painting4
ARTHIST 12118th-Century Art in Europe, ca 1660-17804
ARTHIST 122The Age of Revolution: Painting in Europe 1780-18304
ARTHIST 124The Age of Naturalism, Painting in Europe1830-18744
ARTHIST 126Post-Naturalist Painting4
ARTHIST 142Architecture Since 19004
ARTHIST 147Modernism and Modernity4
ARTHIST 203Artists, Athletes, Courtesans and Crooks5
ARTHIST 210Giotto5
ARTHIST 213Renaissance Print Culture: Art in the Cantor Arts Center5
COMPLIT 115Nabokov in the Transnational Context3-5
COMPLIT 181Philosophy and Literature5
COMPLIT 190Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought3-5
COMPLIT 219Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory3-5
COMPLIT 230AThe Novel in Europe: The Age of Compromise, 1800-18485
COMPLIT 233Baroque and Neobaroque5
COMPLIT 247Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film3-5
COMPLIT 290Human Rights in a Global Frame: Race, Place, Redress, Resistance3-5
COMPLIT 332The Transatlantic Renaissance5
DLCL 100CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People3-5
ENGLISH 81Philosophy and Literature5
ENGLISH 233Baroque and Neobaroque5
FILMSTUD 131Cinemato-graph3-5
FILMSTUD 331Cinemato-graph3-5
HISTORY 10BSurvey of Early Modern Europe3
HISTORY 10CThe Problem of Modern Europe3
HISTORY 30CCulture and Society in Reformation England3
HISTORY 85BJews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability3
HISTORY 106BGlobal Human Geography: Europe and Americas5
HISTORY 110BRenaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe5
HISTORY 110CThe Problem of Modern Europe5
HISTORY 132Ordinary Lives: A Social History of the Everyday in Early Modern Europe5
HISTORY 137AEurope, 1945-20025
HISTORY 140AThe Scientific Revolution5
HISTORY 185BJews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility4-5
HISTORY 222Crime and Punishment in Early Modern Europe and Russia5
HISTORY 227East European Women and War in the 20th Century4-5
HISTORY 230DEurope in the World, 1789-Present4-5
HISTORY 230FSurveillance in Modern Europe4-5
HISTORY 233GCatholic Politics in Europe, 1789-19925
HISTORY 239HColonialism and Empire in Modern Europe5
HISTORY 327East European Women and War in the 20th Century4-5
HISTORY 330DEurope in the World, 1789-Present4-5
HISTORY 330FSurveillance in Modern Europe4-5
ILAC 114NIntroduction to Lyric Poetry3-5
ILAC 120Advanced Critical Reading in Spanish3-5
ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 136Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
ILAC 199Individual Work1-12
ILAC 201Modern Spanish Theater3-5
ILAC 242Poetry Workshop in Spanish3-5
ILAC 278Senior Seminar: Spanish Poetry3-5
INTNLREL 122Introduction to European Studies5
INTNLREL 123The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities5
JEWISHST 5Biblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 5BBiblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 148Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature3-5
JEWISHST 183The Holocaust4
JEWISHST 185BJews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility4-5
LAW 5005European Union Law2-3
ME 421European Entrepreneurship and Innovation Thought Leaders Seminar1
OSPBER 68Protestant Reformation4
OSPBER 161XThe German Economy in the Age of Globalization4-5
OSPMADRD 43The Jacobean Star Way and Europe: Society, Politics and Culture5
OSPMADRD 74Islam in Spain and Europe: 1300 Years of Contact4
OSPPARIS 122XChallenges of Integration in the European Union4-5
PHIL 81Philosophy and Literature5
PHIL 115Problems in Medieval Philosophy: Islamic Aristotelianism and Western Scholasticism3-5
PHIL 215Problems in Medieval Philosophy: Islamic Aristotelianism and Western Scholasticism3-5
REES 100Current Issues in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies1-2
REES 105Central and East European Politics5
REES 205Central and East European Politics5
SOC 309Nations and Nationalism4-5

Iranian Studies Specialization

The following courses are a selection of courses related to Iranian Studies. This list is updated as additional courses are made available. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, Iranian Studies specialization.

Units
AFRICAAM 94Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 145ASecond-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 145BSecond-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 145CSecond-Year Modern Persian ,Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 216AContemporary Language of Iran, First Quarter3
AMELANG 216BContemporary Language of Iran, Second Quarter3
AMELANG 216CContemporary Language of Iran, Third Quarter3
ANTHRO 134BConflict and Change in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 150AMinaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia3-5
ANTHRO 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
ARTHIST 118APublic Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
CLASSICS 147Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Religion and Society in Late Antique Iran4-5
CLASSICS 148Imperishable Heroes and Unblemished Goddesses: Myth, Ritual, and Epic in Ancient Iran3-5
CLASSICS 247Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Religion and Society in Late Antique Iran4-5
CLASSICS 248Imperishable Heroes and Unblemished Goddesses: Myth, Ritual, and Epic in Ancient Iran3-5
COMPLIT 40QAesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran2-3
COMPLIT 125Past Desire Made Present: The Traditions of Erotic Poetry in Medieval Iran and Europe3-5
COMPLIT 209Advanced Readings in Persian2-5
COMPLIT 237AJesters, Cross-dressers, and Rebels: A Subversive History of Persian Literature3-5
COMPLIT 238AUneasy Modernity: 20th Century Persian Poetry and the Specter of Tradition3-5
COMPLIT 243AFrom Idol to Equal: Changing Images of Love in 20th-Century Persian and Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
COMPLIT 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
COMPLIT 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
COMPLIT 260BLove and Negativity in Medieval Persian Mysticism3-5
DLCL 227Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures1
FEMGEN 3BTrans History: The Long View1
FEMGEN 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
GLOBAL 101Global Studies Gateway Course3
GLOBAL 190Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities3
GLOBAL 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
GLOBAL 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
GLOBAL 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
GLOBAL 390Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities3
HISTORY 3BTrans History: The Long View1
HISTORY 82CMaking of the Islamic World, 600-15003
HISTORY 83DGlobal History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times)3-5
HISTORY 84NThe American Empire in the Middle East4
HISTORY 84SBetween Toleration and Persecution: Iran and its Minorities in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 181BFormation of the Contemporary Middle East5
HISTORY 182CMaking of the Islamic World, 600-15005
HISTORY 183DGlobal History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times)3-5
HISTORY 252BDiplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country5
HISTORY 281DShia Islam4-5
HISTORY 282CWomen in the Modern Middle East4-5
HISTORY 284FEmpires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-18004-5
HISTORY 381DShia Islam4-5
HISTORY 382CWomen in the Modern Middle East4-5
HISTORY 384FEmpires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-18004-5
INTNLREL 71QAesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran2-3
INTNLREL 174Diplomacy on the Ground: Case Studies in the Challenges of Representing Your Country5
INTNLREL 198Senior Thesis2-10
INTNLREL 207Tribe, State, and Society in the Modern Middle East5
JEWISHST 330Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities3
MS&E 93QNuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism3
POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations in Iran5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 211NNuclear Politics3-5
POLISCI 215FNuclear Weapons and International Politics5
POLISCI 219Directed Reading and Research in International Relations1-10
POLISCI 229Directed Reading and Research in American Politics1-10
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 311NNuclear Politics3-5
POLISCI 315FNuclear Weapons and International Politics5
RELIGST 180Gender Relations in Islam3
RELIGST 209Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Religion and Society in Late Antique Iran4-5
RELIGST 209ASugar in the Milk: Modern Zoroastrianism as Race, Religion, and Ethnicity4-5
RELIGST 209D`Crow Eaters' & `Fire Worshippers': Exploring Contemporary Zoroastrianism Thru Reading Parsi Lit3-5
RELIGST 209EImperishable Heroes and Unblemished Goddesses: Myth, Ritual, and Epic in Ancient Iran3-5
RELIGST 309Priests, Prophets, and Kings: Religion and Society in Late Antique Iran4-5
RELIGST 309ASugar in the Milk: Modern Zoroastrianism as Race, Religion, and Ethnicity4-5
RELIGST 309D`Crow Eaters' & `Fire Worshippers': Exploring Contemporary Zoroastrianism Thru Reading Parsi Lit3-5
RELIGST 309EImperishable Heroes and Unblemished Goddesses: Myth, Ritual, and Epic in Ancient Iran3-5

Islamic Studies Specialization

The following courses are a selection of courses related to Islamic Studies. This list is updated as additional courses are made available. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, Islamic Studies specialization.

Units
Islamic Arts, Literatures, and Cultures
AFRICAAM 94Public Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
AFRICAST 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
AMELANG 126Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
ANTHRO 13AIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 28NSecularism and its Critics3-5
ANTHRO 49Violence and Belonging in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 132Religion and Politics in the Muslim World5
ANTHRO 132BIslam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies3-5
ANTHRO 133AAnthropology of the Middle East3-5
ANTHRO 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
ANTHRO 134BConflict and Change in the Middle East5
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 142AYouth in the Global South: Beyond Active Subjects and Passive Objects5
ANTHRO 144APractice of Everyday Life in Kazakhstan: From Nomadism to Modernity3-5
ANTHRO 146AAnthropology of Youth5
ANTHRO 146BGlobal Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society5
ANTHRO 147AFolklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia3-5
ANTHRO 147BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ANTHRO 149South Asia: History, People, Politics5
ANTHRO 149ACities and Citizens in the Middle East4
ANTHRO 150AMinaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia3-5
ANTHRO 181AGender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt4
ANTHRO 247BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ANTHRO 249South Asia: History, People, Politics5
ANTHRO 318Democracy and Political Authority5
ANTHRO 341The Archaeololgy of Religious Crusading in Medieval Europe5
ANTHRO 347Religion and Modernity5
ARABLANG 14AShort Stories and Poetry from the Arab World - Part I3
ARCHLGY 13Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ARCHLGY 132The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique3-5
ARCHLGY 147BWorld Heritage in Global Conflict5
ARCHLGY 232The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique3-5
ARTHIST 1AIntroduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval5
ARTHIST 105Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 105BMedieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture3-5
ARTHIST 118APublic Space in Iran: Murals, Graffiti, Performance3-4
ARTHIST 205Cairo and Istanbul: Urban Space, Memory, Protest5
ARTHIST 205AIslamic Painting: Landscape, Body, Power5
ARTHIST 208Hagia Sophia5
ARTHIST 208BThe Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews5
ARTHIST 209Art and Religious Experience in Byzantium and Islam5
ARTHIST 305Art & Architecture in the Medieval Mediterranean4
ARTHIST 405Art, Ekphrasis, and Music in Byzantium and Islam5
ARTHIST 408Hagia Sophia5
ARTHIST 408BThe Art of Medieval Spain: Muslims, Christians, Jews5
ARTHIST 409Iconoclasm5
CLASSICS 56Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval5
COMPLIT 38QEthics of Jihad4
COMPLIT 40QAesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran2-3
COMPLIT 102Film Series: Understanding Turkey Through Film1
COMPLIT 109Masterpieces: Orhan Pamuk3-5
COMPLIT 119Travel Writing in the Pre-Modern Mediterranean3-5
COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
COMPLIT 125Past Desire Made Present: The Traditions of Erotic Poetry in Medieval Iran and Europe3-5
COMPLIT 141AThe Meaning of Arabic Literature: a seminar investigation into the nebulous concept of adab3-5
COMPLIT 143AAlla Turca Love: Tales of Romance in Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 144AIstanbul the Muse: The City in Literature and Film3-5
COMPLIT 144BIstanbul the Muse: Gateways to the World3-5
COMPLIT 145Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
COMPLIT 146AThe Arab Spring in Arabic Literature3-5
COMPLIT 149AClassical Arabic Poetry: An Introduction3-5
COMPLIT 151APhilosophies, Literatures, and Alternatives3-5
COMPLIT 157Contemporary Turkish Cinema and Society3-5
COMPLIT 171Ethics of Jihad5
COMPLIT 238AUneasy Modernity: 20th Century Persian Poetry and the Specter of Tradition3-5
COMPLIT 242AShort Stories from South Asia3-5
COMPLIT 243AFrom Idol to Equal: Changing Images of Love in 20th-Century Persian and Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 243BReadings in Avicenna and al-Jurjani3-5
COMPLIT 247Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film3-5
COMPLIT 247FBeyond Casablanca: North African Cinema and Literature3-5
COMPLIT 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
COMPLIT 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
COMPLIT 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
COMPLIT 252AClassic Arabic Poetry3-5
COMPLIT 252BClassic Arabic Prose3-5
COMPLIT 260BLove and Negativity in Medieval Persian Mysticism3-5
COMPLIT 342Alla Turca Love: Tales of Romance in Turkish Literature3-5
COMPLIT 346Classical Arabic Poetry: An Introduction3-5
COMPLIT 347The Arab Spring in Arabic Literature3-5
COMPLIT 351APhilosophies, Literatures, and Alternatives3-5
CSRE 129Camus4-5
CSRE 133AAnthropology of the Middle East3-5
CSRE 133BCovering Islam: On What We Learn to See, Think and Hear about Islam & Muslims3-5
CSRE 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
CSRE 249The Algerian Wars3-5
DLCL 227Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures1
DLCL 245LA ALJAMÍA, ROMÁRABE LANGUAGE3-5
FEMGEN 210Urdu Literature and Bombay Cinema3
FRENCH 242Beyond Casablanca: North African Cinema and Literature3-5
FRENCH 249The Algerian Wars3-5
GERMAN 244Religious and Gender Identity in Postmigrant Theatre1-5
GERMAN 344Religious and Gender Identity in Postmigrant Theatre1-5
GLOBAL 199Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor1-5
GLOBAL 210Urdu Literature and Bombay Cinema3
GLOBAL 249AThe Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning1-3
GLOBAL 249BIranian Cinema in Diaspora1-3
GLOBAL 249CContemporary Iranian Theater1-3
HISTORY 7EIslamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
HISTORY 239GThe Algerian Wars3-5
HISTORY 296FShort Stories from India and Pakistan3-5
ICA 296F
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
MUSIC 7BMusical Cultures of the World3
MUSIC 13NBollywood and Beyond: South Asian Popular and Folk Music3
MUSIC 80TJewish Music in the Lands of Islam4
MUSIC 146KStudies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia3-5
MUSIC 186Religion and Music in South Asia4-5
MUSIC 187Music and Culture from the Land of Fire: Introduction to Azerbaijani Mugham1-5
MUSIC 246KStudies in Ethnomusicology: Music of South Asia3-5
MUSIC 286Religion and Music in South Asia4-5
REES 35Films of Central Asia1-2
REES 54ACentral Asia Through Films: A Weekly 3-Hour Seminar3-5
REES 244APractice of Everyday Life in Kazakhstan: From Nomadism to Modernity3-5
REES 247AFolklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia3-5
RELIGST 283Religion and Literature4
TAPS 160MIntroduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture3-4
TAPS 357World Drama and Performance4
URBANST 144Cities and Citizens in the Middle East4
Islamic History
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
ENGLISH 234GLiterature and Empire4-5
FEMGEN 5SComparative Partitions: Pakistan, Israel, and the Modern World5
HISTORY 3CTalking About Jews1
HISTORY 5SComparative Partitions: Pakistan, Israel, and the Modern World5
HISTORY 13CTalking About Jews3
HISTORY 39Modern Britain and the British Empire3
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 82CMaking of the Islamic World, 600-15003
HISTORY 83DGlobal History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times)3-5
HISTORY 83SRefugees of Palestine and Syria: History, Identity, and Politics of Exile in the Middle East5
HISTORY 84NThe American Empire in the Middle East4
HISTORY 84SBetween Toleration and Persecution: Iran and its Minorities in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 96Gandhi in His Time and Ours3
HISTORY 102History of the International System5
HISTORY 139Modern Britain and the British Empire5
HISTORY 181BFormation of the Contemporary Middle East5
HISTORY 182CMaking of the Islamic World, 600-15005
HISTORY 183DGlobal History of Muslim Peoples (from the Crusades to Modern Times)3-5
HISTORY 196Gandhi in His Time and Ours5
HISTORY 234GLiterature and Empire4-5
HISTORY 246The Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
HISTORY 281DShia Islam4-5
HISTORY 282CWomen in the Modern Middle East4-5
HISTORY 283The New Global Economy, Oil and Origins of the Arab Spring4-5
HISTORY 283GPlace, Nature, and Life: Spacetime through Ottoman Texts4-5
HISTORY 284FEmpires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-18004-5
HISTORY 288Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
HISTORY 289The Indian Ocean World: Winds, Merchants & Empires4-5
HISTORY 334GLiterature and Empire4-5
HISTORY 345BAfrican Encounters with Colonialism4-5
HISTORY 346The Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
HISTORY 381Economic and Social History of the Modern Middle East4-5
HISTORY 381BModern Egypt4-5
HISTORY 381DShia Islam4-5
HISTORY 382CWomen in the Modern Middle East4-5
HISTORY 382FHistory of Modern Turkey4-5
HISTORY 383GPlace, Nature, and Life: Spacetime through Ottoman Texts4-5
HISTORY 384FEmpires, Markets and Networks: Early Modern Islamic World and Beyond, 1500-18004-5
HISTORY 388Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
HISTORY 389The Indian Ocean World: Winds, Merchants & Empires4-5
JEWISHST 288Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
OSPOXFRD 95Global Islam and the British Empire5
Islamic Politics
ANTHRO 148BIslam and Human Rights in Theory and Practice3-5
COMM 177YSpecialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence4-5
COMM 277YSpecialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence4-5
COMPLIT 42Making Palestine Visible1
CSRE 3AMaking Palestine Visible1
CSRE 148BIslam and Human Rights in Theory and Practice3-5
FEMGEN 148BIslam and Human Rights in Theory and Practice3-5
HISTORY 3AMaking Palestine Visible1
INTNLREL 71QAesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran2-3
INTNLREL 151Decoding the Arab Spring and the Future of the MIddle East5
INTNLREL 157The Political Economy of the Arab Revolutions5
IPS 250AInternational Conflict Resolution Colloquium1
POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations in Iran5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 149TMiddle Eastern Politics5
POLISCI 211PInternational Security in South Asia: Pakistan, India and the United States.5
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 246APaths to the Modern World: Islam and the West5
POLISCI 441LGrad Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics3-5
REES 320State and Nation Building in Central Asia3-5
THINK 26How Do You Build a Nation? Inclusion and Exclusion in the Making of Modern Iran4
Languages
AMELANG 15TIntermediate to Advanced Turkish Conversation2
AMELANG 84AAccelerated First-Year Turkish, Part 15
AMELANG 84BAccelerated First-Year Turkish, part 25
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 145ASecond-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 145BSecond-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 145CSecond-Year Modern Persian ,Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 184AFirst-Year Turkish, First Quarter5
AMELANG 184BFirst-Year Turkish, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 184CFirst-Year Turkish, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 185ASecond-Year Turkish, First Quarter5
AMELANG 185BSecond-Year Turkish, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 185CSecond-Year Turkish, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 186AThird-Year Turkish, First Quarter4
AMELANG 186BThird-Year Turkish, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 186CThird-Year Turkish, Third Quarter4
AMELANG 297Directed Reading in African and Middle Eastern Languages1-5
AMELANG 395Graduate Studies in African and Middle Eastern Languages1-5
ARABLANG 1First-Year Arabic, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 1AAccelerated First-Year Arabic, Part I5
ARABLANG 1HFirst-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 2First-Year Arabic, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 2AAccelerated First-Year Arabic, Part II5
ARABLANG 2HFirst-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 3First-Year Arabic, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 3HBeginning Arabic for Heritage Learners, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 10Arabic Calligraphy3
ARABLANG 21Second-Year Arabic, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 21AAccelerated Second-Year Arabic, Part I5
ARABLANG 21HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 22Second-Year Arabic, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 22AAccelerated second-Year Arabic, Part II5
ARABLANG 22HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 23Second-Year Arabic, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 23HSecond-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 24Arabic Skills Workshop4
ARABLANG 125AColloquial Arabic, First Quarter4
ARABLANG 125BConversational/Colloquial Arabic, Second Quarter4
ARABLANG 126AMedia Arabic, First Quarter2-4
ARABLANG 127Intermediate to Advanced Conversation3
ARABLANG 131Third-Year Arabic, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 131HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, First Quarter5
ARABLANG 132Third-Year Arabic, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 132HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Second Quarter5
ARABLANG 133Third-Year Arabic, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 133HThird-Year Arabic for Heritage Learners, Third Quarter5
ARABLANG 141Fourth-Year Arabic, First Quarter4
ARABLANG 142Fourth-Year Arabic, Second Quarter4
ARABLANG 143Fourth-Year Arabic, Third Quarter4
ARABLANG 297Directed Reading1-5
ARABLANG 394Graduate Studies in Arabic Conversation1-3
ARABLANG 395Graduate Studies in Arabic1-5
COMPLIT 209Advanced Readings in Persian2-5
COMPLIT 245Introductory Ottoman Turkish1-3
COMPLIT 245BADVANCED READING IN TURKISH3-53
COMPLIT 248AReading Turkish I2-4
COMPLIT 248BReading Turkish II2-4
COMPLIT 248CAdvanced Turkish-English Translation2-4
COMPLIT 357Contemporary Turkish Cinema and Society3-5
SPECLANG 109AFirst-Year Bengali, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 109BFirst-Year Bengali, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 109CFirst-Year Bengali, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 110ASecond-Year Bengali4
SPECLANG 110BSecond-Year Bengali - Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 110CSecond-Year Bengali - Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 152AFirst-Year Hindi, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 152BFirst-Year Hindi, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 152CFirst-Year Hindi, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 152HHeritage Hindi5
SPECLANG 153ASecond-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 153BSecond-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 153CSecond-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 154AThird-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 154BThird-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 154CThird-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 156AFirst-Year Indonesian, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 157ASecond-Year Indonesian, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 192AFirst-Year Kazakh, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 192BFirst-Year Kazakh, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 192CFirst-Year Kazakh, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 193ASecond-Year Kazakh, First Quarter3
SPECLANG 193BSecond-Year Kazakh, Second Quarter3
SPECLANG 193CSecond-Year Kazakh, Third Quarter3
SPECLANG 218ABeginning Urdu, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 218BBeginning Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218CBeginning Urdu, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 219BIntermediate Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 229ABeginning Pashto, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 229BBeginning Pashto, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 239ASecond-Year Uzbek, First Quarter3
SPECLANG 239BSecond-Year Uzbek, Second Quarter3
SPECLANG 239CSecond-Year Uzbek, Third Quarter3
SPECLANG 240AThird-Year Uzbek, First quarter3

Latin American Studies Specialization

  1. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken at the 100-level or higher, with the exception of Overseas Studies courses (see also note 1, above).
  2. All courses to be counted toward the minor must be taken for a letter grade.
  3. Some courses have prerequisites or special enrollment requirements. Students are responsible for making sure they have completed any prerequisites and/or secured an instructor's permission, as needed.

Culture and Society

Units
AMSTUD 271Mexicans in the United States5
ANTHRO 102BAztec Language and Culture3
ANTHRO 108AThe Formation of Political State in the Peruvian Andes3-5
ANTHRO 124NMaya Mythology and the Popol Vuh3
ANTHRO 206AIncas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology3-5
ANTHRO 215BPeoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica5
ANTHRO 222ARace and Culture in Mexico and Central America3-5
CSRE 126BCurricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population3-4
FILMSTUD 316International Documentary4
FILMSTUD 347Iberian and Latin American Experimental Cinemas, 1960s to the Present4
HISTORY 106BGlobal Human Geography: Europe and Americas5
HISTORY 112Medicine and Disease in the Ancient World5
HISTORY 170BCulture, Society and Politics in Latin America5
HISTORY 173Mexican Migration to the United States3-5
HISTORY 274EUrban Poverty and Inequality in Latin America5
HISTORY 275BHistory of Modern Mexico4-5
HISTORY 303JWater in World History4-5
HISTORY 366BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
HISTORY 371Graduate Colloquium: Explorations in Latin American History and Historiography4-5
HISTORY 373EThe Emergence of Nations in Latin America: Independence Through 18804-5
HISTORY 375CHistory of Modern Mexico4-5
HISTORY 379Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HISTORY 477Graduate Research Seminar: Migration4-5
ILAC 114NIntroduction to Lyric Poetry3-5
ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5
ILAC 202Identity is a Skin: Identity Debates in Europe and Latin America from Essence to Appearance3-5
ILAC 245Brazil's Rhythm and Songs3-5
ILAC 246Critical Issues of Human Rights through Literature3-5
ILAC 247Film and Politics: Argentina in the Hour of the Furnaces3-5
ILAC 252Guerillas3-5
ILAC 253Poverty, Redemption and Writing: Franciscanism in Latin America3-5
ILAC 270Afro-Brazil: Oral Culture, Literature and Digital Media3-5
ILAC 277Spanish and Society: Cultures of Salsa3-5
ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Literatura y Antropología3-5
ILAC 279Searching for identity3-5
ILAC 341Roberto Bolaño3-5
ILAC 348US-Mexico Border Fictions: Writing La Frontera, Tearing Down the Wall3-5
ILAC 363Visions of the Andes3-5
ILAC 367João/Joyce: Guimarães Rosa and the World Novel3-5
ILAC 382Latin@ Literature3-5
SOC 350WWorkshop: Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Nation1-3

Environment, Ecology, and Sustainability

Units
ANTHRO 260Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case3-5
ANTHRO 262Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
ANTHRO 278Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos5
ANTHRO 337BAnthropological Approaches to Health Issues in Contemporary Latin America5
BIO 234Conservation Biology: A Latin American Perspective3
BIO 328Managing Biodiversity Change: from Science to Policy3
BIOE 371Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context3
EARTHSYS 121Building a Sustainable Society: New Approaches for Integrating Human and Environmental Priorities3
ETHICSOC 278MIntroduction to Environmental Ethics4-5
GEOPHYS 212Topics in Climate Change2
HISTORY 303JWater in World History4-5
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
HUMBIO 129SGlobal Public Health4

Political Economy

Units
ECON 103Econometric Methods: Theory and Applications5
ECON 106World Food Economy5
EDUC 306AEconomics of Education in the Global Economy5
EDUC 404Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century1-2
HISTORY 172AMexico: From Colony to Nation, or the History of an impossible Republic?5
HISTORY 177DU.S. Intervention and Regime Change in 20th Century Latin America5
HISTORY 376FCITY, URBANISATION PROCESSES AND URBAN POLICIES IN LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN4-5
INTNLREL 141ACamera as Witness: International Human Rights Documentaries5
INTNLREL 179Major Themes in U.S.-Latin America Diplomatic History5
IPS 241International Security in a Changing World5
LAW 5017Law in Latin America2
POLISCI 244CPolitical Change in Latin America: The contemporary challenge to democracy5
POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
POLISCI 347GGovernance and Poverty3-5
POLISCI 348SLatin American Politics3-5
POLISCI 440BComparative Political Economy3-5

South Asian Studies Specialization

The following courses are a selection of courses related to South Asian Studies. This list is updated as additional courses are made available. Students should consult with their minor adviser to determine the applicability of any course to the minor in Stanford Global Studies, South Asian Studies specialization.

Units
AMELANG 144AFirst-Year Modern Persian, First Quarter5
AMELANG 144BFirst-Year Modern Persian, Second Quarter5
AMELANG 144CFirst-Year Modern Persian, Third Quarter5
AMELANG 146AThird-Year Persian, First Quarter4
AMELANG 146BThird-Year Persian, Second Quarter4
AMELANG 146CThird-Year Persian, Third Quarter4
ANTHRO 28NSecularism and its Critics3-5
ANTHRO 126Urban Culture in Global Perspective5
ANTHRO 149South Asia: History, People, Politics5
COMPLIT 247Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film3-5
FEMGEN 24Sexuality, Gender, and Religion2
FILMSTUD 250BBollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film3-5
GLOBAL 250Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film3-5
HISTORY 39Modern Britain and the British Empire3
HISTORY 96Gandhi in His Time and Ours3
HISTORY 139Modern Britain and the British Empire5
MUSIC 30NA Stranger in a Strange Land: Jewish Musics in Translation3
MUSIC 186Religion and Music in South Asia4-5
MUSIC 286Religion and Music in South Asia4-5
RELIGST 24Sexuality, Gender, and Religion2
RELIGST 114Yoga Ancient and Modern4
RELIGST 124Sufi Islam4
RELIGST 209D`Crow Eaters' & `Fire Worshippers': Exploring Contemporary Zoroastrianism Thru Reading Parsi Lit3-5
RELIGST 251Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts3-5
RELIGST 256The Brahma Net Sutra (Fanwang Jing)4
RELIGST 259Religion and Music in South Asia4-5
SPECLANG 109AFirst-Year Bengali, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 109BFirst-Year Bengali, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 109CFirst-Year Bengali, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 152AFirst-Year Hindi, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 152BFirst-Year Hindi, Second Quarter5
SPECLANG 152CFirst-Year Hindi, Third Quarter5
SPECLANG 153ASecond-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 153BSecond-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 153CSecond-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 154AThird-Year Hindi, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 154BThird-Year Hindi, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 154CThird-Year Hindi, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 183AFirst-Year Sanskrit, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 183BFirst-Year Sanskrit, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218ABeginning Urdu, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 218BBeginning Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 218CBeginning Urdu, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 219AIntermediate Urdu, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 219BIntermediate Urdu, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 229ABeginning Pashto, First Quarter5
SPECLANG 229BBeginning Pashto, Second Quarter5
TIBETLNG 3First Year Tibetan, Third Quarter4
TIBETLNG 23Intermediate/Advance Tibetan, Third Quarter4
URBANST 114Urban Culture in Global Perspective5

Courses

GLOBAL 101. Global Studies Gateway Course. 3 Units.

Gateway course for students wishing to pursue a Global Studies minor in one of six specializations: African, European, Islamic, Iranian, Latin American, and South Asian Studies.

GLOBAL 105. Perspectives on Human Rights Theory and Practice. 3 Units.

In this introductory human rights course, students will learn about how the distinct methodologies, assumptions, and vocabulary of particular disciplinary communities affect the way scholars and practitioners trained in these fields approach, understand, and employ human rights concepts. Course sessions will include guest lectures from distinguished Stanford faculty from across the university.

GLOBAL 190. Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities. 3 Units.

Illicit trade in art and antiquities is reputedly the third largest illicit trade activity globally. How do nations, individually and collectively, respond to this seemingly inexorable form of illicit trade, and what factors influence those responses? What are the sources and effects of such trade, and how can it best be curbed? This course will delve into these and other pressing political, legal, ethical, economic, cultural and public policy questions about illicit art and antiquities trade, arising across five subject areas: (1) the acquisition of art during the Age of Imperialism (ie, from Roman times through World War II); (2) Holocaust-era takings and the evolution in international legal and ethical responses to wartime looting; (3) removal and repatriation of Indigenous cultural material; (4) theft from museums and private collectors, and legal systems¿ varying allocation of the risk of such theft; and (5) the illicit trade and destruction of antiquities, and issues surrounding their restitution. Several internationally renowned guest speakers will give presentations and contribute to our discussions. Grading will be based on attendance, participation in class and an online discussion forum, a student group presentation, and a final exam or research paper.
Same as: GLOBAL 390, JEWISHST 130, JEWISHST 330, PUBLPOL 191, PUBLPOL 391

GLOBAL 191. Undergraduate Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

Independent studies for graduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeat for credit.

GLOBAL 199. Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor. 1-5 Unit.

Students completing a required capstone project for the Global Studies Minor must enroll in this course for units (1-5) with their capstone advisor selected as the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit, with advisor approval. Students are expected to participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor, and may be expected to give a final presentation on their project at an end-of-the-quarter Global Studies Minor symposium. May be repeat for credit.

GLOBAL 210. Urdu Literature and Bombay Cinema. 3 Units.

What are some of the major themes that drive modern Urdu literature as well as the ¿Muslim Social¿ genre of Bombay Cinema? How can we place these cultural texts within their historical context? Urdu literature and Bombay Cinema provide compelling windows into the crisis of modernity both within South Asia and Muslim societies. In this seminar, we will start with a discussion on the emergence of print culture and its impact on the world of Urdu poetry and an exploration of the work of reformers who viewed Urdu as ¿the language of secular Islam.¿ Next we will engage with the anticolonial Progressive Writers Movement as well as the trauma of Partition and its reflection in literature and film. The course will conclude with a discussion of the contemporary Indian nostalgia for a cosmopolitan Indo-Muslim past. Through projects and presentations, students will hone their written and oral communication skills. They will also practice approaching works of art and literature with a critical lens. Ultimately this course will provide students with a better understanding of the society, literary and film of Muslim South Asia. Literary cultures of Muslim South Asia are not a fixed and unchanging, but rather a set of representations that are constantly shifting and adapting to reflect the context of society.
Same as: FEMGEN 210

GLOBAL 220. American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine the tension in American foreign policy between pursuing U.S. security and economic interests and promoting American values abroad. The course will retrace the theoretical and ideological debates about values versus interests, with a particular focus on realism versus liberalism. The course will examine the evolution of these debates over time, starting with the French revolution, but with special attention given to the Cold War, American foreign policy after September 11th, and the Obama administration. The course also will examine how these contending theories and ideologies are mediated through the U.S. bureaucracy that shapes the making of foreign policy. ** NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please provide a one page double-spaced document outlining previous associated coursework and why you want to enroll in the seminar to Anna Coll (acoll@stanford.edu) by February 22nd. Any questions related to this course can be directed to Anna Coll.
Same as: IPS 242, POLISCI 217A

GLOBAL 249A. The Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning. 1-3 Unit.

This course will focus on the analysis of ten Iranian films with the view of conducting a discourse on the semiotics of Iranian art and culture. Each session will be designated to the viewing of a film by a prominent Iranian filmmaker. Students are expected to prepare for class by having previously examined other available films by the filmmaker under consideration.
Same as: COMPLIT 249A

GLOBAL 249B. Iranian Cinema in Diaspora. 1-3 Unit.

pite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian Revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What changes in aesthetics and point of view of the filmmaker are caused by the change in his or her work environment? Though unwantedly these films are made outside Iran, how related are they to the known (recognized) cinema within Iran? And in fact, to what extent do these films express things that are left unsaid by the cinema within Iran?.
Same as: COMPLIT 249B

GLOBAL 249C. Contemporary Iranian Theater. 1-3 Unit.

Today, Iranian plays¿both in traditional and contemporary styles¿are staged in theater festivals throughout the world and play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran. Forty-six years ago when "Theater in Iran" (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement¿which was altogether westernizing itself blindly¿face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence, today's generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. In this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the dearth of visual documents, an attempt will be made to present a picture of Iranian theater to the student. Students are expected to read the recommended available translated plays of the contemporary Iranian playwrights and participate in classroom discussions. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: COMPLIT 249C

GLOBAL 250. Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film. 3-5 Units.

A broad engagement with Indian cinema: its relationship with Indian politics, history, and economics; its key thematic concerns and forms; and its adaptation of and response to global cinematic themes, genres, and audiences. Locating the films within key critical and theoretical debates and scholarship on Indian and world cinemas. Goal is to open up what is often seen as a dauntingly complex region, especially for those who are interested in but unfamiliar with its histories and cultural forms.
Same as: COMPLIT 247, FILMSTUD 250B

GLOBAL 390. Illicit Trade in Art and Antiquities. 3 Units.

Illicit trade in art and antiquities is reputedly the third largest illicit trade activity globally. How do nations, individually and collectively, respond to this seemingly inexorable form of illicit trade, and what factors influence those responses? What are the sources and effects of such trade, and how can it best be curbed? This course will delve into these and other pressing political, legal, ethical, economic, cultural and public policy questions about illicit art and antiquities trade, arising across five subject areas: (1) the acquisition of art during the Age of Imperialism (ie, from Roman times through World War II); (2) Holocaust-era takings and the evolution in international legal and ethical responses to wartime looting; (3) removal and repatriation of Indigenous cultural material; (4) theft from museums and private collectors, and legal systems¿ varying allocation of the risk of such theft; and (5) the illicit trade and destruction of antiquities, and issues surrounding their restitution. Several internationally renowned guest speakers will give presentations and contribute to our discussions. Grading will be based on attendance, participation in class and an online discussion forum, a student group presentation, and a final exam or research paper.
Same as: GLOBAL 190, JEWISHST 130, JEWISHST 330, PUBLPOL 191, PUBLPOL 391

GLOBAL 391. Graduate Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

Independent studies for graduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeat for credit.