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Science, Technology, and Society

Contacts

Office: Science, Technology, and Society
Mail Code: 94305-2120
Phone: (650) 723-2565
Web Site: http://sts.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Program in Science, Technology, and Society are listed under the subject code STS on theExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Science, Technology, and Society

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) aims to provide students with an interdisciplinary framework through which to understand the complex interactions of science, technology and the social world. After working through a common core of courses drawn from the social sciences, the humanities, the natural and physical sciences and engineering, students pursue coursework in one of five specialized areas:

  • Information Technology, Media and Society
  • Innovation, Technology and Organizations
  • Environment and Sustainability
  • Life Sciences and Biotechnology
  • Policy, Security and Technology

Students may also undertake research in affiliated laboratories and through the honors program. All students complete a capstone project, either by taking a senior capstone seminar (STS 200) or by applying for and completing an honors thesis. Students must demonstrate mastery in at least one field from within the humanities or social sciences and at least one field from within the sciences or engineering. Majors may declare either a B.A. or a B.S. degree (see the specific requirements for each degree).

The Program's affiliated faculty represent over a dozen departments, including Anthropology, Communication, Computer Science, Education, Electrical Engineering, History, Law, Management Science and Engineering, Political Science and Sociology. By learning to bring such a rich collection of disciplinary approaches to bear on questions of science and technology, students graduate uniquely equipped to succeed in professions that demand fluency with both technical and social frameworks. Recent graduates of STS have entered top-ranked Ph.D. and MBA programs and forged successful careers in a variety of fields, including business, engineering, law, public service, medicine and academia.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The Program expects undergraduate majors to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the Program in Science, Technology, and Society. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. a knowledge of core theories and methods in the interdisciplinary field of STS.
  2. an ability to deploy these theories and methods to analyze interactions between science, technology and society in particular historical and cultural contexts.
  3. an ability to critically evaluate empirical evidence and theoretical claims in STS-related debates.
  4. an ability to communicate clearly and persuasively about STS issues to a general audience in multiple media including oral presentation and writing.

Advising and Course Selection

The Program in Science, Technology, and Society offers an advising process that includes faculty, staff and peer advisers. Prospective majors must first meet with a peer adviser and then with the Program’s Student Services Officer to determine which degree they will pursue (the B.A. or B.S.) and how they will fulfill the Program’s basic requirements. When they are ready to declare, they meet with the Program's Student Services Officer to submit their degree plan and then the Associate Director reviews the coursework for intellectual coherence. Majors are then assigned to a faculty adviser who serves as an intellectual mentor and helps them identify the core questions driving their interest in the field. The Program also sponsors a wide variety of events designed to help students meet their colleagues and Program alumni, discover research and internship opportunities, and make their way toward the career of their choice.

STS Core

The program offers a Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in Science, Technology, and Society. Both degree programs require that the student complete the STS Core.

Units
With a grade of C or higher in each course, complete 8 courses satisfying the following requirements:
A. Interdisciplinary Foundational Course (5) 1
STS 1The Public Life of Science and Technology5
B. Disciplinary Analyses: six courses, with two in each area, and at least one of these courses must be a WIM course. (22-30) 2
1. Social Scientific Perspectives 38-10
Digital Media in Society
Theory of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology
Media Technologies, People, and Society
Media, Culture, and Society
Digital Media in Society
War and Peace in American Foreign Policy
Economic Sociology
2. Cultural and Historical Perspectives 48-10
Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS
Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design
World History of Science
History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering
Science and Law in History
The Scientific Revolution
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
3. Scientific and Engineering Perspectives6-10
Programming Methodology
Computers, Ethics and Public Policy
Ethical Issues in Engineering
Good Products, Bad Products
Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications
Technology and National Security
Ethics and Public Policy
C. Senior Requirements (5-10)5-10
Food and Society: Politics, Culture and Technology
Global Mobilities
STS Senior Capstone
Text Technologies: A History
Technology, Nature, and Environmentalism
Sociology of Innovation and Invention
Advanced Individual Work
Total Units32-45

1Students may use STS 101 or STS 101Q to fulfill this requirement if completed in 2011-12 or prior

2 WIM courses: ANTHRO 90C, COMM 120W, HISTORY 140A, HISTORY 232F, MS&E 197, CS 181W, or MS&E 193W

3EDUC 120X may be used to fulfill this requirement, but is not offered this year

Concentration

Minimum of 50 units, at least twelve courses, from among those designated on the appropriate concentration area course list (available in the Related Courses tab and on the STS website). All courses must be taken for a letter grade where offered and may not be double-counted with core coursework. Students may petition only one course outside the list of approved courses to count toward their STS degree plan. Thematic concentrations are organized around an STS-related problem or area:

  1. Information Technology, Media, and Society

  2. Innovation, Technology, and Organizations

  3. Environment and Sustainability

  4. Life Sciences and Biotechnology

  5. Policy, Security, and Technology

  6. Self-Designed Concentration

A student pursing a Bachelor of Arts degree must take at least eight classes from the social science and/or humanities course menus and at least four classes must be from the science and engineering course menus in a single thematic concentration area.  The science and engineering courses chosen should form a sequence of courses that build on one another.

A student pursing a Bachelor of Science degree must take at least eight classes from the science and engineering course menus and at least four classes must be from the social science and/or humanities course menus in a single thematic concentration area. The science and engineering courses should include 2-3 sequences of courses that build on one another.

Alternatively, subject to program approval, a student may choose to design a self-designed concentration. Students interested in this option must submit a 5-page proposal in which they describe their self-designed concentration in detail, compare their proposed area to similar majors at Stanford and explain the rationale for why a self-designed concentration is the optimal way to pursue their academic interests.

Each concentration, certified or self-designed, requires the signature of the STS Associate Director before it is approved.

Honors Program

The Stanford Program in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) invites STS majors to apply for admission to its Honors Program. Since the program was launched in 1978, STS honors students have carried out a wide array of innovative research projects. Honors projects present a unique opportunity to pursue one's intellectual interests in depth, work closely with a faculty advisor, and develop a new set of research and analytical skills that are broadly applicable. STS honors signals expertise in a given field, organizational skills, and intellectual rigor, and students have used them as a springboard for graduate studies and for careers in fields such as information technology, entrepreneurship, finance, public policy, media, education, law, medicine, and the nonprofit sector. Often, the thesis project proves to be among the most rewarding and memorable experiences in a student's academic career at Stanford, as well as an important intellectual milestone. An STS honors thesis tackles a significant problem or question related to a particular area of STS. Students draw research methods from one or more of the disciplines that shape STS, such as history, sociology, communication, anthropology, environmental science, computer programming/modeling, engineering, economics, political science, and art history. Past honors projects are on file in the STS office library.

Honors Program Eligibility and Admission Criteria

To be eligible to apply for the honors program at the end of junior year, students must meet the following criteria:

  1. Find an honors faculty adviser and develop research questions, methodology and plan

  2. Be a current junior or rising senior and have declared STS as a major in Axess

  3. Attend the required Information Session for Juniors in Autumn Quarter

  4. Attend at least one (preferably all three) of the quarterly STS workshops offered for prospective honors students

  5. Finish all STS core course work by the end of Spring Quarter, junior year

  6. Submit a complete honors program application and research proposal by the last day of classes, Spring Quarter, junior year

For application and proposal parameters, see the document STS Honors Program, available on the STS web site.

Honors Degree Requirements

To graduate with honors, seniors in the honors program must meet the following criteria:

  1. Attend required monthly workshops for current STS honors students

  2. Develop an original and complete thesis in consultation with honors faculty adviser

  3. Submit a first draft of thesis to honors adviser no later than April 1

  4. Submit the final thesis to honors adviser by May 1

  5. Earn at least a grade of 'B' on final thesis

  6. Maintain an overall Stanford GPA of 3.4

As of September 1, 2012, STS is no longer admitting non-majors to the honors program.

Minor in Science, Technology, and Society

The program no longer offers a minor. Students currently enrolled in the minor should consult the Stanford Bulletin 2011-12 for degree requirements.

STS Affiliated Faculty

Director and Associate Professor of Communication: Fred Turner

Associate Director:  Kyoko Sato

Program Committee: Stephen Barley (Management Science and Engineering), Paula Findlen (History), Mark Granovetter (Sociology), Hank Greely (Law),  Sarah Lochlann Jain (Anthropology), Robert McGinn (Management Science and Engineering), Brad Osgood (Electrical Engineering), Eric Roberts (Computer Science), Scott Sagan (Political Science), Fred Turner (Communication), John Willinsky (Education)

Affiliated Faculty and Staff: Jeremy Bailenson (Communication), Stephen Barley (Management Science and Engineering), Thomas Byers (Management Science and Engineering), Jean-Pierre Dupuy (French), Paula Findlen (History), Duana Fullwiley (Anthropology), Mark Granovetter, (Sociology),  Hank Greely (Law), Ann Grimes (Communication), James T. Hamilton (Communication), Martin Hellman (Electrical Engineering, Emeritus), Miyako Inoue (Anthropology), Sarah Lochlann Jain (Anthropology), Pamela Lee (Art and Art History), Sandra Soo-Jin Lee (Biomedical Ethics), Helen Longino (Philosophy), Henry Lowood (Stanford University Libraries), Robert McGinn (Management Science and Engineering), Thomas Mullaney (History), Brad Osgood (Electrical Engineering), Walter Powell (Education), Robert Proctor (History), Jessica Riskin (History), Eric Roberts (Computer Science), Scott Sagan (Political Science), Kyoko Sato (STS), Londa Schiebinger (History), Michael Shanks (Classics, Anthropology),  Fred Turner (Communication), John Willinsky (Education), Gavin Wright (Economics)

Emeriti: James Adams (Management Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering), Barton Bernstein (History), Walter Vincenti (Aeronautics and Astronautics

Overseas Studies Courses in Science, Technology, and Society

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


Units
OSPAUSTL 10Coral Reef Ecosystems3
OSPAUSTL 25Freshwater Systems3
OSPAUSTL 30Coastal Forest Ecosystems3
OSPBEIJ 17Chinese Film Studies4
OSPBEIJ 20Communication, Culture, and Society: The Chinese Way4
OSPBEIJ 42Chinese Media Studies4
OSPBER 7A History of German Film3-5
OSPBER 115XThe German Economy: Past and Present4-5
OSPBER 126XA People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU4-5
OSPBER 161XThe German Economy in the Age of Globalization4-5
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPCPTWN 43Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa4
OSPCPTWN 68Cities in the 21st Century: Urbanization, Globalization and Security4
OSPFLOR 33Under the Tuscan Sun: A Model for Agriculture and Sustainability5
OSPFLOR 41The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum3-5
OSPFLOR 44Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution5
OSPFLOR 48Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition4
OSPFLOR 49On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II5
OSPFLOR 58Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change4
OSPFLOR 85Bioethics: the Biotechnological Revolution, Human Rights and Politics in the Global Era4
OSPFLOR 87The Future of Healthcare: Italy, Europe and the U.S.4
OSPFLOR 115YBuilding the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization4
OSPFLOR 134FItalian Cinema and the Aesthetics of Modernism5
OSPKYOTO 64Japanese Popular Culture4-5
OSPKYOTO 65Postwar Japan in Film4-5
OSPMADRD 45Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums4
OSPMADRD 57Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.5
OSPMADRD 72Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures5
OSPMOSC 44Economic Reform and Economic Policy in Modern Russia5
OSPMOSC 68From Science to Market: Technical Innovation Policy in Post-Soviet Russia5
OSPMOSC 72Space, Politics, and Modernity in Russia5
OSPOXFRD 45British Economic Policy since World War II5
OSPOXFRD 57The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-18605
OSPOXFRD 74History and Architecture of Oxford4-5
OSPPARIS 30The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater4
OSPPARIS 44EAP: Analytical Drawing and Graphic Art2
OSPPARIS 72The Ceilings of Paris4
OSPPARIS 74Climate Change Challenges in France and Europe: from Project to Policy4
OSPPARIS 153XHealth Systems and Health Insurance: France and the U.S., a Comparison across Space and Time5
OSPSANTG 29Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America4-5
OSPSANTG 31The Chilean Energy System: 30 Years of Market Reforms5
OSPSANTG 71Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment4-5
OSPSANTG 85Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific5
OSPSANTG 119XThe Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies5
OSPSANTG 130XThe Chilean Economy in Comparative Perspective5

Thematic Concentrations Course Lists

Information Technology, Media, and Society

Thematic concentration in Information Technology, Media, and Society:

Units
Social Science Course Menu (0)
Communication Research Methods
Media Processes and Effects
Bending the Truth: Propaganda in Media and Culture
Digital Journalism
Digital Media in Society
The Dialogue of Democracy
Digital Media Entrepreneurship
Virtual People
Experimental Research in Advanced User Interfaces
Media Psychology
Social Media Issues
Social Media Literacies
Seminar on Liberation Technologies
Economics of the Internet
Learning, Sharing, Publishing, and Intellectual Property
Organizations: Theory and Management
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy
Communication, Culture, and Society: The Chinese Way
Chinese Media Studies
Introduction to Perception
Technology in Contemporary Society
Introduction to Cognitive and Information Sciences
Cognition in Interaction Design
Humanities Course Menu (0)
"Mutually Assured Destruction": American Culture and the Cold War
Histories of Photography
Technology and the Visual Imagination
Art, Business & the Law
The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape
Picturing the Cosmos
Design I : Fundamental Visual Language
Video Art I
Digital Art I
Future Media, Media Archaeologies
Design II: The Bridge
Introduction to Digital Photography and Visual Images
Technical Writing
Introduction to Digital Media
Science Fiction Cinema
Poetic Thinking Across Media
Technology, Innovation, and the History of the Book
The History of Information
Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound
Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music
Chinese Film Studies
Chinese Media Studies
A History of German Film
Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution
Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition
On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II
Italian Cinema and the Aesthetics of Modernism
Postwar Japan in Film
Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums
The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-1860
The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater
The Religious Life of Things
Science and Engineering Course Menu (0)
Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction
Introduction to Scientific Computing
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
From Languages to Information
Introduction to Computer Networking
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging
Digital Photography
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Human-Computer Interaction Design Studio
Introduction to Cryptography
Research Topics in Human-Computer Interaction
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Digital Systems I
Digital Systems II
Introduction to Bioimaging
Perspectives in Assistive Technology
Ethical Issues in Engineering
Technology Entrepreneurship
Interactive Management Science
Introduction to Optimization
Probabilistic Analysis
Information Networks and Services
Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications
Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming

Innovation, Technology, and Organizations

Thematic concentration in Innovation, Technology, and Organizations:

Units
Social Science Course Menu (0)
Digital Media Entrepreneurship
Seminar on Liberation Technologies
Economic Analysis I
Economic Analysis II
Economic Analysis III
Applied Econometrics
Economics of Innovation
American Economic History
Development Economics
Labor Economics
Economics of the Internet
Regulatory Economics
Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation
Science, Innovation and the Law
Forecasting for Innovators:Technology, Tools & Social Change
Innovation, Creativity, and Change
Organizations: Theory and Management
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy
Global Work
Global Entrepreneurial Marketing
Creativity and Innovation
A People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU
The German Economy in the Age of Globalization
The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers
Economic Reform and Economic Policy in Modern Russia
From Science to Market: Technical Innovation Policy in Post-Soviet Russia
British Economic Policy since World War II
Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America
Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment
The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies
The Chilean Economy in Comparative Perspective
Political Economy of International Trade and Investment
Organizations and Public Policy
Giving 2.0: Philanthropy by Design
Philanthropy and Social Innovation
Technology Policy
From Innovation to Implementation: How Government Can Develop and Apply New Ideas
Designing the Way Up: Breaking the Cycle of Poverty in America through Innovative Early Intervention
Science and Technology Policy
Economic Sociology
Formal Organizations
The Social Science of Entrepreneurship
Science, Technology and Politics
Technology in Contemporary Society
Issues in Technology and the Environment
Introduction to Cognitive and Information Sciences
Cognition in Interaction Design
Humanities Course Menu (0)
"Mutually Assured Destruction": American Culture and the Cold War
The Visual Culture of Modernism and its Discontents
The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape
Digital Art and Design in Practice
Design I : Fundamental Visual Language
Future Media, Media Archaeologies
Design II: The Bridge
Modeling Cultural Evolution
Design Theory
Technical Writing
Technology, Innovation, and the History of the Book
Fundamentals of Computer-Generated Sound
Compositional Algorithms, Psychoacoustics, and Computational Music
The German Economy: Past and Present
Cities in the 21st Century: Urbanization, Globalization and Security
The Florentine Sketchbook: A Visual Arts Practicum
Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution
Sharing Beauty in Florence: Collectors, Collections and the Shaping of the Western Museum Tradition
Space as History: Social Vision and Urban Change
Building the Cathedral and the Town Hall: Constructing and Deconstructing Symbols of a Civilization
Italian Cinema and the Aesthetics of Modernism
Japanese Popular Culture
Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums
Space, Politics, and Modernity in Russia
History and Architecture of Oxford
The Avant Garde in France through Literature, Art, and Theater
EAP: Analytical Drawing and Graphic Art
The Ceilings of Paris
Building Paris: Its History, Architecture, and Urban Design
Business Ethics
The Religious Life of Things
Science and Engineering Course Menu (0)
Engineering Economy
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
From Languages to Information
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Human-Computer Interaction Design Studio
Research Topics in Human-Computer Interaction
Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools
Beyond Bits and Atoms - Lab
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Digital Systems I
Digital Systems II
Introduction to Bioimaging
Intro to Solid Mechanics
Engineering Economy
Technology Entrepreneurship
Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Visual Thinking
Introduction to Human Values in Design
Product Design Methods
History and Philosophy of Design
Design and Manufacturing
Good Products, Bad Products
Advanced Product Design: Needfinding
Advanced Product Design: Implementation 1
Advanced Product Design: Implementation 2
Introduction to Decision Making
Interactive Management Science
Introduction to Optimization
Probabilistic Analysis
Introduction to Stochastic Modeling
Information Networks and Services
Introduction to Decision Analysis
Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications
Introduction to Operations Management
Management of New Product Development
Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming

Environment and Sustainability

Thematic concentration in Environment and Sustainability:

Units
Social Science Course Menu (0)
Theory of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology
Food and security
Food and Community: New Visions for a Sustainable Future
World Food Economy
Human Society and Environmental Change
Aquaculture and the Environment: Science, History, and Policy
Marine Biodiversity: Law, Science, and Policy
Concepts of Urban Agriculture
Climate and Agriculture
Feeding Nine Billion
Economic Analysis I
Environmental Economics and Policy
Marine Resource Economics and Conservation
Culture, Evolution, and Society
Environmental and Health Policy Analysis
Forecasting for Innovators:Technology, Tools & Social Change
International Environmental Policy
The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers
Climate Change Challenges in France and Europe: from Project to Policy
Sustainable Cities: Comparative Transportation Systems in Latin America
Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment
Law and Public Policy
Energy and Environment: Technology, Economics and Policy
Science, Technology and Politics
Issues in Technology and the Environment
Environmental Policy and the City in U.S. History
Humanities Course Menu (0)
The View through the Windshield: Cars and the American Landscape
Environmental Crises and Historical Change
Environmentalism, Literature and Cultural Criticism
Science and Law in History
The German Economy: Past and Present
Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution
Science, Technology, and Society in the Face of the Looming Disaster
Urban Sustainability: Long-Term Archaeological Perspectives
Science and Engineering Course Menu (0)
Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology
Ecology
Essential Mathematics for Research in Life and Social Sciences
Methods of Theoretical Population Biology
Molecular Ecology
Marine Ecology
Sensory Ecology
Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions
Environmental Science and Technology
Managing Sustainable Building Projects
Building Information Modeling and Short Course
Building Information Modeling Workshop
Sustainable Development Studio
Climate Change Adaptation for Seaports: Engineering and Policy for a Sustainable Future
Green Architecture
Energy Resources
Sustainability in Theory and Practice
Energy and the Environment
Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes
The Water Course
Sustainable Energy Systems
Transition to sustainable energy systems
Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering
Modeling Uncertainty in the Earth Sciences
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing
Coral Reef Ecosystems
Freshwater Systems
Coastal Forest Ecosystems
Under the Tuscan Sun: A Model for Agriculture and Sustainability
The Chilean Energy System: 30 Years of Market Reforms
Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific
Introduction to the Physics of Energy
Introduction to Nuclear Energy

Life Sciences and Biotechnology

Thematic concentration in Life Sciences and Biotechnology:

Units
Social Science Course Menu (0)
Medical Anthropology
Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases
Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS
Race and Biomedicine
Ethics in Bioengineering
Marine Biodiversity: Law, Science, and Policy
Psychology and American Indian Mental Health
Law and the Biosciences
Culture, Evolution, and Society
Behavior, Health, and Development
Environmental and Health Policy Analysis
Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health
Foundations of Bioethics
Foundations for Community Health Engagement
Bioethics: the Biotechnological Revolution, Human Rights and Politics in the Global Era
The Future of Healthcare: Italy, Europe and the U.S.
Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.
Health Systems and Health Insurance: France and the U.S., a Comparison across Space and Time
Introduction to Perception
Law and Public Policy
Issues in Technology and the Environment
Humanities Course Menu (0)
Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors
Art and Biology
The Renaissance Body in French Literature and Medicine
In Sickness and In Health: Medicine and American Society, 1800-Present
World History of Science
History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering
Science and Law in History
Tobacco and Health in World History
Health Care as Seen Through Medical History, Literature, and the Arts
Novels and Theater of Illness
Galileo: Genius, Innovation and the Scientific Revolution
Issues in Bioethics Across Cultures
Introduction to Philosophy of Science
Introduction to Bioethics
Philosophy, Biology, and Behavior
International History and International Relations Theory
Science and Engineering Course Menu (0)
Genetics, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology
Cell Biology and Animal Physiology
Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology
Core Molecular Biology Laboratory
Core Plant Biology & Eco Evo Laboratory
The Human Genome and Disease
The Human Genome and Disease: Genetic Diversity and Personalized Medicine
Human Behavioral Biology
Essential Mathematics for Research in Life and Social Sciences
Methods of Theoretical Population Biology
Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab
Introduction to Bioengineering
Systems Biology
Systems Physiology and Design
Chemical Principles I
Chemical Principles II
Chemical Principles
Structure and Reactivity
Organic Monofunctional Compounds
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Organic Polyfunctional Compounds
Physical Chemical Principles
Physical Chemistry
Introduction to the Mouse in Biomedical Research
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Introduction to Bioimaging
Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology
Cell and Developmental Biology
The Human Organism
Health Policy Modeling
Coral Reef Ecosystems
Freshwater Systems
Coastal Forest Ecosystems
Stem Cells in Human Development and Regenerative Medicine
Marine Ecology of Chile and the South Pacific

Policy, Security, and Technology

Thematic concentration in Policy, Security, and Technology:

Units
Social Science Course Menu (0)
Democracy and Political Authority
Need to Know: The Tension between a Free Press and National Security Decision Making
Food and security
Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History
International Law and International Relations
The U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War
Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals
Issues in International Economics
Intelligence and National Security
International Conflict Resolution
Ethics and Public Policy
Public and Community Health in Sub-Saharan Africa
The Future of Healthcare: Italy, Europe and the U.S.
Health Care: A Contrastive Analysis between Spain and the U.S.
Climate Change Challenges in France and Europe: from Project to Policy
Health Systems and Health Insurance: France and the U.S., a Comparison across Space and Time
Santiago: Urban Planning, Public Policy, and the Built Environment
The Chilean Economy: History, International Relations, and Development Strategies
Introduction to American National Government and Politics
War and Peace in American Foreign Policy
Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law
International Security in a Changing World
Introduction to American Law
Comparative Democratic Development
Challenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy
Nuclear Weapons and International Politics
Terrorism
Political-Economy of Crime and Violence in Latin America
Law and Public Policy
Technology Policy
Science and Technology Policy
Science, Technology and Politics
Issues in Technology and the Environment
Humanities Course Menu (0)
"Mutually Assured Destruction": American Culture and the Cold War
Picturing the Cosmos
Co-Existence in Hebrew Literature
Ethics of Jihad
Nation in Motion: Film, Race and Immigration in Contemporary French Cinema
Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany
War and Warfare in Germany
Post-Cold War German Foreign Policy
The History of the International System since 1914
U.S. Intervention and Regime Change in 20th Century Latin America
Cities in the 21st Century: Urbanization, Globalization and Security
On-Screen Battles: Filmic Portrayals of Fascism and World War II
Space, Politics, and Modernity in Russia
History of Nuclear Weapons
International History and International Relations Theory
Science, Technology, and Society in the Face of the Looming Disaster
Science and Engineering Course Menu (0)
Chemical Principles I
Chemical Principles II
Chemical Principles
Structure and Reactivity
Organic Monofunctional Compounds
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Introduction to Computers
Programming Methodology
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
Computer Organization and Systems
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Principles of Computer Systems
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Introduction to Cryptography
Nuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism
Interactive Management Science
Technology and National Security
Under the Tuscan Sun: A Model for Agriculture and Sustainability
The Chilean Energy System: 30 Years of Market Reforms
Mechanics
Classical Mechanics Laboratory
Electricity and Magnetism
Introduction to the Physics of Energy
Introduction to Nuclear Energy

Courses

STS 1. The Public Life of Science and Technology. 5 Units.

Focus on key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments through STS interdisciplinary lens that encompasses historical dimensions (e.g., legacy of scientific revolution); technological impact (e.g., affordances of new tools and media); economic and management aspects (e.g., business models, design and engineering strategies); legal and ethical elements (e.g., intellectual property, social justice); and societal response and participation (e.g., media coverage, forms of activism). Discussion section is required and will be assigned the first week of class.

STS 131. Science Technology & Environmental Justice. 5 Units.

This course explores the relationships among science, technology, and social environments, with an eye to inequalities of race, class, gender, region, and nation-state. It engages STS from the vantage of environmental justice and public health activism, with an emphasis on California and the Bay Area. Topics include: the social construction of ¿the environment;¿ risk assessment and the politics of science; undone science; food justice; built environments and regional equity; climate change and green jobs initiatives; greenwashing and the politics of sustainability.

STS 140. Science, Technology and Politics. 4 Units.

This course will critically interrogate the relationship between science and technology and politics. Politics plays a significant role in the production of scientific knowledge and technological artifacts. Science and technology in turn constitute crucial elements of politics and governance in modern democracy. This course will explore these interactions through (1) key theoretical texts in STS and (2) case studies of such issues as climate change, race and science, urban planning, elections and technology, and information technology in social movements. Preference to juniors and seniors. First class attendance mandatory. Enrollment limited to 16.

STS 144. Game Studies: Issues in Design, Technology, and Player Creativity. 4 Units.

What can be learned about innovation from digital games? Digital game technologies, communities, and cultures. Topics include game design, open source ideas and modding, technology studies, player/consumer-driven innovation, fan culture, transgressive play, and collaborative co-creation drawn from virtual worlds and online games.

STS 160Q. Technology in Contemporary Society. 4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Introduction to the STS field. The natures of science and technology and their relationship, what is most distinctive about these forces today, and how they have transformed and been affected by contemporary society. Social, cultural, and ethical issues raised by recent scientific and technological developments. Case studies from areas such as information technology and biotechnology, with emphasis on the contemporary U.S. Unexpected influences of science and technology on contemporary society and how social forces shape scientific and technological enterprises and their products. Enrollment limited to 12.

STS 165N. Cars: Past, Present, and Future. 3 Units.

(Formerly COMM 165N.) Preference to freshmen. Focus is on the past, present and future of the automobile, bridging the humanities, social sciences, design, and engineering. Focus on the human experiences of designing, making, driving, being driven, living with, and dreaming of the automobile. A different theme featured each week in discussion around a talk and supported by key readings and media. Course is informed by history, archaeology, ethnography, human-technology interaction, mechanical engineering, and cognitive science.

STS 190. Issues in Technology and the Environment. 4 Units.

Humans have long shaped and reshaped the natural world with technologies. Once a menacing presence to conquer or an infinite reserve for resources, nature is now understood to require constant protection from damage and loss. This course will examine humanity's varied relationship with the environment, with a focus on the role of technology. Topics include: industrialization, modernism, nuclear technology, and biotechnology. Students will explore theoretical and methodological approaches in STS and conduct original research that addresses this human-nature-technology nexus. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.

STS 199. Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member.

STS 199J. Editing a Science Technology and Society Journal. 1-2 Unit.

The Science Technology and Society (STS) Program has a student journal, Intersect, that has been publishing STS student papers for a number of years. This course involves learning about how to serve as an editor of a peer-reviewed journal, while serving as one of the listed editors of Intersect. Entirely operated online, the journal uses a work-flow management to help with the submission process, peer-review, editing, and publication. Student editors learn by being involved in the publishing process, from soliciting manuscripts to publishing the journal's annual issue, while working in consultation with the instructor. Students will also learn about current practices and institutional frameworks around open access and digital publishing.

STS 200A. Food and Society: Politics, Culture and Technology. 5 Units.

This course will examine how politics, culture, and technology intersect in our food practices. Through a survey of academic, journalistic, and artistic works on food and eating, the course will explore a set of key analytical frameworks and conceptual tools in STS, such as the politics of technology, classification and identity, and nature/culture boundaries. The topics covered include: the industrialization of agriculture; technology and the modes of eating (e.g., the rise of restaurants); food taboos; globalization and local foodways; food and environmentalism; and new technologies in production (e.g., genetically modified food). Through food as a window, the course intends to achieve two broad intellectual goals. First, students will explore various theoretical and methodological approaches in STS. In particular, they will pay particular attention to the ways in which politics, culture, and technology intersect in food practices. Second, student will develop a set of basic skills and tools for their own critical thinking and empirical research, and design and conduct independent research on a topic related to food. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.

STS 200B. Global Mobilities. 5 Units.

In this STS senior capstone seminar, students will study the local and global impacts of the technologies that have increased personal mobility. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.
Same as: ANTHRO 146.

STS 200C. STS Senior Capstone. 5 Units.

Genetics, Ethics and Society. This course will explore three socially transforming components of genetics research that hold simultaneously liberating and constraining possibilities for populations and publics, both locally and globally. Topically the course will be divided into three sections. First, we will examine past and present issues dealing with the study of human subjects, as well as recent proposals to eventually bring full genome scans to every individual (personal genomics). Next we will learn of large-scale projects that aim to map the presence of environmental pathogens by their genetic signatures on a planetary scale and how different global populations may be affected. The last section of the course will focus on still other projects and policies that aim to expand the scope and capacity of state and international law enforcement through DNA-based forensics (the FBI CODIS database and the UK¿s Human Provenance Pilot Project). Projects like the latter also overlap with theories about community, families, and citizens who may or may not be linked through DNA. New concepts, such as the forensic "genetic informant" within a family unit, human DNA and isotope ¿country matches¿ in cases of state asylum, and DNA based kinship rules for family reunification in many Western countries, will be explored. In all three sections we will also examine scientific ethics when subject populations are minorities, or somehow structurally disadvantaged globally.n This capstone course will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas that promise to reorganize critical aspects of human life. Students will be encouraged to explore these dynamics within such important societal domains as health, law, markets of bio-surveillance, and the growing industry of disease and heritage DNA identity testing among others. We will read works from social scientists of science practice, ethicists, medial humanists and scientists. This course will equip students with tools to write about the intersection of science and society and to engage in a research project that relates to the topical foci of the course, broadly conceived.
Same as: ANTHRO 200C.

STS 200D. Text Technologies: A History. 5 Units.

Beginning with cave painting, carving, cuneiform, hieroglyph, and other early textual innovations, survey of the history of writing, image, sound, and byte, all text technologies employed to create, communicate and commemorate. Focus on the recording of language, remembrance and ideas explicating significant themes seen throughout history; these include censorship, propaganda, authenticity, apocalypticism, technophobia, reader response, democratization and authority. The production, transmission and reception of tablet technology, the scroll, the manuscript codex and handmade book, the machine-made book, newspapers and ephemera; and investigate the emergence of the phonograph and photograph, film, radio, television and digital multimedia.The impact of these various text technologies on their users, and try to draw out similarities and differences in our cultural and intellectual responses to evolving technologies. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.
Same as: ENGLISH 184H.

STS 200E. Technology, Nature, and Environmentalism. 5 Units.

Humans have long shaped and reshaped the natural world with technologies. Once a menacing presence to conquer or an infinite reserve for resources, nature is now understood to require constant protection from damage and loss. Humanity's relationships with the environment have changed over time and differed across societies. In this course, students (1) explore diverse ways in which people in different historical and cultural settings have conceptualized nature and their relationships with it, with a focus on the role of technology; and (2) learn the basics of STS research and conduct an original study that addresses this human-nature-technology nexus. First class attendance mandatory. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.

STS 200F. Sociology of Innovation and Invention. 5 Units.

This course examines the social, cultural, and economic factors that foster novelty. We will study a wide array of historical contexts, from the Renaissance to the present day, in which clusters of related innovations transformed the way things are done. We ask when do such innovations cascade out and produce social inventions that, for good and bad, create profound changes in how things are done, leading to new forms of organizations and new categories of people. Seminar/lecture format, reading intensive, final term paper. Prerequisite: admission to the course is restricted to declared STS seniors and is by application only. Email Andrew Weger (aweger@stanford.edu) for an application. Applications must be submitted by 5pm on November 8th.

STS 210. Ethics, Science, and Technology. 4 Units.

Ethical issues raised by advances in science and technology. Topics: biotechnology including agriculture and reproduction, the built environment, energy technologies, and information technology. Prerequisite: 110 or another course in ethics. Limited enrollment.

STS 299. Advanced Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

For students in the STS Honors program. Every unit of credit is understood to represent three hours of work per week per term and is to be agreed upon between the student and the faculty member. May be repeated for credit.