Catalog Navigation
Contacts
Office: Encina Hall West, room 100
Mail Code: 94305-6044
Phone: (650) 723-1608
Web Site: http://polisci.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Political Science are listed under the subject code POLISCI on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Political Science

The mission of the undergraduate program in Political Science is to provide students with a solid grasp of the American political system and other political systems within the context of global forces, international conflicts, social movements, ideological systems and diversity. Courses in the major are designed to help students gain competency in the primary subfields of political science including American and comparative politics, international relations, and the theory/philosophy of politics; to introduce students to a variety of research methodologies and analytical frameworks; and to develop students' written and oral communication skills. Students in the program have excellent preparation for further study in graduate or professional schools as well as careers in government, business, and not-for-profit organizations.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an understanding of core knowledge within the discipline of political science.
  2. the ability to communicate ideas clearly and persuasively in writing.
  3. the ability to analyze a problem and draw correct inferences using qualitative and/or quantitative analysis.
  4. the ability to evaluate theory and critique research within the discipline of Political Science.

Graduate Programs in Political Science

The Department of Political Science offers two types of advanced degrees:

  • the Doctor of Philosophy
  • the Master of Arts in Political Science which is available to Stanford students who are currently enrolled in other advanced degree programs.

The department does not have a terminal M.A. program for external applicants.

The principal goal of the Stanford Ph.D. program in Political Science is the training of scholars. Most students who receive doctorates in the program do research and teach at colleges or universities. The department offers courses and research opportunities in a wide variety of fields in the discipline, including American politics, comparative politics, international relations, political theory, and political methodology.  The program is built around small seminars that analyze critically the literature of a field or focus on a research problem. These courses prepare students for the Ph.D. comprehensive exam requirement within a two-year period and for work on the doctoral dissertation.  

Admission to the graduate program in Political Science is highly selective. Approximately 14-18 students, chosen from a large pool of applicants, enter the program each year. The small size of the student body allows more individual work with members of the faculty than most graduate programs. It also makes possible financial assistance to most students admitted to the Ph.D. program. 

Additional information on the admissions process is available on the Department of Political Science website.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in Political Science. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to make original contributions to the knowledge of Political Science and to interpret and present the results of such research.

Pursued in combination with a doctoral degree, the master's program furthers students' knowledge and skills in Political Science.  This is achieved through completion of courses in three subfields, and experience with independent work and specialization.

Political Science developed a new version of the major starting in 2015-16. Undergraduates who enter the University in 2015-16 and thereafter must follow the guidelines for the new major with the five tracks. This version is listed at the top of this page.

Undergraduates who entered the University in 2014-15 and prior have the option of declaring the major under the new major requirements or the old major version of the major. Students who have already declared the major under the old requirements have the option to switch to the new requirements or remain on the old requirements.  The previous major information is listed at the bottom of this page. 

The overall unit count for the major remains at 70 units. All courses for the major must be completed with a letter grade of 'C' or better.

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science

To receive a B.A. in Political Science, a student must:

  1. Submit a Political Science major proposal during a meeting with the undergraduate administrator and declare on Axess. Forms are available in Encina Hall West, room 100, or at the Department of Political Science web site. For additional information, students may visit the Political Science office or phone (650) 723-1608.
  2. Complete 70 units including:
    1. 5 unit introductory class, POLISCI 1 The Science of Politics, preferably taken before the end of sophomore year.
    2. 40 Political Science course units in a primary and secondary track combined. Each major must declare a primary track and take at least 25 units in this track. The secondary track must be completed with at least 15 units. The five track options include:
      1. Justice and Law
        Units
        POLISCI 24QLaw and Order3
        POLISCI 29NMixed-Race Politics and Culture3
        POLISCI 31NPolitical Freedom: Rights, Justice, and Democracy in the Western Tradition3
        POLISCI 31QJustice and the City3
        POLISCI 102Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 103Justice4-5
        POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 122Introduction to American Law3-5
        POLISCI 123Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 124RThe Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law5
        POLISCI 125PThe First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press4-5
        POLISCI 126PConstitutional Law3
        POLISCI 128SThe Constitution: A Brief History5
        POLISCI 131AThe Ethics and Politics of Collective Action3-4
        POLISCI 131LModern Political Thought: Machiavelli to Marx and Mill5
        POLISCI 132AThe Ethics of Elections5
        POLISCI 133Ethics and Politics of Public Service3-5
        POLISCI 133DThe Paradigm Shift1
        POLISCI 134LIntroduction to Environmental Ethics4-5
        POLISCI 134PContemporary Moral Problems4-5
        POLISCI 135DThe Ethics of Democratic Citizenship5
        POLISCI 136RIntroduction to Global Justice4
        POLISCI 136SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 137APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
        POLISCI 213SA Post American Century? American Foreign Policy in a Uni-Multi-unipolar World5
        POLISCI 215DSpecial Topics: Dilemmas of Democracy and Security in Israel and the Middle East5
        POLISCI 225CFixing US Politics: Political Reform in Principle and Practice5
        POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
        POLISCI 230AClassical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought4-5
        POLISCI 231High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 231DScience, Power and Democracy5
        POLISCI 231TDemocratic Accountability and Transparency5
        POLISCI 231ZTopics in Democratic Theory5
        POLISCI 232TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 234Democratic Theory5
        POLISCI 234PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 235JCreative Political Thinking: Three Cases,Creative Political Thinking: From Machiavelli to Madison5,4-5
        POLISCI 236Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 236STheories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 238THistory of International Relations Thought5
        POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 326Race and Racism in American Politics5
        POLISCI 327CLaw of Democracy3-5
        POLISCI 330Social and Political Philosophy of Hegel and Marx4
        POLISCI 330AClassical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought4-5
        POLISCI 331High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 332TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 333MResearch and Methods in Political Theory3-5
        POLISCI 334PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 335AAdam Smith: From Moral Philosophy to Political Economy3-5
        POLISCI 335JCreative Political Thinking: Three Cases,Creative Political Thinking: From Machiavelli to Madison5,4-5
        POLISCI 335JCreative Political Thinking: Three Cases,Creative Political Thinking: From Machiavelli to Madison5,4-5
        POLISCI 336SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 337APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
      2. International Relations
        Units
        POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
        POLISCI 18NCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context3
        POLISCI 43QImmigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe3
        POLISCI 45NCivil War Narratives3
        POLISCI 101Introduction to International Relations5
        POLISCI 110CAmerica and the World Economy5
        POLISCI 110DWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 110GGoverning the Global Economy5
        POLISCI 110XAmerica and the World Economy5
        POLISCI 110YWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 114SInternational Security in a Changing World5
        POLISCI 115AThe Rise of Asia3-5
        POLISCI 116The International History of Nuclear Weapons5
        POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations in Iran5
        POLISCI 136RIntroduction to Global Justice4
        POLISCI 140LChina in World Politics5
        POLISCI 147Comparative Democratic Development5
        POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
        POLISCI 210GGlobal Supply Chains and the Future of Global Governance5
        POLISCI 211NNuclear Politics3-5
        POLISCI 211SSpecial Topics: The United States and Europe: A Renewed Imperative?5
        POLISCI 212CCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
        POLISCI 212XCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
        POLISCI 213SA Post American Century? American Foreign Policy in a Uni-Multi-unipolar World5
        POLISCI 214RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 215DSpecial Topics: Dilemmas of Democracy and Security in Israel and the Middle East5
        POLISCI 216State Building5
        POLISCI 216GInternational Organizations and Institutions5
        POLISCI 217AAmerican Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process5
        POLISCI 217MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 238CGoverning the 21st Century World5
        POLISCI 238THistory of International Relations Thought5
        POLISCI 240TDemocracy, Promotion, and American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 242ACivil War and Peace Processes,Why is Africa Poor?5
        POLISCI 243CThe Political Economy of Development5
        POLISCI 245Evidence and the Making of Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 311NNuclear Politics3-5
        POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 314RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 315AThe Rise of Asia3-5
        POLISCI 316SDecision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 317MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
      3. Elections, Representation, and Governance
        Units
        POLISCI 2Introduction to American National Government and Politics5
        POLISCI 23QAnalyzing the 2016 Elections3
        POLISCI 25NThe US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective3
        POLISCI 27NThinking Like a Social Scientist3
        POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
        POLISCI 29NMixed-Race Politics and Culture3
        POLISCI 31NPolitical Freedom: Rights, Justice, and Democracy in the Western Tradition3
        POLISCI 72Policy, Politics, and the Presidency: Understanding the 2016 Campaign from Start to Finish2
        POLISCI 102Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 104Introduction to Comparative Politics5
        POLISCI 110DWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 110YWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 120BCampaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections4-5
        POLISCI 120CWhat's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach5
        POLISCI 120ZWhat's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach4
        POLISCI 121Political Power in American Cities5
        POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
        POLISCI 123Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 124LThe Psychology of Communication About Politics in America4-5
        POLISCI 124RThe Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law5
        POLISCI 125MLatino Social Movements5
        POLISCI 125PThe First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press4-5
        POLISCI 125SChicano/Latino Politics5
        POLISCI 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
        POLISCI 126PConstitutional Law3
        POLISCI 128SThe Constitution: A Brief History5
        POLISCI 131AThe Ethics and Politics of Collective Action3-4
        POLISCI 131LModern Political Thought: Machiavelli to Marx and Mill5
        POLISCI 132AThe Ethics of Elections5
        POLISCI 134LIntroduction to Environmental Ethics4-5
        POLISCI 134PContemporary Moral Problems4-5
        POLISCI 135DThe Ethics of Democratic Citizenship5
        POLISCI 141SPolitics of India5
        POLISCI 143SComparative Corruption4-5
        POLISCI 144ARevolution and Reconciliation Through Film5
        POLISCI 147Comparative Democratic Development5
        POLISCI 147PThe Politics of Inequality5
        POLISCI 148Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
        POLISCI 149TMiddle Eastern Politics5
        POLISCI 150AData Science for Politics5
        POLISCI 211Political Economy of East Asia3-5
        POLISCI 213EIntroduction to European Studies5
        POLISCI 217AAmerican Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process5
        POLISCI 217MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 220Place-Making Policies5
        POLISCI 220RThe Presidency3-5
        POLISCI 223The Politics of Gender in the United States5
        POLISCI 223BMoney, Power, and Politics in the New Gilded Age5
        POLISCI 225CFixing US Politics: Political Reform in Principle and Practice5
        POLISCI 226TThe Politics of Education3-5
        POLISCI 227U.S. Immigration Politics5
        POLISCI 231TDemocratic Accountability and Transparency5
        POLISCI 234Democratic Theory5
        POLISCI 238CGoverning the 21st Century World5
        POLISCI 241AAn Introduction to Political Economy of Development5
        POLISCI 241CCampaigns and Elections in Israel5
        POLISCI 244An Introduction to Political Development5
        POLISCI 244AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
        POLISCI 244CPolitical Change in Latin America: The contemporary challenge to democracy5
        POLISCI 244UPolitical Culture3-5
        POLISCI 245Evidence and the Making of Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 245APolitics and Public Finance5
        POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
        POLISCI 246APaths to the Modern World: Islam and the West5
        POLISCI 246PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
        POLISCI 248SLatin American Politics3-5
        POLISCI 249PIntroduction to Israeli Politics5
        POLISCI 311EPolitical Economy I2-5
        POLISCI 316SDecision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 317MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 322AAdvances in Political Psychology3-5
        POLISCI 324Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology1-3
        POLISCI 326TThe Politics of Education3-5
        POLISCI 327Minority Behavior and Representation5
        POLISCI 327CLaw of Democracy3-5
        POLISCI 344Politics and Geography3-5
        POLISCI 344AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
        POLISCI 344UPolitical Culture3-5
        POLISCI 346PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 348Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
        POLISCI 348SLatin American Politics3-5
        POLISCI 355AData Science for Politics5
      4. Political Economy and Development
        Units
        POLISCI 2Introduction to American National Government and Politics5
        POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
        POLISCI 18NCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context3
        POLISCI 24QLaw and Order3
        POLISCI 25NThe US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective3
        POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
        POLISCI 31QJustice and the City3
        POLISCI 43QImmigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe3
        POLISCI 45NCivil War Narratives3
        POLISCI 101Introduction to International Relations5
        POLISCI 102Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 103Justice4-5
        POLISCI 104Introduction to Comparative Politics5
        POLISCI 110CAmerica and the World Economy5
        POLISCI 110GGoverning the Global Economy5
        POLISCI 110XAmerica and the World Economy5
        POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 115AThe Rise of Asia3-5
        POLISCI 116The International History of Nuclear Weapons5
        POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations in Iran5
        POLISCI 120BCampaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections4-5
        POLISCI 121Political Power in American Cities5
        POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
        POLISCI 122Introduction to American Law3-5
        POLISCI 123Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 124LThe Psychology of Communication About Politics in America4-5
        POLISCI 125MLatino Social Movements5
        POLISCI 125SChicano/Latino Politics5
        POLISCI 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
        POLISCI 136SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 137APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
        POLISCI 140LChina in World Politics5
        POLISCI 141SPolitics of India5
        POLISCI 143SComparative Corruption4-5
        POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
        POLISCI 147Comparative Democratic Development5
        POLISCI 148Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
        POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
        POLISCI 149TMiddle Eastern Politics5
        POLISCI 152Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
        POLISCI 210GGlobal Supply Chains and the Future of Global Governance5
        POLISCI 211Political Economy of East Asia3-5
        POLISCI 211SSpecial Topics: The United States and Europe: A Renewed Imperative?5
        POLISCI 212CCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
        POLISCI 212XCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
        POLISCI 213EIntroduction to European Studies5
        POLISCI 216State Building5
        POLISCI 220Place-Making Policies5
        POLISCI 220RThe Presidency3-5
        POLISCI 223The Politics of Gender in the United States5
        POLISCI 223BMoney, Power, and Politics in the New Gilded Age5
        POLISCI 227U.S. Immigration Politics5
        POLISCI 231High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 231DScience, Power and Democracy5
        POLISCI 232TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 234PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 236Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 236STheories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 240TDemocracy, Promotion, and American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 241AAn Introduction to Political Economy of Development5
        POLISCI 241CCampaigns and Elections in Israel5
        POLISCI 241SSpatial Approaches to Social Science5
        POLISCI 242ACivil War and Peace Processes,Why is Africa Poor?5
        POLISCI 243CThe Political Economy of Development5
        POLISCI 244An Introduction to Political Development5
        POLISCI 244AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
        POLISCI 244CPolitical Change in Latin America: The contemporary challenge to democracy5
        POLISCI 244UPolitical Culture3-5
        POLISCI 245APolitics and Public Finance5
        POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
        POLISCI 246APaths to the Modern World: Islam and the West5
        POLISCI 246PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 247AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
        POLISCI 248SLatin American Politics3-5
        POLISCI 249PIntroduction to Israeli Politics5
        POLISCI 311EPolitical Economy I2-5
        POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 315AThe Rise of Asia3-5
        POLISCI 327CLaw of Democracy3-5
        POLISCI 331High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 332TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 334PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 336SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 337APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
        POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
        POLISCI 344Politics and Geography3-5
        POLISCI 344AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
        POLISCI 344UPolitical Culture3-5
        POLISCI 346PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 347AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 348Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
        POLISCI 348SLatin American Politics3-5
        POLISCI 352Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
      5. Data Science
        Units
        POLISCI 27NThinking Like a Social Scientist3
        POLISCI 147PThe Politics of Inequality5
        POLISCI 150AData Science for Politics5
        POLISCI 150BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
        POLISCI 150CCausal Inference for Social Science5
        POLISCI 152Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
        POLISCI 153Thinking Strategically5
        POLISCI 155Political Data Science5
        POLISCI 241SSpatial Approaches to Social Science5
        POLISCI 247AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 343AField Methods3-5
        POLISCI 347AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 352Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
        POLISCI 354Thinking Strategically5
        POLISCI 355AData Science for Politics5
        POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
        POLISCI 355CCausal Inference for Social Science5
        POLISCI 356AFormal Theory I: An Introduction to Game Theory3-5
        POLISCI 356BFormal Theory II: Models of Politics3-5
        POLISCI 358Data-driven Politics3-5
    3. A 5-unit methods requirement satisfied by:
      Units
      Select one of the following:5
      POLISCI 150AData Science for Politics5
      POLISCI 155Political Data Science5
      STATS 60Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5
      ECON 102AIntroduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists5
      CS 106AProgramming Methodology3-5
    4. 20 additional Political Science units including no more than 5 units of directed reading. 
    5. No more than two 3 unit Stanford Introductory Seminar courses can be applied toward the 70 unit major requirement.
  3. Demonstrate the capacity for sustained research and writing in the discipline. This requirement is satisfied by taking a Political Science course designated as a Writing in the Major (WIM) course and does not need to be taken in your primary track.
    Units
    Select one of the following approved Writing in the Major (WIM) courses:
    POLISCI 103Justice4-5
    POLISCI 110CAmerica and the World Economy5
    POLISCI 110DWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
    POLISCI 120CWhat's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach5
    POLISCI 121Political Power in American Cities5
    POLISCI 124RThe Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law5
    POLISCI 136SJustice4-5
    POLISCI 148Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
    POLISCI 212CCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
    POLISCI 236STheories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
    POLISCI 2935
  4. Take at least one 5-unit, 200-level or 300-level undergraduate seminar in Political Science. This course may be taken within any part of the major, including the primary or secondary track.
  5. Students may count up to 25 units of course work from outside the Political Science department toward their Political Science major. This related course work is intended to supplement your learning within the Political Science major. 

    Designated cognate courses are listed on the Approved Cognate Courses list and can be applied directly to the major, without a petition. Cognate courses may be applied in any of the following ways:

    1. Up to one cognate course in your primary track
    2. Up to one cognate course in your secondary track 
    3. Methods course requirement
    4. Additional related course work requirement
  6. Courses not on the Approved Cognate Courses list may be petitioned toward the major. Course petitions are reviewed and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Petitions must be submitted to the undergraduate administrator within one quarter of course completion or within one quarter of declaring the major.
  7. Directed reading and Oxford tutorial units require a petition and may only be applied towards related course work units. These units may not be used in the concentrations, and no more than 10 combined units of directed reading and Oxford tutorial units may count toward the required 70 Political Science units.
  8. All courses for the major must be completed with a letter grade of 'C' or better.

Bachelor of Arts in Political Science (option for students enrolled prior to 2015-16)

To receive a B.A. in Political Science, a student must:

  1. Submit a Political Science major proposal during a meeting with the undergraduate administrator and declare on Axess. Forms are available in Encina Hall West, room 100, or at the Department of Political Science web site. For additional information, come to the office or phone (650) 723-1608.

  2. Complete 70 units including:
    1. 45 Political Science course units in the primary and secondary concentration combined. Each major should declare a primary concentration in one subfield and take at least 30 units in this concentration, including the introductory course for that subfield. The secondary concentration must be completed with at least 15 units, including the introductory course for that subfield. Subfields include:
      1. International Relations:
        Units
        POLISCI 101Introduction to International Relations5
        POLISCI 110DWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 110GGoverning the Global Economy5
        POLISCI 110YWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 114DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 114SInternational Security in a Changing World5
        POLISCI 116The International History of Nuclear Weapons5
        POLISCI 118PU.S. Relations in Iran5
        POLISCI 213EIntroduction to European Studies5
        POLISCI 213SA Post American Century? American Foreign Policy in a Uni-Multi-unipolar World5
        POLISCI 214RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 216State Building5
        POLISCI 215DSpecial Topics: Dilemmas of Democracy and Security in Israel and the Middle East5
        POLISCI 216E5
        POLISCI 217AAmerican Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process5
        POLISCI 217MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
        POLISCI 314RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
        POLISCI 3164-5
        POLISCI 317MSpecial Topics: International Democratization5
        POLISCI 318Special Topics: Democratic Peace-A Political Biography3-5
      2. American Politics:
        Units
        POLISCI 102Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 120BCampaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections4-5
        POLISCI 120CWhat's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach5
        POLISCI 122Introduction to American Law3-5
        POLISCI 123Politics and Public Policy4-5
        POLISCI 124AThe American West5
        POLISCI 124RThe Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law5
        POLISCI 125SChicano/Latino Politics5
        POLISCI 126PConstitutional Law3
        POLISCI 220RThe Presidency5
        POLISCI 223BMoney, Power, and Politics in the New Gilded Age5
        POLISCI 225CFixing US Politics: Political Reform in Principle and Practice5
        POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
        POLISCI 226TThe Politics of Education5
        POLISCI 226U5
        POLISCI 322AAdvances in Political Psychology3-5
        POLISCI 326Race and Racism in American Politics5
        POLISCI 326TThe Politics of Education5
      3. Political Theory:
        Units
        POLISCI 103Justice4-5
        POLISCI 131AThe Ethics and Politics of Collective Action3-4
        POLISCI 131LModern Political Thought: Machiavelli to Marx and Mill5
        POLISCI 133Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
        POLISCI 133DThe Paradigm Shift1
        POLISCI 134LIntroduction to Environmental Ethics4-5
        POLISCI 134PContemporary Moral Problems4-5
        POLISCI 135DThe Ethics of Democratic Citizenship5
        POLISCI 136RIntroduction to Global Justice4
        POLISCI 136SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 137APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
        POLISCI 231High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 232TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 234PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 236Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 236STheories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
        POLISCI 331High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests3-5
        POLISCI 332TThe Dialogue of Democracy4-5
        POLISCI 334PDeliberative Democracy and its Critics3-5
        POLISCI 336Introduction to Global Justice4
        POLISCI 336SJustice4-5
        POLISCI 337APolitical Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
      4. Comparative Politics:
        Units
        POLISCI 104Introduction to Comparative Politics5
        POLISCI 143SComparative Corruption4
        POLISCI 144ARevolution and Reconciliation Through Film5
        POLISCI 146AAfrican Politics4-5
        POLISCI 147Comparative Democratic Development5
        POLISCI 147PThe Politics of Inequality5
        POLISCI 148Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
        POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
        POLISCI 241AAn Introduction to Political Economy of Development5
        POLISCI 241SSpatial Approaches to Social Science5
        POLISCI 244UPolitical Culture5
        POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
        POLISCI 246PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 247AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
        POLISCI 248SLatin American Politics5
        POLISCI 343AField Methods3-5
        POLISCI 344Politics and Geography3-5
        POLISCI 344UPolitical Culture5
        POLISCI 346PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
        POLISCI 347AGames Developing Nations Play5
        POLISCI 348SLatin American Politics5
      5. Methodology:
        Units
        POLISCI 150AData Science for Politics5
        POLISCI 150BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
        POLISCI 150CCausal Inference for Social Science5
        POLISCI 153Thinking Strategically5
        POLISCI 155Political Data Science5
        POLISCI 354Thinking Strategically5
        POLISCI 355AData Science for Politics5
        POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
        POLISCI 355CCausal Inference for Social Science5
        POLISCI 358Data-driven Politics3-5
    2. A 5-unit methods requirement satisfied by:
      Select one of the following:5
      Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
      Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
      Political Data Science
      Data Science for Politics
    3. 20 additional Political Science units including no more than 5 units of directed reading.
    4. No more than two 3-unit Stanford Introductory Seminar courses can be applied toward the 70-unit major requirement.
  3. Introductory Courses: Each student must take two from the following Political Science courses, one of which must be in the primary concentration, the other in the secondary concentration. These courses should be completed by the end of sophomore year.
    Units
    POLISCI 101Introduction to International Relations5
    POLISCI 102Politics and Public Policy4-5
    POLISCI 103Justice4-5
    POLISCI 104Introduction to Comparative Politics5
  4. Demonstrate the capacity for sustained research and writing in the discipline. This requirement is satisfied by taking a Political Science course designated as a Writing in the Major (WIM) course and may be in any subfield of the major.
  5. Take at least one 5-unit, 200-level or 300-level undergraduate seminar in Political Science and may be within your primary or secondary concentration.
  6. Students may petition a maximum of 10 units towards the major. Transfer students are allowed to petition up to 20 units towards the major. A maximum of 15 units may be applied towards the concentrations and 5 units towards other Political Science course units. All Stanford-in-Washington courses and transfer credit from outside of Stanford require petitions which must be reviewed and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Petitions must be submitted to the undergraduate administrator within one quarter of course completion or within one quarter of declaring the major. Cognate courses do not require a petition unless the units are being applied to primary or secondary concentrations.
  7. Directed reading and Oxford tutorial units also require a petition and may only be applied towards related course work units. These units may not be used in the concentrations, and no more than 10 combined units of directed reading and Oxford tutorial units may count toward the required 70 Political Science units.
  8. All courses for the major must be completed with a letter grade of 'C' or better.

Research Honors Program (as of 2016-17)

The Research Honors Program within the Political Science major leads to a Bachelor of Arts with Honors (B.A.H.) in Political Science. Students pursuing the B.A.H. are expected to complete the standard Political Science major as well as conduct research under the supervision of a faculty member, culminating in an honors thesis. Up to 20 units of honors course work may be applied to the additional related course work section of the major. 

To participate in the Research Honors Program in Political Science, students must apply and be accepted to the program during the winter quarter of their junior year.  A complete application includes:

  1. a transcript
  2. a letter of recommendation from a member of the Political Science faculty or from a teaching assistant in a Political Science course
  3. an essay outlining the student's research interest. 

Students are encouraged to participate in an intensive Summer research experience prior to applying to the research honors program. Students may do so by participating in the Political Science Department's Summer Research College (SRC) program or related research experience with faculty during the academic year. 

Prerequisites for admittance:
  1. A GPA of 3.5 or higher
  2. POLISCI 1 The Science of Politics
  3. POLISCI 150A Data Science for Politics
  4. Research experience (strongly recommended)
Research Honors Program Requirements—To graduate with departmental honors in Political Science, students must:
  1. Complete POLISCI 299A Research Design, in the Spring Quarter of their junior year.
  2. Complete the Honors Thesis Adviser form.  The thesis adviser must be a member of the Political Science faculty.
  3. Complete POLISCI 299B Honors Thesis Seminar in the Autumn Quarter of their senior year. 
  4. Complete POLISCI 299C Honors Thesis, in Winter Quarter and POLISCI 299D Honors Thesis, in Spring Quarter with their thesis advisor in their senior year.
  5. Earn a grade of ‘B’ or higher in all honors coursework (POLISCI 299A, 299B, 299C, and 299D). Students unable to meet these requirements may be removed from the program.
  6. Submit a completed thesis, approved by the adviser, in the Spring Quarter of their senior year. The thesis must receive a grade of ‘B+’ or higher.

Research Honors Track (students accepted to the program prior to 2016-17)

The Research Honors Track in Political Science leads to a B.A.H. (Bachelor of Arts with Honors) in Political Science. This program is designed to provide its students with the analytical tools they need to write honors theses and collaborate with Stanford faculty and Ph.D. students.

To receive a B.A.H. in Political Science, students must apply and be accepted to the Research Honors Track. Students must apply to the program in the Spring Quarter of the freshman or sophomore year or Autumn Quarter of the sophomore or junior year.  A complete application includes a transcript; a letter of recommendation from a member of the Stanford Political Science faculty or from a teaching assistant in a Political Science course; and an essay outlining the student's interest in the Research Honors Track. 

To fulfill the research honors track major requirements, a student must:

  1. Complete 70 units
    1. All courses taken for the research honors track must receive a letter grade of 'C' or better. Junior research honors track courses (see 1e) must receive a 'B' or better to count toward the major. Students unable to meet these requirements may be removed from the track.
    2. 10 units of introductory course work in Political Science.
      1. Students must complete at least two of the following courses, preferably by the end of Spring Quarter of sophomore year:
        Units
        Select two of the following:10
        The Science of Politics
        Introduction to International Relations
        Politics and Public Policy
        Justice
        Introduction to Comparative Politics
    3. 10 units of statistics, which can be completed by taking one of the following sequences:
      Select one of the following:10
      Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
      and Data Science for Politics
      Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
      and Data Science for Politics
      Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
      and Applied Econometrics
    4. Students are also encouraged (but not required) to complete one of the following calculus sequences:
      Units
      Select one of the following Series:15
      Series A
      Calculus
      Calculus
      Calculus
      Series B
      Calculus
      Calculus
      Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
    5. Three courses designed for the research honors track, to be taken during sophomore or junior year:
      Units
      POLISCI 291Political Institutions5
      POLISCI 292Political Behavior5
      POLISCI 299AResearch Design5
    6. To accommodate students studying at overseas campuses during their junior year, these courses are offered during the Winter and Spring quarters.
    7. Two 200-level, 300-level, or 400-level graduate elective courses.
    8. Three 100-level Stanford POLISCI courses that must be approved by the student's adviser. One of these courses must be a POLISCI Writing in the Major (WIM) course.
    9. 10 units of honors thesis writing. To satisfy this requirement, students must take POLISCI 299B Honors Thesis Seminar, during the Autumn of their senior year, and must complete the remaining units by taking  POLISCI 299C Honors Thesis, and/or POLISCI 299D Honors Thesis with their thesis adviser.
  2. Complete at least one intensive summer research experience by participating in the Political Science Department's Summer Research College (SRC) program, or by completing an independent project under the direction of a Political Science faculty member. Independent projects must be approved by the director of the research honors track prior to completion and a research project form should be submitted to the undergraduate administrator with a description of the project.
  3. Students may petition a maximum of 10 units to count for the major. Transfer students are allowed to petition a maximum of 20 units. All petitions and transfer courses require approval from the research honors track director.

Minor in Political Science

Students must complete their declaration of the minor on Axess no later than Autumn of their senior year. They must submit the minor declaration form to the undergraduate administrator in Encina Hall West 100. This form can be found in Encina Hall West 100 or on the Political Science web site.

To receive a minor in Political Science, a student must complete a minimum of 30 unduplicated units. All units must be in Political Science courses or related courses. All courses for the minor must be taken for a letter grade. Students must receive a minimum letter grade of 'C' in all courses for the minor.

Introductory Course

The student should enroll in POLISCI 1 The Science of Politics preferably in their freshman or sophomore year.  

Track

The student selects a track in which four courses are taken. These courses are at a more advanced level (numbered above 100) and should follow enrollment in POLISCI 1.  There are five track options: Justice and Law, International Relations, Data Science, Political Economy and Development, and Elections, Representation, and Governance.

Additional Course Work

This may include courses within any of the five tracks or a directed reading, Stanford in Washington, Bing Overseas courses, or cognate courses from the Approved Cognate Course list. A maximum of 5 units of directed reading may count if supervised by a member of the Political Science department.   Cognate courses may be applied only to additional course work.

Transfer Work

A maximum of 10 units of work completed outside Stanford may be given Political Science credit toward the minor for transfer students.  All such cases must be individually reviewed and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Master of Arts in Political Science

The Political Science department does not offer a terminal M.A. degree. An M.A. degree may only be pursued in combination with a doctoral degree from another department within the University or with an advanced degree from one of the University's professional schools. Students interested in pursuing the M.A. should discuss the application requirements with the graduate administrator in Political Science.

The department does not offer a coterminal master's degree.

Students from within the department and from other degree programs who have applied to the M.A. program may elect to take the M.A. degree in Political Science when they have met the following requirements:

  1. Completion of at least three quarters of residency as a graduate student with 45 units of credit of which at least 25 units must be taken in Political Science graduate seminars of 300 level and above. Not more than 25 units of the 45-unit requirement may be taken in a single field.
  2. At least 10 units in each of two fields and at least 5 units in a third field.
  3. The remaining 20 units must come from courses numbered above 100. Of those 20 units, not more than 10 units of work from related departments may be accepted in lieu of a portion of the work in Political Science. Not more than 10 units may be taken as directed reading.
  4. A grade point average (GPA) of 2.7 (B-) or better must be attained for directed readings and all course work. No thesis is required.

Political Science doctoral candidates may pursue master's degrees from other departments. Recent examples include but are not restricted to master's degrees in Statistics and Economics. Students interested in this option should consult the relevant sections of this bulletin for both University and department requirements for master's degrees.

Doctor of Philosophy in Political Science

The University's basic requirements for the Ph.D. degree are discussed in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Programs of study leading to the Ph.D. degree are designed by the student, in consultation with advisers and the Director of Graduate Studies, to serve his or her particular interests as well as to achieve the general department requirements. A student is recommended to the University Committee on Graduate Studies to receive the Ph.D. degree in Political Science when the following program of study has been completed:

  1. Statement of Purpose: By the beginning of the fourth quarter in residence, each graduate student submits a statement of purpose to the student's adviser. This statement indicates the student's proposed major fields of study, the courses taken and those planned to be taken to cover those fields, the student's plan for meeting language and/or skill requirements, plans for scheduling of comprehensive examinations and/or research papers, and, where possible, dissertation ideas or plans. This statement is discussed with, and must be approved by, the student's adviser. In the Autumn Quarter following completion of their first year, students are reviewed at a regular meeting of the department faculty. The main purposes of this review are, in order of importance: to advise and assist the student to realize his or her educational goals; to provide an opportunity for clarifying goals and for identifying ways to achieve them; and to facilitate assessment of progress toward the degree.
  2. Two Major Fields: The candidate for the Ph.D. degree must demonstrate proficiency in two major fields: American politics, comparative politics, international relations, methodology, and political theory. Students demonstrate proficiency by fulfilling, depending on the field, combinations of the following: written qualifying examinations, research papers, or course work. Each field offers a series of three or four courses designed to familiarize students with the literature of that field. In addition, a field may require that students take one or more elective courses covering a specific aspect of the field. All courses that a student uses to fulfill a major field requirement must be taken for a letter grade of 'B' or better.
  3. Third Minor Field: The candidate for the Ph.D. degree must also complete a third minor field. The third field requirement is usually satisfied by taking two courses for at least three units each from among courses approved by the field convener. All courses used to fulfill the third minor field requirement must be taken for a letter grade of 'B' or better. The third field cannot be satisfied by courses taken as a requirement for a major field. A third field in political theory requires two courses in addition to the five units necessary to fulfill the political theory program requirement (see item 4). A third concentration in methodology requires 10 units in addition to the 10 units necessary to fulfill the quantitative methods program requirement (see item 5).
  4. Political Theory Requirement: Every Ph.D. candidate must complete at least one quarter of graduate-level instruction in political theory. All courses used to fulfill the political theory requirement must be taken for a letter grade of 'B' or better.
  5. Quantitative Methods Requirement Every Ph.D. candidate must take POLISCI 450A Political Methodology I: Regression and POLISCI 450B Political Methodology II: Causal Inference in order to fulfill the quantitative methods requirement. Credit for equivalent classes is at the discretion of the political methodology field convener. All courses used to fulfill the quantitative methods requirement must be taken for a letter grade of 'B' or better.
  6. Competence in a Language and/or Skill: The Ph.D. candidate is required to demonstrate competence in a language and/or skill that is likely to be relevant to the dissertation research. The level of competence needed for completion of the research is determined by the student's adviser. Previous instruction can be counted towards this requirement only if approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.
  7. Comprehensive Exams: Students must take the comprehensive exams in two major fields by the end of their second year in the program. Students are expected to have passed these examinations by the end of their second year.
  8. Second-year Research Paper: Prior to being advanced to candidacy, each student must produce a research paper (field paper) demonstrating the capacity to produce research at a level expected of students preparing to write a high quality Ph.D. dissertation. The second-year research paper is given considerable weight as the faculty consider an application for candidacy. Students are advised to begin work on their second-year research papers in the summer between their first and second years in the program, and to submit a first draft to their advisers sometime in the Autumn Quarter of their second year. Second-year research papers are considered incomplete until approved by the two faculty readers. Students are expected to have submitted an approved field paper by the end of their second year.
  9. Advancement to candidacy: In accordance with University guidelines, Ph.D. students are expected to advance to candidacy by the end of their sixth quarter in the program (i.e., by the end of their Spring Quarter in their second year in the program). It is the department’s practice that all students in their sixth quarter be considered for candidacy at a special meeting of the faculty (typically in Week 10 of Spring Quarter). All the requirements for advancing to candidacy listed below must be completed by this meeting. Should a student not be advanced to candidacy by the end of the sixth quarter, the student is at risk of being dismissed from the Ph.D. program. To be eligible for advancement to candidacy, students must complete the requirements listed below.
    1. two major fields
    2. a third minor field
    3. the political theory requirement
    4. the quantitative methods requirement
    5. the second-year research paper
    6. Advancement to candidacy is not automatic upon completion of these requirements. Advancement to candidacy is an expression by the faculty of their confidence that the student can successfully complete the Ph.D. program, and in particular, complete a doctoral dissertation that is an original contribution to scholarship that exemplifies the highest standard of the discipline.

  10. Dissertation Prospectus: During the third year, a formal dissertation prospectus must be submitted to and approved by the student's dissertation adviser and the Director of Graduate Studies. The dissertation prospectus must be approved by the end of the third year. Students must also make a dissertation prospectus presentation in the third year.
  11. TA Requirement: A candidate for the Ph.D. in Political Science is required to serve as a teaching assistant (TA) in the department for a minimum of three quarters. Many students need to TA for up to five quarters as part of their funding package.
  12. Oral Examination: The candidate must pass the University oral examination on the area of the dissertation at a time, after the passing of the written comprehensive examinations, suggested by the candidate's dissertation committee.
  13. Dissertation: The candidate must complete a dissertation satisfactory to the dissertation reading committee.
  14. Adequate Progress In addition to the specific program requirements listed above, at each stage of the Ph.D. program, the department has the following minimum standards for adequate academic progress:
    • Except in rare circumstances, no more than two of the following on the transcript at any given time: incomplete ('I'); grade not reported ('GNR'); not passed or no credit ('NP' or NC'); or withdraw ('W').
    • Adequate grades in all courses taken each term ('B-' and below are regarded as inadequate).
    • Graduate students in the first year must enroll for at least 15 units and must pass at least 8 units per term by the end of the term.  Graduate students in years 2, 3 and 4 must register for at least 8 units and must pass at least 6 units by the end of each term.
    • Advance to candidacy by close of sixth quarter (i.e., for most students, the end of their second academic year in the Ph.D. program);
    • Dissertation prospectus presentation made and approval of dissertation prospectus on file by the end of the third year.
    • Dissertation reading committee formed by end of the fourth year.
    • Advance to TGR status by end of the fourth year.
    • Substantial progress toward completion of the dissertation in fourth and fifth years.

Ph.D. Minor in Political Science

Candidates in other departments which accept a minor in Political Science select two concentrations in political science in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies and submit to her or him a program of study for approval. Written approval for the program must be obtained from the Director of Graduate Studies before application for doctoral candidacy. Students are required to complete at least 20 units in Political Science courses. Courses must be 300 level and above. Grades must be a GPA of 3.0 (B) or better.

Emeriti: (Professors) David B. Abernethy, Lucius J. Barker, Richard A. Brody, Joshua Cohen, David Danielski, Charles Drekmeier, Richard R. Fagen, John A. Ferejohn, John W. Lewis, John Manley, James March, Hubert R. Marshall, Daniel Okimoto, Robert A. Packenham, Philippe Schmitter, Hans N. Weiler

Chair: Judith L. Goldstein

Professors: David W. Brady, Bruce E. Cain, Gary W. Cox, James D. Fearon (on leave, Winter and Spring), Morris P. Fiorina, Judith L. Goldstein, Stephen H. Haber, David J. Holloway, Shanto Iyengar, Terry L. Karl (on leave), Stephen D. Krasner, Jon A. Krosnick, David D. Laitin, Margaret Levi, Michael A. McFaul, Terry M. Moe, Josiah Ober, Jean C. Oi (on leave, Winter), Jack N. Rakove (on leave), Rob Reich, Condoleezza Rice, Douglas Rivers, Jonathan A. Rodden (on leave), Scott D. Sagan, Kenneth F. Scheve Jr., Kenneth A. Schultz, Gary M. Segura (on leave, Winter), Paul M. Sniderman, Michael R. Tomz, Barry R. Weingast, Jeremy M. Weinstein

Associate Professors: Lisa Blaydes, Justin Grimmer, Jens Hainmueller (on leave), Beatriz Magaloni

Assistant Professors: Avidit Acharya, Adam Bonica (on leave, Autumn), Emilee Chapman, Lauren Davenport, Vasiliki Fouka, Andrew B. Hall, Karen L. Jusko (on leave, Autumn), Phillip Y. Lipscy (on leave), Alison McQueen, Clayton Nall (on leave, Autumn)

Lecturers: Abbas Milani, Andrew R. Rutten, Bruce Sievers, Yuki Takagi, Patricia Young

Courtesy Professors: Jonathan B. Bendor, Coit D. Blacker, Martha Crenshaw, Larry Diamond, Jean-Pierre Dupuy, James Fishkin, Lawrence Friedman, Francis Fukuyama, Keith Krehbiel, Neil Malhotra, Nathaniel Persily, Debra M. Satz, Ken Shotts, Stephen J. Stedman, Andrew Walder, Amy Zegart

Courtesy Associate Professor: Alberto Diaz-Cayeros, Saumitra Jha

Courtesy Assistant Professor: Jennifer Pan

Cognate Courses

  1. Students may count up to twenty-five units of coursework from outside the Political Science department toward their Political Science major.  This related coursework is intended to supplement your learning within the Political Science major. 

    Designated cognate courses are listed on the Approved Cognate Courses list and can be applied directly to the major, without a petition.  Cognate courses may be applied in any of the following ways:

    1. Up to one cognate course in your primary track
    2. Up to one cognate course in your secondary track 
    3. Methods course requirement
    4. Additional related coursework requirement
Units
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 242Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
AFRICAST 301AThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
ECON 1Principles of Economics5
ECON 102AIntroduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists5
EDUC 197Education, Gender, and Development4
EDUC 220DHistory of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations3-5
ETHICSOC 20Introduction to Moral Philosophy5
FEMGEN 297Education, Gender, and Development4
HISTORY 106BGlobal Human Geography: Europe and Americas5
HISTORY 152History of American Law5
HISTORY 172AMexico: From Colony to Nation, or the History of an impossible Republic?5
HISTORY 181BFormation of the Contemporary Middle East5
HISTORY 201CThe U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War5
HISTORY 204GWar and Society4-5
HISTORY 228Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II5
HISTORY 246The Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
HISTORY 258EHistory of School Reform: Origins, Policies, Outcomes, and Explanations3-5
HISTORY 261GPresidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History5
HISTORY 279Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HISTORY 288Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
HISTORY 304GWar and Society4-5
HISTORY 328Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II5
HISTORY 346The Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
HISTORY 352BHistory of American Law5
HISTORY 379Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HISTORY 388Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
HUMBIO 120Health Care in America: An Introduction to U.S. Health Policy4
HUMBIO 120AAmerican Health Policy3
HUMBIO 129SGlobal Public Health4
HUMBIO 143Adolescent Sexuality4
HUMBIO 172BChildren, Youth, and the Law5
HUMBIO 173Science, Innovation and the Law5
INTNLREL 119The International Human Rights Movement; Assessing its History, Work and Current Challenges4
INTNLREL 123The Future of the European Union: Challenges and Opportunities5
INTNLREL 140AInternational Law and International Relations5
INTNLREL 140CThe U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War5
INTNLREL 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
INTNLREL 173Presidents and Foreign Policy in Modern History5
INTNLREL 182World War I: Three Perspectives2
IPS 219Intelligence and National Security3
IPS 244U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia5
IPS 246China on the World Stage4
JEWISHST 282Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II5
JEWISHST 288Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
JEWISHST 382Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II5
JEWISHST 388Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict4-5
MS&E 93QNuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism3
MS&E 180Organizations: Theory and Management4
MS&E 193Technology and National Security3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
OSPBER 37Leading from Behind? Germany in the International Arena since 19454-5
OSPBER 115XThe German Economy: Past and Present4-5
OSPBER 126XA People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU4-5
OSPFLOR 78The Impossible Experiment: Politics and Policies of the New European Union5
OSPOXFRD 18Making Public Policy: An Introduction to Political Philosophy, Politics, and Economics4-5
OSPOXFRD 24British and American Constitutional Systems in Comparative Perspective4-5
OSPPARIS 32French Politics in Cross-National Perspective5
OSPPARIS 122XChallenges of Integration in the European Union4-5
OSPSANTG 116XModernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century5
OSPSANTG 129XLatin America in the International System4-5
PHIL 2Introduction to Moral Philosophy5
PSYCH 10Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5
REES 304GWar and Society4-5
REES 320State and Nation Building in Central Asia3-5
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 134Education, Gender, and Development4
SOC 149The Urban Underclass4
SOC 218Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 249The Urban Underclass4
STATS 60Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5
STATS 110Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences4-5
STATS 160Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus5
THINK 5Justice and the Constitution4
THINK 19Rules of War4
THINK 42Thinking Through Africa: Perspectives on Health, Wealth, and Well-Being4
THINK 47Inventing Government: Ancient and Modern4
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4

Overseas Studies Courses in Political Science

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Units
OSPBER 154-5
OSPBER 37Leading from Behind? Germany in the International Arena since 19454-5
OSPBER 115XThe German Economy: Past and Present4-5
OSPBER 126XA People's Union? Money, Markets, and Identity in the EU4-5
OSPCPTWN 313
OSPFLOR 78The Impossible Experiment: Politics and Policies of the New European Union5
OSPOXFRD 24British and American Constitutional Systems in Comparative Perspective4-5
OSPPARIS 32French Politics in Cross-National Perspective5
OSPPARIS 122XChallenges of Integration in the European Union4-5
OSPSANTG 116XModernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century5

Courses

POLISCI 1. The Science of Politics. 5 Units.

Why do countries go to war? How can we explain problems such as poverty, inequality, and pollution? What can be done to improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.

POLISCI 2. Introduction to American National Government and Politics. 5 Units.

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. (This course has merged with Political Science 123/PubPol 101).
Same as: AMSTUD 2

POLISCI 11N. The Rwandan Genocide. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. In 1994, more than 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu Rwandans were killed in the most rapid genocide in history. What could bring humans to carry out such violence? Could it have been prevented? Why did no major power intervene to stop the killing? Should the U.N. be held accountable? What were the consequences for Central Africa? How have international actors respond to the challenges of reconstructing Rwanda? What happened to the perpetrators? Sources include scholarly and journalistic accounts.

POLISCI 12N. Climate Change and Conflict: Will Warming Lead to Warring?. 3 Units.

Policymakers and scholars are increasingly interested in whether climate change and its associated effects could contribute to the risk of violent conflict within and between countries. Will drought and rising temperatures lead to struggles over a dwindling supply of agricultural land? Will shortages of fresh water cause growing tension over access to rivers and lakes? Will rising sea levels cause mass migration from coastal areas, bringing people into conflict? Will social unrest arising from such stresses lead to violent efforts to topple governments or spill over across borders? In this seminar, we explore such questions as: How could the expected effects of climate change make civil or international conflicts more likely? What evidence is there that environmental factors contribute to violent conflicts, historically and today? What regions or countries are most at risk from these challenges, and why? Answering these questions requires that we not only think about the human and social impacts of climate change but also ask basic questions about what causes political violence within and between countries and how we can assess the contribution of different risk factors. Assignments will encourage students to learn more about the conflict risks in countries that interest them and to gain familiarity with some of the methods that political scientists use to explore these issues systematically. The connection between climate and conflict is relatively new area of inquiry, without many settled answers, so this seminar presents an opportunity to explore what we know, what we do not yet know, and what we can do to further our understanding of this issue going forward.

POLISCI 18N. Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context. 3 Units.

How and why do civil wars start, drag on, and end? What does focus of post-Cold War U.S. foreign policy on countries torn apart by civil war tell us about contemporary international relations? We consider these and related questions, with the conflict in Syria as our main case study.

POLISCI 18SC. The Federal Government and the West. 2 Units.

Historical development and current status of the relationship between the U.S. federal government and the American West. Land ownership, natural resource management, agriculture, water, energy, and environmental quality.

POLISCI 19N. Politics of Energy Efficiency. 5 Units.

We will examine the political context of energy efficiency and climate change. Why are some countries, such as Japan and France, able to achieve high levels of energy efficiency, while others, such as the United States and Australia, struggle to do so? What political factors faciliate or impede energy efficiency policies? Why is international cooperation on climate change so difficult?.

POLISCI 22SC. The Face of Battle. 2 Units.

Our understanding of warfare often derives from the lofty perspective of political leaders and generals: what were their objectives and what strategies were developed to meet them? This top-down perspective slights the experience of the actual combatants and non-combatants caught in the crossfire. This course focuses on the complexity of the process by which strategy is translated into tactical decisions by the officers and foot soldiers on the field of battle. We will focus on three battles in American history: Gettysburg (July 1863), the Battle of Little Bighorn (June 1876), and the Korengal Valley campaign in Afghanistan (2006-2010). In addition to reading major works on these battles and the conflicts in which they occurred, we will travel to Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and the Little Bighorn battlefield in Montana. While at Stanford, students will conduct extensive research on individual participants at Gettysburg and Little Bighorn. When we walk through the battlefield sites, students will brief the group on their subjects' experience of battle and on why they made the decisions they did during the conflict. Why did Lt. General Longstreet oppose the Confederate attack on the Union Army at Gettysburg? What was the experience of a military surgeon on a Civil War battlefield? Why did Custer divide his 7th Cavalry troops as they approached the Little Bighorn River? What was the role of Lakota Sioux women after a battle? Travel will be provided and paid by Sophomore College (except incidentals) and is made possible by the support of the Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). The final part of the class covers contemporary military conflicts discussing what the US public, political leaders, and military commanders have learned (and not learned) from the past. The course is open to students from a range of disciplines; an interest in the topic is the only prerequisite. Sophomore College course, applications required by 12noon April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edunnRead the article written about the 2012 Face of Battle Course (http://cisac.fsi.stanford.edu/news/custer_makes_last_stand_in_stanford_tshirts_and_raybans_20121221/).

POLISCI 23Q. Analyzing the 2016 Elections. 3 Units.

the seminar will normally meet for two hours, but after three seminars there will be lab sessions to acquaint students with basic quantitative methods and major social science databases. After every election the commentariat promulgates a story line to explain the results. Typically later analysis shows the media story line to be wrong (eg. "values voters" in 2004). Participants in this seminar will analyze the results of the 2016 elections. The seminar is about ANALYSIS, not ideology. Some familiarity with quantitative methods is a prerequisite.

POLISCI 24Q. Law and Order. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. The role of law in promoting social order. What is the rule of law? How does it differ from the rule of men? What institutions best support the rule of law? Is a state needed to ensure that laws are enforced? Should victims be allowed to avenge wrongs? What is the relationship between justice and mercy?.

POLISCI 24SC. Conservatism and Liberalism in American Politics and Policy. 2 Units.

What influence do political ideologies have in American politics and government? In this course, students will study liberal and conservative ideology in American politics and public policy from the mid-20th century onward. The course begins with an examination of ideology in the American public and then considers ideology among political activists and elected officials, focusing on members of Congress and the president. The course will also cover the ideological polarization of political elites and its impact on the policy-making process. In the final part of the course, through a series of policy case studies, students will also evaluate how well certain public policies have met the ideological goals of their liberal and conservative sponsors. The course will included several lunches and dinners with guest speakers.

POLISCI 25N. The US Congress in Historical and Comparative Perspective. 3 Units.

This course traces the development of legislatures from their medieval European origins to the present, with primary emphasis on the case of the U.S. Congress. Students will learn about the early role played by assemblies in placing limits on royal power, especially via the ¿power of the purse.¿ About half the course will then turn to a more detailed consideration of the U.S. Congress¿s contemporary performance, analyzing how that performance is affected by procedural legacies from the past that affect most democratic legislatures worldwide.

POLISCI 26SC. Environmental & Resource Challenges on Native American Lands. 2 Units.

This seminar will study and examine the varied environmental and resource challenges facing Indian reservations in the western United States. Over 360 Indian reservations, the majority of which are in the western United States, encompass over 56 million acres - a land total approximating the size of the State of Idaho While Indian treaties and executive orders often relegated tribes to isolated and unwanted lands, Indian reservations frequently contain valuable natural resources such as oil, gas, hard minerals, and forests. Many Indian tribes, moreover, enjoy special fishing rights and the legal right to vast amounts of water. At the same time, Indian reservations face serious environmental challenges, including water contamination, habitat decline, and climate change. To examine these questions, we will start with a week of classroom study and discussion. During this week, we will examine the nature of the environmental and resource challenges facing Native American tribes today, the relevant ins and outs of federal Indian law and the legal rights of tribes, Native American governmental systems, and the approaches that tribes are currently taking to these challenges. We will then move into the field and spend approximately ten days in the states of Washington, Montana, and Wyoming, meeting with tribal officials and seeing firsthand the environmental and resource challenges that they face. On our return to Stanford, students will break into groups, and each group will analyze a particular challenge facing a Native American tribe and how best to address that challenge. The course will culminate in student presentations on these analyses. Over the summer, students also will be responsible for assigned readings, online interactive materials, and relevant recent news articles. The class begins on-campus and then travels to Washington, Montana, and Wyoming. Travel expenses during the course will be provided (except incidentals) by the Bill Lane Center for the American West and Sophomore College. Application required, due noon, April 5, 2016. Apply at http://soco.stanford.edu. Cross-listed with Earth Systems (EARTHSYS 15SC), Native American Studies (NATIVEAM 15SC) and Political Science (POLISCI 26SC).
Same as: EARTHSYS 15SC, LAWGEN 15SC, NATIVEAM 15SC

POLISCI 27N. Thinking Like a Social Scientist. 3 Units.

Preference to freshman. This seminar will consider how politics and government can be studied systematically: the compound term Political SCIENCE is not an oxymoron. The seminar will introduce core concepts and explore a variety of methodological approaches. Problems of inference from evidence will be a major concern. Classic and contemporary research studies will be the basis of discussion throughout.

POLISCI 28N. The Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics. 3 Units.

Almost one-third of Americans now identify with a racial/ethnic minority group. This seminar examines the relationship between racial identity, group consciousness, and public opinion. Topics include the role of government institutions in shaping identification, challenges in defining and measuring race, attitudes towards race-based policies, and the development of political solidarity within racial groups. Particular attention will be paid to the construction of political identities among the growing mixed-race population.

POLISCI 29N. Mixed-Race Politics and Culture. 3 Units.

Today, almost one-third of Americans identify with a racial/ethnic minority group, and more than 9 million Americans identify with multiple races. What are the implications of such diversity for American politics and culture? In this course, we approach issues of race from an interdisciplinary perspective, employing research in the social sciences and humanities to assess how race shapes perceptions of identity as well as political behavior in 21st century U.S. We will examine issues surrounding the role of multiculturalism, immigration, acculturation, racial representation and racial prejudice in American society. Topics we will explore include the political and social formation of "race"; racial representation in the media, arts, and popular culture; the rise and decline of the "one-drop rule" and its effect on political and cultural attachments; the politicization of Census categories and the rise of the Multiracial Movement.
Same as: AFRICAAM 52N, ENGLISH 52N

POLISCI 31N. Political Freedom: Rights, Justice, and Democracy in the Western Tradition. 3 Units.

Freedom is one of our core values. Most people can agree that freedom is a good thing. Yet there is far less agreement about how to understand the concept itself and what kinds of political arrangements are best suited to protect and enhance freedom. Is freedom about being left alone? Undertaking action with others? Participating in governance? Does freedom require a limited state? An active and interventionist government? A robustly participatory political system? How is freedom connected to other political values, like justice and equality? This seminar will consider and evaluate some of the most controversial and challenging answers that have been given to these questions by both historical and contemporary political thinkers from Europe and North America. Thinkers covered will include: Plato, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, Robert Putnam, and Jeremy Waldron.

POLISCI 31Q. Justice and the City. 3 Units.

Cities have most often been where struggles for social justice happen, where injustice is most glaring and where new or renewed visions of just communities are developed and tested. What makes a city just or unjust? How have people tried to make cities more just? Why have these efforts succeeded or failed? Each of our sessions will focus on questions like these and include a case study of a particular city, largely with a focus on the United States, including very local cases like San Francisco, Palo Alto and East Palo Alto. The central goal of this class is for you to gain an understanding of the roles of urban design and urban policies in making cities just or unjust places. You will critically engage with some of the debates on cities and justice and gain experience connecting theoretical debates about justice and democracy to empirical data and contemporary work on city design, planning, and policies through readings, our class discussions, and a sustained research project looking a particular city in depth.

POLISCI 34S. Religion and Politics. 3 Units.

What is the relationship between religion, international conflict and peace? This course takes up this question by examining contemporary thinking in international relations, conflict management, political science, and religious ethics. Topics to be taken up include: whether religion is fundamentally a positive or negative force in conflict management; how do major world religions think about war and peace; the relationship of religion to terrorism; whether thinking about religion in international conflict requires its own categories, distinct from models concerning ethnic or nationalistic communities in conflict; varieties of religious militancy; religion's potential role in conflict resolution; among others. Through these investigations, students will better grasp the contemporary scholarship on the place of religion in international conflict and peace building. nnReadings are interdisciplinary in nature, and include case studies. No prerequisite. Open to all majors/minors, and will be particularly beneficial to students in International Relations, Religious Studies, International Policy Studies, and Political Science, as well as students with specific regional political interests where the themes of the course are especially relevant (e.g., Middle East, Latin America, Russia and Eastern Europe, Africa, and so on).

POLISCI 42Q. The Rwandan Genocide. 5 Units.

Between April and July of 1994 more than 800,000 Rwandans, mostly Tutsi but also moderate Hutus, were killed in the most rapid genocide the world has ever known. The percentage of Rwandans killed in a single day of the genocide was ten times greater than the percentage of Americans killed in the entire Vietnam war. What could bring humans to plan and carry out such an orgy of violence? Could it have been prevented? Why did the United States or any other major power not intervene to stop the killing? To what extent should the United Nations be held accountable for the failure to end the genocide? What were the consequences of the genocide for the region of Central Africa? How did international actors respond to the challenges of reconstructing Rwanda after the killings? What has happened to the perpetrators of the genocide? This course surveys scholarly and journalistic accounts of the genocide to seek answers to these questions.nnThis seminar will be residence based in Crothers, but will be open to Crothers residents and non-residents.

POLISCI 43Q. Immigration Crisis? Policy Dilemmas in the US and Europe. 3 Units.

Immigration is a hotly contested social, economic, and political phenomenon in countries throughout the world. People migrate for many reasons, including the desire to start careers, reunite families, and escape oppression. While each story of migration is unique, migration in the modern world has certain commonalities, and these patterns often manifest as political conflict. Labor migration promises economic productivity and efficiency but may threaten existing labor protections and social welfare guarantees to natives. Facilitating migration from failed nation-states may protect the human rights of migrants but introduce security concerns. In the 21st century, the world has witnessed political violence¿by natives and migrants, both first and second generations¿including the September 11th attacks, the London bombings, the mass killings in Norway, and the Paris attacks. How can policymakers harness the promises of immigration without succumbing to its pitfalls? Why do some countries respond so differently than others in similar circumstances? When does the meaning of citizenship evolve and when does it stay the same? What lessons do other countries have for the United States as it considers immigration reform? n n This course is designed to provide students with an overview of immigration law and politics in the United States and other countries, particularly in the European Union. Students will develop the necessary tools to critically analyze immigration policies, starting with the historical evolution of immigration policy in the United States. We will visit Angel Island and discuss the legacy of the Chinese Exclusion Act as well as contemporary immigration politics in San Francisco, a so-called ¿sanctuary city¿ for undocumented immigrants. There will also be a screening on La Haine (Hate), an acclaimed French film which chronicles the challenges of immigrant integration. Students will study the economics of immigration and the politics of refugees in the context of post-9/11 security dilemmas. Students will design a concrete immigration policy proposal.

POLISCI 45N. Civil War Narratives. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Focus is on a new statistics-based theory to account for the susceptibility of countries to civil war. How to write a theory-based historical narrative. Students write and present an original historical narrative focusing on how well the theory explains a particular history and on the importance of factors that are absent from the theory in explaining civil war onsets.

POLISCI 49N. Dictators. 3 Units.

This course explores how dictators perpetuate their rule through the use of ideology, coercion and political institutions. We will examine existing typologies of authoritarian rule and investigate examples of dictatorship from across the world, both contemporary and historical. Using works of fiction in addition to historical and political science texts, we will consider why some people resist authoritarian rule while others do not and the conditions under which dictators are overthrown.

POLISCI 51K. Election 2016. 1 Unit.

The 2016 Presidential Election season has been anything but ordinary. So much in the Democratic and Republican primaries consistently defied conventional wisdom and upended the predictions of experts. This course will attempt, with the help of distinguished guests, to make sense of an election that defies all historical precedent and to take stock of the health of American democracy.nClass is jointly offered for Continuing Studies students and Stanford students. As a 1 unit, online course for Stanford students, enrollment is unlimited. Registration for the course offers online access to a livestream of each class session, participation in online discussions, access to course website and materials, and admission to a lottery for attending each class in person.
Same as: CSRE 51K, HISTORY 51K

POLISCI 57E. State of the Union 2014. 1 Unit.

This course will examine major themes that contribute to the health, or disease, of the US body politic. Challenges and opportunities abound: we live in an age of rising inequality, dazzling technological innovation, economic volatility, geopolitical uncertainty, and the accumulating impact of climate change. These conditions confront our political leaders and us as citizens of a democracy plagued by dysfunction. What are the implications for the body politic? Led by Rob Reich (Political Science, Stanford), David Kennedy (History, Stanford), and James Steyer (CEO, Common Sense Media), the course will bring together distinguished analysts of American politics. Together, we will examine the following topics: inequality; energy and the environment; media and technology; the economy; and the 2014 midterm elections. The course is designed for the entire Stanford community: jointly offered for undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford (through listings in Political Science and History) and for community members through the Continuing Studies Program. For students, the course is available for 1 credit. This course may not be taken for a Letter Grade.
Same as: HISTORY 57E

POLISCI 71. Current Issues in European Security. 1 Unit.

Russia's annexation of Crimea in Spring 2014 posed not only a threat to post-World War II Europe formed around the norm of national sovereignty, but possibly also the very real threat that Russia had awakened from its 20 years of peacefulness to once again impose its will on Eastern Europe. Is Europe again under threat from the East? In Current Issues in European Security, students will attend public events organized by Stanford's Europe Center and Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. These events -- talks by political leaders and scholars from the U.S. and Europe -- will engage and encourage students to understand the deepening crises in Ukraine, conflict in the Baltics, and European security as a whole. Students will leave the course with a better understanding of the multi-faceted dilemmas policy makers face, historical background, and possible paths forward for global decision makers. In addition to attending the events, students will write a final memo recommending a course of action for US policy makers. Events will typically be scheduled from 12 noon to 1:30 p.m. but may be held at other times. There will be approximately six events in spring quarter, and students may also be required to attend one or two separate discussion sessions.

POLISCI 72. Policy, Politics, and the Presidency: Understanding the 2016 Campaign from Start to Finish. 2 Units.

(Same as LAW 7057). In 2016, Americans will once again go to the polls to select a new president. But what will actually happen behind-the-scenes between now and then is largely a mystery to most. This course will introduce students to the nuts-and-bolts of a presidential campaign. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to running for the presidency -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature high-profile guest speakers who have served in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Students, guests, and faculty will also participate in discussions on how these topics will relate to the 2016 presidential contest, which will begin in earnest over the course of the quarter.
Same as: COMM 153A, COMM 253A, PUBLPOL 146, PUBLPOL 246

POLISCI 73. Energy Policy in California. 1 Unit.

This seminar will provide an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures. The course will cover three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of California's 21st century energy systems. Presentations will include experts from the California Energy Commission, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Air Resources Board, the California Independent System Operator, the California Legislature, and the Governor's office. This class is required for all Stanford Energy Internships in California (SEIC) fellowship awardees and is open to other interested undergraduate and graduate students. Class dates are: April 2nd (10am-2pm), April 30th (10am-1pm), and May 21st (10am-1pm). Lunch will be provided. May be repeat for credit. If interested you can fill out this webform: http://web.stanford.edu/~sburbank/Energy.fb.
Same as: CEE 263G, PUBLPOL 73

POLISCI 74. Presidential Politics: Race, Gender, and Inequality in the 2016 Election. 1 Unit.

From the 2016 nomination process to the election.The complexities of identity and its role in uniting and dividing the electorate. Panels covering the media, political participation, and group affiliation.
Same as: AFRICAAM 12, CSRE 12

POLISCI 96X. Mobilizing Democracy: Campaigns, Elections, and Voting. 1 Unit.

Alternative Spring Break: America is often thought of as the archetypal democracy. While most democracies have surprisingly short lifespans, America has persisted for 238 years. However, in the 21st century, we have grounds to question the quality of our democracy. Turnout of the Voting Age Population hovers around 50 percent and today, we are seeing increasing legal challenges to voting rights. In the backdrop of these statistics, there is an entire industry devoted to campaigns. In the 2012 presidential race alone, almost $2.5 billion was poured into the campaign-industrial complex. Given that this cycle is a presidential election year, those amounts are expected to be surpassed. As a consequence, many questions arise: How do politicians engage voters in elections at the various levels of government? Where do they spend their money and why? In the age of big data, how accurately can elections be predicted? How do we maximize participation in elections?.

POLISCI 97X. Bridging the Civil-Military Divide: Military Service as Public Service in the 21st Century. 1 Unit.

Alternative Spring Break: Today, fewer than 0.5 percent of Americans serve in the military, as compared to roughly 12 percent during the second World War. This has led to a widening gap in knowledge about the military, its members and the functions they perform, as well as its basic structure and tradition of service. This course is intended to introduce students to the notion of military service as public service and explore how misperceptions on both sides affect the civil-military divide. We will explore military service from the life of an enlisted soldier deployed to Afghanistan, to an officer working at the Pentagon on broad national security strategy. How does society conceive of a soldier, a sailor, an airman, a marine? How do Americans perceive military service and what role do service members play in our society?.

POLISCI 99Z. Introduction to the Science of Politics. 4 Units.

Why do countries go to war? Why are some countries democratic and others autocratic? How can we improve political representation in the United States and other countries? We will use scientific methods to answer these and other fundamental questions about politics.

POLISCI 101. Introduction to International Relations. 5 Units.

(Formerly POLISCI 1) Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.

POLISCI 101Z. Introduction to International Relations. 4 Units.

Approaches to the study of conflict and cooperation in world affairs. Applications to war, terrorism, trade policy, the environment, and world poverty. Debates about the ethics of war and the global distribution of wealth.
Same as: INTNLREL 101Z

POLISCI 102. Politics and Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly PS 2) American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 123, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201

POLISCI 103. Justice. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Same as: ETHICSOC 171, IPS 208, PHIL 171, PHIL 271, POLISCI 136S, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307

POLISCI 104. Introduction to Comparative Politics. 5 Units.

(Formerly POLISCI 4) Why are some countries prone to civil war and violence, while others remain peaceful? Why do some countries maintain democratic systems, while others do not? Why are some countries more prosperous than others? This course will provide an overview of the most basic questions in the comparative study of political systems, and will introduce the analytical tools that can help us answer them.

POLISCI 110C. America and the World Economy. 5 Units.

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Enroll in POLISCI 110C for WIM credit.
Same as: INTNLREL 110C, POLISCI 110X

POLISCI 110D. War and Peace in American Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Same as: AMSTUD 110D, INTNLREL 110D, POLISCI 110Y

POLISCI 110G. Governing the Global Economy. 5 Units.

Who governs the world economy? Why do countries succeed or fail to cooperate in setting their economic policies? When and how do international institutions help countries cooperate? When and why do countries adopt good and bad economic policies? This course examines how domestic and international politics determine how the global economy is governed. We will study the politics of monetary, trade, international investment, energy, environmental, and foreign aid policies to answer these questions. The course will approach each topic by examining alternative theoretical approaches and evaluate these theories using historical and contemporary evidence. There will be an emphasis on applying concepts through the analysis of case studies.

POLISCI 110X. America and the World Economy. 5 Units.

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Enroll in POLISCI 110C for WIM credit.
Same as: INTNLREL 110C, POLISCI 110C

POLISCI 110Y. War and Peace in American Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

(Students not taking this course for WIM, register for 110Y.) The causes of war in American foreign policy. Issues: international and domestic sources of war and peace; war and the American political system; war, intervention, and peace making in the post-Cold War period.
Same as: AMSTUD 110D, INTNLREL 110D, POLISCI 110D

POLISCI 114D. Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. 5 Units.

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Same as: INTNLREL 114D, IPS 230, POLISCI 314D

POLISCI 114S. International Security in a Changing World. 5 Units.

This class surveys the most pressing global security problems facing the world today and includes an award-winning two-day international crisis simulation. Past guest lecturers have included former Secretary of Defense William Perry, former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Gen. Karl Eikenberry, and former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice. Major topics covered: changing types of warfare, ethics and conduct of war, nuclear proliferation, insurgency and terrorism, Russia, and ISIS. No prior background in international relations is necessary.
Same as: IPS 241

POLISCI 115A. The Rise of Asia. 3-5 Units.

We will examine the sources and implications of the rise of Asia in the international system. Topics will include military competition, international cooperation, regional integration, domestic politics, business and investment, legalization, environmental issues, demographics, social issues, and the role of technology.
Same as: POLISCI 315A

POLISCI 115E. Japan & the World: Innovation, Economic Growth, Globalization, and Int'l Security Challenges. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to the economy, politics, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The course puts a particular emphasis on several emerging issues in Japan including innovation and economic dynamism, Japan's contributions to international peace and cooperation, and Japan's response to international economic and geopolitical challenges. The course will invite several guest instructors, each of whom is an expert on at least one of the issues that Japan faces today, to give lectures in addition to the main instructors. The guest lecturers will also be available outside of the classroom for further discussion during their stays at Stanford.
Same as: EASTASN 153, EASTASN 253, ECON 120

POLISCI 116. The International History of Nuclear Weapons. 5 Units.

An introduction to the history of nuclear weapons from World War II to the present. The focus is on politics, but the role of technology transfer, whether legal or illicit, in the development of nuclear weapons will be examined; so too will the theories about the military and political utility of nuclear weapons. We will look at the efforts to control and abolish nuclear weapons and at the international institutions created to reduce the danger of nuclear war.
Same as: HISTORY 103E

POLISCI 118P. U.S. Relations in Iran. 5 Units.

The evolution of relations between the U.S. and Iran. The years after WW II when the U.S. became more involved in Iran. Relations after the victory of the Islamic republic. The current state of affairs and the prospects for the future. Emphasis is on original documents of U.S. diplomacy (White House, State Department, and the U.S. Embassy in Iran). Research paper.

POLISCI 120B. Campaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections. 4-5 Units.

This course examines the theory and practice of American campaigns and elections. First, we will attempt to explain the behavior of the key players -- candidates, parties, journalists, and voters -- in terms of the institutional arrangements and political incentives that confront them. Second, we will use current and recent election campaigns as "laboratories" for testing generalizations about campaign strategy and voter behavior. Third, we examine selections from the academic literature dealing with the origins of partisan identity, electoral design, and the immediate effects of campaigns on public opinion, voter turnout, and voter choice. As well, we'll explore issues of electoral reform and their more long-term consequences for governance and the political process.
Same as: COMM 162, COMM 262

POLISCI 120C. What's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach. 5 Units.

How politicians, once elected, work together to govern America. The roles of the President, Congress, and Courts in making and enforcing laws. Focus is on the impact of constitutional rules on the incentives of each branch, and on how they influence law. Fulfills the Writing in the Major Requirement for Political Science majors.
Same as: PUBLPOL 124

POLISCI 120Z. What's Wrong with American Government? An Institutional Approach. 4 Units.

How politicians, once elected, work together to govern America. The roles of the President, Congress, and Courts in making and enforcing laws. Focus is on the impact of constitutional rules on the incentives of each branch, and on how they influence law. Fulfills the Writing in the Major Requirement for Political Science majors.

POLISCI 121. Political Power in American Cities. 5 Units.

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.
Same as: AMSTUD 121Z, PUBLPOL 133, URBANST 111

POLISCI 121L. Racial-Ethnic Politics in US. 5 Units.

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. POLISCI 150A, STATS 60 or ECON 1 is strongly recommended.
Same as: CSRE 121L, PUBLPOL 121L

POLISCI 121Z. Political Power in American Cities. 4 Units.

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.

POLISCI 122. Introduction to American Law. 3-5 Units.

For undergraduates. The structure of the American legal system including the courts; American legal culture; the legal profession and its social role; the scope and reach of the legal system; the background and impact of legal regulation; criminal justice; civil rights and civil liberties; and the relationship between the American legal system and American society in general.
Same as: AMSTUD 179, PUBLPOL 302A

POLISCI 123. Politics and Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly PS 2) American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101, PUBLPOL 201

POLISCI 123A. Presidential Politics: Race, Gender, and Inequality in the 2016 Election. 3 Units.

From the 2016 nomination process to the election.The complexities of identity and its role in uniting and dividing the electorate. Panels covering the media, political participation, and group affiliation.
Same as: AFRICAAM 109, CSRE 112

POLISCI 124A. The American West. 5 Units.

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America: its history, physical geography, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students examine themes fundamental to understanding the region: time, space, water, peoples, and boom and bust cycles.
Same as: AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, ENGLISH 124, HISTORY 151

POLISCI 124L. The Psychology of Communication About Politics in America. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on how politicians and government learn what Americans want and how the public's preferences shape government action; how surveys measure beliefs, preferences, and experiences; how poll results are criticized and interpreted; how conflict between polls is viewed by the public; how accurate surveys are and when they are accurate; how to conduct survey research to produce accurate measurements; designing questionnaires that people can understand and use comfortably; how question wording can manipulate poll results; corruption in survey research.
Same as: COMM 164, COMM 264, PSYCH 170

POLISCI 124R. The Federal System: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law. 5 Units.

Does the constitution matter? And if so, how exactly does it shape our daily lives? In this course, we will examine the impact of structural features, such as the separation of powers and federalism. While these features often seem boring and unimportant, they are not. As we will see, arguments over structure were at the heart of the debates over slavery, the incarceration of the Japanese during WWII, the drug war and gay marriage. Prerequisites: 2 or equivalent, and sophomore standing. Fulfills Writing in the Major requirement for PoliSci majors.

POLISCI 124S. Civil Liberties: Judicial Politics and Constitutional Law. 5 Units.

The role and participation of courts, primarily the U.S. Supreme Court, in public policy making and the political system. Judicial activity in civil liberty areas (religious liberty, free expression, race and sex discrimination, political participation, and rights of persons accused of crime). Prerequisites: 2 or equivalent, and sophomore standing.

POLISCI 125M. Latino Social Movements. 5 Units.

Historically significant and contemporary political and social movements in Latino communities in the U.S., with a focus on events of the modern era such as the Spring 2006 marches and student walkouts, the 2009 Basta Dobbs campaign, the 2010 resistance to Arizona's SB1070, and ongoing efforts in 2014 and 2015 related to detention and deportation policies.
Same as: CHILATST 181

POLISCI 125P. The First Amendment: Freedom of Speech and Press. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to the constitutional protections for freedom of speech, press, and expressive association. All the major Supreme Court cases dealing with issues such as incitement, libel, hate speech, obscenity, commercial speech, and campaign finance. There are no prerequisites, but a basic understanding of American government would be useful. In addition to a final and midterm exam, students participate in a moot court on a hypothetical case. (Grad students register for COMM 251).
Same as: COMM 151, COMM 251

POLISCI 125S. Chicano/Latino Politics. 5 Units.

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Same as: CHILATST 125S

POLISCI 125V. The Voting Rights Act. 5 Units.

Focus is on whether and how racial and ethnic minorities including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos are able to organize and press their demands on the political system. Topics include the political behavior of minority citizens, the strength and effect of these groups at the polls, the theory and practice of group formation among minorities, the responsiveness of elected officials, and the constitutional obstacles and issues that shape these phenomena.
Same as: AFRICAAM 125V, CSRE 125V

POLISCI 126P. Constitutional Law. 3 Units.

This course covers Supreme Court case law concerning governmental powers, equal protection, and certain fundamental rights. The course investigates the constitutional foundation for democratic participation in the United States, covering topics such as the Fourteenth Amendment's protections against discrimination on grounds of race, gender, and other classifications, as well as the individual rights to voting and intimate association, and an introduction to First Amendment rights of free speech and press. Students will be evaluated on class participation, a midterm moot court with both a written and oral component, and a take-home final exam. Lectures will be twice per week and a discussion section once per week.
Same as: COMM 152, COMM 252

POLISCI 127A. Finance and Society for non-MBAs. 4 Units.

The financial system is meant to help people, businesses, and governments fund, invest, and manage risks, but it is rife with conflicts of interests and may allow people with more information and control to harm those with less of both. In this interdisciplinary course we explore the forces that shape the financial system and how individuals and society can benefit most from this system without being unnecessarily harmed and endangered. Topics include the basic principles of investment, the role and ¿dark side¿ of debt, corporations and their governance, banks and other financial institutions, why effective financial regulations are essential yet often fail, and political and ethical issues in finance. The approach will be rigorous and analytical but not overly technical mathematically. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Same as: ECON 143, MS&E 147, PUBLPOL 143

POLISCI 127P. Economic Inequality and Political Dysfunction. 5 Units.

This course will examine how two of the defining features of contemporary U.S. politics, economic inequality and political polarization, relate to each other and to Congressional gridlock. The reading list will focus on several books recently authored by preeminent political scientists on this important topic. The course will cover a range of topics, including the disparity in political representation of the preferences of the affluent over those of the poor, the origins of Congressional polarization, the influence of money in politics, budgetary politics, immigration policy, and electoral and institutional barriers to reform.

POLISCI 128S. The Constitution: A Brief History. 5 Units.

A broad survey of the Constitution, from its Revolutionary origins to the contemporary disputes over interpretation. Topics include the invention of the written constitution and interpretative canons; the origins of judicial review; the Civil War and Reconstruction as constitutional crises; the era of substantive due process; the rights revolution; and the Constitution in wartime.
Same as: AMSTUD 157, HISTORY 157

POLISCI 131A. The Ethics and Politics of Collective Action. 3-4 Units.

Collective action problems arise when actions that are individually rational give rise to results that are collectively irrational. Scholars have used such a framework to shed light on various political phenomena such as revolutions, civil disobedience, voting, climate change, and the funding of social services. We examine their findings and probe the theoretical foundations of their approach. What does this way of thinking about politics bring into focus, and what does it leave out? What role do institutions play in resolving collective action problems? And what if the required institutions are absent? Can we, as individuals, be required to cooperate even if we expect that others may not play their part? Readings drawn from philosophy, political science, economics, and sociology.
Same as: ETHICSOC 180M, PHIL 73, PUBLPOL 304A

POLISCI 131L. Modern Political Thought: Machiavelli to Marx and Mill. 5 Units.

This course offers an introduction to the history of Western political thought from the late fifteenth through the nineteenth centuries. We will consider the development of ideas like individual rights, government by consent, and the protection of private property. We will also explore the ways in which these ideas continue to animate contemporary political debates. Thinkers covered will include: Niccolò Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Edmund Burke, John Stuart Mill, and Karl Marx.
Same as: ETHICSOC 131S

POLISCI 132A. The Ethics of Elections. 5 Units.

Do you have a duty to vote? How should you choose whom to vote for? Should immigrants be allowed to vote? Should we make voting mandatory? How (if at all) should we regulate campaign finance? Should we even have elections at all? In this course, we will explore these and other ethical questions related to electoral participation and the design of electoral institutions. We will evaluate arguments from political philosophers, political scientists, and politicians to better understand how electoral systems promote important democratic values and how this affects citizens' and political leaders' ethical obligations. We will focus, in particular, on questions that are particularly relevant to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, though many of the ethical issues we will discuss in this course will be relevant in any electoral democracy.
Same as: ETHICSOC 134R

POLISCI 132C. Family, Friends, and Groups: The Ethics of Association. 4 Units.

The practice of associating with others is a fundamental part of human existence. We cultivate friendships, we grow up in families, we work for nonprofit associations or businesses, we join social movements and sport clubs, and we participate in political associations with our fellow citizens. This seminar explores the ethical dimensions of association. What grounds a right to freedom of association? Do we have, beyond a right, also a duty to participate in associational life? Do we have special obligations towards our friends, family members, or fellow-citizens that we do not have toward strangers? To what extent should the internal life of private associations, such as families or churches, be regulated by the state? Should the state support, through tax-exemptions and subsidies, the nonprofit associations of civil society? Can a state exclude non-citizens, such as immigrants, in the same way in which a private club excludes non-members? These questions have wide-ranging implications for contemporary political and legal debates.
Same as: ETHICSOC 183M

POLISCI 133. Ethics and Politics of Public Service. 3-5 Units.

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Same as: CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122

POLISCI 133D. The Paradigm Shift. 1 Unit.

Examination of the idea of 'paradigm shift' by considering paradigm shifts in different academic fields of inquiry. Serial accumulation of guest lectures by distinguished faculty representing the University's many and varied departments, each asking and answering the question 'What is the most important paradigm shift in the history of my field? Are paradigm shifts revolution or evolution? Do they move us closer to truth? How frequently do they occur? Can humans plan for, cause, or resist them?.
Same as: MUSIC 150D

POLISCI 134L. Introduction to Environmental Ethics. 4-5 Units.

How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? The first part of this course will examine such questions in light of some of our current ethical theories: considering what those theories suggest regarding the extent and nature of our environmental obligations; and also whether reflection on such obligations can prove informative about the adequacy of our ethical theories. In the second part of the course, we will use the tools that we have acquired to tackle various ethical questions that confront us in our dealings with the natural world, looking at subjects such as: animal rights; conservation; economic approaches to the environment; access to and control over natural resources; environmental justice and pollution; climate change; technology and the environment; and environmental activism.
Same as: ETHICSOC 178M, ETHICSOC 278M, PHIL 178M, PHIL 278M

POLISCI 134P. Contemporary Moral Problems. 4-5 Units.

This course considers some of the moral problems encountered on campus and elsewhere in our lives as citizens and individuals. We will begin with questions that pertain to our own classroom and gradually broaden our scope to include, eventually, questions about terrorism and torture. The primary aims of the course are to encourage students to recognize and address moral questions as they appear in the concrete messiness of life and to help students develop the skills necessary to do this. Questions to be considered include: What would make this a good class and is this very question a moral one? What is education and who is entitled to it? What is the value of equality on campus and beyond? What is institutional discrimination? Are Stanford athletes being exploited? What should count as sexual harassment and is it properly captured by Stanford sexual harassment policies? Should abortions be offered by the Stanford Division of Family Planning? Is it permissible to kill animals for the purpose of scientific experimentation? Should Stanford divest from coal companies? Ought the City of San Francisco allow the homeless to reside in its streets? Who has the standing to condemn acts of terror and how do such acts compare to torture?.
Same as: ETHICSOC 185M, PHIL 72

POLISCI 135D. The Ethics of Democratic Citizenship. 5 Units.

We usually think about democratic citizenship in terms of rights and opportunities, but are these benefits of democracy accompanied by special obligations? Do citizens of a democracy have an obligation to take an interest in politics and to actively influence political decision making? How should citizens respond when a democracy¿s laws become especially burdensome? Do citizens of a democracy have a special obligation to obey the law? In this course, we will read classical and contemporary political philosophy including Plato's Crito and King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to explore how political thinkers have understood and argued for the ethics of citizenship. Students in this course will draw on these materials to construct their own arguments, and to identify and assess implicit appeals to the ethics of citizenship in popular culture and contemporary public discourse, from The Simpsons to President Obama's speeches.
Same as: ETHICSOC 135R

POLISCI 135P. Moral Limits of the Market. 4 Units.

Morally controversial uses of markets and market reasoning in areas such as organ sales, procreation, education, and child labor. Would a market for organ donation make saving lives more efficient; if it did, would it thereby be justified? Should a nation be permitted to buy the right to pollute? Readings include Walzer, Arrow, Rawls, Sen, Frey, Titmuss, and empirical cases.
Same as: ETHICSOC 174A, PHIL 174A, PHIL 274A

POLISCI 136R. Introduction to Global Justice. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of core ethical problems in international politics, with special emphasis on the question of what demands justice imposes on institutions and agents acting in a global context. The course is divided into three sections. The first investigates the content of global justice, and comprises of readings from contemporary political theorists and philosophers who write within the liberal contractualist, utilitarian, cosmopolitan, and nationalist traditions. The second part of the course looks at the obligations which global justice generates in relation to five issues of international concern ¿ global poverty, climate change, immigration, warfare, and well-being of women. The final section of the course asks whether a democratic international order is necessary for global justice to be realized.
Same as: ETHICSOC 136R, INTNLREL 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 336

POLISCI 136S. Justice. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Same as: ETHICSOC 171, IPS 208, PHIL 171, PHIL 271, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307

POLISCI 137A. Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 276.) Why and under what conditions do human beings need political institutions? What makes them legitimate or illegitimate? What is the nature, source, and extent of the obligation to obey the legitimate ones, and how should people alter or overthrow the others? Study of the answers given to such questions by major political theorists of the early modern period: Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant.
Same as: PHIL 176, PHIL 276, POLISCI 337A

POLISCI 140L. China in World Politics. 5 Units.

The implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics and for American foreign policy, including issues such as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: POLISCI 340L

POLISCI 141S. Politics of India. 5 Units.

This course provides an overview of the political institutions, processes, and issues in post-independence India. The purpose is not merely to familiarize students to the politics of India, but also to facilitate a good understanding of, and stimulate keen interest in, the subject. The course hopes to build a strong foundation for acquiring a deeper understanding of Indian politics. The subject-matter will be approached from a comparative perspective, and students are encouraged to think about the topics covered with a view on cases beyond India.

POLISCI 142B. British Politics. 5 Units.

The impact on the world's oldest democracy of major changes in policies, politics, and the institution of government made over the last two decades by Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair.

POLISCI 143S. Comparative Corruption. 4-5 Units.

Causes, effects, and solutions to various forms of corruption in business and politics in both developing regions (e.g. Asia, E. Europe) and developed ones (the US and the EU).
Same as: SOC 113

POLISCI 144A. Revolution and Reconciliation Through Film. 5 Units.

The course uses the Spanish political experience in the 20th Century, both in the Spanish civil war and in its transition to democracy in the late 1970s, as a starting point, to focus on the human and social effects of the numerous political upheavals in the transitions from democracy to authoritarianism and back again. Using films about revolutionary change in several different societies, we will treat these as the `texts¿ to motivate our thinking, and examine both the process of social breakdown during periods of civil strife and the role of reconciliation in the reconstruction of societies. We will focus on multiple elements of social consequences in political transitions, including gender, children, non-violent resistance, racism, social class, and the role of the United States. Course requirements will include weekly film screening, discussion, and two critical response papers written across the quarter.

POLISCI 146A. African Politics. 4-5 Units.

Africa has lagged the rest of the developing world in terms of economic development, the establishment of social order, and the consolidation of democracy. This course seeks to identify the historical and political sources accounting for this lag, and to provide extensive case study and statistical material to understand what sustains it, and how it might be overcome.
Same as: AFRICAAM 146A

POLISCI 147. Comparative Democratic Development. 5 Units.

Social, cultural, political, economic, and international factors affecting the development and consolidation of democracy in historical and comparative perspective. Individual country experiences with democracy, democratization, and regime performance. Emphasis is on the third wave of democratization over the past three decades and contemporary possibilities for democratic change. (Diamond).
Same as: SOC 112

POLISCI 147P. The Politics of Inequality. 5 Units.

This course is about the distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in the US: who governs? Is there a ``power elite,'' whose preferences dominate public policy making? Or, does policy reflect a wide range of interests? What is the relationship between income and power? What are the political consequences of increasing income inequality? How do income differences across racial and ethnic groups affect the quality of their representation? What are effective remedies for unequal influence? Finally, which institutions move democratic practice furthest towards full democratic equality? This course will address these questions, focusing first on local distributions of power, and then considering the implications of inequality in state and national politics. nStudents will have the opportunity to study income inequality using income and labor force surveys in a mid-term assignment. Then, in a final paper, students will conduct an empirical examination of the implications of income inequality for American democracy.

POLISCI 148. Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform. 3-5 Units.

Overview of the reforms in China since 1978 that have made its economy one of the fastest growing in the world yet it still has the Chinese Communist Party at the helm wielding one party rule. Key questions addressed include the following: What has been the process and challenges of reform that have reshaped China¿s economic landscape? What are the political consequences of these dramatic economic changes? Why has the CCP remained strong while other communist regimes have failed? Markets have spread but what is the role of the state? What are the opportunities for political participation and prospects for political change? Materials will include readings, lectures, and selected films. This course has no prerequisites. (Graduate students register for 348.) This fulfills the Writing in the Major requirement for PoliSci majors.
Same as: POLISCI 348

POLISCI 149S. Islam, Iran, and the West. 5 Units.

Changes in relative power and vitality of each side. The relationship in the Middle Ages revolved around power and domination, and since the Renaissance around modernity. Focus is on Muslims of the Middle East.

POLISCI 149T. Middle Eastern Politics. 5 Units.

Topics in contemporary Middle Eastern politics including institutional sources of underdevelopment, political Islam, electoral authoritarianism, and the political economy of oil.

POLISCI 150A. Data Science for Politics. 5 Units.

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Same as: POLISCI 355A

POLISCI 150B. Machine Learning for Social Scientists. 5 Units.

Machine learning---the use of algorithms to classify, predict, sort, learn and discover from data---has exploded in use across academic fields, industry, government, and non-profit. This course provides an introduction to machine learning for social scientists. We will introduce state of the art machine learning tools, show how to use those tools in the programming language R, and demonstrate why a social science focus is essential to effectively apply machine learning techniques. Applications of the methods will include forecasting social phenomena, the analysis of social media data, and the automatic analysis of text data. Political Science 150A or an equivalent is required. (Prerequisite 150A/355A).
Same as: POLISCI 355B

POLISCI 150C. Causal Inference for Social Science. 5 Units.

Causal inference methods have revolutionized the way we use data, statistics, and research design to move from correlation to causation and rigorously learn about the impact of some potential cause (e.g., a new policy or intervention) on some outcome (e.g., election results, levels of violence, poverty). This course provides an introduction that teaches students the toolkit of modern causal inference methods as they are now widely used across academic fields, government, industry, and non-profits. Topics include experiments, matching, regression, sensitivity analysis, difference-in-differences, panel methods, instrumental variable estimation, and regression discontinuity designs. We will illustrate and apply the methods with examples drawn from various fields including policy evaluation, political science, public health, economics, business, and sociology. Political Science 150A and 150B or an equivalent is required.
Same as: POLISCI 355C

POLISCI 152. Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science. 3-5 Units.

Concepts and tools of non-cooperative game theory developed using political science questions and applications. Formal treatment of Hobbes' theory of the state and major criticisms of it; examples from international politics. Primarily for graduate students; undergraduates admitted with consent of instructor.
Same as: POLISCI 352

POLISCI 153. Thinking Strategically. 5 Units.

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.
Same as: POLISCI 354

POLISCI 153Z. Thinking Strategically. 4 Units.

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.

POLISCI 155. Political Data Science. 5 Units.

Introduction to methods of research design and data analysis used in quantitative political research. Topics covered include hypothesis testing, linear regression, experimental and observational approaches to causal inference, effective data visualization, and working with big data. These topics will be introduced using data sets from American politics, international relations, and comparative politics. The course begins with an intensive introduction to the R programming language used throughout the course. Satisfies quantitative methods requirement for the Political Science Research Honors Track. Prerequisites: Stat 60 or instructor consent.
Same as: PUBLPOL 157

POLISCI 209. Curricular Practical Training. 1 Unit.

Qualified Political Science students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. The student if responsible for arranging their own internship/employment and gaining faculty sponsorship. Prior to enrolling students must complete a petition due no later than May 15th. An offer letter will need to be submitted along with the petition. At the completion of the summer quarter, a final report must be submitted to the faculty sponsor documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit but the course will not count toward the Political Science major requirements.

POLISCI 210G. Global Supply Chains and the Future of Global Governance. 5 Units.

What explains a government¿s decision to block a trade deal, prevent foreign investors from gaining control of a local factory, or ban the export of rare earth minerals? This course develops theory and evidence that these decisions are political. Applications include the trade in environmental goods, global supply chains, and intellectual property protections. We will discuss these topics in the context of the legal disputes at the World Trade Organization and recent debates about the rise of China and the development of Mega-regional agreements across the Pacific and the Atlantic.

POLISCI 211. Political Economy of East Asia. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly 117.) Comparative and international political economy of E.and S.E. Asia. Industrial development and the Asian miracle, economic integration, regional cooperation, the Asian financial crisis, and contemporary challenges.
Same as: INTNLREL 159

POLISCI 211N. Nuclear Politics. 3-5 Units.

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? Have international and domestic views on nuclear weapons changed since 1945? In this course, we will first examine the political science literature on these key questions about nuclear politics. We will read and critique works using different approaches in political science including quantitative analysis, experiments, game theory, historical case studies, and mixed methods. Students will then design and execute small research projects to address questions that have been inadequately addressed in the existing literature.
Same as: POLISCI 311N

POLISCI 211P. International Security in South Asia: Pakistan, India and the United States.. 5 Units.

This course critically examines the dynamics of continuity and change in American interactions with nuclear armed adversaries, India and Pakistan. It also aims to sensitize the students to Indian and Pakistani perspectives on regional security and the mainsprings of their interactions with United States. There will be an in-depth exploration of the impact of the Indo-US strategic partnership for evolving balance of power in South Asia.

POLISCI 211S. Special Topics: The United States and Europe: A Renewed Imperative?. 5 Units.

New challenges in Asia, the Middle-East, Europe's Eastern and Southern periphery, and even within Europe itself, are making the Transatlantic relationship more central and more critical in world politics than is usually thought. Is there a new dawn in Transatlantic relations? How are the foundations, objectives and "rules of the game" of US-Europe relations being redefined in the context of an emerging new international dis(order)? What will it take for the US and Europe to successfully defend their joint interests and values in an increasingly unstable and dangerous world? The course will discuss the main political, strategic, economic and cultural dynamics and issues at the heart of this new US-Europe relationship.

POLISCI 212C. Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context. 5 Units.

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Same as: POLISCI 212X

POLISCI 212X. Civil War and International Politics: Syria in Context. 5 Units.

The Syrian civil war is both a humanitarian disaster and a focal point for a set of interlocking regional and international political struggles. This course uses the Syrian case as an entry for exploring broader questions, such as why do civil wars begin, how do they end, and what are the international politics of civil war. Please enroll in 212C for WIM credit.
Same as: POLISCI 212C

POLISCI 213E. Introduction to European Studies. 5 Units.

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Same as: INTNLREL 122

POLISCI 213S. A Post American Century? American Foreign Policy in a Uni-Multi-unipolar World. 5 Units.

This seminar examines recent policy from Bush to Obama in the context of two classic traditions: Wilsonianism vs. Realism. What is the role of the international system, what is the weight of domestic forces like ideology, history and identity? Prerequisite: junior or senior standing.

POLISCI 214R. Challenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine the complexities and trade offs involved in foreign policy decision-making at the end of the twentieth century and the dawn of the post-9/11 era. Students will analyze dilemmas confronting policymakers through case studies including post-conflict reconstruction and state-building, nuclear proliferation, democratization and peace negotiation. The seminar will conclude with a 48-hour crisis simulation. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Application for enrollment required. Applications will be available for pick up in Political Science Department (Encina West 100) starting late-October.
Same as: POLISCI 314R

POLISCI 215. Explaining Ethnic Violence. 5 Units.

What is ethnic violence and why does it occur? Should elite machinations, the psychology of crowds, or historical hatreds be blamed? Case studies and theoretical work on the sources and nature of ethnic violence. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.

POLISCI 215D. Special Topics: Dilemmas of Democracy and Security in Israel and the Middle East. 5 Units.

The Middle East is known to be a volatile region, characterized by political violence, armed conflicts, and social instabilities. This volatility is of relevance for many countries including the US with its invested interests in the region and Israel that exists at the heart of the region, and along with its conflict with the Palestinians is considered to be one of the root causes of this volatility. Moreover, the volatility brings into encounter two kinds of collective goods: democracy and security. Their encounter in a conflictual and unstable environment raises a host of questions and dilemmas, both moral and practical: should we balance democracy and security and if so how? Can the two be accommodated at all? Does democracy is better or worse in addressing security problems? Does democracy and security constitute each other conceptually? Do democratic states tend to cooperate with each other when confronting security issues? And what about democratization: how good a ca use is it as a foreign policy? How good a cause is it in justifying war and/or not ending one? From its establishment the State of Israel found itself torn by these and others related questions and the recent decades saw the US drawn by these dilemmas as well (think of the Bybee Memo and the Patriot acts). In the course we will introduce these dilemmas, analyze them and examine different normative and policy answers that were discussed in academia and in the policy world.
Same as: JEWISHST 275D

POLISCI 215F. Nuclear Weapons and International Politics. 5 Units.

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? We will study the political science and history literature on these topics. Research paper required.
Same as: POLISCI 315F

POLISCI 216. State Building. 5 Units.

How and when can external actors (others states, aid agencies, NGOs?) promote institutional change in weak and badly governed states?.

POLISCI 216A. European Security during the Cold War. 4-5 Units.

During the Cold War two highly armed military blocs confronted each other in the center of Europe. What role did they play in the Cold War? How dangerous was their confrontation? This seminar will use archival materials from Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet Union to explore the US-Soviet rivalry in Europe, the politics of the two alliances, the role of nuclear weapons, the crises that took place, and the ending of the Cold War in Europe.
Same as: HISTORY 231A, HISTORY 431A, POLISCI 416A

POLISCI 216B. European Security during the Cold War. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 231A/431A. During the Cold War two highly armed military blocs confronted each other in the center of Europe. What role did they play in the Cold War? How dangerous was their confrontation? This seminar will use archival materials from Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet Union to explore the US-Soviet rivalry in Europe, the politics of the two alliances, the role of nuclear weapons, the crises that took place, and the ending of the Cold War in Europe.
Same as: HISTORY 231B, HISTORY 431B, POLISCI 416B

POLISCI 216G. International Organizations and Institutions. 5 Units.

What is the appropriate balance between government regulation and market freedom? Introduction to important theoretical and policy debates in international political economy. Topics include: political economy of trade; exchange rate policy; the liberalization of trade and finance; the global move to openness; development, debt and aid; and the role of international organizations. Discussion of application of academic insights to key policy debates, including whether governments should offset the welfare costs of globalization, whether the IMF and World Bank should be reformed to meet the needs of the 21st century, and how the international community should respond to financial crises. Students will research, write and orally present policy briefs on specific policy questions.

POLISCI 217A. American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine the tension in American foreign policy between pursuing U.S. security and economic interests and promoting American values abroad. The course will retrace the theoretical and ideological debates about values versus interests, with a particular focus on realism versus liberalism. The course will examine the evolution of these debates over time, starting with the French revolution, but with special attention given to the Cold War, American foreign policy after September 11th, and the Obama administration. The course also will examine how these contending theories and ideologies are mediated through the U.S. bureaucracy that shapes the making of foreign policy. ** NOTE: All interested students should attend the first class. Final enrollment criteria will be detailed on the first day of class. There will be 16 spaces available in the course.
Same as: GLOBAL 220, IPS 242

POLISCI 217M. Special Topics: International Democratization. 5 Units.

Analyzing the international aspects of democratization involves understanding at least the following: (1) what is democracy (2) what domestic-level processes increase or decrease the level of democracy (3) what kind of influences from the outside world work, and do not work, in furthering democracy, and in what ways. This course spans all subfields of political science, and spills over into law, economics, and sociology. A complicating factor is the geographical expanse of democratic institutions and efforts to promote them. Eastern Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, post-civil war El Salvador and Cambodia, are only some of the regions and countries that have been impacted. Their vastly different backgrounds challenge anyone attempting the puzzle. A further complication is the variety of ways in which the outside world may affect the scope and quality of democracy. These ways include but are not limited to: pressures exercised by regional economic institutions and alliances, the power of ideas and socialization, transfers of wealth, demands for trade liberalization, the training of civic activists, reports issued by foreign election observers.
Same as: POLISCI 317M

POLISCI 218. Special Topics: Democratic Peace-A Political Biography. 3-5 Units.

The theories of democratic peace are among the most salient theories in the discipline of International Relations. The academic discussions surrounding their validity have been quite fierce as they concern also the inter-paradigmatic debates so prevalent in IR. No less interestingly, though, is the theories' migration outside of the halls of academia into the political arena in countries such as the United States and Israel. Noteworthy is the impact those theories had on public discussions and on the shaping of foreign policies of the US following the Cold War. This phenomenon raises important meta-theoretical questions about the nature of theory, its powers, and the responsibilities of academia to society. The course will follow the political biography of the theories of democratic peace: their academic origins, migration into the public and political spheres, the politicization process they underwent, the political and rhetorical uses and misuses of the theories (including the Iraq War), and the outcomes of this charged meeting of academia and politics. No less importantly, the course will discuss the responsibility theorists bear for the real-world ramifications of their theories, and the way they should act to discharge their responsibilities.
Same as: POLISCI 318

POLISCI 218J. Japanese Politics and International Relations. 5 Units.

The domestic politics, political economy, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The role of political parties, the bureaucracy, and private actors. Economic development and challenges. Relations with the United States and East Asia.
Same as: POLISCI 318J

POLISCI 218S. Political Economy of International Trade and Investment. 5 Units.

How domestic and international politics influence the economic relations between countries. Why do governments promote or oppose globalization? Why do countries cooperate economically in some situations but not others? Why do countries adopt bad economic policies? Focus on the politics of international trade and investment. Course approaches each topic by examining alternative theoretical approaches and evaluate these theories using historical and contemporary evidence from many geographical regions around the world. Prerequisites: ECON 1A, ECON 1B, and a statistics course.
Same as: INTNLREL 118S

POLISCI 218T. Terrorism. 5 Units.

The course is primarily concerned with variation in terrorist group behavior and therefore concentrates on issues on the organizational level of analysis. We address questions such as: Why and how do terrorist groups emerge? Who joins terrorist groups? Which organizational challenges do terrorists face and how do they solve them? Why are some groups more lethal than others? Why has suicide terrorism increased in the 2000s? How and why do groups decline? Topics such as counterterrorism, macrostructural determinants of terrorism, or the effects of terrorism will be treated only peripherally.

POLISCI 219. Directed Reading and Research in International Relations. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Requires a petition that can be found on our Political Science website.

POLISCI 220. Place-Making Policies. 5 Units.

This research seminar considers the numerous, unappreciated ways governments create and maintain geographic places. Representative topics include: housing aid programs, zoning, controls on internal migration and place of residence, debates over the car and its place in cities, and the role of water projects in the growth of desert cities. In a set of group data projects, students will conduct original research on the consequences of these policies for economic, social, and political outcomes. Prerequisites: Political Power in American Cities (POLISCI 121), Politics and Public Policy (POLISCI 102), or consent of the instructor.

POLISCI 220R. The Presidency. 3-5 Units.

This course provides students with a comprehensive perspective on the American presidency and covers a range of topics: elections, policy making, control of the bureaucracy, unilateral action, war-making, and much more. But throughout, the goal is to understand why presidents behave as they do, and why the presidency as an institution has developed as it has¿with special attention to the dynamics of the American political system and how they condition incentives, opportunities, and power.
Same as: POLISCI 320R

POLISCI 223. The Politics of Gender in the United States. 5 Units.

Gender is one of the most recognizable and important identities in daily life. Yet it has been paid scant attention by political scientists in terms of its role on access to political power, opinion formation, group identity politics, election outcomes, and political representation. This class provides a survey of the literature on gender in American politics. We begin with the interdisciplinary research on the social construction of gender to understand what gender is and is not. Throughout the course we will use these theories to analyze and critique the approaches of quantitative research on gender politics.
Same as: FEMGEN 223X

POLISCI 223B. Money, Power, and Politics in the New Gilded Age. 5 Units.

During the past two generations, democracy has coincided with massive increases in economic inequality in the U.S. and many other advanced democracies. The course will explore normative and practical issues concerning democracy and equality and examine why democratic institutions have failed to counteract rising inequality. Topics will include the influence of money in politics, disparity in political representation of the preferences of the affluent over those of the poor, the implications of political gridlock, and electoral and institutional barriers to reform.

POLISCI 223F. Ethics and Politics. 5 Units.

A discussion of critical ethical issues faced by American and other national leaders. Case studies of 20th- and 21st-century decisions, including those involved with violence (e.g., the use of drone missiles or torture to extract information from enemies), whistle-blowing in government (e.g., decisions to expose what was known about 9/11 in advance), disobedience of those in authority (e.g., Daniel Ellsberg's release of the Pentagon Papers), policies on distributing scarce goods in society (e.g. rationing health care), policies involving justice and equal treatment (e.g. affirmative action or gay marriage), policies regarding life and death (e.g., abortion and euthanasia laws), and others. Students will debate some of the key issues, relying on ethical principles that will be discussed each week, and develop their own case studies.
Same as: ETHICSOC 202R

POLISCI 223R. Pivotal Moments in American Institutions and Public Law, 1781-Present. 5 Units.

American lawyers and policymakers work today in a system of institutions that are strikingly unique in comparative and historical terms. With some exceptions, that system is characterized by relatively stable political and legal institutions, low levels of explicit corruption, high bureaucratic capacity in public organizations, and relatively open, impersonal access to political, policymaking, and legal institutions. Although these characteristics are now too often taken for granted, the process through which they emerged remains remarkably opaque. In the 1780s under the Articles of Confederation, the United States was a poor developing country on the fringe of the Atlantic community with limited capacity and a striking inability to provide basic public goods, such as security. One hundred years later, it well along the way to becoming the richest nation in the world. How did this transformation occur?nnnDrawing on judicial opinions, legal scholarship, political science, economics, and history, this course explores how institutions evolved to create such a system. It traces the problem of institutional development through several critical periods in the history of American public law, including the emergence of the Constitution, the events leading up to and following the Civil War, the Progressive era, World War II, 1964-75, and the emergence of the modern administrative state. Although the primarily focus is on the American experience, we place these developments in comparative context as well.

POLISCI 225C. Fixing US Politics: Political Reform in Principle and Practice. 5 Units.

Americans have been trying to perfect their system of government since its founding. Despite some notable achievements, there is a pervasive sense of frustration with political reform. This course will examine the goals and political consequences of American political regulation. Topics will vary by year to some degree but examples include campaign finance, lobbying, term limits, conflict of interest regulation, direct democracy, citizen commissions and assemblies, vote administration problems, transparency, and open meeting laws.

POLISCI 226. Race and Racism in American Politics. 5 Units.

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
Same as: AMSTUD 226, CSRE 226, POLISCI 326

POLISCI 226T. The Politics of Education. 3-5 Units.

America's public schools are government agencies, and virtually everything about them is subject to political authority--and thus to decision through the political process. This seminar is an effort to understand the politics of education and its impacts on the nation's schools. Our focus is on the modern era of reform, with special attention to the most prominent efforts to bring about fundamental change through accountability (including No Child Left Behind), school choice (charter schools, vouchers), pay for performance, and more and more to the politics of blocking that has made genuine reform so difficult to achieve.
Same as: POLISCI 326T

POLISCI 227. U.S. Immigration Politics. 5 Units.

This course presents an overview of immigration in the United States. We will focus on current policies, U.S. immigration history, individual immigrant groups, economic causes and consequences of immigration, attitudes toward immigrants, U.S. national identity, immigrant political behavior, undocumented immigration, immigrants and public education, language barriers and policies, and immigration reform. Although the course is crafted with a focus on the U.S. as a whole, we will also spend a little time at the end of the quarter narrowing in on the California context, before taking a broader look at immigration in Western Europe to gain a comparative prospective on immigration. Finally, while we will discuss immigrant groups beyond Latinos, the course will disproportionately focus on Latino immigrants, as this is by far the largest immigrant group in the United States.

POLISCI 228. The Democratic Faith: An Empirical Analysis of Citizenship. 5 Units.

Political scientists have now accumulated evidence over more than fifty years documenting the limits of ordinary citizens ¿ their minimal levels of information about public affairs; their minimal capacity for thinking coherently about political choices; their limited understanding of and commitment to core democratic values; their susceptibility to racism and intolerance of many forms. These findings, taken all in all, seem to add up to a conclusion that citizens are incapable of discharging the duties of democratic citizenship. It seems, these results suggest, that the best contribution that they can make to a democratic politics is to stay out of the way. The aim of this course to examine a paradox: how can it simultaneously be true that findings of citizen incompetence and intolerance are valid and that citizens nonetheless can be capable of discharging the duties of democratic citizenship. In particular, this course will concentrate on three main topics: racism in contemporary politics; commitment to civil liberties and civil rights, and multiculturalism. The course will require intensive reading and analysis of quantitative research on public opinion surveys and experiments.

POLISCI 229. Directed Reading and Research in American Politics. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Requires a petition that can be found on our Political Science website.

POLISCI 230A. Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSHIS 133/333.) Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Same as: CLASSICS 181, CLASSICS 381, PHIL 176A, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 330A

POLISCI 231. High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests. 3-5 Units.

Normative political theory combined with positive political theory to better explain how major texts may have responded to and influenced changes in formal and informal institutions. Emphasis is on historical periods in which catastrophic institutional failure was a recent memory or a realistic possibility. Case studies include Greek city-states in the classical period and the northern Atlantic community of the 17th and 18th centuries including upheavals in England and the American Revolutionary era.
Same as: CLASSICS 382, POLISCI 331

POLISCI 231D. Science, Power and Democracy. 5 Units.

This course investigates the relationship between science and democracy, and between knowledge and power, in the modern world. Topics covered include the epistemic properties of democratic institutions; the question of expertise in democratic politics; the role of values in science and public policy; the relationship between democracy and technology; and the relationship between democracy and the social sciences. We also analyze a number of concrete issues at the intersection of politics and science, including climate change and biomedical research. The course is interdisciplinary in method and content, with readings ranging across political theory, philosophy, history, and the social sciences.
Same as: ETHICSOC 206R

POLISCI 231T. Democratic Accountability and Transparency. 5 Units.

This course critically examines two related democratic values, accountability and transparency. We begin with historical perspectives on accountability, tracing its centrality to democratic politics to ancient Athens and early modern debates about the nature and function of political representation. But the bulk of the course deals with contemporary issues and problems: how should we conceive of accountability, both conceptually and normatively, and what is its relationship to other values such as transparency and publicity? What forms of accountability are appropriate for modern democratic politics? Is accountability only for elites, or should ordinary citizens be accountable to one another? In what contexts are transparency and publicity valuable, and when might we instead find their operation counter-productive and troubling? Readings draw from canonical texts as well as contemporary political theory, philosophy, and political science.
Same as: ETHICSOC 207R

POLISCI 231Z. Topics in Democratic Theory. 5 Units.

Democratic rule is rule of the people. But what does that mean? This course explores democracy¿s roots in ancient Athens to its modern incarnation. The course aims to familiarize students with the various strands of democratic theory as well as the way democratic theory responds to hot political issues such as immigration and freedom of speech. The goal of the course is to equip students to think critically about democracy in the modern world and the different interpretation democratic rule can have. The questions we will investigate include: What does democracy require? What is the relationship between democracy and human rights or social justice? Can democracy justify border control? What restrictions, if any, does democracy place on hate speech? What is the role of courts in a democracy? The course provides tools to answer these questions by surveying different approaches to democracy in contemporary literature, as well surveying the history of democratic theory from ancient Athenian democracy to the modern age, with a look to the future of democracy in a globalized era.

POLISCI 232T. The Dialogue of Democracy. 4-5 Units.

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Same as: AMSTUD 137, COMM 137W, COMM 237, POLISCI 332T

POLISCI 233F. Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster. 3-5 Units.

How STS and the Humanities can together help think out the looming catastrophes that put the future of humankind in jeopardy.
Same as: FRENCH 228, ITALIAN 228

POLISCI 234. Democratic Theory. 5 Units.

Most people agree that democracy is a good thing, but do we agree on what democracy is? This course will examine the concept of democracy in political philosophy. We will address the following questions: What reason(s), if any, do we have for valuing democracy? What does it mean to treat people as political equals? When does a group of individuals constitute "a people," and how can a people make genuinely collective decisions? Can democracy really be compatible with social inequality? With an entrenched constitution? With representation?.

POLISCI 234P. Deliberative Democracy and its Critics. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Same as: AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, POLISCI 334P

POLISCI 235J. Creative Political Thinking: Three Cases. 5 Units.

.
Same as: POLISCI 335J

POLISCI 236. Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector. 5 Units.

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. WIM for PoliSci students who enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Same as: ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236S

POLISCI 236S. Theories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector. 5 Units.

What is the basis of private action for the public good? How are charitable dollars distributed and what role do nonprofit organizations and philanthropic dollars play in a modern democracy? In the ¿Philanthropy Lab¿ component of the course, students will award $100,000 in grants to local nonprofits. Students will explore how nonprofit organizations operate domestically and globally as well as the historical development and modern structure of civil society and philanthropy. Readings in political philosophy, history, political sociology, and public policy. WIM for PoliSci students who enroll in POLISCI 236S.
Same as: ETHICSOC 232T, POLISCI 236

POLISCI 237M. Politics and Evil. 5 Units.

In the aftermath of the Second World War, the political theorist Hannah Arendt wrote that ¿the problem of evil will be the fundamental question of postwar intellectual life in Europe.¿ This question remains fundamental today. The acts to which the word ¿evil¿ might apply¿genocide, terrorism, torture, human trafficking, etc.¿persist. The rhetoric of evil also remains central to American political discourse, both as a means of condemning such acts and of justifying preventive and punitive measures intended to combat them. In this advanced undergraduate seminar, we will examine the intersection of politics and evil by considering works by philosophers and political theorists, with occasional forays into film and media. The thinkers covered will include: Hannah Arendt, Immanuel Kant, Niccolò Machiavelli, Friedrich Nietzche, and Michael Walzer.
Same as: ETHICSOC 237M

POLISCI 237S. Civil Society and Democracy in Comparative Perspective. 5 Units.

A cross-national approach to the study of civil societies and their role in democracy. The concept of civil society--historical, normative, and empirical. Is civil society a universal or culturally relative concept? Does civil society provide a supportive platform for democracy or defend a protected realm of private action against the state? How are the norms of individual rights, the common good, and tolerance balanced in diverse civil societies? Results of theoretical exploration applied to student-conducted empirical research projects on civil societies in eight countries. Summary comparative discussions. Prerequisite: a course on civil society or political theory. Students will conduct original research in teams of two on the selected nations. Enrollment limited to 18. Enrollment preference given to students who have taken POLISCI 236S/ETHICSOC 232T.
Same as: ETHICSOC 237

POLISCI 238. Political Disagreement. 5 Units.

Disagreement is a permanent and ubiquitous feature of political life. Furthermore, political disagreement can stem from a wide range of sources. Perhaps most importantly, democratic citizens disagree at the level of values: they disagree about the proper form of the good life as well as the human interests that political laws and institutions ought to serve. This course will focus primary attention on the implications of such value-based disagreement for how we should think about political justice.

POLISCI 238C. Governing the 21st Century World. 5 Units.

How is our world governed, and by whom? How are decisions made on the most important issues of our time, including climate change, global inequality, and protection of human rights? A traditional answer to these questions is that only official governments have the power to govern -to set and enforce rules on these and other issues. In contrast, this class explores the emerging roles ofnnon-state actors, including NGOs, for-profit corporations, informal social movements, and international institutions, in governing our world and making decisions on these and other key issues. We will also study the ways that the governance by non-state actors challenges our ideas of democracy, legitimacy, and justice. The class thus seeks to bring together perspectives and tools from both empirical social science and political theory in order to better understand this important phenomenon.

POLISCI 238T. History of International Relations Thought. 5 Units.

In this course, we will examine the intellectual origins of contemporary theories and approaches to international politics.  In particular, we will trace the classical and early modern roots of contemporary realism, idealism, and cosmopolitanism.  We will also address some of the enduring normative and empirical questions about international politics: (1) What is the basis of political power and authority?  (2) What rights and obligations do individuals have?  (3) What rights and obligations do states have?  (4) What are the causes of conflict?  (5) What are the prospects for enduring peace?  Thinkers covered may include: Thucydides, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Grotius, Hobbes, Kant, Morgenthau, and Waltz.
Same as: INTNLREL 136

POLISCI 239. Directed Reading and Research in Political Theory. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 240C. The Comparative Political Economy of Post-Communist Transitions. 3-4 Units.

Dominant theoretical perspectives of comparative democratization and marketization; focus is on the political economy of transition in Eastern Europe and Eurasia while comparing similar processes in Latin America and Asia. Topics include: meanings of democracy, synergy between democracies and markets, causes of the collapse of communism, paths to political liberalization and democracy, civil society, constitutions, parliaments, presidents, the rule of law, electoral systems, market requirements, strategies of reform, the Russian experience of market building, exporting democracy and the market, and foreign aid and assistance.

POLISCI 240T. Democracy, Promotion, and American Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

Theoretical and intellectual debates about democracy promotion with focus on realism versus liberalism. The evolution of these debates with attention to the Cold War, the 90s, and American foreign policy after 9/11. Tools for and bureaucratic struggles over how to promote democracy. Contemporary case studies.

POLISCI 241A. An Introduction to Political Economy of Development. 5 Units.

This course is an upper-level undergraduate seminar providing an introduction to the political economy of development. This course explores sources of economic growth, inequality, poverty, and other aspects of development with a particular focus on political institutions. We first explore the patterns of development in the world and then overview basic theories of development. Second, we review the key areas of debate within the study of development, including the role of the state, the consequences of corruption, the effects of natural resources, and gender. The course consists of lectures on theoretical and empirical approaches and the discussion on the literature and cases.

POLISCI 241C. Campaigns and Elections in Israel. 5 Units.

Employing a theoretical and comparative framework, this seminar focuses on campaigns and elections in Israel. The seminar is divided into two interrelated sections. In the first section, we will cover voting behavior. Here we will look at Israel¿s election laws, its political culture, socialization and cleavages, turnout, political sophistication, ideology, partisanship and issue voting. In the second half of the semester we will examine elections from the perspective of candidates and campaign strategists. The topics we will focus on include election laws, public and private campaign finance, campaign strategy, media, polling, and advertising. In examining these topics, we will cover a variety of elections campaigns since Israel¿s birth, with an emphasis on the most recent ones.
Same as: JEWISHST 271C

POLISCI 241S. Spatial Approaches to Social Science. 5 Units.

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Same as: ANTHRO 130D, ANTHRO 230D, URBANST 124

POLISCI 241T. Political Economy of Gender. 5 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the political economy of gender. The course first explores the key areas of debate on women¿s representation. Why are women underrepresented in formal political institutions? How the political institutions affect women's representation? What's the effects of women's representation? Also, the course examines the quality of female politicians, women's voting behavior and political preferences, public opinion on gender issues, and women's representation in Law. No prior knowledge is required.

POLISCI 242A. Civil War and Peace Processes. 5 Units.

The objective of this course is to provide students with the wherewithal to acquire a good understanding of civil war. We would survey some of the main issues and debates as reflected in the last three decades of prolific research on the subject. While our emphasis will be on understanding key theoretical arguments advanced in the literature, we also hope to familiarize students with the advances made by researchers to test the empirical validity of their arguments. The lectures are structured around four broad themes derived from the literature: causes, conflict dynamics, consequences and post-conflict trajectory. While these four themes are not exhaustive, we will cover most of the critical issues highlighted in the literature.

POLISCI 242C. Corruption, Conflict and Financial Crisis: Contemporary Global Politics and Journalism. 5 Units.

This course offers students interested in contemporary global politics a unique introduction to the critical analysis of current events through the lens of award-winning non-fiction writing. Each week, we will explore a new political issue crucial to understanding today¿s world by reading some of the most gripping (and best written!) first- and second-hand narratives of these events, as recounted by journalists, academics and documentarians working in the field. Topics will include: global poverty, the overthrow of authoritarian regimes, terrorism, genocide and crimes against humanity, the Israel-Palestinian conflict, financial crises, and political corruption. In class, students will discuss the readings and learn to apply major social scientific theories to systematically analyze these complex political issues. Through this course, students will not only gain exposure to some exemplary writing on topics of current importance, but also acquire the skills and tools necessary to understand some of the most intractable and interesting problems in the world today.

POLISCI 243C. The Political Economy of Development. 5 Units.

Why are some countries rich and others poor? What explains the economic policies that governments adopt, and how do those policies affect economic performance? Why some policies persist over time while other don't? We will use tools from political science and economics to explore these important questions. The readings for this course will include conceptual and historical material from many geographic regions. As we explore the fascinating relationship between politics and economics, we will evaluate hypotheses according to robust and sound empirical evidence.

POLISCI 243D. Special Topics: Taiwan's Democratic Evolution. 5 Units.

This course is an introduction to the contemporary politics of Taiwan. Once a poor, insecure autocracy, today Taiwan has been transformed into a prosperous and stable liberal democracy, albeit one whose long-term security remains imperiled by the rising power of the People¿s Republic of China. We will draw on concepts and theories from political science to explore distinct aspects of this ongoing political evolution, including the transition to and consolidation of democracy, origins and trajectory of economic and social development, sources of Taiwanese nationalism, security of the Taiwanese state and its relationship to the PRC and the United States, parties and elections, and public policy processes and challenges.

POLISCI 243E. Political Economy of Development in Rural India. 5 Units.

When and why do farmers accept, manipulate, or overthrow the pre-existingnndistribution of political, economic and social power?nnThis course will help students utilize political economy theories and methods of analysisnnto understand the institutional dynamics of change in rural India. First, it will providennstudents with a deeper understanding of the nature of change in a particularly dynamic,nnvaried and influential state with a mainly-rural population: India. Second, it will focus onnnthree major topics in political economy: control over land; taxation and investment; andnnanti-state resistance. The course will draw from political science¿s examinations of hownnand why states succeed, fail, and conduct major reforms by examining these questions innnthe context of rural India¿s small farmers. Indian political institutions are simultaneouslynnlauded as extremely stable, highly-prone to decentralized rebellion, and models fornnvoice and innovation from which the rest of the world has much to learn.nnOverall, this course will expect students to engage with the political economy literature ¿ both historical and contemporary ¿ in order to develop two short research papers and present well-argued positions in class-wide debates on the nature of political, economic and social change driven by and for small farmers in rural India.

POLISCI 243L. Politics of Economic Reform. 5 Units.

Description to come.

POLISCI 244. An Introduction to Political Development. 5 Units.

Political development concerns the evolution of three categories of institutions: (1) the state itself; (2) the rule of law; and (3) accountable government. Focus on many of the major theories of political development, beginning with some classic social theorists and continuing up through the present.

POLISCI 244A. Authoritarian Politics. 3-5 Units.

Examination of how authoritarian regimes govern. Topics include: historical determinants of authoritarian government, typologies of authoritarian rule and impact of authoritarian governance on economic growth.
Same as: POLISCI 344A

POLISCI 244C. Political Change in Latin America: The contemporary challenge to democracy. 5 Units.

The purpose is to present the contemporary tendencies that characterize the mutation of democracy in Latin America. Along with a general conceptualization, focus will be given to specific cases that illustrate concepts. Three axes constitute the frame of the course: the background, the new trends of democracy on the eve of the 21st century, and the emergence of "refoundational" government and movements.

POLISCI 244P. Religion and Politics in Latin America. 5 Units.

The purpose of this seminar is to introduce students to the complexities of Politics and Religion in Latin America from a historical and sociological perspective. The seminar will examine the evolution of Church-State-Society-Community-Individual relations in Latin America, from Independence to present day. Topics will include new definitions of religious freedom, debates concerning the so called ¿lay State¿ (Estado laico), secularization, and the role of the lay or secular state and religious groups in the development of democratic or authoritarian regimes, as well as civil and religious freedoms, particularly sexual and reproductive rights and bioethical issues (contraception, abortion euthanasia, stem cell research, homosexual rights and homophobia). nThe course will combine a series of reading tests designed to introduce central questions of the texts with a critical discussion of the assigned source material, in order to develop a knowledgeable approach and research interest in the student.

POLISCI 244T. Organized Crime and Democracy in Latin America. 5 Units.

Scholars and policy analysts have long emphasized the strength of the rule of law as a key determinant of economic development and social opportunity. They also agree that the rule of law requires an effective and accountable legal system. The growth of transnational organized crime is a major impediment, however, to the creation of effective and accountable legal systems. nThis seminar examines how and why transnational criminal organizations have developed in Latin America, explores why they constitute a major challenge to the consolidation of democratic societies, economic development and individual rights. It also examines the efforts of governments to combat them, with a focus on the experiences of Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil. The course examines these cases in order to draw lessons¿by pointing to both successes and failures¿of use to policy analysts, legal scholars, and practitioners.
Same as: INTNLREL 152, IPS 247

POLISCI 244U. Political Culture. 3-5 Units.

Implications of cultural coordination and cultural difference for political processes and institutions. Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
Same as: POLISCI 344U

POLISCI 245. Evidence and the Making of Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine how various forms of historical data and social-scientific evidence are and can be used to shape and inform foreign policy decision-making. Drawing on in-depth explorations of a variety of contemporary foreign policy challenges ¿ the collapse of Syria, Russia¿s invasion of Ukraine, Iran¿s pursuit of a nuclear weapon, increasing repression in Egypt, post-conflict reconstruction in Iraq, and the spread of radical extremism ¿ this course will challenge students to think through how a better understanding of theory and the impact of prior policies might change the decisions of U.S. policymakers. The seminar will blend perspectives from social science and behind-the-scenes insights from high-level policymaking. For advanced undergraduates.

POLISCI 245A. Politics and Public Finance. 5 Units.

The main related but different questions addressed by course are: nhow states have, through history, financed their expenditures, e.g. by taxing people or issuing public debt; how different political and fiscal institutions have been shaped by the varying need of the state to collect revenues (such as war, revolution threats, increasing demand of redistribution by the ¿median voter¿).n nWe will focus mainly, but not only, on the historical experience of the Western World (e.g. Europe and the US), and pay special attention to the nature of political institutions in place (e.g. absolutist regimes, constitutional monarchies, different forms of democracy), over a relatively long period of time (i.e. beginning with the). The exposition will not necessarily follow a chronological order, but rather a logical one (in some sense).

POLISCI 245E. Middle East Politics. 5 Units.

This course offers a thematic approach to the study of Middle Eastern politics. We will overview the major areas of political science research on the contemporary Middle East while simultaneously building empirical knowledge about the politics of individual countries in the region. Topics to be covered include: state capacity and democracy; economic development and mineral resources; the politics of religion and gender; international relations and civil conflict; terrorism and revolution.

POLISCI 245R. Politics in Modern Iran. 5 Units.

Modern Iran has been a smithy for political movements, ideologies, and types of states. Movements include nationalism, constitutionalism, Marxism, Islamic fundamentalism, social democracy, Islamic liberalism, and fascism. Forms of government include Oriental despotism, authoritarianism, Islamic theocracy, and liberal democracy. These varieties have appeared in Iran in an iteration shaped by history, geography, proximity to oil and the Soviet Union, and the hegemony of Islamic culture.

POLISCI 246A. Paths to the Modern World: Islam and the West. 5 Units.

How and why did Europe develop political institutions that encouraged economic growth and industrialization? And why has the Islamic world lagged in the creation of growth-promoting institutions? This course uses a comparative approach to understanding two routes to the modern world -- the historical experiences of Christian Europe and the Islamic world. We will explore questions including, when do representative parliamentary assemblies emerge and how does urbanization affect economic development?.

POLISCI 246P. The Dynamics of Change in Africa. 4-5 Units.

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
Same as: AFRICAST 301A, HISTORY 246, HISTORY 346, POLISCI 346P

POLISCI 247A. Games Developing Nations Play. 5 Units.

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Same as: ECON 162, POLISCI 347A

POLISCI 247G. Governance and Poverty. 5 Units.

Poverty relief requires active government involvement in the provision of public services such as drinking water, healthcare, sanitation, education, roads, electricity and public safety. Failure to deliver public services is a major impediment to the alleviation of poverty in the developing world. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to examining these issues, bringing together readings from across the disciplines of political science, economics, law, medicine and education to increase understanding of the complex causal linkages between political institutions, the quality of governance, and the capacity of developing societies to meet basic human needs. Conceived in a broadly comparative international perspective, the course will examine cross-national and field-based research projects, with a particular focus on Latin America and Mexico.

POLISCI 248L. Political-Economy of Crime and Violence in Latin America. 5 Units.

Latin America has experienced a significant wave of crime and violence in the past two decades.Criminal organizations have penetrated State organizations and are increasingly embedded insociety. These organizations have created wide and solid networks all over the region, including theUnited States. The activities of criminal organizations in Latin America have eroded the social fabric,weakened State institutions, have caused a significant number of deaths, and have created strong disincentives for productive investment. The course aims at acquainting students with the political-economy of crime and violence. It focuses on understanding the incentives that individuals face for engaging in criminal activities; the incentives that criminal organizations have to use violence against each other, against citizens, and against State forces; the incentives that citizens face to side, or not, with criminal organizations; andnthe responses that States have structured against crime and violence.nThe course focuses on Latin America, but also learns from the case of the United States for which there is a relatively more extensive literature. The course makes extensive use of available data on the topic and emphasizes the learning of adequate methods for measuring these phenomena.
Same as: POLISCI 348L

POLISCI 248S. Latin American Politics. 3-5 Units.

Fundamental transformations in Latin America in the last two decades: why most governments are now democratic or semidemocratic; and economic transformation as countries abandoned import substitution industrialization policies led by state intervention for neoliberal economic polices. The nature of this dual transformation.
Same as: POLISCI 348S

POLISCI 249. Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Requires a petition that can be found on our Political Science website.

POLISCI 249P. Introduction to Israeli Politics. 5 Units.

This course aims to introduce students to Israel¿s political system and its major actors. We will survey Israel¿s political landscape, both chronologically and thematically, covering the major issues and conflicts which have dominated Israeli politics since its inception.
Same as: INTNLREL 163, JEWISHST 279P

POLISCI 259. Directed Reading and Research in Political Methodology. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 291. Political Institutions. 5 Units.

This course focuses on the role of political institutions in shaping policy outcomes around the world, with special attention to the United States. Students will become familiar with a wide range of theoretical approaches to the study of institutions, and they will learn the basics of applied quantitative empirical analysis. Enrollment is restricted to Political Science Research Honors Track students.

POLISCI 292. Political Behavior. 5 Units.

This research seminar will survey important topics in the study of mass political behavior including public opinion, political participation, partisanship and voting. Open only to students in the Political Science Research Honors Track.

POLISCI 299. Honors Thesis. 1-5 Unit.

Students conduct independent research work towards a senior honors thesis. Restricted to students in the Research Track Honors Program in Political Science.

POLISCI 299A. Research Design. 5 Units.

This course is designed to teach students how to design a research project. The course emphasizes the specification of testable hypotheses, the building of data sets, and the inferences from that may be drawn from that evidence. It is only open to students in the PS Research Honors Track.

POLISCI 299B. Honors Thesis Seminar. 3-5 Units.

(Previously 299Q) Restricted to Research Honors Track students who have completed POLISCI 291, 292, and 293.

POLISCI 299C. Honors Thesis. 1-5 Unit.

(Previously 299B) Students conduct independent research work towards a senior honors thesis.

POLISCI 299D. Honors Thesis. 1-5 Unit.

(Previously 299C) Students conduct independent research work towards a senior honors thesis.

POLISCI 311E. Political Economy I. 2-5 Units.

Theoretical models of political economy. Potential topics include: basic social choice theory, democracy, electoral competition, political accountability, legislative bargaining, lobbying, corruption, autocratic politics, democratization, conflict and arms races, and institutional change. Attention to economics implications, including taxation, redistribution, and public goods. Prerequisite: 203 or permission of instructors.
Same as: ECON 220

POLISCI 311N. Nuclear Politics. 3-5 Units.

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? Have international and domestic views on nuclear weapons changed since 1945? In this course, we will first examine the political science literature on these key questions about nuclear politics. We will read and critique works using different approaches in political science including quantitative analysis, experiments, game theory, historical case studies, and mixed methods. Students will then design and execute small research projects to address questions that have been inadequately addressed in the existing literature.
Same as: POLISCI 211N

POLISCI 314D. Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. 5 Units.

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Same as: INTNLREL 114D, IPS 230, POLISCI 114D

POLISCI 314R. Challenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine the complexities and trade offs involved in foreign policy decision-making at the end of the twentieth century and the dawn of the post-9/11 era. Students will analyze dilemmas confronting policymakers through case studies including post-conflict reconstruction and state-building, nuclear proliferation, democratization and peace negotiation. The seminar will conclude with a 48-hour crisis simulation. For advanced undergraduates and graduate students. Application for enrollment required. Applications will be available for pick up in Political Science Department (Encina West 100) starting late-October.
Same as: POLISCI 214R

POLISCI 315A. The Rise of Asia. 3-5 Units.

We will examine the sources and implications of the rise of Asia in the international system. Topics will include military competition, international cooperation, regional integration, domestic politics, business and investment, legalization, environmental issues, demographics, social issues, and the role of technology.
Same as: POLISCI 115A

POLISCI 315F. Nuclear Weapons and International Politics. 5 Units.

Why do states develop nuclear weapons and why do some states, that have the technological capacity to build nuclear weapons, refrain from doing so? What are the strategic consequences of new states deploying nuclear weapons? What is the relationship between the spread of nuclear energy and the spread of nuclear weapons? We will study the political science and history literature on these topics. Research paper required.
Same as: POLISCI 215F

POLISCI 316S. Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

Formal and informal processes involved in U.S. foreign policy decision making. The formation, conduct, and implementation of policy, emphasizing the role of the President and executive branch agencies. Theoretical and analytical perspectives; case studies. Interested students should attend the first day of class. Admission will be by permission of the instructor. Priority to IPS students.
Same as: IPS 316S

POLISCI 317M. Special Topics: International Democratization. 5 Units.

Analyzing the international aspects of democratization involves understanding at least the following: (1) what is democracy (2) what domestic-level processes increase or decrease the level of democracy (3) what kind of influences from the outside world work, and do not work, in furthering democracy, and in what ways. This course spans all subfields of political science, and spills over into law, economics, and sociology. A complicating factor is the geographical expanse of democratic institutions and efforts to promote them. Eastern Europe, Russia, the Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, post-civil war El Salvador and Cambodia, are only some of the regions and countries that have been impacted. Their vastly different backgrounds challenge anyone attempting the puzzle. A further complication is the variety of ways in which the outside world may affect the scope and quality of democracy. These ways include but are not limited to: pressures exercised by regional economic institutions and alliances, the power of ideas and socialization, transfers of wealth, demands for trade liberalization, the training of civic activists, reports issued by foreign election observers.
Same as: POLISCI 217M

POLISCI 318. Special Topics: Democratic Peace-A Political Biography. 3-5 Units.

The theories of democratic peace are among the most salient theories in the discipline of International Relations. The academic discussions surrounding their validity have been quite fierce as they concern also the inter-paradigmatic debates so prevalent in IR. No less interestingly, though, is the theories' migration outside of the halls of academia into the political arena in countries such as the United States and Israel. Noteworthy is the impact those theories had on public discussions and on the shaping of foreign policies of the US following the Cold War. This phenomenon raises important meta-theoretical questions about the nature of theory, its powers, and the responsibilities of academia to society. The course will follow the political biography of the theories of democratic peace: their academic origins, migration into the public and political spheres, the politicization process they underwent, the political and rhetorical uses and misuses of the theories (including the Iraq War), and the outcomes of this charged meeting of academia and politics. No less importantly, the course will discuss the responsibility theorists bear for the real-world ramifications of their theories, and the way they should act to discharge their responsibilities.
Same as: POLISCI 218

POLISCI 318J. Japanese Politics and International Relations. 5 Units.

The domestic politics, political economy, and international relations of contemporary Japan. The role of political parties, the bureaucracy, and private actors. Economic development and challenges. Relations with the United States and East Asia.
Same as: POLISCI 218J

POLISCI 319. Directed Reading in International Relations. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 320R. The Presidency. 3-5 Units.

This course provides students with a comprehensive perspective on the American presidency and covers a range of topics: elections, policy making, control of the bureaucracy, unilateral action, war-making, and much more. But throughout, the goal is to understand why presidents behave as they do, and why the presidency as an institution has developed as it has¿with special attention to the dynamics of the American political system and how they condition incentives, opportunities, and power.
Same as: POLISCI 220R

POLISCI 321. Law and Politics Workshop. 2-3 Units.

This workshop will feature guest speakers who are political scientists or law professors specializing in the legal regulation of politics. Students will be responsible for response papers to each scholarly paper presented. On weeks without guest speakers, topics to be covered will include election law, administrative law, legislation, judicial behavior and public opinion, as well as the political science relevant to those areas of law. The final grade will be determined by class participation (10%), response papers (30%) and final research paper (60%). Students can take the course for R credit for either 2 or 3 units, depending on paper length. Elements used in grading: Class participation (10%), Response papers (30%) and final paper of no less than 18 pages for 2 units of credit and 26 pages for 3 units of credit (60%). (Cross-listed as POLISCI 321).

POLISCI 322A. Advances in Political Psychology. 3-5 Units.

Among the topics: the comparative contributions of rational choice and political psychology; political information process; coordinating vs. inducing preferences; identities and values; and prejudice and politics.

POLISCI 322S. Topics in Constitutional History. 5 Units.

Originalism has become the dominant topic in contemporary constitutional interpretation. Is it possible to interpret the Constitution according to its original, meaning, intentions, and understandings? Should we think of the Constitution as a fixed set of rules laid down linguistically, or a set of understandings shaped by the nation's history? How should modern interpreters assess the legacy of major epochs of constitutional change, from the founding era through Reconstruction and on to the great disputes over the New Deal and civil rights? These are the questions this course will entertain.

POLISCI 323. Pivotal Moments in American Institutions and Public Law, 1781-Present. 5 Units.

(Same as Law 680) American lawyers and policymakers work today in a system of institutions that are strikingly unique in comparative and historical terms. With some exceptions, that system is characterized by relatively stable political and legal institutions, low levels of explicit corruption, high bureaucratic capacity in public organizations, and relatively open, impersonal access to political, policymaking, and legal institutions. Although these characteristics are now too often taken for granted, the process through which they emerged remains remarkably opaque. In the 1780s under the Articles of Confederation, the United States was a poor developing country on the fringe of the Atlantic community with limited capacity and a striking inability to provide basic public goods, such as security. One hundred years later, it well along the way to becoming the richest nation in the world. How did this transformation occur?nnnDrawing on judicial opinions, legal scholarship, political science, economics, and history, this course explores how institutions evolved to create such a system. It traces the problem of institutional development through several critical periods in the history of American public law, including the emergence of the Constitution, the events leading up to and following the Civil War, the Progressive era, World War II, 1964-75, and the emergence of the modern administrative state. Although the primarily focus is on the American experience, we place these developments in comparative context as well.

POLISCI 323R. The Press and the Political Process. 4-5 Units.

(Graduate students register for COMM 260.) The role of mass media and other channels of communication in political and electoral processes.
Same as: COMM 160, COMM 260

POLISCI 324. Graduate Seminar in Political Psychology. 1-3 Unit.

For students interested in research in political science, psychology, or communication. Methodological techniques for studying political attitudes and behaviors. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: COMM 308

POLISCI 326. Race and Racism in American Politics. 5 Units.

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
Same as: AMSTUD 226, CSRE 226, POLISCI 226

POLISCI 326T. The Politics of Education. 3-5 Units.

America's public schools are government agencies, and virtually everything about them is subject to political authority--and thus to decision through the political process. This seminar is an effort to understand the politics of education and its impacts on the nation's schools. Our focus is on the modern era of reform, with special attention to the most prominent efforts to bring about fundamental change through accountability (including No Child Left Behind), school choice (charter schools, vouchers), pay for performance, and more and more to the politics of blocking that has made genuine reform so difficult to achieve.
Same as: POLISCI 226T

POLISCI 327. Minority Behavior and Representation. 5 Units.

Politics of minorities in the U.S. Topics include: historic and contemporary struggles of Latinos, African Americans, and gays and lesbians for political power and social acceptance; group-level public opinion and electoral behavior; scholarship on group influence in the policy making process and policy issues of importance; and the jurisprudence shaping minority political access and civil rights.

POLISCI 327C. Law of Democracy. 3-5 Units.

Combined with LAW 7036 (formerly Law 577). This course is intended to give students a basic understanding of the themes in the legal regulation of elections and politics. We will cover all the major Supreme Court cases on topics of voting rights, reapportionment/redistricting, ballot access, regulation of political parties, campaign finance, and the 2000 presidential election controversy. The course pays particular attention to competing political philosophies and empirical assumptions that underlie the Court's reasoning while still focusing on the cases as litigation tools used to serve political ends. Elements used in grading: Class participation and one day take home final exam. (POLISCI 327C; LAW 577).
Same as: COMM 361

POLISCI 329. Directed Reading and Research in American Politics. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 330. Social and Political Philosophy of Hegel and Marx. 4 Units.

.
Same as: ETHICSOC 330R, PHIL 330

POLISCI 330A. Classical Seminar: Origins of Political Thought. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSHIS 133/333.) Political philosophy in classical antiquity, focusing on canonical works of Thucydides, Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. Historical background. Topics include: political obligation, citizenship, and leadership; origins and development of democracy; and law, civic strife, and constitutional change.
Same as: CLASSICS 181, CLASSICS 381, PHIL 176A, PHIL 276A, POLISCI 230A

POLISCI 330D. State and Society in Antiquity. 3-5 Units.

This seminar explores the characteristics and development of ancient states from a social-scientific and comparative perspective. Key issues include state formation, state-society relations, citizenship, sovereignty, and diversity in political ecologies from city-states to empires. Basic background knowledge of ancient history is highly desirable. Open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates majoring in relevant fields.
Same as: CLASSICS 379A

POLISCI 331. High-Stakes Politics: Case Studies in Political Philosophy, Institutions, and Interests. 3-5 Units.

Normative political theory combined with positive political theory to better explain how major texts may have responded to and influenced changes in formal and informal institutions. Emphasis is on historical periods in which catastrophic institutional failure was a recent memory or a realistic possibility. Case studies include Greek city-states in the classical period and the northern Atlantic community of the 17th and 18th centuries including upheavals in England and the American Revolutionary era.
Same as: CLASSICS 382, POLISCI 231

POLISCI 332. Topics in Political Philosophy. 5 Units.

Leading ideas in A Theory of Justice, Political Liberalism, and The Law of Peoples..
Same as: PHIL 372D

POLISCI 332T. The Dialogue of Democracy. 4-5 Units.

All forms of democracy require some kind of communication so people can be aware of issues and make decisions. This course looks at competing visions of what democracy should be and different notions of the role of dialogue in a democracy. Is it just campaigning or does it include deliberation? Small scale discussions or sound bites on television? Or social media? What is the role of technology in changing our democratic practices, to mobilize, to persuade, to solve public problems? This course will include readings from political theory about democratic ideals - from the American founders to J.S. Mill and the Progressives to Joseph Schumpeter and modern writers skeptical of the public will. It will also include contemporary examinations of the media and the internet to see how those practices are changing and how the ideals can or cannot be realized.
Same as: AMSTUD 137, COMM 137W, COMM 237, POLISCI 232T

POLISCI 333. Rational and Social Agency. 2-5 Units.

Contemporary discussions of practical reason, individual rational agency, planning agency, diachronic agency, intention, belief, intentional action, shared agency, identification and self-governance. Tentative list of authors whose work will be studied includes: Michael Bratman, Margaret Gilbert, Richard Holton, Christine Korsgaard, Alfred Mele, Kieran Setiya, Scott Shapiro, Michael Smith, David Velleman, Jay Wallace, and Gary Watson.
Same as: PHIL 377

POLISCI 333M. Research and Methods in Political Theory. 3-5 Units.

This seminar has two aims. First, we discuss recent scholarship that examines the relationship between normative and empirical (or positive) work. In particular, we focus on normative work in political theory/philosophy and empirical work in political science and other social sciences. Second, we discuss in an informal workshop setting the ongoing work of graduate students, considering how, if at all, the readings on methodology could inform this work.

POLISCI 333S. Marx. 2-4 Units.

This course examines the works of a thinker who radically transformed the ways that we think about modern society. Marx saw fundamental problems with capitalist societies, including: un-freedom, alienation, inequality, and bureaucratization. He developed a theory to account for these problems. Our task will be to read his works critically and to evaluate their contributions to our understanding the relationship between politics, social structure, knowledge and human agency. We will also be especially interested in comparing his view with alternative diagnoses of the problems of modern capitalist societies, especially those of Max Weber and John Rawls.
Same as: PHIL 339

POLISCI 334. Philanthropy and Civil Society. 1-3 Unit.

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Same as: EDUC 374, SOC 374

POLISCI 334P. Deliberative Democracy and its Critics. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the theory and practice of deliberative democracy and engages both in a dialogue with critics. Can a democracy which emphasizes people thinking and talking together on the basis of good information be made practical in the modern age? What kinds of distortions arise when people try to discuss politics or policy together? The course draws on ideas of deliberation from Madison and Mill to Rawls and Habermas as well as criticisms from the jury literature, from the psychology of group processes and from the most recent normative and empirical literature on deliberative forums. Deliberative Polling, its applications, defenders and critics, both normative and empirical, will provide a key case for discussion.
Same as: AMSTUD 135, COMM 135, COMM 235, COMM 335, POLISCI 234P

POLISCI 335A. Adam Smith: From Moral Philosophy to Political Economy. 3-5 Units.

This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates interested in moral philosophy or modern political economy. The course blends two approaches to Adam Smith. We use political thought and intellectual history to introduce students to the intellectual roots of ¿classical Liberalism¿; asking: What are the moral psychological foundations of justice?, Does the free market make everyone, including the least advantaged, better off? How do we sustain a good society? We use social science to study Smith¿s integrated approach to human cooperation in three realms, society, politics, and markets; asking: ¿Why isn¿t the entire world developed? How did Europe develop out of feudalism? How does a community sustain moral behavior? The two perspectives allow us to discover that Smith has ideas on these subjects that expand today¿s frontiers of both positive and normative social science.

POLISCI 335J. Creative Political Thinking: Three Cases. 5 Units.

.
Same as: POLISCI 235J

POLISCI 335L. Roads Not Taken, 1880-1960. 4 Units.

This course is intended to illuminate ideas about justice, freedom, equality, democracy, peace, and social conflict, and to raise persisting questions about such topics as the role of violence in politics through looking at the ideas of America writers such as Edward Bellamy, W.E.B. DuBois, Eugene Debs, Jane Addams, Emma Goldman, John Dewey and Reinhold Niebuhr.
Same as: AMSTUD 275R, ETHICSOC 275R, PHIL 275R

POLISCI 336. Introduction to Global Justice. 4 Units.

This course provides an overview of core ethical problems in international politics, with special emphasis on the question of what demands justice imposes on institutions and agents acting in a global context. The course is divided into three sections. The first investigates the content of global justice, and comprises of readings from contemporary political theorists and philosophers who write within the liberal contractualist, utilitarian, cosmopolitan, and nationalist traditions. The second part of the course looks at the obligations which global justice generates in relation to five issues of international concern ¿ global poverty, climate change, immigration, warfare, and well-being of women. The final section of the course asks whether a democratic international order is necessary for global justice to be realized.
Same as: ETHICSOC 136R, INTNLREL 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R

POLISCI 336C. French Political Thought From Rousseau to the Present. 3-5 Units.

An overview of the current awakening of French political thought as it is grounded in a new reading of the great classics of French social thought, from Rousseau to Tocqueville and Benjamin Constant. Readings of Lefort, Castoriadis, Louis Dumont, Ricoeur, Furet, Manent, Ferry, Renaut, Gauchet, Raynaud, etc. Readings in French. (Translations in English will be made available whenever possible.) Discussions in French and in English.
Same as: FRENCH 245

POLISCI 336S. Justice. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Same as: ETHICSOC 171, IPS 208, PHIL 171, PHIL 271, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 136S, PUBLPOL 103C, PUBLPOL 307

POLISCI 337A. Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 276.) Why and under what conditions do human beings need political institutions? What makes them legitimate or illegitimate? What is the nature, source, and extent of the obligation to obey the legitimate ones, and how should people alter or overthrow the others? Study of the answers given to such questions by major political theorists of the early modern period: Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Kant.
Same as: PHIL 176, PHIL 276, POLISCI 137A

POLISCI 337L. Ancient Greek Law and Justice. 3-5 Units.

The development and practice of law and legal procedure in the ancient Greek world, emphasizing the well documented case of classical Athens. Constitutional, criminal, and civil law, approached through analysis of actual laws and speeches by litigants in Athenian courtrooms. Review of a growing scholarship juxtaposing Greek law to other prominent legal traditions and exploring the role of law in Greek social relations, economics, and literature, and its relationship to Greek conceptions of justice.
Same as: CLASSICS 378

POLISCI 338E. The Problem of Evil in Literature, Film, and Philosophy. 3-5 Units.

Conceptions of evil and its nature and source, distinctions between natural and moral evil, and what belongs to God versus to the human race have undergone transformations reflected in literature and film. Sources include Rousseau's response to the 1755 Lisbon earthquake; Hannah Arendt's interpretation of Auschwitz; Günther Anders' reading of Hiroshima; and current reflections on looming climatic and nuclear disasters. Readings from Rousseau, Kant, Dostoevsky, Arendt, Anders, Jonas, Camus, Ricoeur, Houellebeck, Girard. Films by Lang, Bergman, Losey, Hitchcock.
Same as: FRENCH 265

POLISCI 339. Directed Reading and Research in Political Theory. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 340L. China in World Politics. 5 Units.

The implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics and for American foreign policy, including issues such as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: POLISCI 140L

POLISCI 343A. Field Methods. 3-5 Units.

Familiarizes students with a variety of field methods potentially applicable to ongoing research projects and dissertations. Topics include case selection, process tracing, participant observation, interviewing, archival research, survey design, labnexperiments, field experiments, and ethical concerns in the field. Students develop a field research strategy as a final project. Prerequisites: 440A,B,C.

POLISCI 344. Politics and Geography. 3-5 Units.

The role of geography in topics in political economy, including development, political representation, voting, redistribution, regional autonomy movements, fiscal competition, and federalism.

POLISCI 344A. Authoritarian Politics. 3-5 Units.

Examination of how authoritarian regimes govern. Topics include: historical determinants of authoritarian government, typologies of authoritarian rule and impact of authoritarian governance on economic growth.
Same as: POLISCI 244A

POLISCI 344U. Political Culture. 3-5 Units.

Implications of cultural coordination and cultural difference for political processes and institutions. Prerequisite: 104 or equivalent.
Same as: POLISCI 244U

POLISCI 346P. The Dynamics of Change in Africa. 4-5 Units.

Crossdisciplinary colloquium; required for the M.A. degree in African Studies. Open to advanced undergraduates and PhD students. Addresses critical issues including patterns of economic collapse and recovery; political change and democratization; and political violence, civil war, and genocide. Focus on cross-cutting issues including the impact of colonialism; the role of religion, ethnicity, and inequality; and Africa's engagement with globalization.
Same as: AFRICAST 301A, HISTORY 246, HISTORY 346, POLISCI 246P

POLISCI 347A. Games Developing Nations Play. 5 Units.

If, as economists argue, development can make everyone in a society better off, why do leaders fail to pursue policies that promote development? The course uses game theoretic approaches from both economics and political science to address this question. Incentive problems are at the heart of explanations for development failure. Specifically, the course focuses on a series of questions central to the development problem: Why do developing countries have weak and often counterproductive political institutions? Why is violence (civil wars, ethnic conflict, military coups) so prevalent in the developing world, and how does it interact with development? Why do developing economies fail to generate high levels of income and wealth? We study how various kinds of development traps arise, preventing development for most countries. We also explain how some countries have overcome such traps. This approach emphasizes the importance of simultaneous economic and political development as two different facets of the same developmental process. No background in game theory is required.
Same as: ECON 162, POLISCI 247A

POLISCI 347D. Rebooting Government with Design Thinking. 3-4 Units.

Students apply tools of human-centered design to issues of government performance. Small project teams work with NGO and government partners (in the U.S. and abroad) on concrete design challenges focused on issues such as how to deliver services more effectively and ensure that citizens¿ voices are heard. Students identify needs, generate concepts, create prototypes, and test their appropriateness. Taught through the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (http://dschool.stanford.edu). Enrollment limited. Application required. Prerequisites: consent of instructor(s).
Same as: PUBLPOL 347D

POLISCI 347G. Governance and Poverty. 3-5 Units.

Poverty relief requires active government involvement in the provision of public services such as drinking water, healthcare, sanitation, education, roads, electricity and public safety. Failure to deliver public services is a major impediment to the alleviation of poverty in the developing world. This course will use an interdisciplinary approach to examining these issues, bringing together readings from across the disciplines of political science, economics, law, medicine and education to increase understanding of the complex causal linkages between political institutions, the quality of governance, and the capacity of developing societies to meet basic human needs. Conceived in a broadly comparative international perspective, the course will examine cross-national and field-based research projects, with a particular focus on Latin America and Mexico.

POLISCI 348. Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform. 3-5 Units.

Overview of the reforms in China since 1978 that have made its economy one of the fastest growing in the world yet it still has the Chinese Communist Party at the helm wielding one party rule. Key questions addressed include the following: What has been the process and challenges of reform that have reshaped China¿s economic landscape? What are the political consequences of these dramatic economic changes? Why has the CCP remained strong while other communist regimes have failed? Markets have spread but what is the role of the state? What are the opportunities for political participation and prospects for political change? Materials will include readings, lectures, and selected films. This course has no prerequisites. (Graduate students register for 348.) This fulfills the Writing in the Major requirement for PoliSci majors.
Same as: POLISCI 148

POLISCI 348L. Political-Economy of Crime and Violence in Latin America. 5 Units.

Latin America has experienced a significant wave of crime and violence in the past two decades.Criminal organizations have penetrated State organizations and are increasingly embedded insociety. These organizations have created wide and solid networks all over the region, including theUnited States. The activities of criminal organizations in Latin America have eroded the social fabric,weakened State institutions, have caused a significant number of deaths, and have created strong disincentives for productive investment. The course aims at acquainting students with the political-economy of crime and violence. It focuses on understanding the incentives that individuals face for engaging in criminal activities; the incentives that criminal organizations have to use violence against each other, against citizens, and against State forces; the incentives that citizens face to side, or not, with criminal organizations; andnthe responses that States have structured against crime and violence.nThe course focuses on Latin America, but also learns from the case of the United States for which there is a relatively more extensive literature. The course makes extensive use of available data on the topic and emphasizes the learning of adequate methods for measuring these phenomena.
Same as: POLISCI 248L

POLISCI 348S. Latin American Politics. 3-5 Units.

Fundamental transformations in Latin America in the last two decades: why most governments are now democratic or semidemocratic; and economic transformation as countries abandoned import substitution industrialization policies led by state intervention for neoliberal economic polices. The nature of this dual transformation.
Same as: POLISCI 248S

POLISCI 349. Directed Reading and Research in Comparative Politics. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 351A. Foundations of Political Economy. 3 Units.

Introduction to political economy with an emphasis on formal models of collective choice, public institutions, and political competition. Topics include voting theory, social choice, institutional equilibria, agenda setting, interest group politics, bureaucratic behavior, and electoral competition.

POLISCI 351B. Economic Analysis of Political Institutions. 4 Units.

Applying techniques such as information economics, games of incomplete information, sequential bargaining theory, repeated games, and rational expectations of microeconomic analysis and game theory to political behavior and institutions. Applicatoins include agenda formation in legislatures, government formation in parliamentary systems, the implications of legislative structure, elections and information aggregation, lobbying, electoral competition and interest groups, the control of bureaucracies, interest group competition, and collective choice rules.

POLISCI 351C. Institutions and Bridge-Building in Political Economy. 4 Units.

This course critically surveys empirical applications of formal models of collective-choice institutions. It is explicitly grounded in philosophy of science (e.g., Popperian positivism and Kuhn's notions of paradigms and normal science). Initial sessions address the meanings and roles of the concept of institutions in social-science research. Historically important works of political science and/or economics are then considered within a framework called Components of Institutional Analysis (or CIA), which provides a fully general way of evaluating research that is jointly empirical and formal theoretical. The course concludes with contemporary instances of such bridge-building. The over-arching objectives are to elevate the explicitness and salience of desirable properties of research and to illustrate the inescapable tradeoffs among the stipulated criteria. nAlthough this is a core course in the GSB Political Economy PhD curriculum, its substantive foci may differ across years depending on the instructor. For Professor Krehbiel's sessions, the emphasis is on legislative behavior, organization, and lawmaking, and on inter-institutional strategic interaction (e,g, between executive, legislative, and judicial branches in various combinations). nStudents should have taken POLECON 680 and POLECON 681. Also listed as Political Science 351C.

POLISCI 352. Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science. 3-5 Units.

Concepts and tools of non-cooperative game theory developed using political science questions and applications. Formal treatment of Hobbes' theory of the state and major criticisms of it; examples from international politics. Primarily for graduate students; undergraduates admitted with consent of instructor.
Same as: POLISCI 152

POLISCI 353A. Workshop in Statistical Modeling. 1 Unit.

Theoretical aspects and empirical applications of statistical modeling in the social sciences. Guest speakers. Students present a research paper. Prerequisite: 350B or equivalent. May be repeat for credit.

POLISCI 353C. Workshop in Statistical Modeling. 1-2 Unit.

Continuation of 353A. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 353A and B. May be repeat for credit.

POLISCI 354. Thinking Strategically. 5 Units.

This course provides an introduction to strategic reasoning. We discuss ideas such as the commitment problem, credibility in signaling, cheap talk, moral hazard and adverse selection. Concepts are developed through games played in class, and applied to politics, business and everyday life.
Same as: POLISCI 153

POLISCI 355A. Data Science for Politics. 5 Units.

Data science is quickly changing the way we understand and and engage in the political process. In this course we will develop fundamental techniques of data science and apply them to large political datasets on elections, campaign finance, lobbying, and more. The objective is to give students the skills to carry out cutting edge quantitative political studies in both academia and the private sector. Students with technical backgrounds looking to study politics quantitatively are encouraged to enroll.
Same as: POLISCI 150A

POLISCI 355B. Machine Learning for Social Scientists. 5 Units.

Machine learning---the use of algorithms to classify, predict, sort, learn and discover from data---has exploded in use across academic fields, industry, government, and non-profit. This course provides an introduction to machine learning for social scientists. We will introduce state of the art machine learning tools, show how to use those tools in the programming language R, and demonstrate why a social science focus is essential to effectively apply machine learning techniques. Applications of the methods will include forecasting social phenomena, the analysis of social media data, and the automatic analysis of text data. Political Science 150A or an equivalent is required. (Prerequisite 150A/355A).
Same as: POLISCI 150B

POLISCI 355C. Causal Inference for Social Science. 5 Units.

Causal inference methods have revolutionized the way we use data, statistics, and research design to move from correlation to causation and rigorously learn about the impact of some potential cause (e.g., a new policy or intervention) on some outcome (e.g., election results, levels of violence, poverty). This course provides an introduction that teaches students the toolkit of modern causal inference methods as they are now widely used across academic fields, government, industry, and non-profits. Topics include experiments, matching, regression, sensitivity analysis, difference-in-differences, panel methods, instrumental variable estimation, and regression discontinuity designs. We will illustrate and apply the methods with examples drawn from various fields including policy evaluation, political science, public health, economics, business, and sociology. Political Science 150A and 150B or an equivalent is required.
Same as: POLISCI 150C

POLISCI 356A. Formal Theory I: An Introduction to Game Theory. 3-5 Units.

An introduction to noncooperative game theory through applications in political science. Topics will include the Hotelling-Downs model, the probabilistic voting model, political bargaining models and political agency models, among others.

POLISCI 356B. Formal Theory II: Models of Politics. 3-5 Units.

A continuation of Formal Theory I covering advanced topics, including classical political economy, comparative institutions, theories of conflict and cooperation, dynamic political economy, and the new behavioral political economy.

POLISCI 357. Sampling and Surveys. 5 Units.

The importance of sample surveys as a source of social science data including public opinion, voting, welfare programs, health, employment, and consumer behavior. Survey design, sampling theory, and estimation. Nonresponse, self-selection, measurement error, and web survey methods. Prerequisite: 350B or equivalent.

POLISCI 358. Data-driven Politics. 3-5 Units.

Covers advanced computational and statistical methods for collecting and modeling large-scale data on politics. Topics will include automated and computer-assisted methods for collecting, disambiguating, and merging unstructured data (web-scraping, identity resolution, and record-linkage), database management (SQL, data architecture), data-reduction techniques for measuring the political preferences for large numbers of individuals, topic models applied to political text/speech, and social network analysis for mapping relationships and identifying influential actors.

POLISCI 359. Advanced Individual Study in Political Methodology. 1-10 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 362. New Economics of Organization. 5 Units.

Survey of economic approaches to organization, emphasizing theory and application, with attention to politics.

POLISCI 400. Dissertation. 1-18 Unit.

.

POLISCI 400C. Research Design. 5 Units.

Required of Political Science PhD candidates with International Relations, American Politics, or Comparative Politics as their first or second field. Other by consent of instructor. Students develop their own research design. Prerequisites: 410A&B or 420A&B or 440A&B.

POLISCI 404. Dispute Resolution in International Economic Law. 1 Unit.

(Same as LAW 356.) Topics include: theoretical work on international trade and investment disputes; empirical work on WTO dispute resolution and the efficacy of developing country participation; and legal analysis of current, prominent disputes in the WTO and under international investment treaties. Substantial paper required. May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 410A. International Relations Theory, Part I. 3-5 Units.

First of a three-part graduate sequence. History of international relations, current debates, and applications to problems of international security and political economy.

POLISCI 410B. International Relations Theory, Part II. 3-5 Units.

Second of a three-part graduate sequence. History of international relations theory, current debates, and applications to problems of international security and political economy. Prerequisite: 410A.

POLISCI 410C. Research in International Relations. 5 Units.

Third of a three-part graduate sequence. Focus is on developing research papers begun in 410A or B, and exploring active areas of research in the field. Prerequisite: 410B.

POLISCI 411A. Workshop in International Relations. 1 Unit.

For graduate students. Contemporary work. Organized around presentation of research by students and outside scholars. May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 411B. Workshop in International Relations. 1-2 Unit.

For graduate students. Contemporary work. Organized around presentation of research by students and outside scholars. May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 411C. Workshop in International Relations. 1 Unit.

For graduate students. Contemporary work. Organized around presentation of research by students and outside scholars. May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 412. The Politics and Economics of Modern Europe. 3-5 Units.

What are the implications of European integration for social and economic policy and outcomes? In this course, we will examine how EU membership has altered the democratic politics of Europe, with a special focus on policymaking during Europe's most recent financial crisis.

POLISCI 416A. European Security during the Cold War. 4-5 Units.

During the Cold War two highly armed military blocs confronted each other in the center of Europe. What role did they play in the Cold War? How dangerous was their confrontation? This seminar will use archival materials from Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet Union to explore the US-Soviet rivalry in Europe, the politics of the two alliances, the role of nuclear weapons, the crises that took place, and the ending of the Cold War in Europe.
Same as: HISTORY 231A, HISTORY 431A, POLISCI 216A

POLISCI 416B. European Security during the Cold War. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 231A/431A. During the Cold War two highly armed military blocs confronted each other in the center of Europe. What role did they play in the Cold War? How dangerous was their confrontation? This seminar will use archival materials from Britain, France, Germany, the Soviet Union to explore the US-Soviet rivalry in Europe, the politics of the two alliances, the role of nuclear weapons, the crises that took place, and the ending of the Cold War in Europe.
Same as: HISTORY 231B, HISTORY 431B, POLISCI 216B

POLISCI 420A. American Political Institutions. 3-5 Units.

Theories of American politics, focusing on Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the courts.

POLISCI 420B. Topics in American Political Behavior. 3-5 Units.

For graduate students with background in American politics embarking on their own research. Current research in American politics, emphasizing political behavior and public opinion. Possible topics: uncertainty and ambivalence in political attitudes, heterogeneity in public opinion, the structure of American political ideology, political learning, the media as a determinant of public opinion, and links between public opinion and public policy.

POLISCI 420C. Discovery in American Politics. 5 Units.

What are the "novel facts" being generated in the study of American politics, and how are these discoveries being made? Emphasis on strengths and limitations of emerging methodologies and review of the substantive contributions they yield. Student-led replication of extant research and development of original research ideas a key component of the course. Prerequisites: 420A,B.

POLISCI 421K. Questionnaire Design for Surveys and Laboratory Experiments: Social and Cognitive Perspectives. 4 Units.

The social and psychological processes involved in asking and answering questions via questionnaires for the social sciences; optimizing questionnaire design; open versus closed questions; rating versus ranking; rating scale length and point labeling; acquiescence response bias; don't-know response options; response choice order effects; question order effects; social desirability response bias; attitude and behavior recall; and introspective accounts of the causes of thoughts and actions.
Same as: COMM 339, PSYCH 231

POLISCI 421R. American Political Development, 1865-present. 3-5 Units.

In this reading-intensive course, we will conduct a wide-ranging survey of major transformations in the American political system in the post-Civil War period. Our inquiries about these transformations will focus on the origins of the modern administrative state, the interactive role of the state and social movements, and changes in the party system. We¿ll examine these developments not only to understand institutional change, but to learn how changing institutions have shaped the behavior of the American electorate.

POLISCI 422. Workshop in American Politics. 1 Unit.

Research seminar. Frontiers in mass political behavior. Prerequisite: 420B or equivalent. Course may be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 423A. The Laboratory of the Study of American Values I. 1-5 Unit.

Designed for graduate students who are writing dissertations about American public opinion. Students participate in all phases of the research process and include questions on nationally representative surveys. Enrollment is limited to members of the Laboratory for the Study of American Values.

POLISCI 423B. The Laboratory of the Study of American Values II. 1-5 Unit.

Designed for graduate students who are writing dissertations about American public opinion. Students participate in all phases of the research process and include questions on nationally representative surveys. Enrollment is limited to members of the Laboratory for the Study of American Values.

POLISCI 423C. The Laboratory of the Study of American Values III. 1-5 Unit.

Designed for graduate students who are writing dissertations about American public opinion. Students participate in all phases of the research process and include questions on nationally representative surveys. Enrollment is limited to members of the Laboratory for the Study of American Values.

POLISCI 425. Political Communication. 1-5 Unit.

An overview of research in political communication with particular reference to work on the impact of the mass media on public opinion and voting behavior. Limited to Ph.D. students. Prerequisite: 260 or consent of instructor.
Same as: COMM 360G

POLISCI 425S. Topics in Political Communication: Media Bias, Selective Exposure, and Political Polarization. 1-5 Unit.

This course surveys theories of media bias, biased processing of information, and the empirical challenges facing researchers attempting to link changes in the composition of audiences to attitudinal and behavioral outcomes. (Limited to PhD students).
Same as: COMM 362

POLISCI 426S. Theories of Racism in American Politics: A Critique. 0 Units.

.

POLISCI 427R. Race and Racism in American Politics. 5 Units.

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.

POLISCI 428. Political Economy and Political Behavior. 4 Units.

[Same as POLECON 677] This seminar will expose students to cutting-edge research in political behavior and political economy published in the leading political science (and other social science) journals. The aim is for students to learn the contemporary literature so that they can be producers of research. To that end, the required assignments in the class will be aimed at professional development: writing an original research note, writing a review, and delivering a scholarly presentation.

POLISCI 430A. Ancient Greek Economic Development. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSHIS 330A.) Drawing on Herodotus and other literary sources, ancient historians have traditionally seen classical Greece as a very poor land. Recent research, however (much of it conducted here at Stanford), suggests that Greece in fact saw substantial economic growth and rising standards of living across the first millennium BCE. This seminar tests the poor Hellas/wealthy Hellas models against literary and archaeological data. We will develop and test hypotheses to explain the rate and pace of economic change in the Greek world.
Same as: CLASSICS 384A

POLISCI 430B. Ancient Greek Economic Development. 1-5 Unit.

(Formerly CLASSHIS 330B.) Drawing on Herodotus and other literary sources, ancient historians have traditionally seen classical Greece as a very poor land. Recent research, however (much of it conducted here at Stanford), suggests that Greece in fact saw substantial economic growth and rising standards of living across the first millennium BCE. This seminar tests the poor Hellas/wealthy Hellas models against literary and archaeological data. We will develop and test hypotheses to explain the rate and pace of economic change in the Greek world.
Same as: CLASSICS 384B

POLISCI 431L. INEQUALITY: Economic and Philosophical Perspectives. 5 Units.

The nature of and problem of inequality is central to both economics and philosophy. Economists study the causes of inequality, design tools to measure it and track it over time, and examine its consequences. Philosophers are centrally concerned with the justification of inequality and the reasons why various types of inequality are or are not objectionable.nIn this class we bring both of these approaches together. Our class explores the different meanings of and measurements for understanding inequality, our best understandings of how much inequality there is, its causes, its consequences, and whether we ought to reduce it, and if so, how. nThis is an interdisciplinary graduate seminar. We propose some familiarity with basic ideas in economics and basic ideas in contemporary political philosophy; we will explain and learn about more complex ideas as we proceed. The class will be capped at 20 students.
Same as: ECON 380, ETHICSOC 371R, PHIL 371D

POLISCI 432R. Selections in Modern Political Thought. 3-5 Units.

This graduate-level seminar explores selections from the canon of Western political thought from the late fifteenth through nineteenth centuries. Throughout the course, we will engage in close textual readings of individual thinkers and consider some of the larger questions raised by political modernity. The Fall 2015 offering of the course will focus on the three modern social contract thinkers: Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.
Same as: MTL 334

POLISCI 433. Workshop in Political Theory. 1-2 Unit.

For graduate students. May be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 434. Egalitarianism. 5 Units.

This seminar will explore different theories of equality in contemporary political philosophy. Topics include: the currency of equality (equality of what?); equality versus sufficiency or prioritarianism; the relationship between equality and responsibility; the value of equality; and different interpretations of equality of opportunity. Readings will be drawn from the work of Elizabeth Anderson, G.A. Cohen, Ronald Dworkin, Thomas Nagel, Derek Parfit, John Rawls, Thomas Scanlon, Amartya Sen, and others.

POLISCI 434A. Ethics, Economics and the Market. 4 Units.

Economic analysis inevitably raises moral questions. Getting clear on those moral questions, and the competing answers to them, can help improve both economic analysis and our understanding of the values involved in alternative social policies. This course focuses on a central economic institution: the market. How have the benefits and costs of using markets been understood? For example, it is often claimed that markets are good for welfare, but how is welfare to be understood? What is the connection between markets and different values such as equality and autonomy? What, if anything is wrong with markets in everything? Are there moral considerations that allow us to, distinguish different markets? This course examines competing answers to these questions, drawing on historical and contemporary literature. Readings include Adam Smith, JS Mill, Karl Marx, Michael Walzer, Dan Hausman and Michael McPherson and Debra Satz among others. For graduate students only.
Same as: ETHICSOC 303R, PHIL 375

POLISCI 435R. Political Realism. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore various articulations of political realism in their historical contexts. Realism is generally taken to be a pragmatic approach to a political world marked by the competition for material interests and the struggle for power. Yet beyond a shared critique of idealism and an insistence on the priority and autonomy of the political, realists tend to have very different normative visions and political projects. We will consider the works of several political realists from the history of political and international relations thought, including: Thucydides, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Carr, Niebuhr, and Morgenthau.
Same as: PHIL 372R

POLISCI 436R. Amartya Sen's capability theory. 2-4 Units.

Amartya Sen's pioneering work attempts to open up economics to missing informational and evaluative dimensions. This seminar will explore Sen's "capability approach" and its implications for the study of economics, gender, and justice. It will look at different ways that the capability approach has been developed, in particular, by Martha Nussbaum, but also by other political philosophers.
Same as: PHIL 378

POLISCI 437. Autonomy. 5 Units.

.

POLISCI 438. Democracy and the Constitution. 5 Units.

(Same as LAW 268) Connections between democratic theory and constitutional theory. Sources include literature from political philosophy, constitutional law, and jurisprudence, and arguments about freedom of expression, campaign finance, legislative apportionment, federalism, and separation of powers. Readings from Scalia, Breyer, Ely, Ackerman, Dahl, Rawls, Habermas, Dworkin, Riker, and Schumpeter, as well as constitutional cases.
Same as: PHIL 374C

POLISCI 440A. Theories in Comparative Politics. 3-5 Units.

Required of Political Science Ph.D. students with comparative politics as first or second concentration; others by consent of instructor. Theories addressing major concerns in the comparative field including democracy, regime change, the state, revolutions, national heterogeneity, and economic performance.

POLISCI 440B. Comparative Political Economy. 3-5 Units.

Required of Political Science Ph.D. students with comparative politics as a first or second concentration; others by consent of the instructor. The origins of political and economic institutions and their impact on long run outcomes for growth and democracy. Emphasis is on the analysis of causal models, hypothesis testing, and the quality of evidence.

POLISCI 440C. Methods in Comparative Politics. 5 Units.

Required of Political Science Ph.D. candidates with comparative politics as a first or second concentration; others by consent of instructor. Current methodological standards in comparative politics. Students develop their own research design that meets these standards.

POLISCI 440D. Workshop in Comparative Politics. 1-2 Unit.

Faculty, guest speakers, and graduate students conducting research in comparative politics present work-in-progress. Graduate students may enroll for up to 5 total units apportioned by quarter. Auditors welcome. Course may be repeated for credit.

POLISCI 441L. Grad Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics. 5 Units.

Survey of major topics in the study of Middle Eastern politics including state formation, authoritarian resilience and political Islam.

POLISCI 443S. Political Economy of Reform in China. 3-5 Units.

Content, process, and problems of China¿s post-Mao reforms. Changes in property rights, markets, credit, and the role of the state in economic development. Comparative insights about reform in the Chinese communist system that distinguishes it from the experience of regimes in E. Europe and the former Soviet Union.

POLISCI 443T. Approaches to Chinese Politics. 3-5 Units.

Major secondary literature on Chinese politics, involving the evolution of theoretical concepts and social scientific approaches characterizing the field. Subjects include changes made to defining fundamental issues of Chinese political theory, and the implications of shifts in research methods and analytical tools. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of politics of post-1949 China.

POLISCI 444. Comparative Political Economy: Advanced Industrial Societies. 3-5 Units.

Political economy approaches to key policy outcomes including redistribution, the size of government, fiscal behavior, and pork-barrel politics. Theories related to institutions, interest groups, and geography, focusing on middle- and upper-income countries.

POLISCI 446. Models and Empirical Methods in Political Economy. 5 Units.

This course surveys the use and empirical evaluation of formal models in political economy to explain policy outcomes, the determinants of political regimes, the sources of institutional persistence, and the causes and consequences of electoral rules. The course has two main goals. The first is to become better consumers and producers of formal work through the study of leading applications in political economy. The second is to introduce innovative approaches to research design and measurement for evaluating formal theories in political economy.

POLISCI 448R. Workshop: China Social Science. 1 Unit.

For Ph.D. students in the social sciences and history. Research on contemporary society and politics in the People's Republic of China. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 368W

POLISCI 450A. Political Methodology I: Regression. 5 Units.

Introduction to statistical research in political science, with a focus on linear regression. Teaches students how to apply multiple regression models as used in much of political science research. Also covers elements of probability and sampling theory.

POLISCI 450B. Political Methodology II: Causal Inference. 5 Units.

Survey of statistical methods for causal inference in political science research. Covers a variety of causal inference designs, including experiments, matching, regression, panel methods, difference-in-differences, synthetic control methods, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity designs, quantile regression, and bounds. 350A is a prequisite for this class.

POLISCI 450C. Political Methodology III: Model-Based Inference. 3-5 Units.

Provides a survey of statistical tools for model-based inference in political science. Topics include generalized linear models for various data types and their extensions, such as discrete choice models, survival outcome models, mixed effects and multilevel models.

POLISCI 450D. Political Methodology IV: Advanced Topics. 3-5 Units.

Covers advanced statistical tools that are useful for empirical research in political science. Possible topics include missing data, survey sampling and experimental designs for field research, machine learning, text mining, clustering, Bayesian methods, spatial statistics, and web scraping.

POLISCI 451. Design and Analysis of Experiments. 3-5 Units.

Political scientists increasingly rely on experimental methods. This course covers the principles and logic of experimental design as applied to laboratory, field and survey experiments. We discuss the strengths and limitations of experiments in relation to observational methods. Design considerations include randomization, the construction of treatments, the use of deception, the ethical implications of deception, and new developments in subject recruitment. Turning to the analysis of experimental data, we describe the methods for estimating treatment effects, interactions, and more complex indirect effects stemming from either mediator or moderator variables. We also cover appropriate data analytic strategies for quasi-experimental designs including interrupted time series, matching and propensity scores.

POLISCI 452. Text as Data. 3-5 Units.

Topics covered will include preprocessing texts (unigrams, bigrams, and a brief introduction to natural language processing), unsupervised learning (clustering, topic models, and computer-assisted methods), supervised learning (includingnSVM, lasso, naive Bayes, and a matrix smoothing method), and methodsnfor evaluation (cross-validation, model based, expert based). Thenclass is ideal for students in the dissertation phase of research whonhave texts they would like to analyze, but aren't quite sure what tondo with them. Prerequisites are at least 350a and 350b and anwillingness to learn programming skills (including Python and R).

POLISCI 474. Design and Analysis of Surveys. 1-5 Unit.

.

POLISCI 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

.

POLISCI 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

.