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Office: Building 360, Room 362H
Mail Code: 94305-2190
Phone: (650) 725-2789
Web Site: http://jewishstudies.stanford.edu

The Taube Center for Jewish Studies investigates all aspects of Jewish culture, history, religion, literature, language and education from biblical times to the present. Courses are offered on the undergraduate and graduate levels in a program complemented by a full range of guest lectures, conferences, and symposia. The Center annually sponsors the Donald and Robin Kennedy Undergraduate Award for the best undergraduate essay on any theme in Jewish Studies, the Dr. Bernard Kaufman Undergraduate Research Award in Jewish Studies awarded to an undergraduate engaged in research on Jews in modernity, and the Koret Award for best essay written in Hebrew by an undergraduate. In alternate years, the Center sponsors the Nelee Langmuir Award for a student working in the field of Modern European History with a preference given to work on the Holocaust, and the Short Story Contest which awards the top three stories written on a Jewish theme.

Graduate students must apply and enroll in the program through the departments of English, History, Comparative Literature, Religious Studies, or the School of Education, and meet the requirements of those departments. All graduate students in the University with an academic interest in Jewish Studies are encouraged to participate in the Colloquium for Jews, Judaism and Jewish Culture, an ongoing opportunity to share work and meet with faculty and visiting scholars. For more information about graduate studies in Jewish Studies, contact the Center manager or Director.

Undergraduate Program in Jewish Studies

An undergraduate program in Jewish Studies is offered through Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE). It is interdisciplinary in that it that draws together a wide range of disciplines including history, literary studies, religious studies, gender studies, education, and other fields. Through its courses and extracurricular programs, the Taube Center seeks to introduce students to the ideas and experience of the Jewish people over its entire history, from the biblical period to the Holocaust and contemporary Israeli culture.

Undergraduates interested in completing a major or minor in Jewish Studies should visit the "Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE)" section of this bulletin for program descriptions and courses.

Interim Director: Ari Y. Kelman (Education)

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: Zachary Baker (Stanford University Libraries), Joel Beinin (History), Jonathan Berger (Music), Rowan Dorin (History), Amir Eshel (German Studies), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies), Avner Greif (Economics), Katherine Jolluck (History), Ari Y. Kelman (Education), Mark Mancall (History, emeritus), Ariel Mayse (Religious Studies), Norman Naimark (History), Reviel Netz (Classics), Jack Rakove (History), Aron Rodrigue (History), Noah Rosenberg (Biology), Janice Ross (Theater and Performance Studies), Nancy Ruttenberg (English), Gabriella Safran (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Anna Schultz (Music), Vered Karti Shemtov (Language Center, Comparative Literature), Lee Shulman (Education, emeritus), Peter Stansky (History, emeritus), Marie-Pierre Ulloa (French), Amir Weiner (History), Sam Wineburg (Education), Steven Zipperstein (History)

Yiddish & Hebrew Instructional Staff: Jon Levitow, Gallia Porat

Writer-in-residence: Maya Arad

Courses

JEWISHST 4N. A World History of Genocide. 3-5 Units.

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Same as: HISTORY 4N

JEWISHST 5. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Same as: CLASSICS 6G, RELIGST 171A

JEWISHST 5B. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGRK 6) This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. Pre-requisite: CLASSICS 6G (Formerly CLASSGRK 5) or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Same as: CLASSICS 7G

JEWISHST 5G. Intensive Biblical Greek. 8 Units.

Equivalent to two quarters of Biblical Greek (CLASSICS 6G, 7G). Students will learn the core of New Testament Greek with the goal of learning to accurately translate and read the New Testament. Students will read one-third of the Gospel of John during the course and will be well-prepared to read the Greek New Testament independently after the course. Focus on knowledge of key vocabulary and grammar needed to read the Greek Bible with ease. No previous knowledge of Greek required. Course does not fulfill the Stanford language requirement.
Same as: RELIGST 171X

JEWISHST 18N. Religion and Politics: Comparing Europe to the U.S.. 3-4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative. Historical, political, sociological, and religious studies approaches. The relationship between religion and politics as understood in the U.S. and Europe. How this relationship has become tense both because of the rise of Islam as a public religion in Europe and the rising influence of religious groups in public culture. Different understandings and definitions of the separation of church and state in Western democratic cultures, and differing notions of the public sphere. Case studies to investigate the nature of public conflicts, what issues lead to conflict, and why. Why has the head covering of Muslim women become politicized in Europe? What are the arguments surrounding the Cordoba House, known as the Ground Zero Mosque, and how does this conflict compare to controversies about recent constructions of mosques in Europe? Resources include media, documentaries, and scholarly literature.
Same as: RELIGST 18N

JEWISHST 19N. Everyone Eats: Food, Religion and Culture. 3 Units.

Food is one of the most essential aspects of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. In this seminar we will study how food habits have shaped religious traditions, and vice versa, how religious traditions have shaped food ways. Some traditions are centered around food regiments such as the dietary laws, derived from biblical law that shapes Jewish and Christian tradition very differently. Indeed, many religious and ethical thinkers, as well as anthropologists, have interpreted the meanings of the dietary laws very differently. Further, in many religious traditions the killing of animals and consumption of meat is deeply fraught. We will explore the history of food practices and their contemporary impact; the connections between food, religion, and identity; the meanings that religious thinkers and anthropologists have attributed to food habits; as well as the creative translations of religious traditions into contemporary food ethics by various social movements and groups, predominantly in the U.S.
Same as: CSRE 19N, RELIGST 19N

JEWISHST 22S. From 'superfluous women' to the 'Yolocaust': The Experience of War in 20th Century Europe. 5 Units.

Through a variety of primary sources, including diaries, photographs, letters, and artifacts this course explores the multiplicity of ways in which Europeans experienced the great conflicts that swept the continent in the 20th century. The unprecedented impact of these wars will be traced in stories of those whose voices have been marginalized in conventional historiography. This course encourages and guides students in their first forays into archival work in a hands-on approach to developing ways of thinking historically.
Same as: HISTORY 22S

JEWISHST 37Q. Zionism and the Novel. 3 Units.

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Same as: COMPLIT 37Q

JEWISHST 39S. The Other Side: Ethnography and Travel Writing through Jewish, Christian and Muslim Eyes. 3 Units.

In an age of reality television and social media, we are bombarded with snapshots of the exotic, monstrous, and bizarre. Yet despite their quantity, these images pale in comparison to the qualities of terror, wonder and curiosity that ancient travelers evoked in their encounters with foreign lands and peoples. Early ethnographers, too, painstakingly explored the beliefs and practices of unfamiliar peoples sometimes very close to home. This course surveys their most vivid writings, from ancient Greece to the colonization of the New World, focusing on the relation between fascination with the other and the author's own religious imagination. In particular, it introduces the contributions of Jewish travelers and ethnographers to this history, which has often been written from the standpoint of imperial, ecclesiastical or colonial power. It stresses literary continuities across three general periods (ancient, medieval, and colonial), showing how remarkably consistent patterns of identification spring from diverse encounters.

JEWISHST 53. Exploring Jewish Spirituality. 4 Units.

It was once accepted as fact that Judaism is a purely rational religion devoid of any authentic mystical tradition. But the past century of scholarship has reversed this claim, demonstrating that the spiritual life has been integral to Judaism's vital heart since ancient times. This yearning for a direct immediate experience of God's Presence, a longing to grasp the mysteries of the human soul and know the inner dynamics of the Divine realm, has taken on many different forms across the centuries. This course will introduce students to the major texts and core ideas of Jewish mysticism and spirituality, tracking their development from the Hebrew Bible to the present day. Close attention will be paid to the sources¿ historical context, and we will also engage with broader methodological questions regarding the academic study of religion and the comparative approach to mysticism.
Same as: RELIGST 53

JEWISHST 71. Jews and Christians: Conflict and Coexistence. 3 Units.

The relationship between Judaism and Christianity has had a long a controversial history. Christianity originated as a dissident Jewish sect but eventually evolved into an independent religion, with only tenuous ties to its Jewish past and present. Since the Holocaust, Jews and Christians have begun the serious work of forging more meaningful relationships with each other. This course explores the most significant moments that have shaped the relationship between Judaism and Christianity and examines some of the theological complexities imbedded in these traditions, while searching constructive ways of situating oneself amidst such complexities.
Same as: RELIGST 71

JEWISHST 80T. Jewish Music in the Lands of Islam. 4 Units.

An Interdisciplinary study of Music, Society, and Culture in communities of the Jewish Diaspora in Islamic countries. The course examines the diverse and rich musical traditions of the Jews in North Africa and the Middle East. Based on the "Maqamat" system, the Arabic musical modes, Jewish music flourished under Islamic rule, encompassing the fields of sacred music, popular songs, and art music. Using musicological, historical, and anthropological tools, the course compares and contrasts these traditions from their original roots through their adaptation, appropriation, and re-synthesis in contemporary art music and popular songs.
Same as: MUSIC 80T

JEWISHST 85B. Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Visibility and Vulnerability. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B

JEWISHST 85S. A History of Strangers: Jews in the Mediterranean. 5 Units.

A community needs outsiders. Sometimes it needs them to provide material things, but always it needs them to define itself. Focusing on Jews in the early-modern Mediterranean (1450-1750), this course asks questions about the nature of community, the causes and effects of exclusion, and processes of creating the "other." We will look at primary sources produced by "strangers" and so-called "host" societies. Sources include travelogues, maps, novels, poetry, paintings, contracts, Ottoman edicts, Italian charters, and rulings from religious courts.
Same as: HISTORY 85S

JEWISHST 86Q. Blood and Money: The Origins of Antisemitism. 4-5 Units.

For over two millennia, Jews and Judaism have been the object of sustained anxieties, fears, and fantasies, which have in turn underpinned repeated outbreaks of violence and persecution. This course will explore the development and impact of antisemitism from Late Antiquity to the Enlightenment, including the emergence of the Blood libel, the association between Jews and moneylending, and the place of Judaism in Christian and Islamic theology. No prior background in history or Jewish studies is necessary. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Same as: HISTORY 86Q

JEWISHST 101A. First-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 5 Units.

In the first-year program, students acquire essential Hebrew through abundant opportunities to interact in the language in meaningful ways. The students learn to function appropriately in the language in a variety of social and cultural contexts.
Same as: AMELANG 128A

JEWISHST 101B. First-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128A.
Same as: AMELANG 128B

JEWISHST 101C. First-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128B. Fulfill the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 128C

JEWISHST 102A. Second-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128C.
Same as: AMELANG 129A

JEWISHST 102B. Second-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129A.
Same as: AMELANG 129B

JEWISHST 102C. Second-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129B.
Same as: AMELANG 129C

JEWISHST 103A. Third-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 3 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129C.
Same as: AMELANG 130A

JEWISHST 104. Hebrew Forum. 2 Units.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMELANG 131A

JEWISHST 104A. First-Year Yiddish, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Same as: AMELANG 140A

JEWISHST 104B. First-Year Yiddish, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140A. Prerequisite: AMELANG.
Same as: AMELANG 140B

JEWISHST 104C. First-Year Yiddish, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140B. Prerequisite: AMELANG 140B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 140C

JEWISHST 105. Hebrew Forum. 2-4 Units.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May repeat for credit.
Same as: AMELANG 131B

JEWISHST 106. Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature. 3-5 Units.

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Same as: AMELANG 126, COMPLIT 145

JEWISHST 107A. Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter. 2 Units.

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. Students that are enrolled in this course must also enroll in Beginning Hebrew. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the year, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Same as: AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A

JEWISHST 107B. Biblical Hebrew, Second Quarter. 2 Units.

Continuation of 170A.
Same as: AMELANG 170B

JEWISHST 107C. Biblical Hebrew, Third Quarter. 2 Units.

Continuation of 170B.
Same as: AMELANG 170C

JEWISHST 120. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. 3 Units.

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Same as: FEMGEN 130, RELIGST 130

JEWISHST 125. Modern Jewish Mystics: Devotion in a Secular Age. 4 Units.

The twentieth-century was a time of tremendous upheaval and unspeakable tragedy for the Jewish communities of Europe. But the past hundred years were also a period of great renewal for Jewish spirituality, a renaissance that has continued into the present day. We will explore the mystic writings of figures from the Safed Renaissance, the Hasidic masters, with a particular focus on the works of Martin Buber, Hillel Zeitlin, Abraham Isaac Kook, Abraham Joshua Heschel, and Arthur Green. We will examine their teachings in light of the challenges of the two World Wars, the Holocaust, and the processes of modernity and secularism. Consideration will be made of the unique cultural contexts of modern Israel and contemporary America.
Same as: RELIGST 165

JEWISHST 127D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 127E. Readings in Talmudic Literature Advanced. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Knowledge of Hebrew is required. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Meeting time and location TBA. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 227E, RELIGST 170E

JEWISHST 129. Sacred Words: Jewish Thought and the Question of Language. 4 Units.

Jews have long been referred as the people of the book, but they might better be referred to as the people of the word. Drawing upon texts from the Hebrew Bible to the works of modern Hebrew writers like of Hayyim Nahman Bialik and Amoz Oz, this seminar will chart the development of Jewish thinking on language over the past two millennia. We will explore issues such as: the idea of canonization; oral versus written language; the nature and possibility of translation; the origins of language; notions of negative theology; mystical approaches to the word; the rebirth of Hebrew as a spoken and cultural language; and the limits of language after the Holocaust. This course will also bring Jewish thought into dialogue with contemporary philosophical reflections on issues of language. Modern explorations of language will prove an interesting way of deepening our understanding of the Jewish thinkers on one hand, and enriching contemporary intellectual discourse on the other.
Same as: RELIGST 169

JEWISHST 132. Between Nation-Building and Liberalization: The Welfare State in Israel. 3 Units.

According to one commentator, the political economy of Israel is characterized by embedded illiberalism. In the context of a national and territorial conflict, the Israeli state fostered comprehensive nation-building projects (such as immigration absorption), via employment and social protection schemes. This course surveys the distinctive development of the Israeli welfare state in comparative perspective, and analyzes its particular politics and outcomes in the form of inclusion but also exclusion of different populations from full citizenship. The course will follow a chronological path from the pre-state crystallization of national welfare institutions to the current neo-liberalization trend that seems to undermine collectivist projects and advance the re-commodification of citizenship. Throughout the course we will discuss issues such as: the role of labor and nationalism in the design of social policy, the production of national, ethnic and gender inequality, and the dynamics of change and continuity following heightened liberalization and internationalization since the 1980s. The course exposes students to key issues of the sociology of the welfare state with particular emphasis on the development and role of the state in a deeply conflicted society, using the Israeli experience. At the conclusion of the course students are expected to understand how welfare state institutions reflect but also reproduce societal schisms and conflicts, and be familiar with central aspects of Israeli politics past and present.
Same as: SOC 102

JEWISHST 132A. Social Inequality in Israel. 3 Units.

Like the US, Israel is a nation of immigrants. Israel additionally shares with the US vast economic, ethnic/racial and gender gaps, which are shaped and are being shaped by the demographic diversity characterizing its society. The course will provide a comparative framework for analyzing social inequality in Israel. We will start by reviewing essential concepts and theories in the study of social stratification. We will then review the main cleavages characterizing Israeli society, while comparing them to gaps in other advances societies and particularly the US. We will focus on class, gender and ethnicity as the main distinctions and will examine their implications for differences in life chances in several domains across the life course. We will conclude with a discussion of possible scenarios for change, which are relevant to both Israel and the US. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the analysis of social inequality in Israel and elsewhere.
Same as: CSRE 132A, SOC 102A

JEWISHST 132D. Sociology of Jewishness. 3-5 Units.

Examines the place of the Jewish people in society throughout various locales and historical periods to understand how interactions among Jews and with other groups have shaped Jewish identities. Topics include modernism, the Holocaust, Israel/nationhood, race/ethnicity, intermarriage, and assimilation. Uses theoretical, empirical, and historical material from multiple social scientific fields of study and explores the study of Judaism from several major sociological lenses.
Same as: CSRE 132J, SOC 132J

JEWISHST 133. Sociology of Citizenship. 3 Units.

Not only a legal status, citizenship forms a major concern for political sociologists interested in questions of membership, exclusion, redistribution, and struggles over the boundaries of collective identity. Citizenship is in essence membership in a political community that entails rights and duties, and structures a tripartite relationship between the individual, community and state. The institutions of citizenship include formal and bureaucratic rules of eligibility ¿ but also informal institutions such as identity and belonging. Throughout the course, students are exposed to key issues of the sociology of citizenship such as the historically different paths of men, women, minority groups and immigrants into citizenship, the contested development of rights and duties, the regulation of population, as well as insurgency and collective attempts to rearticulate the terms of the ¿contract¿ with the state. Israel, the USA, France and Germany are used as empirical illustrations. At the conclusion of the course students will know how to utilize the analytic framework of citizenship in order to analyze a wide range of political phenomena in contemporary societies.
Same as: SOC 103

JEWISHST 133A. Social Policy in Israel. 3 Units.

Early theorists of the welfare state described it as a reaction to the emergence of needs and interests of specific social groups during processes of economic development and change. Later theorists countered that the welfare state does not merely react to social cleavages during times of economic change but rather works to actively shape them, in line with worldviews or the interests of dominant group members. Adopting the latter approach, the goal of this course is to provide the tools and knowledge necessary for a critical evaluation of the social services provided to Israeli citizens and their impact on social and economic inequalities. The course will survey various approaches to the understanding of the goals of the welfare state. A comparative and historical account of the development of the welfare state will be presented, while highlighting recent developments, such as the increase in poverty rates and the aging of the population. During the course, we will examine the diverse needs that are served by the welfare state, as well as major dilemmas associated with the provision of services. Throughout the course, we will study critical thinking techniques and will use them for analyzing issues that are central for the development of social policies in Israel and the US.
Same as: CSRE 133J, SOC 103A

JEWISHST 139. Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism. 4 Units.

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Same as: FEMGEN 139

JEWISHST 143. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts, as well as excerpts of Francophone theater. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Required readings include: Aimé Césaire, "Cahier d'un retour au pays natal," Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Kaouther Adimi, "L'envers des autres", Maryse Condé, "La Vie sans fards". Movies include "Goodbye Morocco", "Aya de Yopougon", "Rome plutôt sue Vous". Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, FRENCH 133

JEWISHST 144B. Poetic Thinking Across Media. 4 Units.

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.

JEWISHST 145. Masterpieces: Kafka. 3-5 Units.

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.
Same as: COMPLIT 114, GERMAN 150

JEWISHST 147A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: JEWISHST 347A

JEWISHST 147B. The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story. 3-5 Units.

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Same as: COMPLIT 127B

JEWISHST 148. Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature. 1-5 Unit.

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Same as: JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 198, SLAVIC 398

JEWISHST 155D. Jewish American Literature. 5 Units.

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of ¿Jewishness¿ itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of ¿Jewishness¿ differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We¿ll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents¿ nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Same as: AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, REES 145D

JEWISHST 183. The Holocaust. 4-5 Units.

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Same as: HISTORY 137, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 383

JEWISHST 185B. Jews in the Contemporary World: Faith and Ethnicity, Vulnerability and Visibility. 4-5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?.
Same as: CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, REES 185B

JEWISHST 199B. Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.

JEWISHST 205. Reading Hebrew, First Quarter. 2-4 Units.

Introduction to Hebrew literature through short stories and poetry by notable Israeli writers. In Hebrew. Prerequisite: one year of Hebrew or equivalent.
Same as: AMELANG 250A

JEWISHST 221D. Readings in Syriac Literature. 2-5 Units.

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the works of Syriac speaking Christians in antiquity and beyond. This course offers an introduction to the Syriac language, including its script, vocabulary and grammar, and a chance to read from a selection of foundational Syriac Christian texts.
Same as: JEWISHST 321D, RELIGST 221D, RELIGST 321D

JEWISHST 224. Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics, Philosophy and Religion. 4 Units.

Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) is a major French philosopher of the second half of the twentieth century and is among the half-dozen most important Jewish thinkers of the century. Born in Lithuania, Levinas lived most of his life in France; he was primarily a philosopher but also a deeply committed Jewish educator who often lectured and wrote about Judaism and Jewish matters. Levinas was influenced by Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, and others, like Buber and Rosenzweig. We will look at the philosophical world in which he was educated and explore his unique development as a philosopher in the years after World War Two. Levinas reacted against the main tendencies of Western philosophy and religious thought and as a result shaped novel, powerful, and challenging ways of understanding philosophy, religion, ethics, and politics. n In this course, we will examine works from every stage of Levinas's career, from his early study of Husserl and Heidegger to the emergence of his new understanding of the human condition and the primacy of ethics, the face-to-face encounter with the human other, the role of language and the relationship between ethics and religion, and finally his understanding of Judaism and its relationship to Western philosophy. We will be interested in his philosophical method, the relevance of his thinking for ethics and religion, the role of language in his philosophy and the problem of the limits of expressibility, and the implications of his work for politics. We shall also consider his conception of Judaism, its primary goals and character, and its relation to Western culture and philosophy.
Same as: JEWISHST 324, RELIGST 234, RELIGST 334

JEWISHST 227D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 127D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 227E. Readings in Talmudic Literature Advanced. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Knowledge of Hebrew is required. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Meeting time and location TBA. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 127E, RELIGST 170E

JEWISHST 237. Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy?. 4-5 Units.

The meddling of religion in politics has become a major global issue. Can religion co-exist with politics in a democracy? In Israel this is an acute issue exhibiting an existential question: To what extent religion is a source of the weaknesses and vulnerabilities of Israeli Democracy? The course offered is a research workshop, part of a policy-oriented applied research in motion. The workshop will meet a few times during the Fall Quarter and the instructor will be available to consult with the workshop's participants on a bi-weekly basis. The workshop will include unique opportunities for hands-on, team-based research.
Same as: IPS 237

JEWISHST 240. The Yiddish Story. 3-5 Units.

The Yiddish language is associated with jokes, folktales, and miracle legends, as well as modern stories. This class traces the development of Yiddish literature through these short oral and written forms, following Jewish writers out of the East European market town to cities in the Soviet Union, Israel, and especially the United States. We conclude with stories written in other languages about Yiddish writers. Readings include Sholem Aleichem, I. L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Esther Singer-Kreitman, Cynthia Ozick, and Dina Rubina. Readings in English; optional discussion section for students who read Yiddish.
Same as: AMSTUD 240Y

JEWISHST 271C. Campaigns and Elections in Israel. 5 Units.

Employing a theoretical and comparative framework, this seminar focuses on campaigns and elections in Israel. The seminar is divided into two interrelated sections. In the first section, we will cover voting behavior. Here we will look at Israel¿s election laws, its political culture, socialization and cleavages, turnout, political sophistication, ideology, partisanship and issue voting. In the second half of the semester we will examine elections from the perspective of candidates and campaign strategists. The topics we will focus on include election laws, public and private campaign finance, campaign strategy, media, polling, and advertising. In examining these topics, we will cover a variety of elections campaigns since Israel¿s birth, with an emphasis on the most recent ones.
Same as: POLISCI 241C

JEWISHST 275D. Special Topics: Dilemmas of Democracy and Security in Israel and the Middle East. 5 Units.

The Middle East is known to be a volatile region, characterized by political violence, armed conflicts, and social instabilities. This volatility is of relevance for many countries including the US with its invested interests in the region and Israel that exists at the heart of the region, and along with its conflict with the Palestinians is considered to be one of the root causes of this volatility. Moreover, the volatility brings into encounter two kinds of collective goods: democracy and security. Their encounter in a conflictual and unstable environment raises a host of questions and dilemmas, both moral and practical: should we balance democracy and security and if so how? Can the two be accommodated at all? Does democracy is better or worse in addressing security problems? Does democracy and security constitute each other conceptually? Do democratic states tend to cooperate with each other when confronting security issues? And what about democratization: how good a ca use is it as a foreign policy? How good a cause is it in justifying war and/or not ending one? From its establishment the State of Israel found itself torn by these and others related questions and the recent decades saw the US drawn by these dilemmas as well (think of the Bybee Memo and the Patriot acts). In the course we will introduce these dilemmas, analyze them and examine different normative and policy answers that were discussed in academia and in the policy world.
Same as: POLISCI 215D

JEWISHST 282. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 382

JEWISHST 282K. The Holocaust and Its Aftermath. 4-5 Units.

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Same as: HISTORY 202K, HISTORY 302K, JEWISHST 382K

JEWISHST 284C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 286. Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times. 4-5 Units.

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Same as: HISTORY 286, HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 386

JEWISHST 287S. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 481

JEWISHST 288D. Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990. 4-5 Units.

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Same as: HISTORY 238D, HISTORY 338D, JEWISHST 388D

JEWISHST 289A. Nationhood and Belonging: Poles and Jews. 3 Units.

Examines changing conceptions of nationhood in Poland, late-19th century to present, with focus on place of Jews in Polish society. What conditions fostered the early political sense of the nation? Why was it replaced with integral nationalism, and for some, fascism? How did Jews relate to their homeland? Emphasis on post-1918 history: impact of independence, Great Depression, West European fascism, World War II, imposition of communist rule, and collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Considers current Polish-Jewish relations.
Same as: HISTORY 229A, HISTORY 329A, JEWISHST 389A

JEWISHST 291X. Learning Religion: How People Acquire Religious Commitments. 4 Units.

This course will examine how people learn religion outside of school, and in conversation with popular cultural texts and practices. Taking a broad social-constructivist approach to the variety of ways people learn, this course will explore how people assemble ideas about faith, identity, community, and practice, and how those ideas inform individual, communal and global notions of religion. Much of this work takes place in formal educational environments including missionary and parochial schools, Muslim madrasas or Jewish yeshivot. However, even more takes place outside of school, as people develop skills and strategies in conversation with broader social trends. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to questions that lie at the intersection of religion, popular culture, and education. May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMSTUD 231X, EDUC 231, RELIGST 231X

JEWISHST 297X. American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America. 2-4 Units.

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Same as: AMSTUD 279X, EDUC 279, HISTORY 288D, RELIGST 279X

JEWISHST 299A. Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter.

JEWISHST 321D. Readings in Syriac Literature. 2-5 Units.

In recent years, there has been growing interest in the works of Syriac speaking Christians in antiquity and beyond. This course offers an introduction to the Syriac language, including its script, vocabulary and grammar, and a chance to read from a selection of foundational Syriac Christian texts.
Same as: JEWISHST 221D, RELIGST 221D, RELIGST 321D

JEWISHST 324. Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics, Philosophy and Religion. 4 Units.

Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) is a major French philosopher of the second half of the twentieth century and is among the half-dozen most important Jewish thinkers of the century. Born in Lithuania, Levinas lived most of his life in France; he was primarily a philosopher but also a deeply committed Jewish educator who often lectured and wrote about Judaism and Jewish matters. Levinas was influenced by Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, and others, like Buber and Rosenzweig. We will look at the philosophical world in which he was educated and explore his unique development as a philosopher in the years after World War Two. Levinas reacted against the main tendencies of Western philosophy and religious thought and as a result shaped novel, powerful, and challenging ways of understanding philosophy, religion, ethics, and politics. n In this course, we will examine works from every stage of Levinas's career, from his early study of Husserl and Heidegger to the emergence of his new understanding of the human condition and the primacy of ethics, the face-to-face encounter with the human other, the role of language and the relationship between ethics and religion, and finally his understanding of Judaism and its relationship to Western philosophy. We will be interested in his philosophical method, the relevance of his thinking for ethics and religion, the role of language in his philosophy and the problem of the limits of expressibility, and the implications of his work for politics. We shall also consider his conception of Judaism, its primary goals and character, and its relation to Western culture and philosophy.
Same as: JEWISHST 224, RELIGST 234, RELIGST 334

JEWISHST 347A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: JEWISHST 147A

JEWISHST 348. Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature. 1-5 Unit.

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Same as: JEWISHST 148, SLAVIC 198, SLAVIC 398

JEWISHST 382. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282

JEWISHST 382K. The Holocaust and Its Aftermath. 4-5 Units.

This seminar gives an overview over different aspects of the history of the Holocaust and its aftermath and will examine key issues in recent Holocaust historiography and questions of memory and representation. Special emphasis is put on the nature of the historian's task, as viewed through the lens of historians of the Holocaust, as well as to the significance of the Holocaust in history and how it has changed over time. The course will confront students with historiographical texts and historical documents, with photography and film, works of scholarship and art.
Same as: HISTORY 202K, HISTORY 302K, JEWISHST 282K

JEWISHST 383. The Holocaust. 4-5 Units.

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Same as: HISTORY 137, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 183

JEWISHST 384C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 385A. Core Colloquium in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 385A

JEWISHST 385B. Graduate Colloquium in Modern Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

Instructor consent required.
Same as: HISTORY 385B

JEWISHST 386. Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times. 4-5 Units.

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Same as: HISTORY 286, HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 286

JEWISHST 388D. Germany and the World Wars, 1870-1990. 4-5 Units.

(Students who have taken History 38A/138A should not enroll in this course.) This course examines Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. During this time, Germany ushered in five regimes and two world wars, seesawing between material ruin and economic prosperity on the frontline of Europe's military and ideological rifts. Beginning with Bismarck's wars of unification, the class spans World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Same as: HISTORY 238D, HISTORY 338D, JEWISHST 288D

JEWISHST 389A. Nationhood and Belonging: Poles and Jews. 3 Units.

Examines changing conceptions of nationhood in Poland, late-19th century to present, with focus on place of Jews in Polish society. What conditions fostered the early political sense of the nation? Why was it replaced with integral nationalism, and for some, fascism? How did Jews relate to their homeland? Emphasis on post-1918 history: impact of independence, Great Depression, West European fascism, World War II, imposition of communist rule, and collapse of the Soviet Bloc. Considers current Polish-Jewish relations.
Same as: HISTORY 229A, HISTORY 329A, JEWISHST 289A

JEWISHST 393X. The Education of American Jews. 4 Units.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the question of how American Jews negotiate the desire to retain a unique ethnic sensibility without excluding themselves from American culture more broadly. Students will examine the various ways in which people debate, deliberate, and determine what it means to be an "American Jew". This includes an investigation of how American Jewish relationships to formal and informal educational encounters through school, popular culture, religious ritual, and politics.
Same as: EDUC 313, RELIGST 313X

JEWISHST 481. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 287S

JEWISHST 486A. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 486A

JEWISHST 486B. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 486A.
Same as: HISTORY 486B