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Office: Encina Hall C100
Mail Code: 94305-6055
Phone: (650) 725-9075
Email: ips-information@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://ips.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies are listed under the subject code IPS on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies (IPS), established in 1982, is an interdisciplinary program devoted to rigorous analysis of international policy issues in diplomacy, governance, security, global health, and international economic policy. Its goal is to provide students with exposure to issues they will face in the international arena, and to develop the skills and knowledge to address those issues. The program allows students to specialize in democracy, development, and the rule of law; energy, environment, and natural resources; global health; international political economy; or international security and cooperation.

The IPS program combines a rigorous scholarly focus with practical training designed to prepare students for careers in public service and other settings where they can have an impact on international issues.  The program is designed to integrate perspectives from political science, law, economics, history, and other disciplines, while also incorporating research opportunities and a focus on implementation and administration of solutions addressing global problems. 

University requirements for the M.A. degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the master's program is to help students develop knowledge and skills in preparation for professional careers in international policy and related fields. This is achieved through completion of required courses in the global, quantitative, and skills core, as well as courses in an area of concentration and the capstone practicum course. Students are also encouraged to gain experience through a summer internship and research skills through assistantships with Stanford faculty.

Admission

To apply or for information on graduate admission, see the Office of Graduate Admissions website. Applications for admission in Autumn Quarter must be filed with supporting credentials by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, January 9, 2018. 

Language Requirement

In order to earn the M.A. degree in International Policy Studies, students must be proficient in a foreign language.  Foreign language proficiency can be demonstrated by:

  • Completion of three years of university-level coursework in a foreign language (verified by a transcript)
  • Passing an oral and written proficiency exam at Stanford prior to graduation
  • Status as a non-native English speaker

Prerequisite Course Work

The IPS program requires the completion of five prerequisites courses prior to matriculation. These are microeconomics, macroeconomics, statistics, international trade and international finance. International trade and international finance are often covered in a single international economics course.  While not a required prerequisite course, an understanding of calculus is important for the statistics sequence in the Quantitative Core.

Prerequisite courses may be taken at four-year institutions, community colleges, or through online courses, and must be taken for a letter grade.  Proof of completion, which is usually verified by a transcript, is required. Stanford courses satisfying these requirements are:

Microeconomics and Macoroeconomics
Economic Analysis II
Economic Analysis III
International Finance and International Trade
International Finance
International Trade
Statistics (prerequisite coursework should cover, at minimum, most of the content in STATS 200)
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Introduction to Statistical Inference

Application Materials

In addition to the web-based application, applicants must submit the following materials:

  • Statement of purpose on relevant personal, academic, and career plans and goals
  • Official transcripts (two hard copies, which are mailed to the IPS program office, and one scanned copy electronically uploaded to the online application)
    • Stanford students, and alumni with an active SUNet ID and password, may request an official eTranscript to be sent from Stanford University and automatically deposited into the application; in this case, hard copies are not required.
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores
  • Academic writing sample (written in English, 7-15 pages in length, and double-spaced)
  • Resume or curriculum vitae
  • TOEFL scores (only required of applicants who are non-native English speakers and who did not attend undergraduate institutions where English is the language of instruction; please see Graduate Admissions for additional information)

Applicants are expected to have a B.A. or B.S. degree from an accredited school.

Applicants should plan to review the admissions section of the IPS website as well as the Frequently Asked Questions.

Master of Arts in International Policy Studies (IPS)

University requirements for the master's degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Degree Requirements

To earn the M.A. degree in International Policy Studies, students matriculating in Autumn Quarter 2017 must complete the courses listed in the curriculum below. These requirements include:

  • Two courses in the global core (4 unit)
  • Four courses in the quantitative core (19-20 units)
  • Four courses in the skills core (16-20 units)
  • Six or more courses in the area of concentration (26 units)
  • The capstone (8 units)

The minimum number of units required to graduate is 73.  

During the first year of the program, students must complete required course work in statistics, econometrics, international economics, advanced economics, international relations theory, policy writing, and an introductory (gateway) course in the area of concentration. During the second year of the program, students are required to complete either the practicum or master's thesis during Autumn and Winter quarters. Only students with two or more years of relevant policy work may petition to write a master's thesis.  

Students who matriculated in Autumn Quarter of a previous year should review their degree requirements by visiting the University's Archived Bulletins.

Curriculum

Units
(*) signifies degree requirement must be completed during first year
Global Core
Director's Seminar (*):1
IPS Student-Faculty Colloquium
International Relations Theory (*)3
Managing Global Complexity
Quantitative Core
Statistics Course (*):5
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists
Econometrics Course - Select one of the following (*):5
Applied Econometrics
International Economics Course - Select one of the following (*):5
Topics in International Macroeconomics
Issues in International Economics
Advanced Economics Course - Select one of the following:4-5
Topics in International Macroeconomics
Issues in International Economics
Microeconomics for Policy
Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers
Skills Core
Policy Writing - Select one of the following (*):5
The Politics of International Humanitarian Action
The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies
International Mediation and Civil Wars
U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia
Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia
Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy
Justice - Select one of the following: 4-5
International Justice
Introduction to Global Justice
Justice
Decision Making - Select one of the following:4-5
Decision Modeling and Information
Behavioral Decision Making
Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications
Problem Solving and Decision Making for Public Policy and Social Change
Introduction to Decision Analysis
Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis
Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science
Skills Elective - Select one of the pre-approved electives below. Alternatively, this requirement may be fulfilled by completing: A) an additional elective course in one's area of concentration; B) an additional policy writing course; C) an additional quantitative course; or D) a pre-approved course in one of the four other areas of concentration (see "Related Courses" tab for listing)3-5
Negotiation
Programming Methodology
Public Speaking
FINANCE 221
Strategic Communication
Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers
Design Thinking Studio
Organizational Psychology of Design Thinking
Area of Concentration: Gateway and elective courses:26
Capstone
Select one to be completed during Autumn and Winter quarters of the second year:8
Practicum
IPS Master's Thesis
(*) indicates degree requirement that must be completed during first year
Total Units73-78

Area of Concentration Curriculum

Students are required to choose one area of concentration from the list below and complete at least six courses within the concentration for a minimum of 26 total units. Each area of concentration has a gateway course, which must be taken during the first year and prior to enrolling in subsequent courses. Additionally, each area of concentration has a list of approved elective courses, which can be found under the Related Courses tab of this page. Courses not listed under the Related Courses tab have not been approved and need to be petitioned. Petitions are reviewed by the IPS Faculty Director. The petition form can be found on the IPS web site.

Area of Concentration Requirements:
  1. Students must select an area of concentration during the first year of the program.  
  2. Students must complete a minimum of six courses within the area of concentration, including the gateway course, for a minimum total of 26 units.  
    1. The gateway course counts towards the six total courses within the area of concentration.
    2. Each of the six courses must be taken for a minimum of three units.
    3. Additional one or two-unit courses may be applied to the concentration in order to reach the minimum of 26 units
    4. 1 unit courses must be petitioned since they are generally only offered as S/NC.  If a 2 unit course is only offered for Satisfactory/No Credit (S/NC) it must also be petitioned.  
  3. All course work must be taken for a letter grade.  
  4. Students concentrating in International Political Economy are required to take IPS 202 Topics in International Macroeconomics for the international economics requirement and IPS 203 Issues in International Economics for the area of concentration gateway. In addition, they must complete IPS 204A Microeconomics for Policy or IPS 204B Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers to fulfill the advanced economics requirement.
  5. Students from any other area of concentration may fulfill the advanced economics requirement by taking IPS 204A Microeconomics for Policy, IPS 204B Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers, or the second course in the international economics category listed within the Quantitative Core. 
Area of Concentration Gateway Courses
Units
Democracy, Development, and Rule of Law Gateway Course: 5
Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law
Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources Gateway Course: 3-4
Understanding Energy
Global Health Gateway Course: 4
Global Public Health
International Political Economy Gateway Course: 5
IPS 202 will be applied towards the international economics requirement and IPS 203 will be applied towards the area of concentration gateway course
Topics in International Macroeconomics
Issues in International Economics
International Security and Cooperation Gateway Course: 5
Students with an advanced background may petition to be exempted from the gateway course and instead take six elective courses in the concentration. Consultation with the student services officer and approval from the faculty director are required for this option.
International Security in a Changing World

IPS-Specific Academic Policies

The University's general requirements, applicable to all graduate degrees at Stanford, are listed in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. In addition, the IPS-specific degree requirement academic policies are listed below.  

Course Petitions

Students may petition for units from a course that is not currently listed in the Related Courses tab to fulfill area of concentration requirements. A course petition may also be used to apply for an exemption from a core course that covers course work previously completed at the graduate level. The course petition must be submitted electronically to IPS no later than Friday of the first week of the academic quarter in which the course is offered. The IPS faculty director reviews the petition and renders a decision within one week of the petition submission. Notification is sent via email by the IPS staff.

Directed Readings

Students may arrange directed reading courses if the current course offerings do not meet particular research or study needs. Directed reading courses are independent study projects students may undertake with Stanford faculty members. Once the student has identified a faculty member to support his or her studies, the student must submit the directed reading proposal to the IPS office for review by the IPS faculty director. Directed reading petitions must be submitted no later than the end of the second week of the quarter. The IPS faculty director reviews the directed reading proposal and renders a decision no later than two days prior to the Final Study List Deadline. If approved, the IPS staff creates a section number for the specific instructor so the student can enroll in the course. The course is listed as IPS 299 Directed Reading and the section number corresponds to the instructor. There are two restrictions for directed readings:

  1. Students can receive credit for a maximum of 5 units per directed reading course.
  2. Students must receive a letter grade for the directed reading course.

Academic Standing and Grade Requirement

IPS graduate students must maintain a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA to remain in good academic standing. In addition, a minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA is required for conferral of the M.A. degree.

All courses taken to fulfill requirements for the M.A. degree in International Policy Studies must be taken for a letter grade. The only exceptions are: IPS 300 IPS Student-Faculty Colloquium, which is only offered as S/NC; courses taken in the Law School, the School of Medicine, or the Graduate School of Business where a letter grade may not be offered; or 1 or 2 unit elective courses, which are only offered as S/NC that have been approved via petition in the area of concentration. Pre-approval is required from the IPS student services officer in order to apply a non-letter grade course in Law, Medicine, or the Graduate School of Business toward the IPS degree. 

Language Requirement

Proficiency in a foreign language is required and may be demonstrated by completion of three years of university-level course work in a foreign language or by passing an oral and written proficiency examination prior to graduation. International students who speak English as a second language already meet this requirement.

Additional Academic Requirements

  1. Students are not required to repeat a course that covers material they have already mastered. In such cases, students may petition to substitute a different course for a required course in one of the core areas (global, quantitative, skills). This flexibility does not reduce the unit requirements for the M.A. degree.
  2. All graduate degree candidates must submit a Master's Degree Program Proposal (i.e., IPS Program Proposal) to the International Policy Studies office no later than the seventh week of Spring Quarter.  Submission of the IPS Program Proposal requires scheduling a 30-minute advising session with the IPS student services adviser to review degree progress and outline course work that needs to be completed during the second year of the program in order to graduate.  The University requires each student to have a program proposal on file with the academic program in order for the student to apply to graduate.  Failure to complete this process results in a hold being placed on the student’s account. 
  3. During the first year of the program, first-year graduate students in IPS are required to electronically submit their course enrollment to the IPS student services officer no later than the second Friday of each academic quarter. 
  4. A maximum of 10 undergraduate units can be applied towards the IPS degree (ECON 102A Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social ScientistsECON 102B Applied Econometrics, and MS&E 152 Introduction to Decision Analysis do not count towards the 10-unit maximum allowance). Courses listed at the 100-level or below are considered to be at the undergraduate level.  The exceptions are History and Political Science, which list undergraduate courses at the 200-level and below. 
  5. Units from language courses do not count towards the IPS degree requirements except in cases in which they are used to substitute for units that were made available through an exemption from a core course. English proficiency courses for international students do not count towards the IPS degree requirements. 
  6. Only students with two or more years of relevant policy work may petition to write a master's thesis (IPS 209A IPS Master's Thesis)

Coterminal Master's Program

Undergraduates at Stanford may apply for admission to the coterminal master's program in IPS when they have earned a minimum of 120 units toward graduation, including Advanced Placement and transfer credit, and no later than the quarter prior to the expected completion of their undergraduate degree. The coterminal application requires the following supporting materials:

  • Two letters of recommendation from University faculty
  • Academic writing sample of at least eight double-spaced pages
  • Statement of purpose focusing on relevant personal, academic, and career plans and goals
  • Resume

Students must submit the Coterminal Online Application. Applications must be filed together with supporting materials by 11:59 pm on Tuesday, January 9, 2018.

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal master’s forms, see the Registrar’s Publications page.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken three quarters prior to the first graduate quarter, or later, are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Exchange Program

Stanford–Vienna Academic Exchange

The Stanford–Vienna Academic Exchange is an Autumn Quarter exchange program between the Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies and the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna. Two second-year students from each institution are selected by application to receive fellowships to spend Autumn Quarter in an academic exchange at the other institution where they take courses as full-time students, pursue extracurricular activities, and participate in the academic life of the host institution.

IPS students participating in the Stanford-Vienna Academic Exchange must complete all requirements listed in the M.A. curriculum. However, the minimum number of Stanford units required to graduate will be 58. In addition to the minimum requirement of 58 units, students must complete at minimum the equivalent of three full-time courses at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna (DA), of which one course must be IPS 209 Practicum.

The IPS Practicum is offered as an independent study course in Vienna, and students receive a Satisfactory/No Credit (S/NC) grade for their participation in the course during Autumn Quarter. Upon return to Stanford for Winter Quarter, students must register for a total of 4 units of IPS 209 Practicum .

While on exchange at the DA, an IPS student's status is listed as active, but they are not considered enrolled at Stanford. In addition, IPS students receive an academic transcript from the DA for Autumn Quarter. Hence, there is no reference to the exchange on an IPS student's Stanford transcript.

For further information, please see the Stanford-Vienna Academic Exchange section of the IPS web site.

Joint Degree Programs

Up to a maximum of 45 units, or one year, of the University residency requirement can be credited toward both graduate degree programs (i.e., the joint degree may require up to 45 fewer units than the sum of the individual degree unit requirements). For example, an M.A./M.P.P. has a three-year residency requirement, one year less than what is required for the separate degrees. The reduced requirement recognizes the subject matter overlap between the fields comprising the joint degree.

Juris Doctor and Master of Arts in International Policy Studies (J.D./M.A.)

Students may choose to pursue a joint J.D./M.A. in IPS degree. The joint degree program combines the strengths of the Law School and IPS. Prospective students interested in the joint J.D./M.A. in IPS program may apply concurrently to both the Stanford Law School (SLS) and the IPS program. Two separate application forms are required and applicants must submit LSAT scores to the Law School and GRE scores to the IPS program.

Students already enrolled at SLS may apply to the joint J.D./M.A. in IPS program no later than the end of the second year of Law School. The IPS program makes rolling admissions decisions based on the student's original application materials (GRE scores are not required in addition to LSAT scores in this case). Submission of the following is required for consideration:

For further information, see the "Joint Degree Programs" section of this bulletin, the University Registrar's site, and the SLS' Joint and Cooperative Degree Programs web site.

Master of Arts in International Policy Studies and Master of Public Policy (M.A./M.P.P.) 

Admission to the joint degree program requires admission to and matriculation in Stanford’s Ford Dorsey program in International Policy Studies and consent of that program.

Applications for graduate study in Public Policy are only accepted from:

  1. students currently enrolled in any Stanford graduate or undergraduate degree program
  2. from external applicants seeking a joint degree, or
  3. from Stanford alumni who have graduated within the past five years.

To be considered for matriculation beginning in the Autumn Quarter 2018-19, all application materials must be submitted no later than April 10, 2018. The early deadline for applications is Tuesday, January 23, 2018 with a final deadline on Tuesday, April 10, 2018. Early submission of MPP applications is encouraged. Admission notifications are sent on a rolling basis no later than May 1, 2018. Admitted students are encouraged to respond to offers of admission by April 15, 2018 and are required to respond to offers of admission by May 15, 2018 at the latest.

External applicants for joint degrees must apply to the department or school offering the other graduate degree (i.e., PhD, MD, MA, MS, MBA, or JD), indicating an interest in the joint degree program; applicants admitted to the other degree program are then evaluated for admission to the MPP or MA program.  Applicants who are admitted to IPS may apply once they have received admission to the program but prior to matriculation in autumn quarter. They may also apply during the first or second year of the IPS program.

Details on the joint degree curriculum can be found on the Public Policy web site.

For further information, see the "Joint Degree Programs" section of this bulletin and the University Registrar's site.

Dual Degree Programs

Students who have attended Stanford for at least one term and who are currently enrolled may submit a Graduate Program Authorization Petition to seek to add a new degree program in a different department to be pursued concurrently with the existing program.

It is important that the attempt to add degree programs be made while the student is enrolled. Otherwise, a new Application for Graduate Admission must be submitted and an application fee paid. Similarly, enrollment must be continuous if a new degree program is added after completion of an existing program. Summer quarter enrollment is optional for students who intend to begin a new degree program in the Autumn quarter, provided that they have been enrolled the prior Spring quarter.

Graduate Program Authorization Petitions are filed electronically in Axess and approved by the current and the new department. In addition, petitions from international students is routed to the Bechtel International Center for review. Upon all approvals, the student's record automatically updates with the requested changes.

Master of Business Administration and Master of of Arts in International Policy Studies

The dual degree is designed for students who want to work at the intersection of business and the state both in the U.S. and abroad.  Prospective students interested in the M.B.A./M.A. in IPS dual degree program may apply concurrently to both the Stanford Graduate School of Business and the IPS program.  Two separate applications are required and applicants must submit GRE scores with each application.

Students already enrolled at the Stanford Graduate School of Business may apply to the M.B.A./M.A. in IPS dual degree program no later than the end of the first year. The IPS program makes rolling admissions decisions based on the student's original application materials. Submission of the following is required for consideration:

  • IPS/GSB Dual Degree Application Form (available from the IPS web site)
  • Stanford Official Transcript
  • Graduate Program Authorization Petition (submitted via Axess)
  • Enrollment Agreement for Students with Multiple Programs (available for download on the University Registrar's forms page)

Completing this combined course of study requires approximately three academic years, depending on the student's background and quantitative preparation. Admissions processes for both programs are completely independent of each other and units from courses can only be applied to one degree or the other, not both.

Leadership:

Michael McFaul, Director, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies
Kathryn Stoner, Deputy Director, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

Executive Committee:

Coit D. Blacker (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Lisa Blaydes (Political Science)
James Fearon (Political Science)
Francis Fukuyama (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
David Holloway (History)
Beatriz Magaloni (Political Science)
Scott Sagan (Political Science)
Andrew Walder (Sociology)
Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science)

Affiliated Faculty:

Paul Brest (Law)
Jeremy Bulow (Economics)
Marshall Burke (Earth System Science)
David Cohen (Handa Center for Human Rights and International Justice)
Martha Crenshaw (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Larry Diamond (Hoover Institution)
Alberto Díaz-Cayeros (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Pascaline Dupas (Economics)
Karen Eggleston (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Donald Emmerson (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Rodney Ewing (Geological and Environmental Sciences)
Marcel Fafchamps (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Siegfried Hecker (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Nicholas Hope  (Stanford Center for International Development)
Takeo Hoshi (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Donald Kennedy (Environmental Science and Policy, Emeritus)
Stephen Krasner (Political Science)
Yong Suk Lee (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
David Lobell (Earth System Science)
Jenny Martinez (Law)
Abbas Milani (Iranian Studies)
Grant Miller (School of Medicine)
Rosamond Naylor (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Jean Oi (Political Science)
Jim Patell (Graduate School of Business)
Rob Reich (Political Science)
Condoleezza Rice (Graduate School of Business)
Richard Roberts (History)
Lee Ross (Psychology)
Kenneth Scheve (Political Science)
Mark Thurber (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Stephen J. Stedman (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Allen Weiner (Law)
Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science)
Paul Wise (Pediatrics)
Frank Wolak (Economics)
Amy Zegart (Hoover Institution)

Adjunct Professors:

Michael Armacost (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Karl Eikenberry (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Thomas Fingar (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Kathleen Stephens (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Lecturers, Academic Staff, and Scholars:

Chonira Aturupane (International Policy Studies)
Byron Bland (Law)
Deland Chan (Urban Studies)
Erica Gould (International Relations)
Kevin Hsu (Urban Studies)
Christine Jojarth (International Policy Studies)
Anja Manuel (International Policy Studies)
Scott McKeon (Economics)
Eric Morris (International Policy Studies)
Caroline Nowacki (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
Matthew Spence (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
Daniel Sneider (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)
David Straub (Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies)

Visiting Faculty:

Arye Carmon

Area of Concentration Curriculum

The Ford Dorsey Program in International Policy Studies (IPS) offers five areas of concentration:

Each concentration is guided by one -or more- major international research centers at Stanford. This collaboration provides IPS students with exposure to cutting-edge research on global policy issues. Students are required to choose one area of concentration and complete at least six courses within the concentration for a minimum of 26 total units. Each area of concentration requires the completion of a gateway course (indicated on the Master's tab), which must be taken during the first year and prior to enrolling in subsequent courses. Additionally, each area of concentration has a list of approved elective courses, as shown below. See the Master's tab for information on how to petition to apply a course toward the area of concentration that is not included in the lists below.  


Democracy, Development and Rule of Law
Units
ACCT 516Analysis and Valuation of Emerging Market Firms2
AFRICAST 209Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 301AThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
ANTHRO 313Anthropology of Neoliberalism5
BIOE 372Design for Service Innovation4
CEE 207AUnderstanding Energy3-5
CEE 227Global Project Finance3-5
CEE 241AInfrastructure Project Development3
CEE 265DWater and Sanitation in Developing Countries1-3
COMM 312Models of Democracy3-5
CS 325BData for Sustainable Development3-5
EARTHSYS 185Feeding Nine Billion4-5
EARTHSYS 212Human Society and Environmental Change4
EARTHSYS 242Remote Sensing of Land4
EARTHSYS 262Data for Sustainable Development3-5
EARTHSYS 281Urban Agriculture in the Developing World3-4
EASTASN 217Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia3-5
EASTASN 289KHigher Education and Development in Korea3
ECON 118Development Economics5
EDUC 202IInternational Education Policy Workshop4
EDUC 306AEconomics of Education in the Global Economy5
EDUC 377BStrategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures4
EDUC 377CPhilanthropy: Strategy, Innovation and Social Change3
ENGR 231Transformative Design3
ENVRES 380Collaborating with the Future: Launching Large Scale Sustainable Transformations3-4
ESS 270Analyzing land use in a globalized world3
ETHICSOC 232TTheories and Practices of Civil Society, Philanthropy, and the Nonprofit Sector5
ETHICSOC 280Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals3-5
GSBGEN 305Investing for Good3
GSBGEN 367Problem Solving for Social Change3
HISTORY 378AThe Logic of Authoritarian Government, Ancient and Modern5
HISTORY 379Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HRP 274Design for Service Innovation4
INTNLREL 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice3-5
IPS 207Economics of Corruption3-5
IPS 210The Politics of International Humanitarian Action3-5
IPS 211The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies3-5
IPS 213International Mediation and Civil Wars3-5
IPS 216Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation3
IPS 224Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia3-5
IPS 231Russia, the West and the Rest4
IPS 232Hacking for Diplomacy: Tackling Foreign Policy Challenges with the Lean Launchpad3-4
IPS 236The Politics of Private Sector Development3-5
IPS 237Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy?4-5
IPS 242American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process5
IPS 244U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia5
IPS 248America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies3-5
IPS 264Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia3-5
IPS 274International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development4-5
IPS 275UN Habitat III: Bridging Cities and Nations to Tackle Urban Development3-5
IPS 280Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals3-5
LAW 5029Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives3
LAW 5103State-Building and the Rule of Law Seminar3
LAW 5104Advanced State-Building and Rule of Law Seminar3
ME 206ADesign for Extreme Affordability4
MED 262Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries5
MS&E 231Introduction to Computational Social Science3
OIT 333Design for Extreme Affordability4
OIT 334Design for Extreme Affordability4
PEDS 225Humanitarian Aid and Politics3
PHIL 276Political Philosophy: The Social Contract Tradition4
POLISCI 240TDemocracy, Promotion, and American Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
POLISCI 314RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 316SDecision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 327CLaw of Democracy3-5
POLISCI 344AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
POLISCI 346PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
POLISCI 347GGovernance and Poverty3-5
POLISCI 348Chinese Politics3-5
POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
POLISCI 355CCausal Inference for Social Science5
POLISCI 440ATheories in Comparative Politics3-5
POLISCI 440BComparative Political Economy3-5
POLISCI 441LGrad Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics3-5
POLISCI 443SPolitical Economy of Reform in China3-5
POLISCI 451Design and Analysis of Experiments3-5
PUBLPOL 223Thinking About War4-5
PUBLPOL 242Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators3
PUBLPOL 302AIntroduction to American Law3-5
PUBLPOL 307Justice4-5
PUBLPOL 364The Future of Finance2
REES 205Central and East European Politics5
REES 320State and Nation Building in Central Asia3-5
SOC 218Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 230Education and Society4-5
SOC 231World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives4-5
SOC 240Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 314Economic Sociology4-5
SOC 370ASociological Theory: Social Structure, Inequality, and Conflict5
STRAMGT 325Starting and Growing a Social Venture4
STRAMGT 367Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation3
STRAMGT 368Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations and Social Ventures3
STRAMGT 579The Political Economy of China2
URBANST 137Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance3
PUBLPOL 364The Future of Finance2

Energy, Environment, and Natural Resources 
Units
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176BElectric Power: Renewables and Efficiency3-4
CEE 207AUnderstanding Energy3-5
CEE 224ASustainable Development Studio1-5
CEE 227Global Project Finance3-5
CEE 241AInfrastructure Project Development3
CEE 241CGlobal Infrastructure Projects Seminar1-2
CEE 246Entrepreneurship in Civil & Environmental Engineering3-4
CEE 263DAir Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions3
CEE 265ASustainable Water Resources Development3
CEE 265DWater and Sanitation in Developing Countries1-3
CEE 266DWater Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips2
CEE 297MManaging Critical Infrastructure2
CEE 375AWater, Climate, and Health3
EARTHSYS 112Human Society and Environmental Change4
EARTHSYS 188Social and Environmental Tradeoffs in Climate Decision-Making1-2
EARTHSYS 206World Food Economy5
EARTHSYS 211Fundamentals of Modeling3-5
EARTHSYS 239Ecosystem Services: Frontiers in the Science of Valuing Nature3
EARTHSYS 281Urban Agriculture in the Developing World3-4
EARTHSYS 288Social and Environmental Tradeoffs in Climate Decision-Making1-2
ECON 106World Food Economy5
ECON 118Development Economics5
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ECON 159Economic, Legal, and Political Analysis of Climate-Change Policy5
ECON 206World Food Economy5
ENERGY 267Engineering Valuation and Appraisal of Oil and Gas Wells, Facilities, and Properties3
ENERGY 271Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics3
ENERGY 291Optimization of Energy Systems3-4
ENVRES 220The Social Ocean: Ocean Conservation, Management, and Policy1-2
ENVRES 240Environmental Decision-Making and Risk Perception1-3
ENVRES 250Environmental Governance2-3
ENVRES 380Collaborating with the Future: Launching Large Scale Sustainable Transformations3-4
ESS 270Analyzing land use in a globalized world3
ESS 306From Freshwater to Oceans to Land Systems: An Earth System Perspective to Global Challenges2
FINANCE 335Corporate Valuation, Governance and Behavior4
GSBGEN 322Improving and Measuring Social Impact3
GSBGEN 336Energy Markets and Policy3
GSBGEN 367Problem Solving for Social Change3
GSBGEN 514Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies2
GSBGEN 532Clean Energy Opportunities2
IPS 232Hacking for Diplomacy: Tackling Foreign Policy Challenges with the Lean Launchpad3-4
IPS 266Managing Nuclear Waste: Technical, Political and Organizational Challenges3
IPS 270The Geopolitics of Energy3-5
IPS 275UN Habitat III: Bridging Cities and Nations to Tackle Urban Development3-5
LAW 2504Environmental Law and Policy3
LAW 2506Natural Resources Law and Policy3
ME 206ADesign for Extreme Affordability4
ME 368d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context4
ME 377Design Thinking Studio4
MED 262Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries5
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
MS&E 273Technology Venture Formation3-4
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3
OIT 333Design for Extreme Affordability4
OIT 334Design for Extreme Affordability4
OIT 343D-Lab: Design for Service Innovation4
POLISCI 247GGovernance and Poverty5
POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
URBANST 114Urban Culture in Global Perspective5

Global Health
Units
AFRICAAM 229Literature and Global Health3-5
AFRICAST 151AIDS in Africa3
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
BIO 146Population Studies1
BIOE 371Global Biodesign: Medical Technology in an International Context3
BIOMEDIN 251Outcomes Analysis4
BIOMEDIN 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
BIOMEDIN 432Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4
CEE 265DWater and Sanitation in Developing Countries1-3
CS 325BData for Sustainable Development3-5
EARTHSYS 212Human Society and Environmental Change4
EARTHSYS 262Data for Sustainable Development3-5
EASTASN 217Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia3-5
ECON 118Development Economics5
ECON 127Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries5
ECON 249Topics in Health Economics I2-5
GSBGEN 367Problem Solving for Social Change3
HISTORY 243GTobacco and Health in World History4-5
HRP 201BHealth Policy PhD Core Seminar II--First Year2
HRP 207Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research I2
HRP 208Introduction to Concepts and Methods in Health Services and Policy Research II2
HRP 212Cross Cultural Medicine3
HRP 231Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases3
HRP 234Engineering Better Health Systems: modeling for public health4
HRP 252Outcomes Analysis4
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 259Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Epidemiology3-4
HRP 261Intermediate Biostatistics: Analysis of Discrete Data3
HUMBIO 124CGlobal Child Health3
HUMBIO 129SGlobal Public Health4
HUMBIO 153Parasites and Pestilence: Infectious Public Health Challenges4
IPS 216Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation3
IPS 290Practical Approaches to Global Health Research3
LAW 3009Health Law: Improving Public Health3
LAW 5025Global Poverty and the Law3
ME 206ADesign for Extreme Affordability4
MED 236Economics of Infectious Disease and Global Health3
MS&E 256Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices3
MS&E 292Health Policy Modeling3
OIT 333Design for Extreme Affordability4
OIT 334Design for Extreme Affordability4
PEDS 222Beyond Health Care: the effects of social policies on health3
PUBLPOL 231Health Law: Finance and Insurance3
SOC 230Education and Society4-5
SOMGEN 207Theories of Change in Global Health3-4
SURG 231Healthcare in Haiti and other Resource Poor Countries1

International Political Economy

IPE concentrators will apply IPS 202 towards the international economics requirement and IPS 203 towards the area of concentration gateway course.

Units
IPS 202Topics in International Macroeconomics (International Economics Requirement)5
IPS 203Issues in International Economics (IPE Gateway)5
ANTHRO 377Authority: Anthropological Perspectives5
CEE 227Global Project Finance3-5
EARTHSYS 206World Food Economy5
EASTASN 217Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia3-5
EASTASN 294The Rise of China in World Affairs3-5
ECON 102CAdvanced Topics in Econometrics5
ECON 106World Food Economy5
ECON 118Development Economics5
ECON 155Environmental Economics and Policy5
ECON 206World Food Economy5
ECON 241Public Economics I2-5
ECON 242Public Economics II2-5
ECON 246Labor Economics I2-5
ECON 251Natural Resource and Energy Economics2-5
ECON 252The Future of Finance2
ECON 265International Economics2-5
ECON 266International Trade I2-5
ECON 267International Trade II2-5
ECON 272Intermediate Econometrics III2-5
EDUC 306AEconomics of Education in the Global Economy5
EDUC 377EImproving and Measuring Social Impact3
ENERGY 271Energy Infrastructure, Technology and Economics3
ESS 305Climate Change: An Earth Systems Perspective2
FINANCE 324Practical Corporate Finance4
FINANCE 327Financial Markets4
FINANCE 335Corporate Valuation, Governance and Behavior4
GSBGEN 305Investing for Good3
GSBGEN 314Creating High Potential Ventures in Developing Economies4
HISTORY 379Latin American Development: Economy and Society, 1800-20144-5
HISTORY 381Economic and Social History of the Modern Middle East4-5
IPS 204AMicroeconomics for Policy4-5
IPS 204BEconomic Policy Analysis for Policymakers4-5
IPS 207Economics of Corruption3-5
IPS 216Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation3
IPS 224Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia3-5
IPS 230Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
IPS 236The Politics of Private Sector Development3-5
IPS 264Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia3-5
IPS 270The Geopolitics of Energy3-5
IPS 274International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development4-5
LAW 5014International Trade Law3
MED 262Economics of Health Improvement in Developing Countries5
MGTECON 591Global Management Research2
MKTG 337Applied Behavioral Economics3
MKTG 552Building Innovative Brands2
MS&E 148Ethics of Finance2
MS&E 226"Small" Data3
MS&E 231Introduction to Computational Social Science3
MS&E 241Economic Analysis3-4
MS&E 246Financial Risk Analytics3
MS&E 273Technology Venture Formation3-4
MS&E 447Systemic and Market Risk : Notes on Recent History, Practice, and Policy3
MS&E 449Buy-Side Investing1-2
POLECON 230Strategy Beyond Markets2
POLECON 584Managing Global Political Risk1
POLISCI 150AData Science for Politics5
POLISCI 213EIntroduction to European Studies5
POLISCI 247AGames Developing Nations Play5
POLISCI 313RPolitical Economy of Financial Crisis5
POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
POLISCI 344AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
POLISCI 348Chinese Politics3-5
POLISCI 351AFoundations of Political Economy3
POLISCI 352Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
POLISCI 358Data-driven Politics3-5
POLISCI 440ATheories in Comparative Politics3-5
POLISCI 440BComparative Political Economy3-5
POLISCI 443SPolitical Economy of Reform in China3-5
POLISCI 444Comparative Political Economy: Advanced Industrial Societies3-5
POLISCI 450APolitical Methodology I: Regression5
POLISCI 450DPolitical Methodology IV: Advanced Topics3-5
PUBLPOL 137Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance3
PUBLPOL 204Economic Policy Analysis4-5
PUBLPOL 242Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators3
PUBLPOL 302BEconomic Analysis of Law3
PUBLPOL 303DApplied Econometrics for Public Policy4-5
PUBLPOL 354Economics of Innovation5
PUBLPOL 364The Future of Finance2
SOC 214Economic Sociology4
SOC 231World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives4-5
STATS 202Data Mining and Analysis3
STATS 315BModern Applied Statistics: Data Mining2-3
STRAMGT 325Starting and Growing a Social Venture4
STRAMGT 330Entrepreneurship and Venture Capital: Partnership for Growth3
STRAMGT 353Entrepreneurship: Formation of New Ventures4
STRAMGT 367Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation3
STRAMGT 369Social Entrepreneurship4
STRAMGT 579The Political Economy of China2

International Security and Cooperation

The ISC gateway is IPS 241.  Those with an advanced background in ISC may petition to bypass the gateway course and take six elective courses in the concentration.  Those who do not plan to take IPS 241 must consult with the IPS Student Services Officer and receive approval by petition from the IPS Faculty Director.

Units
AFRICAST 301AThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
COMM 233Need to Know: The Tension between a Free Press and National Security Decision Making4-5
COMM 312Models of Democracy3-5
EARTHSYS 251Biological Oceanography3-4
EASTASN 262Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present3-5
EASTASN 294The Rise of China in World Affairs3-5
ECON 252The Future of Finance2
ENGLISH 172DIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
ETHICSOC 280Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals3-5
HISTORY 103EThe International History of Nuclear Weapons5
HISTORY 302GPeoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War4-5
HISTORY 356350 Years of America-China Relations4-5
INTNLREL 110DWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
INTNLREL 140CThe U.S., U.N. Peacekeeping, and Humanitarian War5
IPS 210The Politics of International Humanitarian Action3-5
IPS 211The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies3-5
IPS 213International Mediation and Civil Wars3-5
IPS 214Refugees in the Twenty-first Century3-5
IPS 216Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation3
IPS 219Intelligence and National Security3
IPS 231ARussia and the West5
IPS 232Hacking for Diplomacy: Tackling Foreign Policy Challenges with the Lean Launchpad3-4
IPS 236The Politics of Private Sector Development3-5
IPS 237Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy?4-5
IPS 242American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process5
IPS 243U.S. Policy Options in North Korea3-4
IPS 245Does Google Need a Foreign Policy? Private Corporations & International Security in the Digital Age4
IPS 246China on the World Stage4
IPS 248America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies3-5
IPS 250International Conflict Resolution2
IPS 250AInternational Conflict Resolution Colloquium1
IPS 255Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model2-3
IPS 264Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia3-5
MS&E 231Introduction to Computational Social Science3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
PHIL 287Philosophy of Action4
POLECON 230Strategy Beyond Markets2
POLECON 584Managing Global Political Risk1
POLISCI 110YWar and Peace in American Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 149SIslam, Iran, and the West5
POLISCI 212XCivil War and International Politics: Syria in Context5
POLISCI 215Explaining Ethnic Violence5
POLISCI 240TDemocracy, Promotion, and American Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 245RPolitics in Modern Iran5
POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
POLISCI 314RChallenges and Dilemmas in American Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 316SDecision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy5
POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
POLISCI 344AAuthoritarian Politics3-5
POLISCI 346PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
POLISCI 347GGovernance and Poverty3-5
POLISCI 348Chinese Politics3-5
POLISCI 352Introduction to Game Theoretic Methods in Political Science3-5
POLISCI 355AData Science for Politics5
POLISCI 355BMachine Learning for Social Scientists5
POLISCI 359Advanced Individual Study in Political Methodology1-10
POLISCI 441LGrad Seminar on Middle Eastern Politics3-5
PSYCH 155Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PSYCH 245Social Psychological Perspectives on Stereotyping and Prejudice3
PSYCH 383International Conflict Resolution2
PUBLPOL 223Thinking About War4-5
PUBLPOL 242Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators3
PUBLPOL 307Justice4-5
PUBLPOL 364The Future of Finance2
REES 320State and Nation Building in Central Asia3-5
SOC 146Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
SOC 218Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 240Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 245Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 310Political Sociology4-5
STATS 216Introduction to Statistical Learning3
STRAMGT 579The Political Economy of China2

Courses

IPS 201. Managing Global Complexity. 3 Units.

Is international relations theory valuable for policy makers? The first half of the course will provide students with a foundation in theory by introducing the dominant theoretical traditions and insights in international relations. The second half of the course focuses on several complex global problems that cut across policy specializations and impact multiple policy dimensions. Students will assess the value of major theories and concepts in international relations for analyzing and addressing such complex global policy issues.

IPS 202. Topics in International Macroeconomics. 5 Units.

Topics: standard theories of open economy macroeconomics, exchange rate regimes, causes and consequences of current account imbalances, the economics of monetary unification and the European Monetary Union, recent financial and currency crises, the International Monetary Fund and the reform of the international financial architecture. Prerequisites: ECON 52 and ECON 165.

IPS 203. Issues in International Economics. 5 Units.

Topics in international trade and international trade policy: trade, growth and poverty, the World Trade Organization (WTO), regionalism versus multilateralism, the political economy of trade policy, trade and labor, trade and the environment, and trade policies for developing economies. Prerequisite: ECON 51, ECON 166.

IPS 204A. Microeconomics for Policy. 4-5 Units.

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for the ECON 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take ECON 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Same as: PUBLPOL 51, PUBLPOL 301A

IPS 204B. Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers. 4-5 Units.

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Same as: PUBLPOL 301B

IPS 205. Introductory Statistics for Policy. 5 Units.

Introduction to key elements of probability and statistical analysis, focusing on international and public policy relevant applications. Topics will include basic probability, discrete and continuous random variables, exploratory data analysis, hypothesis testing, and elements of mathematical statistics. Lectures will include both theoretical and practical components, and students will be introduced to R statistical programming and LaTeX.

IPS 206. Applied Statistics for Policy. 5 Units.

Introduction to the use of statistical models and their application in quantitative policy analysis and data interpretation in policy contexts, with an emphasis on regression analysis, aiming to enable students to become intelligent and capable consumers and producers of regression analyses. Attention will be given to providing both applied experience with regression analyses and knowledge of the underlying statistical theory.

IPS 207. Economics of Corruption. 3-5 Units.

The role of corruption in the growth and development experience of countries with a focus on the economics of corruption. Topics covered: the concept and measurement of corruption; theory and evidence on the impact of corruption on growth determinants and development outcomes, including public and private investment, financial flows, human capital accumulation, poverty and income inequality; the link between corruption and financial crises, including the recent crises in the US and the Eurozone; the cultural, economic, and political determinants of corruption; and policy measures for addressing corruption, including recent civil society initiatives and use of liberation technology.nPrerequisite: ECON 1.

IPS 207B. Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications. 4 Units.

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Same as: PSYCH 216, PUBLPOL 305B

IPS 208A. International Justice. 4-5 Units.

This course will examine the arc of an atrocity. It begins with an introduction to the interdisciplinary scholarship on the causes and enablers of mass violence genocide, war crimes, terrorism, and state repression. It then considers political and legal responses ranging from humanitarian intervention (within and without the Responsibility to Protect framework), sanctions, commissions of inquiry, and accountability mechanisms, including criminal trials before international and domestic tribunals. The course will also explore the range of transitional justice mechanisms available to policymakers as societies emerge from periods of violence and repression, including truth commissions, illustrations, and amnesties. Coming full circle, the course will evaluate current efforts aimed at atrocity prevention, rather than response, including President Obama¿s atrocities prevention initiative. Readings address the philosophical underpinnings of justice, questions of institutional design, and the way in which different societies have balanced competing policy imperatives. Cross-listed with LAW 5033.
Same as: HUMRTS 102

IPS 209. Practicum. 1-8 Unit.

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major international policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis. Enrollment must be split between Autumn and Winter Quarters for a total of 8 units.

IPS 209A. IPS Master's Thesis. 1-8 Unit.

For IPS M.A. students only (by petition). Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.

IPS 210. The Politics of International Humanitarian Action. 3-5 Units.

The relationship between humanitarianism and politics in international responses to civil conflicts and forced displacement. Focus is on policy dilemmas and choices, and the consequences of action or inaction. Case studies include northern Iraq (Kurdistan), Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, and Darfur. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.

IPS 211. The Transition from War to Peace: Peacebuilding Strategies. 3-5 Units.

How to find sustainable solutions to intractable internal conflicts that lead to peace settlements. How institutions such as the UN, regional organizations, and international financial agencies attempt to support a peace process. Case studies include Bosnia, East Timor, Kosovo, Burundi, Liberia, and Afghanistan. In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter.

IPS 213. International Mediation and Civil Wars. 3-5 Units.

This graduate seminar will examine international mediation efforts to achieve negotiated settlements for civil wars over the last two decades. Contending approaches to explain the success or failure of international mediation efforts will be examined in a number of cases from Africa (Sudan, Sierra Leone, Burundi), the Balkans (Bosnia, Macedonia), and Asia (Cambodia, Indonesia/Aceh). In addition to class attendance, each student will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions during the quarter. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.

IPS 214. Refugees in the Twenty-first Century. 3-5 Units.

The focus of this graduate seminar is policy dilemmas in international responses to massive population movements. In 2015 and 2016 hundreds of thousands of persons from the Middle East (particularly Syria) and Africa fled their home countries and attempted to cross into Europe by sea. In September 2016, the United Nations General Assembly unanimously adopted the "New York Declaration for Refugees and Migrants". This political declaration aims to improve the international response to large movements of refugees and migrants, including protracted refugee situations. One of the many challenges confronting this multilateral diplomatic undertaking is that the definition of the word "refugee" is contested, as is the process to determine who is a refugee. This course will provide an immersive examination of the causes and consequences of refugee movements. This course is a seminar that requires full student attendance and participation. A focus of the course is to develop the skills of students in writing policy memos. Students will meet with the instructor for multiple one-on-one sessions on their policy memos.

IPS 216. Making Things Happen in the Real World: Leadership and Implementation. 3 Units.

For any problem we want to solve - reducing poverty, improving education, ending civil wars, integrating refugee populations, increasing access to quality health care - someone has to take proposed solutions and make them stick. Course emphasis is on how to make change in the real world by focusing on policy implementation: what skilled leaders do when they engage stakeholders, confront opposition, prioritize goals, find and marshal resources, fail and learn, and succeed or not. In particular, the course will tackle problems that many policy courses ignore, such as why implementation is difficult and what strategies and capacities leaders need to put plans into actions. Focus will be on case analysis and discussion led by professors from a variety of different disciplinary backgrounds in economics, pediatrics, epidemiology, public health, and political science.

IPS 219. Intelligence and National Security. 3 Units.

How intelligence supports U.S. national security and foreign policies. How it has been used by U.S. presidents to become what it is today; organizational strengths and weaknesses; how it is monitored and held accountable to the goals of a democratic society; and successes and failures. Current intelligence analyses and national intelligence estimates are produced in support of simulated policy deliberations.

IPS 224. Economic Development and Challenges of East Asia. 3-5 Units.

This course explores East Asia¿s rapid economic development and the current economic challenges. For the purpose of this course, we will focus on China, Japan, and Korea. The first part of the course examines economic growth in East Asia and the main mechanisms. In this context, we will examine government and industrial policy, international trade, firms and business groups, and human capital. We will discuss the validity of an East Asian model for economic growth. However, rapid economic growth and development in East Asia was followed by economic stagnation and financial crisis. The second part of the course focuses on the current economic challenges confronting these countries, in particular, inequality, demography, and entrepreneurship and innovation. Readings will come from books, journal articles, reports, news articles, and case studies. Many of the readings will have an empirical component and students will be able to develop their understanding of how empirical evidence is presented in articles. Prerequisite course: IPS 206, POLISCI 350B, ECON 102B, or equivalent.

IPS 225. Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan. 4 Units.

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Same as: EASTASN 151, EASTASN 251

IPS 230. Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law. 5 Units.

Links among the establishment of democracy, economic growth, and the rule of law. How democratic, economically developed states arise. How the rule of law can be established where it has been historically absent. Variations in how such systems function and the consequences of institutional forms and choices. How democratic systems have arisen in different parts of the world. Available policy instruments used in international democracy, rule of law, and development promotion efforts.
Same as: INTNLREL 114D, POLISCI 114D, POLISCI 314D

IPS 231. Russia, the West and the Rest. 4 Units.

Focus on understanding the diversity of political, social, and economic outcomes in Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Exploration of questions, including: Is Russia still a global power? Where does it have influence internationally, how much, and why? Developmentally, what is the relevant comparison set of countries? Is Russia's economic growth over the last decade truly similar to Brazil, China, and India or is it more comparable to Kazakhstan, Nigeria, and Kenya? How has Russia's domestic political trajectory from liberalizing country to increasingly autocratic affected its foreign policy toward Ukraine, Georgia, and other formerly Soviet states? Finally, is Russia's reemergence as an important global actor more apparent than real?.
Same as: REES 231

IPS 231A. Russia and the West. 5 Units.

Today, American-Russian relations, and Russia¿s relations with West more generally, are tense and confrontational. One has to look deep into the Cold War to find a similar era of confrontation and competition. Yet, relations between Russia and the West were not always this way. The end of the Cold War, for instance, ushered in a period of cooperation. Back then, many believed that Russia was going to develop democratic and market institutions and integrate into Western international institutions. This seminar will examine various explanations for these variations in Russia¿s relations with the West, starting in the 19th century, and briefly examining the Cold War period, but a real focus on the last thirty years. In evaluating competing explanations. the course will focus on balance of power theories, culture, historical legacies, institutional design, and individual actors in both the United States (and sometimes Europe) and Russia.
Same as: POLISCI 213A, REES 213A

IPS 232. Hacking for Diplomacy: Tackling Foreign Policy Challenges with the Lean Launchpad. 3-4 Units.

At a time of significant global uncertainty, diplomats are grappling with transnational and cross-cutting challenges that defy easy solution including: the continued pursuit of weapons of mass destruction by states and non-state groups, the outbreak of internal conflict across the Middle East and in parts of Africa, the most significant flow of refugees since World War II, and a changing climate that is beginning to have impacts on both developed and developing countries. While the traditional tools of statecraft remain relevant, policymakers are looking to harness the power of new technologies to rethink how the U.S. government approaches and responds to these and other long-standing challenges. In this class, student teams will take actual foreign policy challenges and learn how to apply lean startup principles, ("mission model canvas," "customer development," and "agile engineering¿) to discover and validate agency and user needs and to continually build iterative prototypes to test whether they understood the problem and solution. Teams take a hands-on approach requiring close engagement with officials in the U.S. State Department and other civilian agencies. Team applications required at the end of shopping period. Limited enrollment.
Same as: MS&E 298

IPS 236. The Politics of Private Sector Development. 3-5 Units.

This is a case-based course on how to achieve public policy reform with the aim of promoting private sector development in developing countries. It will deal with issues like privatization, reducing informality, infrastructure development, trade promotion, and combatting corruption.

IPS 237. Religion and Politics: A Threat to Democracy?. 4-5 Units.

The meddling of religion in politics has become a major global issue. Can religion co-exist with politics in a democracy? In Israel this is an acute issue exhibiting an existential question: To what extent religion is a source of the weaknesses and vulnerabilities of Israeli Democracy? The course offered is a research workshop, part of a policy-oriented applied research in motion. The workshop will meet a few times during the Fall Quarter and the instructor will be available to consult with the workshop's participants on a bi-weekly basis. The workshop will include unique opportunities for hands-on, team-based research.
Same as: JEWISHST 237

IPS 238. Overcoming Practical Obstacles to Policy Implementation. 3-5 Units.

Many of the obstacles to effective governance lie less in the proper formulation of public policies than in their implementation. Modern government is complex, multilayered, and often highly politicized. This course will focus on problems of implementation based on the practical experiences of policy practitioners. This will be a team-taught course utilizing faculty from across the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), and will encompass diverse policy areas including national security, foreign policy, crime, health, food safety, and environment.

IPS 241. International Security in a Changing World. 5 Units.

This class examines the most pressing international security problems facing the world today: nuclear crises, nuclear non-proliferation, terrorism, and climate change. Alternative perspectives--from political science, history, and STS (Science, Technology, and Society) studies--are used to analyze these problems. The class includes an award-winning two-day international negotiation simulation.
Same as: HISTORY 104D, POLISCI 114S

IPS 242. American Foreign Policy: Interests, Values, and Process. 5 Units.

This seminar will examine the tension in American foreign policy between pursuing U.S. security and economic interests and promoting American values abroad. The course will retrace the theoretical and ideological debates about values versus interests, with a particular focus on realism versus liberalism. The course will examine the evolution of these debates over time, starting with the French revolution, but with special attention given to the Cold War, American foreign policy after September 11th, and the Obama administration. The course also will examine how these contending theories and ideologies are mediated through the U.S. bureaucracy that shapes the making of foreign policy. ** NOTE: The enrollment of the class is by application only. Please provide a one page double-spaced document outlining previous associated coursework and why you want to enroll in the seminar to Anna Coll (acoll@stanford.edu) by February 22nd. Any questions related to this course can be directed to Anna Coll.
Same as: GLOBAL 220, POLISCI 217A

IPS 243. U.S. Policy Options in North Korea. 3-4 Units.

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IPS 244. U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia. 5 Units.

Case study approach to the study of contemporary U.S. policy towards Japan, Korea, and China. Historical evolution of U.S. foreign policy and the impact of issues such as democratization, human rights, trade, security relations, military modernization, and rising nationalism on U.S. policy. Case studies include U.S.-Japan trade tensions, anti-Americanism in Korea, and cross-straits relations between China and Taiwan. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.

IPS 245. Does Google Need a Foreign Policy? Private Corporations & International Security in the Digital Age. 4 Units.

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Same as: PUBLPOL 245

IPS 246. China on the World Stage. 4 Units.

China's reemergence as a global player is transforming both China and the international system. Other nations view China's rise with a mixture of admiration, anxiety, and opportunism. Some welcome China's rise as a potential counterweight to US preeminence; others fear the potential consequences of Sino-American rivalry and erosion of the US-led international system that has fostered unprecedented peace and prosperity. This course provides an overview of China's engagement with countries in all regions and on a wide range of issues since it launched the policy of opening and reform in 1978. The goal is to provide a broad overview and systematic comparisons across regions and issues, and to examine how China's global engagement has changed over time.

IPS 247. Organized Crime and Democracy in Latin America. 5 Units.

Scholars and policy analysts have long emphasized the strength of the rule of law as a key determinant of economic development and social opportunity. They also agree that the rule of law requires an effective and accountable legal system. The growth of transnational organized crime is a major impediment, however, to the creation of effective and accountable legal systems. nThis seminar examines how and why transnational criminal organizations have developed in Latin America, explores why they constitute a major challenge to the consolidation of democratic societies, economic development and individual rights. It also examines the efforts of governments to combat them, with a focus on the experiences of Mexico, Colombia, and Brazil. The course examines these cases in order to draw lessons¿by pointing to both successes and failures¿of use to policy analysts, legal scholars, and practitioners.
Same as: INTNLREL 152

IPS 248. America's War in Afghanistan: Multiple Actors and Divergent Strategies. 3-5 Units.

Establishing clear and consistent political-military objectives when waging limited wars is an essential but difficult task. Efforts to develop coherent campaign strategies are complicated by competing interests among US government actors (diplomatic, development, military and intelligence), members of the coalition intervention force, and relevant international organizations. This course will examine post-9/11 efforts to defeat Al Qaeda and stabilize Afghanistan from the perspectives of key US, international, and Afghan actors including the White House, State Department, Defense Department, Central Intelligence Agency, United Nations, NATO, Pakistan, and Afghan political elite and civil society. Classes will include presentations by individuals with firsthand diplomatic and military experience in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

IPS 250. International Conflict Resolution. 2 Units.

Same as LAW 5009; formerly Law 656) This seminar examines the challenges of managing and resolving intractable political and violent intergroup and international conflicts. Employing an interdisciplinary approach drawing on social psychology, political science, game theory, and international law, the course identifies various tactical, psychological, and structural barriers that can impede the achievement of efficient solutions to conflicts. We will explore a conceptual framework for conflict management and resolution that draws not only on theoretical insights, but also builds on historical examples and practical experience in the realm of conflict resolution. This approach examines the need for the parties to conflicts to address the following questions in order to have prospects of creating peaceful relationships: (1) how can the parties to conflict develop a vision of a mutually bearable shared future; (2) how can parties develop trust in the enemy; (3) how can each side be persuaded, as part of a negotiated settlement, to accept losses that it will find very painful; and (4) how do we overcome the perceptions of injustice that each side are likely to have towards any compromise solution? We will consider both particular conflicts, such as the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the South African transition to majority rule, as well as cross-cutting issues, such as the role international legal rules play in facilitating or impeding conflict resolution, the intragroup dynamics that affect intergroup conflict resolution efforts, and the role of criminal accountability for atrocities following civil wars. Special Instructions: Section 01: Grades will be based on class participation, written assignments, and a final exam. Section 02: Up to five students, with consent of the instructor, will have the option to write an independent research paper for Research (R) credit in lieu of the written assignments and final exam for Section 01. After the term begins, students (max 5) accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor.
Same as: PSYCH 383

IPS 250A. International Conflict Resolution Colloquium. 1 Unit.

(Same as LAW 611.) Sponsored by the Stanford Center on International Conflict and Negotiation (SCICN). Conflict, negotiation, and dispute resolution with emphasis on conflicts and disputes with an international dimension, including conflicts involving states, peoples, and political factions such as the Middle East and Northern Ireland. Guest speakers. Issues including international law, psychology, and political science, economics, anthropology, and criminology.
Same as: PSYCH 283

IPS 252. Implications of Post-1994 Conflicts in Great Lakes Region of Africa: an American Perspective. 3 Units.

Seminar will explore the post-1994 conflicts in the Great Lakes Region from the perspective of the former US Special Envoy to the region. Particular emphasis will be placed on the intensified regional and international efforts to resolve these conflicts since the M23 rebellion of 2012. It will consider the implications these activities have for the region, legal accountability, international peacekeeping and the conduct of American foreign policy. The seminar will include the following segments: 1) the origins and nature of the post-1994 conflicts and recent efforts to resolve them with particular attention to the relationship between modern Congolese history and the Rwandan genocide and the peace-making efforts initiated by the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework agreement of February 2013; 2) accountability for conflict-related crimes committed in the region including sex and gender-based crimes and the legal and other regimes established to address conflict minerals; and 3) the broader implications of the conflict for American foreign policy in Africa (in particular and in general, and lessons learned about the way in which such policy is formulated) as well as the implications of this conflict for international peace-making and peace-keeping efforts. The course is cross-listed for IPS and law school students.

IPS 255. Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model. 2-3 Units.

Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national and local police agencies is critical in supporting efforts to combat cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPOL---the world's largest international police organization'is constantly innovating to respond effectively to the world's evolving threat landscape. As a leader in global policing efforts, INTERPOL launched the INTERPOL 2020 Initiative to review the Organization's strategy and develop a roadmap for strengthening its policing capabilities. INTERPOL 2020 will provide the strategic framework to ensure the Organization remains a leader and respected voice in global security matters. This practicum will allow students to assist INTERPOL in modernizing its organizational structure to better fight cyber-crime and terrorism. Students in this practicum will contribute to the Strategic Framework 2017-2020, focusing on comparative governance practices for international organizations. The practicum will analyze decision-making processes within the organization and across other similar organizations (acknowledging their respective mandates) with respect to specific issues identified by INTERPOL. The work product developed during the course of this practicum will serve as part of a framework for INTERPOL to guide and support the development of its governance model. Students in practicum will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via Video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. In addition, selected students in the practicum may have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. Open to graduate students from outside the Law School and, in exceptional cases, to advanced undergraduate students, the practicum seeks those who demonstrate strong interest and background in global security and international law, organizational behavior, and strategic management. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, we will give preference to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. NOTE (for LAW students): Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with LAW 805Z.

IPS 264. Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to India, Af-Pak and China. Analyzes historical forces that shaped the region, recent history and current state of key countries: the economic and political rise of India and China; rise of the Taliban and Al Qaeda in Afghanistan; Pakistan's government, military, and mullahs; and China's impact on the region. nExplores U.S. policy in depth: U.S. intervention in- and upcoming withdrawal from Afghanistan, U.S. relations with Pakistan and India, the "pivot to Asia" and its implications for US-China relations and the strategic balance in Asia. nSatisfies the IPS policy writing requirement.

IPS 266. Managing Nuclear Waste: Technical, Political and Organizational Challenges. 3 Units.

The essential technical and scientific elements of the nuclear fuel cycle, focusing on the sources, types, and characteristics of the nuclear waste generated, as well as various strategies for the disposition of spent nuclear fuel - including reprocessing, transmutation, and direct geologic disposal. Policy and organizational issues, such as: options for the characteristics and structure of a new federal nuclear waste management organization, options for a consent-based process for locating nuclear facilities, and the regulatory framework for a geologic repository. A technical background in the nuclear fuel cycle, while desirable, is not required.
Same as: GS 266

IPS 270. The Geopolitics of Energy. 3-5 Units.

The global energy landscape is undergoing seismic shifts with game-changing economic, political and environmental ramifications. Technological breakthroughs are expanding the realms of production, reshuffling the competition among different sources of energy and altering the relative balance of power between energy exporters and importers. The US shale oil and gas bonanza is replacing worries about foreign oil dependence with an exuberance about the domestic resurgence of energy-intensive sectors. China¿s roaring appetite for energy imports propels its national oil companies to global prominence. Middle Eastern nations that used to reap power from oil wealth are bracing for a struggle for political relevance. Many African energy exporters are adopting promising strategies to break with a history dominated by the ¿resource curse¿.nThis course provides students with the knowledge, skill set and professional network to analyze how the present and past upheavals in oil and gas markets affect energy exporters and importers, their policymaking, and their relative power. Students will gain a truly global perspective thanks to a series of exciting international guest speakers and the opportunity to have an impact by working on a burning issue for a real world client. Satisfies the IPS Policy Writing Requirement.

IPS 274. International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development. 4-5 Units.

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Same as: CEE 126, EARTHSYS 138, URBANST 145

IPS 275. UN Habitat III: Bridging Cities and Nations to Tackle Urban Development. 3-5 Units.

From climate change to refugee housing, cities have powered into an expanding role in international affairs, helping national governments navigate critical global challenges. Every twenty years, the world convenes at the United Nations Conference on Housing and Sustainable Urban Development (HABITAT) to debate human settlement and collectively redraw our urban future. Using HABITAT III in Quito as a lens, we explore urban growth and governance; technology and finance; environmental and cultural sustainability; international negotiations and multilateral cooperation. Includes independent research on themes from HABITAT III and the New Urban Agenda.

IPS 280. Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals. 3-5 Units.

Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Same as: ETHICSOC 280, HUMRTS 103, INTNLREL 180A

IPS 290. Practical Approaches to Global Health Research. 3 Units.

How do you come up with an idea for health research overseas? How do you develop a research question, concept note, and get your project funded? How do you manage personnel in the field, difficult cultural situations, or unexpected problems? How do you create a sampling strategy, select a study design, and ensure ethical conduct with human subjects? This course takes students through the process of health research in under-resourced countries from the development of the initial research question and literature review to securing support and detailed planning for field work. Students progressively develop and receive weekly feedback on a concept note to support a funding proposal addressing a research question of their choosing. Aims at graduate students; undergraduates in their junior or senior year may enroll with instructor consent. This course is restricted to undergraduates unless they have completed 85 units or more.
Same as: HRP 237, MED 226

IPS 298. Practical Training. 1-3 Unit.

Students obtain internship in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree program and area of concentration. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by associate director. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Student is responsible for arranging own internship. Limited to International Policy Studies students only. May be repeated for credit.

IPS 299. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

IPS students only. May be repeated for credit.

IPS 300. IPS Student-Faculty Colloquium. 1 Unit.

Presentations of techniques and applications of international policy analysis by students, faculty, and guests, including policy analysis practitioners.

IPS 316S. Decision Making in U.S. Foreign Policy. 5 Units.

Formal and informal processes involved in U.S. foreign policy decision making. The formation, conduct, and implementation of policy, emphasizing the role of the President and executive branch agencies. Theoretical and analytical perspectives; case studies. Interested students should attend the first day of class. Admission will be by permission of the instructor. Priority to IPS students.
Same as: POLISCI 316S

IPS 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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