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Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Contacts

Office: Building 260, Room 119
Mail Code: 94305-2014
Phone: (650) 723-4977
Email: ilac@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://ilac.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, formerly the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, are listed under the subject code ILAC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site. For courses in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish language instruction with the subject codes CATLANG, PORTLANG and SPANLANG, see the "Language Center" section of this bulletin.

The Language Center offers a series of second- and third-year courses designed for students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken (heritage speakers) and who wish to develop their existing linguistic strengths. See the "Language Center" section of this bulletin.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Studying Iberian and Latin American cultures at Stanford means engaging in a deep and compelling exploration of the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America (including Brazil), and Latina/o populations of the United States. To achieve our goal of training students as experts in these areas, we balance an emphasis on literary studies with philosophical, historical, and social approaches to cultural issues.  As a result of our focus on critical thinking, open discussion, and close textual analysis, our undergraduate majors provide excellent preparation for a large number of professional fields, including business, education, international relations, law, and medicine. Our graduate program provides rigorous and highly individualized advanced training in the analysis of Iberian, Latin American (including Brazil), and Latina/o literatures, and our students go on to produce innovative original research and find excellent jobs, both in academe and beyond.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. oral proficiency in Catalan, Portuguese, and/or Spanish beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities;
  2. close reading skills of authentic texts in Catalan Portuguese, and/or Spanish;
  3. writing proficiency in Catalan, Portuguese, and/or Spanish beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities.

Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

In this major, students engage in a thoroughly transnational and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American (including Brazil) literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with an emphasis on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

This undergraduate program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the Spanish language in a global perspective.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the terminal M.A. program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is for students to develop further the knowledge and skills acquired as undergraduates, and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through the completion of graduate courses in the student's major area of interest as well as in related areas.

The Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis with respect to the areas and traditions taught by the department. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to develop innovative research and to present the results of this research to the world in compelling ways.

Other Programs

Coterminal B.A. and M.A.

The coterminal degree program allows undergraduates to study for a master's degree in Iberian and Latin American Cultures while completing their bachelor's degree(s) in ILAC or a different department. The course requirements for the coterminal B.A. and M.A. are the same as those outlined for the terminal M.A., and students should be aware that university policy prevents one course from counting for both the B.A. and M.A. degrees.  University requirements for the coterminal B.A. and M.A. (along with application procedures) are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin.


Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

This program is designed for students who wish to engage in a transitional and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with an emphasis on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day. B.A. Iberian and Latin American Cultures appears on the official transcript and on the diploma. The major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures required 60 units of coursework. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

For all ILAC courses taught in Spanish, students must have successfully completed SPANLANG 102 Composition and Writing Workshop or successfully tested above this level through the Language Center. One course above 100 and one core course, or consent of the instructor, are prerequisites for 200-level courses.

Declaring the Major

Students declare the major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures through Axess. Students should meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to discuss appropriate courses and options within the major, and to plan the course of study. Majors are also urged to attend department events such as public talks and conferences.

Double Majors

The major in ILAC is designed to combine with a second major in another field and with study abroad. Students should be aware, however, that university policy prevents one course from counting for both degree programs.

General Course Requirements

Students must complete a total of 60 units for the major. The first four requirements listed below are considered core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University.

  1. ILAC 120 Advanced Critical Reading in Spanish, Writing in the Major (WIM): 5 units are required, and this is a prerequisite for every course in the major; however, concurrent enrollment is allowed.
  2. Core courses in literature. All three courses must be completed
    Units
    ILAC 136Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
    ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
    ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5
  3. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one.
    Units
    ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
    ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
  4. Senior Seminar. Students must take one of the following:
  5. ILAC 278Senior Seminar: Monsters of Modern Spanish Empire3-5
    ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Pau-Brazil from Modernism to Concretism5

5. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:

  • Up to 15 units of language courses (not including conversational courses) in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan.
  • Additional 100- or 200- level ILAC literature courses.
  • Up to 15 units of pre-approved coursework from Stanford Study Abroad programs in Barcelona, Madrid, or Santiago.
  • Up to 5 units of pre-approved coursework from outside ILAC
  • Up to 10 units of Thinking Matters courses taught at least partially by an ILAC faculty member
  • Up to 10 units of coursework in Structured Liberal Education (SLE).

6. In addition to course requirements for the major, students must also take an Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) in Catalan, Portuguese, or Spanish through the Language Center two quarters prior to degree conferral.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

This program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the language in a global perspective. "B.A. Spanish" appears on the official transcript and on the diploma. The major in Spanish requires 60 units of coursework. All coursework must be done in Spanish. If a class is taught in a language other than Spanish, then written work (e.g. final papers) must be completed in Spanish. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

Students must be at or above the level of SPANLANG 13 or successfully tested above this level through the Language Center. 

Declaring the Major

Students declare the major in Spanish through Axess. Students should meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to discuss appropriate courses and options within the major, and to plan the course of study. Majors are also urged to attend department events such as public talks and conferences. 

Double Majors

The Spanish major is designed to combine with a second major in another field and with study abroad. Students should be aware, however, that university policy prevents one course from counting for both degree programs.

General Course Requirements

Students must complete a total of 60 units for the major.  The first five requirements listed below are core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University.

  1. ILAC 120 Advanced Critical Reading in Spanish, Writing in the Major (WIM).  5 units are required. This is a prerequisite for every course in the major; however, concurrent enrollment is allowed.
  2. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one.
    Units
    ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
    ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
  3.  Senior Seminar
    Units
    ILAC 277Spanish and Society: Rock en Español3-5

4. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:

  • Additional 100- or 200-level ILAC courses
  • Up to 15 units of pre-approved coursework from Stanford study abroad programs in Barcelona, Madrid, or Santiago.
  • Up to 5 units of pre-approved coursework from outside ILAC

5. In addition to the course requirements listed above, all majors must test their proficiency in Spanish through the Language Center by winter quarter of their senior year. Students must receive a notation of at least "Advanced Mid" to be deemed adequately proficient. Those needing outside tutoring will be advised to do so (resources available through the CTL and ILAC).  The proficiency examination will consist of both an oral interview and a writing proficiency test.

Honors Program

ILAC majors and Spanish majors with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above, and who maintain a 3.5 (GPA) in major courses, are eligible to participate in the DLCL's honors program. Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis adviser from among their home department's regular faculty, in their junior year, preferably by March 1, but no later than May 1. During Spring Quarter of the junior year, a student interested in the honors program should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of their home department to submit a thesis proposal (2-5 pages), DLCL Honors application and an outline of planned course work for their senior year.

Honors papers vary considerably in length as a function of their topic, historical scope, and methodology. They may make use of previous work developed in seminars and courses, but display an enhanced comparative or theoretical scope. Quality rather than quantity is the key criterion. Honors theses range from 40-90 pages not including bibliography and notes. Please consult the DLCL Honors Handbook for more details on declaring and completing the honors thesis.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the honors college hosted by Bing Honors College and coordinated by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. The honors college is offered at the end of the summer, during the weeks directly preceding the start of the academic year, and is designed to help students develop their honors thesis projects. Applications must be submitted through the Bing program. For more information, view the Bing Honors website.

Enrollment: A minimum of 10 units total, described below, and a completed thesis is required. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year. If an essay is found deserving of a grade of 'A-' of better by the thesis adviser, honors are granted at the time of graduation.

  • Spring Quarter of the junior year (optional) DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units S/NC) under the primary thesis adviser. Drafting or revision of the thesis proposal. The proposal is reviewed by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Director of the department and will be approved or returned for submission.
  • Autumn Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 189A Honors Thesis Seminar (4 units S/NC) taught by a DLCL appointed faculty member. Course will focus on researching and writing the honors thesis.
  • Winter Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 189B Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units Letter grade) under the primary thesis adviser. Focus will be on writing writing under guidance of primary adviser. The letter grade will determine if honors is granted or not.
  • Spring Quarter of the senior year (option; mandatory if not taken during junior year) DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units S/NC) under the primary thesis adviser. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser and Student Service Officer no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year.
  • Spring Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 199 Honors Thesis Oral Presentation (1 unit S/NC). Enroll with primary thesis adviser.

Minors in Spanish and Portuguese

Both the minor in Portuguese and the minor in Spanish are for students who want to combine acquisition of linguistic competence with the study of the literatures and cultures of the Lusophone or Spanish-speaking worlds. Each minor requires 30 units of course work taken for a letter grade. Up to 5 units of course work outside the department, and up to 15 units of second-year and above Spanish or Portuguese language courses (not including conversational courses) may count toward these minors with the approval of the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Minor in Portuguese

Units
Required Courses: (30)30
1. A 100- or 200-level course in Iberian literature with a Lusophone component
2. A 100- or 200-level course in Latin American literature with a Lusophone component.
3. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete the required 30 units. Thinking Matters courses with a Lusophone component taught at least partially by ILAC faculty may count toward these elective as may 5 units of SLE.

Minor in Spanish

Units
Required Courses: (30)30
1. A 100- or 200-level course in Iberian literature
2. A 100- or 200-level course in Latin American literature
3. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete the required 30 units. Thinking Matters courses with a Hispanophone component taught at least partially by ILAC faculty may count towards these electives, as may 5 units of SLE.

Master of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The purpose of the terminal M.A. program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is for students to develop further the knowledge or skills acquired as undergraduates, and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies.  This is achieved through the completion of graduate courses in the student's major area of interest as well as in related areas.  Students in this program may not apply concurrently for entrance to the Ph.D. program.

Students must complete a minimum of 45 graduate-level units, 36 of which must be taken at Stanford.  All 45 units must have a letter grade of B or above.  Students enrolled in the terminal M.A. program must file a Program Proposal for a Master's Degree during their first quarter of enrollment.  Any changes to the proposal should be reviewed and approved by the Chair of Graduate Studies.

The requirements for the terminal M.A.(and coterminal M.A.) are:

  1. A 200-level or above course in literary or cultural theory
  2. Two 200-level or above courses in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  3. Two 200-level or above courses in Iberian literature and culture
  4. One 300-level course in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  5. One 300-level course in Iberian literature and culture
  6. Enrollment in at least two graduate seminars (200- or 300- level) offered in the department each quarter
  7. Intermediate-high proficiency in Portuguese or Catalan (equivalent to one year of university study).

Independent study courses (ILAC 299 Individual Work, ILAC 399 Individual Work) and crosslisted courses originating outside the department may not be used to fulfill requirements except by consent of the Chair of Graduate Studies.

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis with respect to the areas and traditions taught by the department. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to develop innovative research and to present the results of this research to the world in compelling ways.

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. The requirements of the Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC) are:

1. Course work

A total of 135 units is required for the Ph.D. During each quarter in year one and year two, students are required to enroll in and complete at least two graduate courses (200- or 300- level) offered through the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures.  It is anticipated that students make every effort to take a seminar with a core member of the faculty each quarter.  Students may take independent study courses (ILAC 299, 399) only during the summer quarter until they achieve TGR status.  Any exceptions must be made in consultation with the ILAC Chair of Graduate Studies and with the relevant faculty member and/or the student's faculty adviser.

Doctoral students in the department must take required courses for a letter grade if available and are expected to earn a grade of B+ or better in each course instructed in the DLCL.  Any grade of B or below is considered to be less than satisfactory.  Grades of B or below are reviewed by faculty and the following actions may be taken: 1) the grade stands and the student's academic performance is monitored to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made; 2) the grade stands and the student is required to revise and resubmit the work associated with the course; or 3) the student may be required to retake the course.

In consultation with their primary adviser, students in their first year choose one major field and two minor areas of study from the following:

  • A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • B1. Colonial to Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B3. Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture
  • C. US Latin/Chicano Literature and Culture

Students must select one minor area from a group (A, B, C) other than that in which their major area falls. At least four graduate-level courses must be taken in the major area of study. At least two graduate-level courses must be taken in each minor area.

1a. First Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 54 graduate units during their first year of graduate study as well as 10 units during the summer. First year required coursework:

  • A 200-level or above course in literary or cultural theory
  • Two 200-level or above courses in Latin American (including Brazil) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  • Two 200-level or above courses in Iberian literature and culture
  • One 300-level course in Latin American (including Brazil) or Latino/Chicano literature and culture
  • One 300-level course in Iberian literature and culture
  • Enrollment in and completion of  ILAC 309 First Year Writing Workshop and  DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages
  • Intermediate-high proficiency in Portuguese or Catalan (equivalent to one year of university study)

1b. Second Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 30 graduate units during their second year of graduate study as well as 10 units during the summer.  In addition, second-year students must enroll in and complete at least two graduate seminars (200- or 300- level) offered in the department each quarter.

1c. Third Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 30 graduate units during their third year of graduate study.  In addition, they must successfully complete ILAC 310 (the Dissertation Prospectus Workshop).  

2. Language

All students are required to have advanced-high proficiency in English and Spanish by the time they take the comprehensive examination.  In addition, students specializing in Iberian literature and culture must attain intermediate-mid proficiency in Catalan and Portuguese (equivalent to two quarters of university study for each language); for students specializing in Latin American and/or US Latino/Chicano literature and culture, the level of advanced-low proficiency in Portuguese (equivalent to four quarters of university study) must be attained. Alternatively, they may substitute one quarter of Catalan or a native American language such as Quechua for the fourth quarter in Portuguese. This requirement must be fulfilled before students take the comprehensive examination. Students wishing to satisfy the language requirements in Catalan and/or Portuguese may do so by passing a proficiency exam administered by the Language Center.

3. Examinations

All students must pass the following: 1) a Qualifying Exam; 2) a written and oral Comprehensive examination; and 3) a University Oral examination.

3a. Qualifying Exam

In the Autumn quarter of their first year, students will receive a digital reader containing 24 secondary texts related to all areas of Iberian and Latin American literature and culture. These texts will serve as the basis for the Qualifying Exam, which will be administered the week before classes begin for the Autumn quarter of the student's second year of study.  During the one hour oral examination, students must answer questions from all active members of the ILAC faculty.  Students who fail this examination may request to retake it during the Winter quarter.

3b. Comprehensive examination

This exam consists of two parts: 1) a written submission; and 2) an oral presentation. It is designed for students to demonstrate intellectual competence in multiple areas of study. This exam occurs during Winter Quarter of the fourth year of graduate study, and it must be completed prior to the last day of instruction in that same quarter. Students must select a major and two minor areas for the exam from the following options:

  • A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • B1. Colonial to Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B3. Luso-Brazilian Literature and Culture
  • C. US Latin/Chicano Literature and Culture

Students must select one minor area from a group (A, B, C) other than that in which their major area falls.

The committee for the Comprehensive Exam is formed by asking three ILAC professors to serve on the committee, one for each of the three examination areas chosen by the student. In consultation with each member of the committee, the student must develop a list of twenty-one themes (seven for each area of study) plus a reading list of 130 texts and critical works (approximately 60 for the major area and 35 for each of the minor areas). In addition, the student will submit a 6,000-word research paper on a topic preferably related to the dissertation. This paper must be written in English. The comprehensive exam reading list and research paper must be presented to committee members and to the Graduate Student Services Coordinator at least two weeks prior to the Oral portion of the Comprehensive Exam. The Oral exam will be based upon the submitted list and research paper and will last no more than two hours.

3c. University Oral examination

All Ph.D. candidates in ILAC are required to take a University Oral examination after successfully completing the Comprehensive Examination and before the end of the Spring quarter of their fourth year. This examination is a defense of the dissertation prospectus. During the examination, the candidate speaks for approximately 20 minutes on the proposed dissertation, the methods to be used in research and the conclusions the candidate expects to reach. Afterward, there will be questions by the members of the committee, in an order established by the Chair of the committee. The examination will last no more than two hours.

The University Oral examination committee must be finalized no later than the last week of the quarter during which the student successfully completes the comprehensive examination. The examination committee should include the dissertation adviser and three other members, usually from the Reading Committee, and a Chair from outside the department, for a total of five members. All members must belong to the Academic Council. The adviser and two other members must be ILAC faculty. Once a committee and date are finalized, the student must submit the University Oral Examination form to the Graduate Student Services Coordinator. The members of the Oral Examination committee must receive copies of the dissertation prospectus no later than three weeks prior to the examination.

The dissertation prospectus should consist of 20-25 pages (approximately 7,000 words) and follow the most recent MLA Style guidelines. The dissertation prospectus must contain a title along with the following sections: 1) Statement of Thesis; 2) Statement of Significance and Impact; 3) Brief Literature Review; 4) Outline of Theoretical Framework (i.e., a definition of key terms and concepts); 5) Chapter Outline; 6) Preliminary Biography; 7) Timetable for Completion.

4. Teaching

Each Ph.D candidate must teach a minimum of five quarters of undergraduate courses (three are taught during the second year and the remaining two after advancing to TGR status). Language course assignments are arranged through the Language Center. In preparation for teaching, Ph.D. candidates are required to take DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages during the Spring quarter of their first year.

5. Ph.D. Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation should demonstrate the student's ability to carry out original research and to organize and present the results in publishable form. The scope of the dissertation should be such that it is completed in twelve to eighteen months of full-time work. A copy of the completed dissertation must be submitted to each member of the reading committee at least eight weeks before the University filing deadline in the quarter during which the candidate expects to receive the Ph.D. degree. Committee members will have three weeks to read the dissertation before determining whether to approve or require changes. Ph.D. dissertations must be completed and approved within five years from the date of admission to candidacy. Students taking more than five years must apply for reinstatement of candidacy which is reviewed on a case by case basis.

Yearly review

In order to evaluate student progress and to identify potential problem areas, the department's faculty reviews the academic progress of each first-year student at the beginning of Winter and Spring quarters and again at the end of the academic year. The first two reviews are primarily intended to identify developing problems that could impede progress. In most cases, students are simply given constructive feedback, but if more serious concerns warrant, a student may be placed on probation with specific guidelines for addressing the problems detected.The review at the end of Spring Quarter is more thorough; each student's performance during the first year is reviewed and discussed. Possible outcomes of the spring review include: (1) continuation of the student in good standing, or (2) placing the student on probation, with specific guidelines for the period of probation and the steps to be taken in order to be returned to good standing. For students on probation at this point (or at any other subsequent points), possible outcomes of a review include: (1) restoration to good standing; (2) continued probation, again with guidelines for necessary remedial steps; or (3) termination from the program. All students are given feedback from their advisers at the end of their first year of graduate work, helping them to identify areas of strength and potential weakness.

Candidacy

Admission to candidacy is an important decision grounded in an overall assessment of a student’s ability to successfully complete the Ph.D. program. Per University policy, students are expected to complete department qualifying procedures and apply for candidacy by the end of the second year in residence. In reviewing a student for admission to candidacy, the faculty considers a student’s academic progress including but not limited to: advanced language proficiency, coursework, performance on the Qualifying Exam, and successful completion of teaching and research assistantships. A student must also have completed at least 3 units of work with each of 4 Stanford faculty members prior to consideration for candidacy. In addition to successful completion of department prerequisites, a student is only admitted to candidacy if the faculty makes the judgment that the student has the potential to successfully complete the requirements of the degree program. Candidacy is determined by faculty vote. Failure to advance to candidacy results in the dismissal of the student from the doctoral program. Candidacy is valid for five years and students are required to maintain active candidacy through conferral of the doctoral degree. All requirements for the degree must be completed before candidacy expires. The Department of Iberian and Latin American Studies conducts regular reviews of each student’s academic performance, both prior to and following successful admission to candidacy. Failure to make satisfactory progress to degree may result in dismissal from the doctoral program. Additional information about University candidacy policy is available in the Bulletin and GAP.

Ph.D. Minor in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Stanford Ph.D. students wishing to earn a minor in Iberian and Latin American Cultures must complete 25 units, with a grade point average (GPA) or 3.0 or above, selected from courses numbered 200 or higher.  For more information, students should speak with the ILAC Chair of Graduate Studies. Students in the Ph.D. program in ILAC who choose a minor in another department should consult with advisers in that department.

Emeriti: (Professors) Bernard Gicovate, Mary Pratt, Sylvia Wynter; (Professor, Teaching) María-Paz Haro

Director: Gabriella Safran

Chair of Graduate Studies: Jorge Ruffinelli (Autumn), Marilia Librandi Rocha (Winter, Spring)

Chair of Undergraduate Studies: Vincent Barletta

Professors: Michael P. Predmore (on leave, Autumn), Joan Ramon Resina (Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Comparative Literature)(on leave), Jorge Ruffinelli, Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

Associate Professors: Vincent Barletta, Lisa Surwillo

Assistant Professors: Héctor M. Hoyos, Marília Librandi Rocha (on leave Autumn)

Courtesy Professors: John Felstiner, Roland Greene, Hans U. Gumbrecht, Ramón Saldívar

Courtesy Associate Professors: James A. Fox, Paula Moya

Visiting Professors: Antoni Martí Monterde (Winter), Andrés Lema-Hincapié (Spring)
Visiting Lecturer: Miquel Bota (Autumn)

Lecturer: Ximena Briceño

Director of Iberian Studies Program: Joan Ramon Resina

Spanish Language Program Coordinator: Alice Miano

Portuguese Language Program Coordinator: Lyris Wiedemann

Catalan Language Program Coordinator: Joan Molitoris

Overseas Studies Courses in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Study Abroad Programs in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

All majors are encouraged to study abroad. To transfer credits from non-Stanford programs abroad, consult the Bing Overseas Studies Office. Course work taken abroad may be applied toward both our major and minor programs. Students planning to study abroad must consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to coordinate the course work from abroad with their degree program. The maximum number of units is identified in the elective section for each major.

The department and Bechtel International Center maintain information on study abroad programs. Stanford supports the options listed below and credits course work taken in academically sound programs. Students considering different options are encouraged to speak with the Director of the department or the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Stanford in Santiago de Chile and Madrid or Barcelona, Spain

The Bing Overseas Studies Programs in Santiago de Chile and Madrid, Spain require a certain level of proficiency in Spanish. For more information, students should consult the program summary of their interested campus. Course work is primarily in Spanish. Information is available in the "Overseas Studies" section of this bulletin or at the Bing Overseas Studies web site. Internships and research opportunities may be arranged for students staying for two quarters.

For ILAC majors with an interest in Iberian Studies, the department recommends study in Barcelona through the Consortium for Advanced Study in Barcelona (CASB), a consortium of U.S. universities of which Stanford is a participating member. This program combines courses at the program's center with open access to courses at three Barcelona universities: Universitat Pompeu Fabra, University of Barcelona, and Autonomous University of Barcelona. Visiting faculty from Brown, Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Duke, Harvard, Northwestern, Princeton, and Stanford complement the offerings of these three major universities. Admission is highly competitive.

The department also recognizes other programs, and students are encouraged to discuss their interests with the Director of the department or with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Brazil and Portugal

The University maintains a relationship with the State University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil at the graduate level. Students interested in study in Brazil should contact Professor Marília Librandi Rocha. Students interested in study in Portugal should contact Professor Vincent Barletta.

Bing Overseas Studies Program

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

 

Units
OSPMADRD 41Dissidence and Continuity: Spanish Theater, 1907 to the Present4-5
OSPMADRD 43The Jacobean Star Way and Europe: Society, Politics and Culture5
OSPMADRD 45Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums4
OSPMADRD 46Drawing with Four Spanish Masters: Goya, Velazquez, Picasso and Dali3
OSPMADRD 50Flirting with Spanish Metafiction: Cervantes, Velázquez, Fuentes, Almodóvar4-5
OSPMADRD 61Society and Cultural Change: The Case of Spain4
OSPMADRD 62Spanish California: Historical Issues4
OSPSANTG 14Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century4-5
OSPSANTG 68The Emergence of Nations in Latin America4-5
OSPSANTG 116XModernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century5
OSPSANTG 118XArtistic Expression in Latin America5

Catalan Language Courses Courses

CATLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Catalan, Part 1. 5 Units.

First quarter of the two-quarter sequence. For students with knowledge of another Romance language, preferably Spanish. Emphasis is on developing beginning proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CATLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Catalan, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of CATLANG 1A. For students with knowledge of another Romance language, preferably Spanish. Further development of socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Completion of CATLANG 2A fulfills the University language requirement. Prerequisite: CATLANG 1A.

CATLANG 11A. Accelerated Second-Year Catalan, Part A. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of CATLANG 2A. Sequence integrating culture and language of the Catalan-speaking world. Socially and culturally appropriate forms in narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis is on oral and written proficiency in formal, informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: CATLANG 2A.

CATLANG 199. Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CATLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Catalan. 2-5 Units.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite consent of instructor.

Iberian & Latin American Cultures Courses

ILAC 10SC. Spanish Immersion. 2 Units.

Wouldn't it be great if you could quickly increase your Spanish proficiency through an intensive immersion experience right here at Stanford? Wouldn't you love to gain the cultural and historical knowledge necessary to begin taking film, literature, and culture courses generally reserved for advanced students? This intensive Spanish immersion course is designed to help students who have completed a year of Spanish to move forward quickly toward greater linguistic and cultural competence. nAfter a year of Spanish, students tend to be able to handle straightforward interactions related to basic needs and personal information, but they generally lack the ability to handle more abstract discussions or to combine short utterances into longer presentations of their ideas. Most students likewise have little knowledge of the rich and complex history that surrounds the Spanish language or the central role that Spanish has played in the cultural, artistic, and political life of California. nIn this course, a team of experienced instructors will help students improve their Spanish through intensive lessons that incorporate film, literature, and social issues. Through a focused discussion of the themes of immigration and democracy in Spain, Latin America, and the United States, as well as excursions and guest lectures by Stanford faculty and community leaders, this course will immerse students in Spanish and help them to gain advanced proficiency much more quickly.

ILAC 103N. The Millenium Novel in Latin America. 3 Units.

Between 2000 and 2012, a young Spanish American novel emerges, taking at times a minimalist point of view to narrate individual stories with a subjective tone, or continuing a tradition of the historical panorama to present national tragedies that occurred in the last two or three decades. Focus is on this new type of novel from different countries, with such titles as "El cuerpo en que nací" by Guadalupe Entel; "Las teorías salvajes" by Pola Oloixarac; "El ruido de las cosas al caer" by Juan Gabriel Vazquez; and "Bonsai" by Alejandro Zambra, among others. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 107N. 3D Modeling, Virtual Media, and the Poetics of the Self: The Art and Lives of Fernando Pessoa. 3-5 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa, Portugal'€™s greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work (in Portuguese and English) as for his complex understanding of selfhood (he would divide his own subjectivity into 106 different, autonomous selves), Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa'€™s work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, art, and the self. Class field trip to San Francisco. Written assignments include a journal, blog posts, and a final paper written as someone else. Taught in English.

ILAC 108N. Masterpieces: García Márquez. 3-5 Units.

Extensive and detailed reading of the major works and a selection of the most significant critical texts about the author. Secondary readings by Vargas Llosa, Ludmer, Moretti, and Bloom. Topics include: macondismo, magical realism, canonicity, representations of violence, and autobiography.

ILAC 110. Spanish Society in the 21st Century Through Film. 3-5 Units.

Open to undergraduates with an interest in 21st Century Film and the social reality of Spain nowadays. Explores how Spain has evolved from being one of the most undeveloped European countries to become a first mover in social issues such as gay marriage or women's public role. Topics include racism, migration, the reconstruction of the past and the vision of the other. Themes are analyzed through movies directed by Spanish and American filmmakers such as: Cesc Gay, Bollain, Bigas-Luna, González-Iñárritu and Woody Allen. Class taught in Spanish, readings both in Spanish and English.

ILAC 111Q. Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Same as: DLCL 111Q.

ILAC 114N. Introduction to Lyric Poetry. 3-5 Units.

A basic introduction to the elements of lyric poetry--image, metaphor, symbol, connotation, denotation, irony, rhyme and meter - drawing upon a selection of poems from major poets of the Hispanic World, including, G. A. Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Rubén Darío, Miguel de Unamuno, Antonio Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, Garcia Lorca, Pablo Neruda, and Gabriela Mistral. This is a bilingual course, taught both in English, and Spanish, with an emphasis on Spanish.

ILAC 116. Approaches to Spanish and Spanish American Literature. 3-5 Units.

Short stories, poetry, and theater. What analytical tools do the "grammars" of different genres call for? What contact zones exist between these genres? How have ideologies, the power of patronage, and shifting poetics shaped their production over time? Authors may include Arrabal, Borges, Cortázar, Cernuda,García Márquez, Lorca, Neruda, Rivas. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C.

ILAC 120. Advanced Critical Reading in Spanish. 3-5 Units.

Research and writing in the humanities; focus is on culture, literature, and society of the Spanish-speaking world. Students will learn how to conduct research online and in the library while developing archive skills. Emphasis is on skill-building while exploring topics of interest to each student from various historical periods and global locations. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent. Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement.

ILAC 122. Literature and Politics - Two Mediterranean Cases: Catalonia and Italy. 3-5 Units.

A comparison between the different roles played by writers as members of the intellectual establishment in Catalonia, Spain and Italy. Focus on the relation between intellectuals and politics in shaping national identity. We will give especially consideration to the role played by intellectuals during the Fascist and Francoist dictatorships and during Spain's transition to democracy. Taught in English.
Same as: ITALIAN 136.

ILAC 130. Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 131. Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.

ILAC 133N. The Animal Within: Animal Presence in Latin American Narrative. 3 Units.

How does the criterion for the division between the human and the animal take part on contemporary Latin American narrative? To what extent is this divide challenged or contested? The course combines a discussion of the literary works of authors like Jorge Luis Borges, Horacio Quiroga, Julio Cortázar, Mario Bellatin, Clarice Lispector, and José María Arguedas with a reflection on the animal and animality in the writings of Bataille, Derrida and Deleuze. Taught in English.

ILAC 134. In the First Person: Representation of the Self in Modern Latin America. 3-5 Units.

This course examines different expressions of self-portrayal in Latin America from 1920s to the present. The course explores different models of self-shaping and forms of expression that draw contourns on self and identity in Latin America. After a brief consideration of the Inca Garcilaso, Sor Juana, J.F. Sarmiento, we examine the works of José Vasconcelos, Norah Lange, Victoria Ocampo, Frida Kahlo, José María Arguedas, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Bellatin, Tununa Mercado, Marcela Trujillo, Fernando Vallejo, among others. Taught in Spanish; Spanish proficiency required.

ILAC 135. From Book to Screen: Brazilian Novels and Their Film Adaptations. 3-5 Units.

Can the study of cinematographic adaptation of novels help us understand better the specific nature of literature and that of film? Addressing this central question, the course combines an introduction to Brazilian narrative (Euclides Da Cunha, Mário De Andrade, João Guimaraes Rosa, Graciliano Ramos, Rubem Fonseca, Clarice Lispector) and a panorama of Brazilian cinematography (from Cinema Novo to contemporary productions). The course offers a space for reflection on the multifaceted relationship between the literary and the cinematographic. Taught in English.

ILAC 136. Modern Iberian Literatures. 3-5 Units.

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

ILAC 138. From National Angst to Incipient Modernity: Spanish Literature After Empire. 3-5 Units.

This course focuses on the most predominant and influential Spanish writers from 1836 to 1936, exploring the emergence of a new political and social conscience in Spain and its transition from global empire to a nation that questions the ideas behind its world decline and eventual Civil War. The writers chosen portray a nation trying to find a new political order after the failure of various forms of government. Readings include the nonfiction and narrative of Larra, Espronceda, Galdós, and subsequently analyzing the innovative thinking and actions of Generation of 1898 philosopher Unamuno and the poets Machado and García Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 140. Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film. 3-5 Units.

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an evergrowing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: El niño pez, Bolivia, Ulises, Faustino Mayta visita a su prima, Copacabana, Chico y Rita, Sin nombre, Los que se quedan, Amador, and En la puta calle. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Same as: CHILATST 140.

ILAC 145. Poets, Journalists and Collectors: Latin American Modernismo. 3-5 Units.

Discusses the different artistic avatars exercised by Latin American modernistas at the turn of the 19th Century in the context of growing capitalism, technological innovation and social transformation. We focus on how modernistas as poets, journalists and collectors explored and transgressed the limits of the individual and his/her situation. We consider topics like cosmopolitanism, dandysm, autonomy of art, and the aesthetic cultivation of the self. Authors include: Delmira Agustini, Rubén Darío, Julián del Casal, Leopoldo Lugones, José Martí, Manuel Gutierrez Nájera, José Enrique Rodó, José Asunción Silva, and Abraham Valdelomar. Spanish proficiency required.

ILAC 157. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures. 3-5 Units.

Survey of literature in Spanish from the early modern period. Course will draw on transatlantic literature. Taught in Spanish; prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

ILAC 161. Modern Latin American Literature. 3-5 Units.

From independence to the present. Topics include romantic allegories of thennation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 175. Daydreaming in Portugal and Brazil. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the role of the imagination in 19th and 20th century Portuguese and Brazilian literature. We will read 4-5 novels, short stories and articles analyzing how and why authors recreate imaginary processes in their characters, and what these processes reveal about the socio-cultural contexts of their period. Authors include Raúl Brandão, Machado de Assis, Antonio Lobo Antunes, Raduan Nassar, and Álvaro Cardoso Gomes, with complementary short pieces by Fernando Pessoa, José Saramago, Mario de Andrade, Guimarães Rosa, and Clarice Lispector. Readings available in English and Portuguese. In English.

ILAC 193. The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar. 3-5 Units.

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 393.

ILAC 193Q. Spaces and Voices of Brazil through Film. 3-4 Units.

The manners in which a country is perceived and defines itself is a result of many complex forces, and involves the reproduction of social relations and complex social constructions both on the part of those who live there and those who see it from a distance. The perceptions of what Brazil is and what defines the country has changed throughout times, but has conserved some clear pervasive defining traits. This course is an introduction to the history, culture, politics and artistic production of Brazil as seen through feature films, documentaries and some complementary readings. Movies include, among others, Banana is my Business, Black Orpheus, Olga, They Don't Use Black-Tie, City of God, Central Station, Gaijin, and Four Days in September-among others. In English.
Same as: PORTLANG 193Q.

ILAC 199. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.

ILAC 207E. RENAISSANCE PASTORALISMS. 3-5 Units.

Major works of Iberian pastoral lyric poetry and narrative fiction.nWhat made this classical mode so popular during the Renaissance andnbeyond? What are its essential characteristics? What does it tell usnabout early modern theories of humanity's relation to nature? Was itnmerely a form of erotic escapism or is something darker and morentroubling lurking between its lines? What can it teach us today aboutnnature, eros, ethics, death, and love? Authors include: Theocritus;nVirgil; Sannazaro; Garcilaso de la Vega; Montemayor; Ribeiro; Camões;nand Cervantes. Readings in English, Portuguese, and Spanish.nDiscussion in English.

ILAC 210. Queer Almodovar. 3-5 Units.

Focus on the representation of non-normative sexualities and genders in films by Pedro Almodóvar, one of the most recognizable auteur directors in Europe today. Analysis of his hybrid and eclectic visual style complemented by critical and theoretical readings in queer studies. Taught in English.
Same as: FEMST 210.

ILAC 216. Comparative Cities: Travel Literature as Urban Experience in Catalan Culture. 3-5 Units.

a comparative reflection on travel literature, focused on some major Western cities, taking as a starting point the reflections on travel by some writers and theorists: Francis Bacon, Stendhal, Goethe, Georg Simmel, Claudio Magris and Tzvetan Todorov, in order to comment travel writing by some of the most prominent Catalan writers in the 20th century.nCatalan travel literature, whether autobiographical or in essay form, is often related to literary journalism and exile. This is true of Santiago Rusiñol, Eugeni Xammar, Josep Pla, Agustí Calvet Gaziel, Josep Maria de Sagarra, and Sebastià Gasch, among others. These writers take notice of cities like Paris, Berlin, Madrid, Venice, Buenos Aires and New York, at historically decisive times: the two World Wars, the rise of fascism in Italy, Spain and Germany, the Cold War, the emergence of the United States as a world power¿ In this sense, travel writers offer a double comparative vantage point: on the one hand, between their own literature and that of other European travel writers; on the other hand, between Barcelona and some of the greatest cities in the world. These contrasts, perceived through the literary lens, help us understand the cosmopolitanism and modernity of Catalan culture. Taught in Spanish; all readings available both in Catalan and Spanish.

ILAC 218. Anticlericalism in the Iberian Novel of the 19th Century. 3-5 Units.

The rapid social and cultural changes in which 19th-century novelists wrote; the anti-clerical stance as marker of society's attempts to modernize. Why were monks and priests reviled by many Spanish novelists? How and why did they re-write Spanish history around these figures? What was the role of the church and religious men in modern society? Questions of individualism, property, and labor in novels by major Iberian prose realists. In Spanish.

ILAC 223. The Generation of 1898 and Beyond. 3-5 Units.

Preference for graduate students, majors are welcome. Course will focus on six major authors (Unamuno, Baroja, A. Machado, J. R. Jiménez, Valle-Inclán, García Lorca) and representative works, written between 1898 and 1930, dealing with an historical period of crisis and transition, and displaying major aesthetic innovations in both poetry and theater. Fundamental themes include the decline of feudal Galicia, the Spanish-Amrican War of 1898, the emergence and social activism of new social forces, and the struggle for and betrayal of democracy, expressed through the various genres of the novel, poetry, and theater. Major works of Antonio Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Federico García Lorca will be examined, with special emphasis on the historical context of the first three decades of the 20th century and their contributions to the development of 20th century Spanish lyric poetry. Taught in either English or Spanish, depending on course enrollment.

ILAC 224. Literature Inspired by the Spanish Republic and the Spanish Civil War. 3-5 Units.

This course will deal with the significance of the Spanish Civil War in Iberian, European, and world history, through the literary works (poetry, theater, and novel) of major Spanish and Latin American writers. The war is anticipated in the poetry of Antonio Machado and in the theater of Garcia Lorca, dealt with directly in the poetry of Alberti and Hernandez, of Neruda (Chile), Vallejo (Peru), and N. Guillen (Cuba), and treated in the aftermath during the Franco dictatorship in the novels of Cela and Sender. Taught in English.

ILAC 235. Critique of Technology. 3-5 Units.

Informed citizens living in today's world, and especially in Silicon Valley, should be able to formulate their own, articulate positions about the role of technology in culture. The course gives students the tools to do so. Against the trend towards the thoughtless celebration of all things technological, we will engage in critique in the two senses of the term: as careful study of the cultural implications of technology and as balanced, argumentative criticism. Can technology make life more meaningful, society more fair, people smarter, and the world smaller? Selections by fiction writers, philosophers and thinkers (such as Heidegger and Beller), as well as recent popular works of social commentary, such as You are not a Gadget, The Shallows, 24/7, and Present Shock.

ILAC 239. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.

ILAC 240E. Borges and Philosophy. 3-5 Units.

Analysis of the Argentine author's literary renditions of philosophical ideas. Topics may include: time, free will, infinitude, authorship and self, nominalism vs. realism, empiricism vs. idealism, skepticism, peripheral modernities, postmodernism, and Eastern thought. Close reading of short stories, poems, and essays from Labyrinths paired with selections by authors such as Augustine, Berkeley, James, and Lao Tzu. The course will be conducted in English; Spanish originals will be available. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major in Philosophy and Literature.

ILAC 241. Fiction Workshop in Spanish. 3-5 Units.

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.

ILAC 242. Poetry Workshop in Spanish. 3-5 Units.

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.

ILAC 243. The Millenium Novel in Latin America. 3-5 Units.

Between 2000 and 2012, a young Spanish American novel emerges, taking at times a minimalist point of view to narrate individual stories with a subjective tone, or continuing a tradition of the historical panorama to present national tragedies that occurred in the last two or three decades. Focus is on this new type of novel from different countries, with such titles as "El cuerpo en que nací" by Guadalupe Entel; "Las teorías salvajes" by Pola Oloixarac; "El ruido de las cosas al caer" by Juan Gabriel Vazquez; and "Bonsai" by Alejandro Zambra, among others.

ILAC 245. Brazil's Rhythm and Songs. 3-5 Units.

Audiovisual introduction to Brazilian popular music. Chorinho, Samba, Frevo, Forro, Bossa Nova, Tropicalia, Pagode, Repente, Hip-Hop, Axe. Candomble and Capoeira rhythms. Amerindian Songs. Dances and Rituals: Bumba meu Boi, Congada, Caterete, Carnaval. Drama Performances and Musical Films. Final visual-sonorous exhibition created by students. In English. Special sections for Portuguese learners.

ILAC 248. Distant Borders: Hispanic Migrations. 3-5 Units.

During the last half a century, different people from Africa, Eastern Europe, have been moving from one area to another, looking for a better habitat. This has been a world wide phenomenon that has changed hundreds of thousands of lives, producing imperfect utopias. This course will focus on the assimilation of families and individuals to different cultures, as well as how the new country deals with this, many time rejecting the "other". Cinema and literature have been a great source to understand the drama of migration, and the course will use extensively these forms of artistic representation. Authors include Ángel Vásquez, Jorge Semprún, Mahi Binebine, Ariel Dorfman, Alberto Fuguet, Zoé Valdés, and Julia Álvarez.

ILAC 251. Latin American Literary Theory. 3-5 Units.

Latin American literary theory through the works of José Carlos Mariátegui, José Enrique Rodó, Alfonso Reyes, Antonio Candido, Roberto Schwartz, Angel Rama, Roberto Fernández Retamar, Antonio Cornejo Polar, Josefina Ludmer, Flora Sussekind. This course will focus on the concepts of "the lettered city", "hybridization", "psychoanalysis", "marxist theory", "class struggle", "literary politics", "latinamericanism". In sum: Literary theory from the inside of Latin American culture, considering also its Western influences. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 252. Guerillas. 3-5 Units.

The modern strategic response to state dictatorships in Latin America has its origins in Ernesto Che Guevara's "Guerra de guerrillas". This course will focus on how those irregular military groups were formed in Chile, Mexico, Argentina, and Uruguay during the 20th Century. We will give particular attention to the "invisible" guerrillas" (the women) in revolutionary moments. That view will be enhanced by films and literature on this subject. Authors include Palau, Ignacio Taibo II, Tort, Gibler, Guevara, Gilio, Caula, and Cavallo.

ILAC 253. Poverty, Redemption and Writing: Franciscanism in Latin America. 3-5 Units.

How are theories of poverty reflected in literary writing? What is the relationship between writing and redemption? Addressing these central questions, the course examines the heritage of Catholic thought and aesthetics in prominent colonial and post-colonial Latin America through the figure of Francis of Assisi. Franciscan writing allows us to explore the notions of subjectivity, solidarity, exception, animality, and capital. In Spanish.

ILAC 254. Surrealism in Latin America and Spain. 3-5 Units.

This course focuses on the legacy of Surrealism in the Hispanic transatlantic traditions, both in literature and the visual arts (film and paintings). We will study and analyze two aesthetic paths: on one hand, the embracing of Surrealism to enrich one¿s own poetics; on the other, that of other groups and authors' orthodox approach to the principles established by André Breton and his cohort in the aesthetic adventure. The course will study and assess Surrealism's lasting echoes in recent literary manifestations (among them Roberto Bolaño¿s works). Taught in Spanish.
Same as: Poetry and Fiction.

ILAC 257. Dictatorships in Latin America through testimonies and film. 3-5 Units.

Focus on Pinochet coup, the Falkland Islands, the prison Libertad in Uruguay, the "Plan Condor." How literature, journalism and cinema denounced and revisited the worst political times in Latin America. Taught in Spanish.
Same as: Argentina, Chile, Uruguay in the 70s.

ILAC 261. Voices in Brazilian Fiction. 3-5 Units.

Brazilian Literary canon. Novels and short stories from independence to the present. Topics include romanticism and realism; regionalism; modernism and postmodernism. Authors may include: José de Alencar, Machado de Assis, Oswald de Andrade, Graciliano Ramos, Guimarães Rosa, Lispector, Hilda Hilst, Silviano Santiago. Readings in Portuguese; Class discussions in English; Assignments in Portuguese or in English.

ILAC 263. Visions of the Andes. 3-5 Units.

What visions of the Andes circulate in Latin American literature, photography and painting? How are they constructed? How is their value accrued? The course focuses on visual and written images of Andean landscapes. Beginning with 19th century technical photography, the course explores the visual economy of the Andes in representative texts and images from Peru, Bolivia and Chile, vis-à-vis critical discourses about Andean culture. In Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 363.

ILAC 276. Aesthetics, Revolutionaries and Terrorists. 3-5 Units.

Who is a terrorist and who is a revolutionary? With surge of Anarchism in the XXth Century, the "culture of fear" has been one of the axes of political activism. This course will explore the difference between the desire to correct injustice in society (Revolution) and the desire to destroy society (Terrorism) using literary texts and films. Readings will include novels and testimonies of the protagonists in various social struggles, as well as journalistic and academic papers about these social movements.
Same as: ILAC 376.

ILAC 277. Spanish and Society: Rock en Español. 3-5 Units.

Can music be a medium to study how a society communicates? This course wants to answer this question by paying attention to how has Spanish changed and adapted in recent history. Taking rock and pop as a global musical phenomenon, the focus of the course will be the most prominent bands and songs in Spanish language. Emphasis is on the analysis of the use of Spanish in real-world contexts. In Spanish.

ILAC 278. Senior Seminar: Monsters of Modern Spanish Empire. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on debates over the morality of empire and slavery in literary works from modern Spain and Cuba. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 278A. Senior Seminar: Pau-Brazil from Modernism to Concretism. 3-5 Units.

From the historical Linguas people in Colonial Portuguese America to the Modern Galactic vision of Haroldo de Campos and his theory of translation as transcreation. A Cultural and Literary immersion in Brazilian history, in Luso-Afro-European-Amerindian plurilingualism and ethnic diversity. Authors include Pero Vaz de Caminha, Jean de Lery, Antonio Vieira, Oswald de Andrade, Mario de Andrade, Tarsila do Amaral, Augusto de Campos, Haroldo de Campos, Decio Pignatari, Helio Oiticica, Eduardo Viveiros de Castro, Andre Vallias, and Josely Vianna Baptista. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 280. Latin@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Same as: CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 382.

ILAC 281. Fernando Pessoa's Five forms of Anxiety. 3-5 Units.

Ethics, politics, and philosophy in the poetry of Fernando Pessoa. A close analysis of five forms of anxiety that pervade Fernando Pessoa¿s poetry: 1) that you are a person; 2) that you are one person; 3) that you are yourself; 4) that your life can be wasted; and 5) that others may fail to understand you. How do these forms of anxiety shape Pessoa¿s style(s), his system of heteronyms, his interest in certain literary forms (such as esoteric and prophetic literature), and his perception of the Portuguese cultural and geohistorical context? Readings available in English and Portuguese. Taught in English.

ILAC 287. Queer Raza. 3-5 Units.

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?
Same as: CHILATST 120, FEMGEN 120.

ILAC 299. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

Open to department advanced undergraduates or graduate students by consent of professor. May be repeated for credit.

ILAC 305. Rhythm: Ethics and Poetics of the Premodern. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on the notion of rhythm as a theoretical frame for the analysis of medieval and early modern Iberian poetry. Topics include Ancient Greek and modern conceptions of rhythm and the links between poetics and ethics in the medieval period and beyond. Authors include: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristoxenus, Maurice Blanchot, Paul Celan, EmmanuelnnLevinas, Arcipreste de Hita, Ausiås March, Garcilaso de la Vega, and Luís de Camões. Taught in English.

ILAC 309. First Year Writing Workshop. 1 Unit.

This course enables students to develop the writing skills necessary in their academic careers. Course topics include writing in the discipline, critiques, and literature reviews.

ILAC 316. Realism and Surrealism in the Cinema of Luis Bunuel. 3-5 Units.

Surrealism, realism, dark comedy, film genres transformed by Spanish director, Luis Bunuel in Spain, France and Mexico during the second half of the XX century. An examination of Bunuel's work from his Surrealist beginnings (L´Age d´Or, Un Chien Andalou), subsequent realistic films in Mexico (Los Olvidados, Nazarin), and a mixture of Surrealism and Realism (Viridiana, Exterminating Angel, Simon del Desierto), as well his work with dark comedy (Archibaldo de la Cruz, Belle de Jour, Le charme discret de la bourgeoisie). In Spanish.

ILAC 329. Luis de Camoes - Epic. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on Camões's epic masterpiece, Os Lusiadas. Topics include empire, intertextuality, Indian Ocean Studies, history, prophecy, and poetics. Readings in English and Portuguese.

ILAC 332. Race and Slavery in Nineteenth Century Spain. 3-5 Units.

An analysis of the literature written in Spain during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries dealing with the empire post 1808. Authors discussed include Blanco White, Baroja, Avellaneda, and Rusiñol, among others.

ILAC 333. Spain and the Transatlantic. 3-5 Units.

Course will address a variety of literary works from the 19th century to today, current debates on transatlantic studies, review of recent scholarship, and history. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 335. Materialism and Literature. 3-5 Units.

Exploration of vibrant materialism (Bennet, Latour) and historical materialism (critical theory) as a basis to approach Latin American commodity novels, i.e., those that revolve around bananas, coffee, etc. Literary works by J.E. Rivera, García Márquez, Asturias, Neruda, Magnus, and others. Taught in Spanish.
Same as: COMPLIT 335A.

ILAC 336. Early 20th Century Iberian Poetry. 3-5 Units.

This course will study the development of the dominant trends of early Iberian 20th-century lyric poetry, against the background of Restoration Spain (1875-1930), and the forces of resistance and opposition to its oligarchical and archaic social and political structure. We will concentrate on the major works of the three most important poets: Antonio Machado, Juan Ramón Jiménez, and Federico García Lorca. Symbolist-modernist poetry, the creation of symbolic systems, and the brief appearance of surrealism all define key aspects of this avant-garde during the first three decades. Special attention will be given to close stylistic analysis and to the historical and social conditions out of which arose the progressive intellectual and educational movement that gave rise to this renaissance of brilliant lyric poetry. Taught in either English or Spanish depending on class enrollment.

ILAC 341. Roberto Bolaño. 3-5 Units.

The most universally acclaimed Latin American writer since the Boom, Roberto Bolaño has recently joined transnational literary canons. But what does that tell us about the phenomenon of World Literature itself? The class will provide an overview of Bolaño's vast oeuvre by considering nouvelles, selected short stories, and sections of the long novels The Savage Detectives and 2666. The focus will be on exploring the multifarious relationship of Bolaño and the world. Up-to-date critical bibliography includes readings by Sarah Pollack, Gareth Williams, Sergio Villalobos, and others. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 345. Biopolitics and Sovereignity in Andean Culture, 1920-1940. 3-5 Units.

What is productive life? How is life aesthetically and politically valued? This course explores the inscription of life in changing political and aesthetic regimes of the Andean South in the turbulent decades of the 1920s-1940s. Based on theories of biopower and soveregnity, we explore topics such as domination, domestication, appropriation, exclusion, facism, solidarity, tellurism, race, mestizaje, and human/nature relations. We will consider poetry, narrative, journals, and the visual arts. Authors include: Gabriela Mistral, Pablo Neruda, Pablo de Rokha, Alcides Arguedas, Augusto Céspedes, Franz Tamayo, Leopoldo Marechal, Roberto Artl, Jorge Luis Borges, César Vallejo, José Carlos Mariátegui, Ciro Alegría, and José María Arguedas. Spanish proficiency required.

ILAC 363. Visions of the Andes. 3-5 Units.

What visions of the Andes circulate in Latin American literature, photography and painting? How are they constructed? How is their value accrued? The course focuses on visual and written images of Andean landscapes. Beginning with 19th century technical photography, the course explores the visual economy of the Andes in representative texts and images from Peru, Bolivia and Chile, vis-à-vis critical discourses about Andean culture. In Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 263.

ILAC 367. João/Joyce: Guimarães Rosa and the World Novel. 3-5 Units.

A comparative analysis of João Guimarães Rosa's (1908-1967) work, with special attention to the novel Grande Sertao-Veredas, translated by a Stanford professor, launched by A. Knopf in 1963. Rosa's fiction disturbs gender, racial, and literary divisions by the creation of a Babelic Brazilian Portuguese language from the sertao. Students increase their literary vocabulary with new terms, nonada and conconversa, and a gallery of Indigenous, Afro-Americans, mestizos, and foreigners' characters. Discussions in English; readings in Portuguese and Spanish.
Same as: COMPLIT 317.

ILAC 376. Aesthetics, Revolutionaries and Terrorists. 3-5 Units.

Who is a terrorist and who is a revolutionary? With surge of Anarchism in the XXth Century, the "culture of fear" has been one of the axes of political activism. This course will explore the difference between the desire to correct injustice in society (Revolution) and the desire to destroy society (Terrorism) using literary texts and films. Readings will include novels and testimonies of the protagonists in various social struggles, as well as journalistic and academic papers about these social movements.
Same as: ILAC 276.

ILAC 380E. Critical Concepts in Chican@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Combines primary texts of Chican@ literature with a metacritical interrogation of key concepts informing Chican@ literary criticism, the construction of Chican@ literary history, and a Chican@ literary canon. Interrogates the resistance paradigm and the "proper" subject of this literature, and critiques established genealogies and foundational authors and texts, as well as issues of periodization, including the notion of "emergence" (e.g. of feminist voices or dissident sexualities). Considers texts, authors and subjects that present alternatives to the resistance paradigm.
Same as: CHILATST 201C, CSRE 201C.

ILAC 382. Latin@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Same as: CHILATST 200, CSRE 200, ILAC 280.

ILAC 389E. Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations. 3-5 Units.

Examines major questions and issues that arise in considering race, sex, and gender together. Focus on critical and theoretical texts queering ethnic and diaspora studies and bringing race and ethnicity into queer studies. Close reading of texts in a variety of media negotiating racialized sexualities and sexualized identities. How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and structures of power?
Same as: CSRE 289E, FEMGEN 389E.

ILAC 393. The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar. 3-5 Units.

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 193.

ILAC 399. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

For Spanish and Portuguese department graduate students only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ILAC 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

ILAC 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

Portuguese Language Courses

PORTLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Portuguese, Part 1. 4-5 Units.

For students with two years of college level study of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in conversations, providing and obtaining information, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Students learn the language as they contrast Brazilian culture with their own. Lab. Completion of PORTLANG 2A fulfills the University's foreign language requirement.

PORTLANG 1F. Accelerated First-Year Business Portuguese, Part I: Focus on Business and Economics.. 4-5 Units.

For GSB students and business/economics-oriented majors with two years of formal study of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in Portuguese-speaking work environments, establishing relationships, providing and obtaining information, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Written and spoken language; social and cultural influences; and how to present information, concepts, and ideas related to business and organizational contexts. Completion of PORTLANG 2F fulfills the University foreign language requirement.

PORTLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Portuguese, Part 2. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 1A. For students with two years of college level study of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in conversations, providing and obtaining information, describing and narrating, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Students learn the language as they contrast Brazilian culture with their own. Lab. Completion of PORTLANG 2A fulfills the University's foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test, or PORTLANG 1A.

PORTLANG 2F. Accelerated First-Year Business Portuguese, Part 2: Focus on Business and Economics.. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 1F. For GSB students and business/economics-oriented majors with two years of formal study of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in Portuguese-speaking work environments, establishing relationships, providing and obtaining information, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Written and spoken language; social and cultural influences; and how to present information, concepts, and ideas related to business and organizational contexts. Completion of PORTLANG 2F fulfills the University foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test, or completion of PORTLANG 1A or 1F. Fulfill the University Foreign Language Requirement.

PORTLANG 11A. Accelerated Second-Year Portuguese, Part 1. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 2A. Goal is to use linguistically and culturally appropriate forms in oral narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis is on expository speech. Prerequisite: Placement Test, PORTLANG 2A or PORTLANG 3.

PORTLANG 12A. Accelerated Second-Year Portuguese, Part 2. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 11A. Goal is to use linguistically and culturally appropriate forms in narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis on expository writing. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 11A.

PORTLANG 99. Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff).

PORTLANG 101. Reading Brazil. 3-5 Units.

Short expository readings, guest lectures, discussions, compositions on Brazilian issues. Review of grammatical structures. Vocabulary building with emphasis on common idiomatic expressions and troublesome lexical distinctions. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A or equivalent.

PORTLANG 102. Brazil in Text: Advanced Grammar and Composition. 3-5 Units.

3rd year course. Further development of academic writing. Short fictional and expository readings, guest lectures, discussions, compositions on Brazilian issues. Emphasis is on building paragraphs, organizing arguments, and justifying positions. May be used as workshop to write papers in Portuguese for another course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A or equivalent.

PORTLANG 103. Advanced Conversation: Brazil Today. 3-5 Units.

3rd year course. Reading and discussions on issues from current newspapers and magazines, reading comprehension strategies with online news updates, and vocabulary building with emphasis on formal expository writing. Writing practice if desired. Students prepare short presentations and lead subsequent discussions. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A.

PORTLANG 161. Advanced Reading in Portuguese, Fourth-year Portuguese. 3-5 Units.

The course emphasizes high-level reading comprehension and leads to advanced development of communication skills for extended formal and informal discourse in Portuguese. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 101.

PORTLANG 162. Advanced Writing in Portuguese, Fourth-year Portuguese. 3-5 Units.

The course has two tracks, depending on the interest of the student: a) technical writing (business letters, technical reports, expressing/supporting opinions, etc.) and b) creative writing (`crônicas' short stories, poems, etc.). Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 102.

PORTLANG 163. Contemporary Issues in the Lusophone World. Fourth-Year Portuguese. 3-5 Units.

The class emphasizes formal presentations/discussions in Portuguese, based on contemporary issues in the lusophone world. Students use as linguistic models newspaper and magazine articles, TV news broadcasts, online news services, films, art exhibits, news on scientific advances, etc. Focus is on mastering high-level vocabulary/structures, as well as reading and rhetorical strategies, for appropriate use in professional settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 103.

PORTLANG 164. Translating the Lusophone world, Fourth-Year Portuguese. 3-5 Units.

For advanced students. Literary and technical translation. Readings on theoretical topics on translation; discussion, analysis and comparison of existing translations (literary and technical); individual translation projects according to students field of study, and discussion and analysis of those projects in class. Final translation project to be undertaken individually. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 250 or completion of 3rd year sequence.

PORTLANG 193Q. Spaces and Voices of Brazil through Film. 3-4 Units.

The manners in which a country is perceived and defines itself is a result of many complex forces, and involves the reproduction of social relations and complex social constructions both on the part of those who live there and those who see it from a distance. The perceptions of what Brazil is and what defines the country has changed throughout times, but has conserved some clear pervasive defining traits. This course is an introduction to the history, culture, politics and artistic production of Brazil as seen through feature films, documentaries and some complementary readings. Movies include, among others, Banana is my Business, Black Orpheus, Olga, They Don't Use Black-Tie, City of God, Central Station, Gaijin, and Four Days in September-among others. In English.
Same as: ILAC 193Q.

PORTLANG 250. Reading in Portuguese. 4 Units.

Introductory class for students with superior reading proficiency in Spanish or another Romance language. Reading competence for research and courses in Luso-Brazilian studies. Literary, journalistic, and academic readings. Fulfills University reading requirement for advanced degrees. May be offered alternate years.

PORTLANG 297. Directed Reading. 1-4 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff).

PORTLANG 394. Graduate Studies in Portuguese Conversation. 1-3 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff).

PORTLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Portuguese. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.n (Staff).

Spanish Language Courses

SPANLANG 1. First-Year Spanish, First Quarter. 5 Units.

Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world.

SPANLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Spanish, Part 1. 5 Units.

Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Spanish, or those with a strong background in another Romance language. SPANLANG 2A fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test.

SPANLANG 1G. Accelerated First-Year Business Spanish, Part 1. 4 Units.

For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 2. First-Year Spanish, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 1. Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Prerequisite Placement Test or SPANLANG 1.

SPANLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Spanish, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 1A. Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Spanish, or those with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 1A. Fulfills the University language requirement.

SPANLANG 2G. Accelerated First-Year Business Spanish, Part 2. 4 Units.

Continuation of 1G. For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 3. First-Year Spanish, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 2. Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 2. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 3G. Spanish for Business Professionals. 4 Units.

For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 5A. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part A. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 1. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C.

SPANLANG 5B. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part B. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 2. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 1 or 5A.

SPANLANG 5C. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part C. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 3. Continuation of 5B. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 2 or 5B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 10. Beginning Oral Communication. 2 Units.

Additional pronunciation, vocabulary, and speaking skills. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: one quarter of Spanish, demonstrated oral proficiency above the novice level; may be taken concurrently with SPANLANG 2, SPANLANG 2A 2A, or SPANLANG 3.

SPANLANG 11C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, First Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.

SPANLANG 11R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, First Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `R' content focuses on international relations and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 2A or SPANLANG 3.

SPANLANG 12C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, Second Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 11C. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11C or 11R.

SPANLANG 12R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, Second Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 11R. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `R' content focuses on international relations and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11R or 11C.

SPANLANG 13C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12C. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C or 12R. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 13R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, Third Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12R. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language, international relations, and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 12R. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 13SL. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Integration of community engagement and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based reciprocity and service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 15. Intermediate Oral Communication. 3 Units.

Emphasis is on interaction in Spanish locally and globally. Regional vocabularies and cultures at home and abroad. Interaction with local native Spanish speakers and communities globally via the Internet. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 2A, SPANLANG 3 and demonstrated oral proficiency above the low intermediate level.

SPANLANG 15S. Intermediate Oral Communication. 3 Units.

Emphasis is on interaction in Spanish locally and globally. Regional vocabularies and cultures at home and abroad. Interaction with local native Spanish speakers and communities globally via the Internet. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: first-year Spanish and demonstrated oral proficiency above the low intermediate level.

SPANLANG 21B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, First Quarter. 3-5 Units.

Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Third quarter focus is on the development of written and oral styles and registers used in more formal settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test.

SPANLANG 22B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, Second Quarter. 3-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 21B. Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG or 21B.

SPANLANG 23B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, Third Quarter. 3-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 22B. Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Third quarter Focus is on the development of written and oral styles and registers used in more formal settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 22B.

SPANLANG 25A. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part A. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 11. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socioculturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 25B. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part B. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 12. Continuation of 25A. Prerequisite: 25A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 25C. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part C. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 13. Continuation of 25B. Prerequisite: 25B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 99. Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 100. Advanced Oral Communication. 3 Units.

For students who have completed second-year Spanish or who have oral skills above the intermediate level. Interactive activities require students to persuade, analyze, support opinions, and gather and interpret others' points of view. Focus is on vocabulary enrichment and idiomatic expressions. Cultural, literary, political, and journalistic readings. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

SPANLANG 101. The Structure of Spanish. 5 Units.

Criteria and skills to analyze Spanish grammatical structure. Identification of word functions in sentences and texts, types of sentences, and terminology. Structure of nouns, adjectives, and verbs, and their relationship with meaning. The differences between Spanish grammar as a formal system and in everyday life. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R or SPANLANG 23B.

SPANLANG 102. Composition and Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

Individual development of the ability to write in Spanish. Emphasis is on style and diction, and on preparing and writing essays on literary topics. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics more closely related to their studies for projects. Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 102B. Composition and Writing Workshop for Heritage Language Students. 3-5 Units.

For students with a good understanding of written accents, spelling, and syntax. Focus is on the craft of writing with emphasis on brainstorming, planning, outlining, drafting, revising, style, diction, and editing. Writing essays on literary topics. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics related to their studies. Prerequisite: 23B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 121M. Spanish for Medical Students. 3 Units.

First quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on taking the medical history. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Offered to undergraduates for 3 units(2 units for medical students).
Same as: HRP 280.

SPANLANG 122M. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

Second quarter of three-quarter series.Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Offered to undergraduates for 3 units(2 units for medical students).
Same as: HRP 281.

SPANLANG 123M. Spanish for Medical Students. 2-3 Units.

Third quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on different specialties and medical conditions. Topics include the human body, hospital procedures, diagnostics, food, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Offered to undergraduates for 3 units(2 units for medical students).
Same as: HRP 282.

SPANLANG 131M. Spanish for Heritage and Foreign Language Pre-Med and Public Health Students. 3-4 Units.

For pre-med or public health students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken or for students who possess a considerable command of Spanish. Focus is on developing the ability to provide information on health-related topics to Spanish speakers in the U.S. Students participate in the organization and delivery of information on preventive health care in a workshop setting to a Spanish-speaking community.

SPANLANG 199. Individual Reading. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 205A. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part A. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 1. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units.

SPANLANG 205B. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part B. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 2. Continuation of 205A. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units. Prerequisite 205A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 205C. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part C. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 3. Continuation of 205B. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units. Prerequisite 205B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225A. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part A. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 11. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socioculturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225B. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part B. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 12. Continuation of 225A. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Prerequisite 225A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225C. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part C. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 13. Continuation of 225B. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Prequisite 225B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 250. Reading Spanish. 3 Units.

Reading Spanish - For students who have already taken Spanish for at least one year or have superior reading proficiency in another Romance language. Emphasis is on academic texts. Fulfills University reading requirements for advanced degrees if students earn a grade of 'B.'.

SPANLANG 394. Graduate Studies in Spanish Conversation. 1-3 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Spanish. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.