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Office: Building 260, Room 119
Mail Code: 94305-2014
Phone: (650) 723-4977
Email: ilac@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://ilac.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Iberian and Latin American Cultures, formerly the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, are listed under the subject code ILAC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site. For courses in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish language instruction with the subject codes CATLANG, PORTLANG and SPANLANG, see the "Language Center" section of this bulletin.

The Language Center offers a series of second- and third-year courses designed for students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken (heritage speakers) and who wish to develop their existing linguistic strengths. See the "Language Center" section of this bulletin.

The department is a part of the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Studying Iberian and Latin American cultures at Stanford means engaging in a deep and compelling exploration of the languages, literatures, and cultures of the Iberian Peninsula, Latin America (including Brazil), and Latina/o communities in the United States. To achieve the goal of training students as experts in these areas, the department balances an emphasis on literary studies with philosophical, historical, and social approaches to cultural issues. Given the focus on critical thinking, open discussion, and close textual analysis, undergraduate majors are provided excellent preparation for a large number of professional fields, including business, education, international relations, law, and medicine. The graduate program provides rigorous and highly individualized advanced training in the analysis of Iberian, Latin American (including Brazil), and Latina/o literatures, and students go on to produce innovative original research and find excellent jobs, both in academe and beyond.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. oral proficiency in Catalan, Portuguese, and/or Spanish beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities;
  2. close reading skills of texts in Catalan Portuguese, and/or Spanish;
  3. writing proficiency in Catalan, Portuguese, and/or Spanish beyond the interpersonal level with presentational language abilities.

Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

In this major, students engage in a thoroughly transnational and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American (including Brazil) literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with an emphasis on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

This undergraduate program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the Spanish language in a global perspective.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the terminal M.A. program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is for students to develop further the knowledge and skills acquired as undergraduates and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through the completion of graduate courses in the student's major area of interest as well as in related areas.

The Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis with respect to the areas and traditions taught by the department. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to develop innovative research and to present the results of this research to the world in compelling ways.

Bachelor of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

This program is designed for students who wish to engage in a transitional and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with an emphasis on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day. B.A. Iberian and Latin American Cultures appears on the official transcript and on the diploma. The major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures required 60 units of coursework. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

For all ILAC courses taught in Spanish, students must have successfully completed SPANLANG 101 The Structure of Spanish or SPANLANG 102 Composition and Writing Workshop or successfully tested above this level through the Language Center. Students are advised to take core courses before 200-level courses.

Declaring the Major

Students declare the major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures through Axess. Students should meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to discuss appropriate courses and options within the major, and to plan the course of study. Majors are also urged to attend department events such as public talks and conferences.

Double Majors

The major in ILAC is designed to combine with a second major in another field and with study abroad. Students should be aware, however, that university policy prevents one course from counting for both degree programs.

General Course Requirements

Students must complete a total of 60 units for the major. The first five requirements listed below are considered core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University. AP credit and Transfer credit from other Universities do not count towards this major. 

1. A Writing in the Major (WIM) course: 5 units are required. This is offered as a Senior Seminar, open to Seniors only and to Juniors by petition, if they have demonstrated need to be away from campus during their Senior year.  The course designated as WIM for 2017-18 is:

ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Cervantes's Novelas Ejemplares3-5

2. Core courses in literature. All three courses must be completed. Majors are required to take these courses for 4 units.

Units
ILAC 136Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures (WIM 2015-2016)3-5
ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5

3. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least two of three. Majors are required to take these courses for 4 units.

Units
ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 132EIntroduction to Global Portuguese: Cultural Perspectives3-5

4. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:

  • Up to 15 units of language courses (not including conversational courses) in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan.
  • Additional 100- or 200- level ILAC literature courses.
  • Up to 15 units of pre-approved coursework from Stanford Study Abroad programs in Madrid or Santiago. A course taught abroad by a core member of the ILAC faculty does not count against this limit.
  • Up to 5 units of pre-approved coursework from outside ILAC
  • Up to 10 units of Thinking Matters courses taught at least partially by an ILAC faculty member

5. In addition to course requirements for the major, students must also take an Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) in Catalan, Portuguese, or Spanish by contacting the Language Center two quarters prior to degree conferral.

Bachelor of Arts in Spanish

This program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the language in a global perspective. "B.A. Spanish" appears on the official transcript and on the diploma. The major in Spanish requires 60 units of coursework. All coursework must be done in Spanish. If a class is taught in a language other than Spanish, then written work (e.g. final papers) must be completed in Spanish. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

Students must have completed SPANLANG 101 or 102 or (successfully tested above this level through the Language Center)Students are advised to take core courses before 200-level courses.

Declaring the Major

Students declare the major in Spanish through Axess. Students should meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to discuss appropriate courses and options within the major, and to plan the course of study. Majors are also urged to attend department events such as public talks and conferences. 

Double Majors

The Spanish major is designed to combine with a second major in another field and with study abroad. Students should be aware, however, that university policy prevents one course from counting for both degree programs.

General Course Requirements

Students must complete a total of 60 units for the major.  The first four requirements listed below are core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University. AP credit and Transfer credit from other Universities do not count towards this major. 

1. A Writing in the Major (WIM) course: 5 units are required.  This is offered as a Senior Seminar, open to Seniors only and to Juniors by petition, if they have demonstrated need to be away from campus during their Senior year.  The course designated as WIM for 2017-18 is:

ILAC 277Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - Cultures of Salsa3-5

2. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one. Majors are required to take their selected courses for 4 units.

Units
ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5

3. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:

  • Additional 100- or 200-level ILAC courses.
  • Up to 15 units of pre-approved coursework from Stanford study abroad programs in Madrid or Santiago. A course abroad taught by a core member of the ILAC faculty does not count against this limit. 
  • Up to 5 units of pre-approved coursework from outside ILAC.
  • Up to three courses of SPANLANG at the second year level or above i.e., SPANLANG 11C, 11R, 12C, 12R, 13C, 13R, 21B, 22B, 23B, 101, and 102.

4. In addition to the course requirements listed above, all majors must test their proficiency in Spanish through the Language Center by Winter Quarter of their senior year. Students must receive a notation of at least advanced-mid to be deemed adequately proficient. Those needing outside tutoring are advised to do so; resources are available through the VPTL and ILAC. The proficiency examination consists of both an oral interview and a writing proficiency test.

Honors Program

ILAC majors and Spanish majors with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above, and who maintain a 3.5 (GPA) in major courses, are eligible to participate in the DLCL's honors program. Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis adviser from among their home department's regular faculty, in their junior year, preferably by March 1, but no later than May 1. During Spring Quarter of the junior year, a student interested in the honors program should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of their home department to submit a thesis proposal (2-5 pages), DLCL Honors application and an outline of planned course work for their senior year.

Honors papers vary considerably in length as a function of their topic, historical scope, and methodology. They may make use of previous work developed in seminars and courses, but display an enhanced comparative or theoretical scope. Quality rather than quantity is the key criterion. Honors theses range from 40-90 pages not including bibliography and notes. Please consult the DLCL Honors Handbook for more details on declaring and completing the honors thesis.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the honors college hosted by Bing Honors College and coordinated by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. The honors college is offered at the end of the summer, during the weeks directly preceding the start of the academic year, and is designed to help students develop their honors thesis projects. Applications must be submitted through the Bing program. For more information, view the Bing Honors website.

Enrollment: A minimum of 10 units total, described below, and a completed thesis is required. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year. If an essay is found deserving of a grade of 'A-' of better by the thesis adviser, honors are granted at the time of graduation.

  • Spring Quarter of the junior year (optional) DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units S/NC) under the primary thesis adviser. Drafting or revision of the thesis proposal. The proposal is reviewed by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Director of the department and will be approved or returned for submission.
  • Autumn Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 189A Honors Thesis Seminar (4 units S/NC) taught by a DLCL appointed faculty member. Course will focus on researching and writing the honors thesis.
  • Winter Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 189B Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units Letter grade) under the primary thesis adviser. Focus will be on writing writing under guidance of primary adviser. The letter grade will determine if honors is granted or not.
  • Spring Quarter of the senior year (option; mandatory if not taken during junior year) DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar (2-4 units S/NC) under the primary thesis adviser. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser and Student Service Officer no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year.
  • Spring Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 199 Honors Thesis Oral Presentation (1 unit S/NC). Enroll with primary thesis adviser.

Joint Major Programs: ILAC and Computer Science & Spanish and Computer Science

The joint major program (JMP), authorized by the Academic Senate for a pilot period of six years beginning in 2014-15, permits students to major in both Computer Science and one of ten Humanities majors. See the "Joint Major Program" section of this bulletin for a description of University requirements for the JMP. See also the Undergraduate Advising and Research JMP web site and its associated FAQs.

Students completing the JMP receive a B.A.S. (Bachelor of Arts and Science).

Because the JMP is new and experimental, changes to procedures may occur; students are advised to check the relevant section of the bulletin periodically.

Declaring a Joint Major Program

To declare the joint major, students must first declare each major through Axess, and then submit the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program. The Major-Minor and Multiple Major Course Approval Form is required for graduation for students with a joint major.

Dropping a Joint Major Program

To drop the joint major, students must submit the Declaration or Change of Undergraduate Major, Minor, Honors, or Degree Program. . Students may also consult the Student Services Center with questions concerning dropping the joint major.

Transcript and Diploma

Students completing a joint major graduate with a B.A.S. degree. The two majors are identified on one diploma separated by a hyphen. There will be a notation indicating that the student has completed a "Joint Major".  The two majors are identified on the transcript with a notation indicating that the student has completed a "Joint Major".

Iberian and Latin American Studies Major Requirements in the Joint Major Program

See the "Computer Science Joint Major Program" section of this bulletin for details on Computer Science requirements.

This program is designed for students who wish to engage in a transitional and cross-linguistic study of Iberian and Latin American literatures and cultures. Courses emphasize critical thinking and close textual analysis, with an emphasis on the deep and often understudied intersections between literature written in Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish from the medieval period to the present day. B.A. Iberian and Latin American Cultures appears on the official transcript and on the diploma. The major in Iberian and Latin American Cultures required 50 units of coursework. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

For all ILAC courses taught in Spanish, students must have successfully completed SPANLANG 102 Composition and Writing Workshop or tested above this level through the Language Center. One course above 100 and one core course, or consent of the instructor, are prerequisites for 200-level courses.

Requirements

Students must complete a total of 50 units for the major. The first six requirements listed below are considered core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University.

  1. A Writing in the Major (WIM) course: 5 units are required. This is offered as a Senior Seminar, open to Seniors only and to Juniors by petition, if they have demonstrated need to be away from campus during their Senior year.  The course designated as WIM for 2017-18 is:
    Units
    ILAC 278ASenior Seminar: Cervantes's Novelas Ejemplares3-5
  2. Core courses in literature. All three courses must be completed
    Units
    ILAC 136Modern Iberian Literatures3-5
    ILAC 157Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures (WIM 2015-16)3-5
    ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5
  3. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one.
    Units
    ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
    ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5
  4. Capstone Project: Senior year, the student enrolls in a 2-unit DLCL 299 with a DLCL faculty member. The faculty member advising this project must sign off on this description. In order to have it approved as their capstone Computer Science and ILAC project must be written in proficient Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan. The student must submit a description of the project to the Chair of Undergraduate Studies in ILAC by May 15th of the junior year or no later than October 1st of the senior year.
  5. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:
    • Up to 15 units of language courses (not including conversational courses) in Spanish, Portuguese, or Catalan.
    • Additional 100- or 200- level ILAC literature courses.
    • Up to 15 units of pre-approved course work from Stanford Study Abroad programs in Barcelona, Madrid, or Santiago. A course taught abroad by a core member of the ILAC faculty does not count against this limit.
    • Up to 5 units of pre-approved course work from outside ILAC
    • Up to 10 units of Thinking Matters courses taught at least partially by an ILAC faculty member

     6. In addition to course requirements for the major, students must also take an Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) in Catalan, Portuguese, or Spanish through the Language Center two quarters prior to degree conferral.

Spanish Major Requirements in the Joint Major Program

See the "Computer Science Joint Major Program" section of this bulletin for details on Computer Science requirements.

This program is designed for students who want to move towards fluency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing Spanish while developing a contextualized understanding of the language through linguistic and cultural study. This degree emphasizes critical use of the language in a global perspective. All course work must be done in Spanish. If a class is taught in a language other than Spanish, then written work (such as final papers) must be completed in Spanish. Courses cannot be duplicated for two degrees. All courses must be taken for a letter grade.

Prerequisites

Students must be at or above the level of SPANLANG 13 or tested above this level through the Language Center. 

Requirements

Students must complete a total of 50 units for the major.  The first five requirements listed below are core requirements and must be taken at Stanford University.

1. A Writing in the Major (WIM) course.  5 units are required. This is a prerequisite for every course in the major; however, concurrent enrollment is allowed. . WIM offerings change nearly every year, but a WIM designated ILAC course from any year satisfies the requirement.

Units
ILAC 277Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - Cultures of Salsa3-5

2. Core courses in culture, history, and civilization. Choose at least one.

Units
ILAC 130Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 131Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives3-5

3. Capstone Project: Senior year, the student enrolls in a 2-unit independent study DLCL 299 with a DLCL faculty member. The faculty member advising this project must sign off on this description. In order to have it approved as their capstone Spanish and Computer Science project must be written in proficient Spanish. The student must submit a description of the project to the Chair of Undergraduate Studies in ILAC by May 15th of the junior year or no later than October 1st of the senior year.


4. Elective Courses. Elective courses can be taken within the following parameters:

  • Additional 100- or 200-level ILAC courses.
  • Up to 15 units of pre-approved coursework from Stanford study abroad programs in Barcelona, Madrid, or Santiago. A course abroad taught by a core member of the ILAC faculty does not count against this limit. 
  • Up to 5 units of pre-approved coursework from outside ILAC.
  • Up to three courses of SPANLANG at the second year level or above.

5. In addition to the course requirements listed above, all majors must test their proficiency in Spanish through the Language Center by winter quarter of their senior year. Students must receive a notation of at least "Advanced Mid" to be deemed adequately proficient. Those needing outside tutoring will be advised to do so (resources available through the VPTL and ILAC).  The proficiency examination will consist of both an oral interview and a writing proficiency test.

Minors in Spanish and Portuguese

Both the minor in Portuguese and the minor in Spanish are for students who want to combine acquisition of linguistic competence with the study of the literatures and cultures of the Lusophone or Spanish-speaking worlds. Each minor requires six courses totaling a minimum of 23 units. Each course must be taken for a letter grade.

Up to three courses of second-year Spanish language (for Spanish minor) or Portuguese (for Portuguese minor) or above may count towards the degree, not including conversational, oral communication, business, or medical language courses.

With the approval of the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, Independent Study and the following courses may count towards the degree.

Up to two courses from abroad may apply towards the minor.  One or both may be a language course at second-year or above. One or both may be a literature or culture course listed as authorized by the ILAC department on the BOSP website. (A literature or culture course taught by a core member of the ILAC faculty abroad does not count against this limit.) At least two courses at the 100 or 200 level must be taken in the ILAC department (or with ILAC faculty abroad).

One 3-5 unit (5 unit maximum) course on a related topic from another department.

AP credit and Transfer credit from other Universities do not count towards this minor. 

Minor in Portuguese

Units
Required Courses: Minimum of 6 courses and 23 units. 23
1. Two 100- or 200-level courses in literature or culture with a Lusophone component
2. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete the required 23 units and six courses
3. Pre-Approved Courses for 2017-18 to fulfill 1 and 2 above
ILAC 110NBrazil: Musical Culture and Films3-5
ILAC 132EIntroduction to Global Portuguese: Cultural Perspectives3-5
ILAC 161Modern Latin American Literature3-5
ILAC 217Fernando Pessoa: Aesthetics as Ontology3-5
ILAC 274Aurality and Literature3-5

Minor in Spanish

Units
Required Courses: Minimum of 6 courses and 23 units. 23
1. A 100- or 200-level course in ILAC with a significant component of Iberian literature, film, or other cultural texts.
2. A 100- or 200-level course in ILAC with a significant component of Latin American literature, film, or other cultural texts.
3. Any additional 100- or 200-level courses in literature and culture to complete the required 23 units and six courses.

Master of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The purpose of the terminal M.A. program in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is for students to develop further the knowledge or skills acquired as undergraduates, and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies.  This is achieved through the completion of graduate courses in the student's major area of interest as well as in related areas.  Students in this program may not apply concurrently for entrance to the Ph.D. program.

Coterminal Master of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The coterminal degree program allows undergraduates to study for a master's degree in Iberian and Latin American Cultures while completing their bachelor's degree(s) in ILAC or a different department. The course requirements for the coterminal M.A. are the same as those for the terminal M.A., and students should be aware that University policy prevents one course from counting for both the B.A. and M.A. degrees.

University Coterminal Requirements

Coterminal master’s degree candidates are expected to complete all master’s degree requirements as described in this bulletin. University requirements for the coterminal master’s degree are described in the “Coterminal Master’s Program” section. University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

After accepting admission to this coterminal master’s degree program, students may request transfer of courses from the undergraduate to the graduate career to satisfy requirements for the master’s degree. Transfer of courses to the graduate career requires review and approval of both the undergraduate and graduate programs on a case by case basis.

In this master’s program, courses taken during or after the first quarter of the sophomore year are eligible for consideration for transfer to the graduate career; the timing of the first graduate quarter is not a factor. No courses taken prior to the first quarter of the sophomore year may be used to meet master’s degree requirements.

Course transfers are not possible after the bachelor’s degree has been conferred.

The University requires that the graduate adviser be assigned in the student’s first graduate quarter even though the undergraduate career may still be open. The University also requires that the Master’s Degree Program Proposal be completed by the student and approved by the department by the end of the student’s first graduate quarter.

Degree Requirements for the Master of Arts in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Students must complete a minimum of 45 graduate-level units, 36 of which must be taken at Stanford. All 45 units must have a letter grade of 'B' or above. Students enrolled in the terminal M.A. program must file a Program Proposal for a Master's Degree during their first quarter of enrollment.  Any changes to the proposal should be reviewed and approved by the Chair of Graduate Studies.

The requirements for the terminal M.A. and coterminal M.A. are:

  1. A 200-level or above course in literary or cultural theory
  2. Two 200-level or above courses in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latinx/Chicanx literature and culture
  3. Two 200-level or above courses in Iberian literature and culture
  4. One 300-level course in Latin American (including Brazilian) or Latinx/Chicanx literature and culture
  5. One 300-level course in Iberian literature and culture
  6. Enrollment in at least two graduate seminars (200- or 300- level) offered in the department each quarter
  7. Intermediate-high proficiency in Portuguese or Catalan (equivalent to one year of university study).

Independent study courses (ILAC 299 Individual Work, ILAC 399 Individual Work) and crosslisted courses originating outside the department may not be used to fulfill requirements except by consent of the Chair of Graduate Studies.

Doctor of Philosophy in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

The Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis with respect to the areas and traditions taught by the department. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to develop innovative research and to present the results of this research to the world in compelling ways.

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. The requirements of the Ph.D. in Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC) are:

1. Course Work

A total of 135 units is required for the Ph.D. During each quarter preceding advancement to TGR status, students are required to complete (for a letter grade) at least two graduate courses (200- or 300- level) offered through the department. These are taken for for three units each.  All courses counted towards the 135-unit requirement for the Ph.D. be at the graduate level. Excess course work can be taken at the UG level, but not used towards the Ph.D. requirements. Students should make every effort to take a seminar with a core member of the faculty each quarter and one course with each faculty member of the department during the first two years of study. Students may take independent study courses (ILAC 299, ILAC 399) only during the Summer Quarter until they reach TGR status.  Any exceptions must be made in consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies, the relevant faculty member, and/or the student's faculty adviser.  During the first three years of  study, students must also meet with their primary advisor and the Chair of Graduate Studies early in the Spring Quarter of each year to plan a course to plan a course of study for the 10 units to be completed during the Summer Quarter. Students who transfer graduate units from another institution may adjust the course of study outlined below. See the 2017-18 Graduate Handbook for details.

Doctoral students in the department must take required courses for a letter grade if available, and they are expected to earn a grade of 'B+' or better in each course taken in the DLCL.  Any grade of 'B' or below is considered to be less than satisfactory. Grades of 'B' or below are reviewed by faculty and the following actions may be taken: 1) the grade stands, and the student's academic performance is monitored to ensure that satisfactory progress is being made; 2) the grade stands and the student is required to revise and resubmit the work associated with the course; or 3) the student may be required to retake the course.

In consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies, students in their first year choose one major field and two minor areas of study from the following:

  • A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • B1. Colonial and Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B3. African and/ or Brazilian Literature and Culture
  • C. US Latinx Literature and Culture

Students must select one minor area from a group (A, B, C) other than that in which their major area falls. At least four graduate-level courses must be taken in the major area of study. At least two graduate-level courses must be taken in each minor area.

1a. First Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 30 graduate units during their first year of graduate study as well as 10 units during the summer. First year-required course work:

  • One 200-level or above course in literary or cultural theory ( DLCL 369 Introduction to the Profession of Literary Studies is highly recommended)
  • Three 200-level or above courses in Latin American (including Brazil) or Latinx literature and culture
  • Three 200-level or above courses in Iberian literature and culture
  • Enrollment in and completion of  DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages
  • Intermediate-high proficiency in Portuguese or Catalan (equivalent to one year of university study)

1b. Second Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 30 graduate units during their second year of graduate study as well as 10 units during the Summer.  In addition, second-year students must complete at least two graduate seminars (200- or 300- level) offered in the department each quarter and enroll in DLCL 311 during one quarter (but attend all year). All DLCL courses must be taken for a letter grade.  

1c. Third Year

Students must enroll in and complete a minimum of 30 graduate units during their third year of graduate study as well as 10 units during the summer.  In addition, third-year students must enroll in and complete at least two graduate seminars (200- or 300- level) offered in the department each quarter. All DLCL courses must be taken for a letter grade.  

1d. Fourth Year

Students must enroll in and complete 15 units of graduate work during the Autumn and Winter quarters of their fourth year. All DLCL courses must be taken for a letter grade.  

2. Language

All students are required to have advanced-high proficiency in English and Spanish by the time they take the comprehensive examination.  In addition, students specializing in Iberian literature and culture must attain intermediate-mid proficiency in Catalan and Portuguese (equivalent to two quarters of university study for each language); for students specializing in Latin American and/or US Latinx/Chicanx literature and culture, the level of advanced-low or (C1) proficiency in Portuguese (equivalent to four quarters of university study) must be attained. Alternatively, they may study Portuguese for three quarters and study one quarter of Catalan or a Native American language such as Nahuati, Quechua, or Tupi. This requirement must be fulfilled before students take the comprehensive examination. Students wishing to satisfy the language requirements in Catalan and/or Portuguese may do so by passing a proficiency exam administered by the Language Center. Further explanation of the language requirements and options for satisfying them can be found in the 2017-18 Graduate Handbook.

3. Examinations

All students must pass the following: 1) a qualifying exam; 2) a written and oral comprehensive examination; and 3) a University oral examination.

3a. Qualifying Examination

In the Autumn Quarter of their first year, students receive a digital reader with a selection of texts related to all areas of Iberian and Latin American literature and culture. These texts serve as the basis for the qualifying exam, which is administered the first week of Autumn Quarter of the student's second year of study.  During the one-hour oral examination, students meet with a faculty committee and must answer questions in English and/or in Spanish submitted by all active members of the ILAC faculty.  Students who fail this examination may request to retake it during the Winter Quarter of the same year.

3b. Comprehensive Examination

This exam consists of two parts: 1) the submission of a written paper; and 2) an oral question and answer period. It is designed for students to demonstrate intellectual competence in multiple areas of study. This exam occurs during Spring Quarter of the third year of graduate study, and it must be completed prior to the last day of instruction in that same quarter. Students with transferred credits may take this exam earlier in the third year. Students must select a major and two minor areas for the exam from the following options:

  • A1. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A2. Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • A3. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Iberian Literature and Culture
  • B1. Colonial and Nineteenth-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B2. Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Latin American Literature and Culture
  • B3. Luso-Afro-Brazilian Literature and Culture
  • C. Latinx Literature and Culture

Students must select one minor area from a group (A, B, C) other than that in which their major area falls.

The committee for the comprehensive exam consists of three ILAC professors to serve on the committee, one for each of the three examination areas chosen by the student. Students are responsible for forming their own committee. In consultation with each member of the committee, the student must develop a list of 130 texts (approximately 60 for the major area and 35 for each of the minor areas) and should propose organizing themes (in discussion with the committee and as appropriate. In addition, the student must submit a 6,000-word research paper on a topic preferably related to the dissertation. This paper must be written in English. The comprehensive exam reading list and research paper must be presented to committee members and to the graduate student services coordinator at least two weeks prior to the oral portion of the comprehensive exam. The oral exam is based upon the submitted list and research paper and lasts no more than two hours. 

3c. University Oral Examination

Ph.D. candidates in ILAC are required to take a University oral examination after successfully completing the comprehensive examination and before the end of the Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with transferred credits may take this exam earlier in the fourth year. This examination is a defense of the dissertation prospectus. During the examination, the candidate speaks for approximately 20 minutes on the proposed dissertation, the methods to be used in research and the conclusions the candidate expects to reach. Afterward, each member of the committee, in an order established by the chair of the committee, questions the candidate further. The examination lasts no more than two hours.

The University oral examination committee must be finalized no later than the last week of the quarter during which the student successfully completes the comprehensive examination. The examination committee should include the dissertation adviser and three other members, usually from the reading committee, and a chair from outside the department, for a total of five members. All members must belong to the Academic Council. The adviser and two other members must be ILAC faculty. Once a committee and date are finalized, the student must submit the University oral examination form to the graduate student services coordinator. The members of the oral examination committee must receive copies of the dissertation prospectus no later than three weeks prior to the examination.

The dissertation prospectus should consist of approximately 10 pages (3,000 words). It must contain a title along with the following sections: 1) statement of thesis; 2) statement of project significance, both for the student's chosen sub-field(s) and the humanities at large; 3) chapter outline; 4) preliminary biography; 5) timetable for completion.

4. Teaching

Each Ph.D candidate must teach a minimum of five quarters of undergraduate courses (three are taught during the second year and the remaining two during the third year). Language course assignments are arranged through the Language Center. In preparation for teaching, Ph.D. candidates are required to take  DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages during the Spring Quarter of their first year. All students must complete one full year (three quarters), plus an additional quarter during the regular academic year of teaching in the Language Center. Students then may apply to co-teach an ILAC literature or culture course with a core ILAC faculty member or they may choose to teach another course in the Language Center to satisfy the requirement of five quarters of undergraduate teaching. Other additional teaching opportunities may arise, but these do not satisfy the teaching requirement.

5. Ph.D. Dissertation

The doctoral dissertation should demonstrate the student's ability to carry out original research and to organize and present the results in publishable form. A copy of the completed dissertation must be submitted to each member of the reading committee at least eight weeks before the University filing deadline in the quarter during which the candidate expects to receive the Ph.D. degree. Committee members will have three weeks to read the dissertation before determining whether to approve or require changes. Ph.D. dissertations must be completed and approved within five years from the date of admission to candidacy. Students taking more than five years must apply for reinstatement of candidacy, which is reviewed on a case by case basis.

Yearly review

The department conducts annual reviews of each student’s academic performance at the end of the Spring Quarter. All students are given feedback from the Chair of Graduate Studies, which helps them to identify areas of strength and potential weakness.  In most cases, students are simply given constructive feedback; however, if there are more serious concerns, a student may be placed on probation with specific guidelines for addressing the problems detected. At any point during the degree program, evidence that a student is performing at a less than satisfactory level may be cause for a formal academic review of that student.

Possible outcomes of the spring review include: continuation of the student in good standing, or placing the student on probation, with specific guidelines for the period of probation and the steps to be taken in order to be returned to good standing. For students on probation at this point (or at any other subsequent points), possible outcomes of a review include: restoration to good standing; continued probation, with guidelines for necessary remedial steps; or dismissal from the program.

Candidacy

Admission to candidacy is an important decision grounded in an overall assessment of a student’s ability to successfully complete the Ph.D. program. Per University policy, students are expected to complete department qualifying procedures and apply for candidacy by the end of the second year in residence.

In reviewing a student for admission to candidacy, the faculty considers a student’s academic progress including but not limited to: advanced language proficiency, course work, performance on the qualifying exam, and successful completion of teaching and research assistantships. A student must also have completed at least 3 units of work with each of four Stanford faculty members prior to consideration for candidacy.

In addition to successful completion of department prerequisites, a student is only admitted to candidacy if the faculty makes the judgment that the student has the potential to complete the requirements of the degree program successfully. Candidacy is determined by faculty vote. Failure to advance to candidacy results in the dismissal of the student from the doctoral program.

Candidacy is valid for five years and students are required to maintain active candidacy through conferral of the doctoral degree. All requirements for the degree must be completed before candidacy expires. The department  conducts regular reviews of each student’s academic performance, both prior to and following successful admission to candidacy. Failure to make satisfactory progress to degree may result in dismissal from the doctoral program. Additional information about University candidacy policy is available in the Bulletin and GAP.

Ph.D. Minor in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Stanford Ph.D. students wishing to earn a minor in Iberian and Latin American Cultures must complete 25 units, with a grade point average (GPA) or 3.0 or above, selected from courses numbered 200 or higher.  For more information, students should speak with the ILAC Chair of Graduate Studies. Students in the Ph.D. program in ILAC who choose a minor in another department should consult with advisers in that department.

Faculty in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Emeriti: (Professors) Bernard Gicovate, Mary Pratt, Michael P. Predmore, María-Paz Haro (Teaching), Sylvia Wynter (Teaching), Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

Director: Lisa Surwillo

Chair of Graduate Studies: Héctor Hoyos

Chair of Undergraduate Studies:  Lisa Surwillo

Professors: Joan Ramon Resina (also Comparative Literature), Jorge Ruffinelli (on leave Autumn)

Associate Professors: Vincent Barletta (also Comparative Literature), Héctor Hoyos, Lisa Surwillo

Assistant Professors: Marília Librandi Rocha

Lecturer: Ximena Briceño, Nicole Hughes (Mellon Fellow)

Courtesy Professors: John Fellstiner, Zephyr Frank, Roland Greene, Hans U. Gumbrecht, Ramon Saldivar, James A. Fox, Paula Moya

Visiting Professor: Florencia Garramuño (Winter)

Visiting Lecturer: Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas (Autumn)

Overseas Studies Courses in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

Study Abroad Programs in Iberian and Latin American Cultures

All majors are encouraged to study abroad. To transfer credits from non-Stanford programs abroad, consult the Bing Overseas Studies Office. Course work taken abroad may be applied toward both our major and minor programs. Students planning to study abroad must consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to coordinate the course work from abroad with their degree program. The maximum number of units is identified in the elective section for each major.

The Department, The Center for Latin American Studies, and the Bechtel International Center maintain information on study abroad programs. Stanford supports the options listed below and credits course work taken in academically sound programs. Students considering different options are encouraged to speak with the Director of the Department or the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Stanford in Santiago de Chile and Madrid, Spain

The Bing Overseas Studies Programs in Santiago de Chile and Madrid, Spain require a certain level of proficiency in Spanish. For more information, students should consult the program summary of their interested campus. Course work is primarily in Spanish. Information is available in the "Overseas Studies" section of this bulletin or at the Bing Overseas Studies web site. Internships and research opportunities may be arranged for students staying for two quarters. Admission is highly competitive.

The department also recognizes other programs, and students are encouraged to discuss their interests with the Director of the Department or with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.

Brazil and Portugal

The University maintains a relationship with the State University of Rio de Janeiro in Brazil at the graduate level. Students interested in study in Brazil should contact Professor Marília Librandi Rocha. Students interested in study in Portugal should contact Professor Vincent Barletta.

Bing Overseas Studies Program

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Units
OSPMADRD 43The Jacobean Star Way and Europe: Society, Politics and Culture5
OSPMADRD 45Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums4
OSPMADRD 46Drawing with Four Spanish Masters: Goya, Velazquez, Picasso and Dali4
OSPMADRD 55Latin Americans in Spain: Cultural Identities, Social Practices, and Migratory Experience4
OSPMADRD 61Society and Cultural Change: The Case of Spain4
OSPMADRD 83Narrating the Nation: National and Post-National Spanish and Latin American Literature4
OSPSANTG 14Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century4-5
OSPSANTG 68The Emergence of Nations in Latin America4-5
OSPSANTG 116XModernization and its Discontents: Chilean Politics at the Turn of the Century5
OSPSANTG 118XArtistic Expression in Latin America5

Catalan Language Courses Courses

CATLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Catalan, Part 1. 5 Units.

First quarter of the two-quarter sequence. For students with knowledge of another Romance language, preferably Spanish. Emphasis is on developing beginning proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CATLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Catalan, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of CATLANG 1A. For students with knowledge of another Romance language, preferably Spanish. Further development of socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Completion of CATLANG 2A fulfills the University language requirement. Prerequisite: CATLANG 1A.

CATLANG 11A. Accelerated Second-Year Catalan, Part A. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of CATLANG 2A. Sequence integrating culture and language of the Catalan-speaking world. Socially and culturally appropriate forms in narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis is on oral and written proficiency in formal, informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: CATLANG 2A.

CATLANG 199. Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CATLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Catalan. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite consent of instructor.

Iberian & Latin Amer. Cultures Courses

ILAC 110N. Brazil: Musical Culture and Films. 3-5 Units.

An audiovisual introduction to Brazilian cultural and regional diversities. Films and Music from Samba to Bossa Nova to Tropicália to Hip-Hop. Rhythms and Spirituals of Capoeira and Candomblé. Amerindian songs. Dances and Rituals. Final visual-sonorous exhibition and performance by students. Taught in English.

ILAC 111Q. Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Same as: DLCL 111Q

ILAC 113Q. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Same as: DLCL 113Q

ILAC 130. Introduction to Iberia: Cultural Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

The purpose of this course is to study major figures and historical trends in modern Iberia against the background of the linguistic plurality and social and cultural complexity of the Iberian world. We will study the fundamental issues of empire, the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, Latin American independence, recurring civil wars, federal republicanism, and the historic nationalisms (Galician, Basque, and Catalan), all leading up to the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), which is a defining moment in modern Spanish and European history, with ongoing consequences still felt and debated painfully today in contemporary Spain. This course is designed to help prepare students for their participation in the Stanford overseas study programs in Barcelona and Madrid. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.

ILAC 131. Introduction to Latin America: Cultural Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

Part of the Gateways to the World program, this is an introductory course for all things Latin American: culture, history, literature, and current events. By combining lecture and seminar formats, the class prepares you for all subsequent research on, and learning about, the region. Comparative discussion of independence movements in Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean, the Andean Region, Brazil, and the Southern Cone. Other topics vary yearly, including: representations of ethnicity and class, the Cold War, popular culture, as well as major thinkers and writers. Open to all. Recommended for students who want to study abroad in Santiago, Chile. Required for majors in Spanish or Iberian and Latin American Cultures (ILAC). In Spanish.

ILAC 132E. Introduction to Global Portuguese: Cultural Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

Portuguese is the sixth most-spoken language in the world (roughly 250 million speakers now, with expected growth to 400 million by 2050) and the most-spoken language south of the Equator. It is the official language of nation-states on four continents, making it truly global in scope. Beyond Brazil, there are tens of millions of Portuguese speakers in Africa and Europe as well as smaller communities in Asia and North America. In this course, students will learn about the cultures and communities that make up the Portuguese-speaking world, even as they learn to critique the idea of linking these communities by means of a language that became global (like Spanish and English) through violent colonial expansion. Topics include art and music, film, poetry, short story, post-colonialism, indigeneity, crioulismo, empire, diaspora, semi-peripherality, modernism. Course taught in English with optional Portuguese section.

ILAC 136. Modern Iberian Literatures. 3-5 Units.

1800 to the mid 20th century. Topics include: romanticism; realism and its variants; the turn of the century; modernism and the avant garde; the Civil War; and the first half of the 20th century. Authors may include Mariano Jose de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Becquer, Rosalia de Castro, Benito Perez Galdos, Jacint Verdaguer, Eca de Queiros, Miguel de Unamuno, Ramon de Valle-Inclan, Antonio Machado, and Federico García Lorca. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

ILAC 137. Latin American Heroes and Heroines. 3-5 Units.

This course will focus on artists, writers, and political leaders in Latin America whose work would change Latin American history. The historical significance of some of these individuals is polemical, but their influence in Latin American culture is nevertheless of great importance. The ¿heroes and heroines¿ to be studied include: Eva Peron, Frida Kahlo, Ernesto Guevara, Anthony Quinn, Evo Morales, Michelle Bachelet, Fidel Castro, Jose Mujica, Carlos Fuentes, German Valdes Tin Tan, Mario Moreno Cantinflas, Gabriel García Márquez, Niní Marshall.".

ILAC 140. Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film. 3-5 Units.

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an evergrowing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: El niño pez, Bolivia, Ulises, Faustino Mayta visita a su prima, Copacabana, Chico y Rita, Sin nombre, Los que se quedan, Amador, and En la puta calle. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Same as: CHILATST 140

ILAC 145. Poets, Journalists and Collectors: Latin American Modernismo. 3-5 Units.

Discusses the different artistic avatars exercised by Latin American modernistas at the turn of the 19th Century in the context of growing capitalism, technological innovation and social transformation. We focus on how modernistas as poets, journalists and collectors explored and transgressed the limits of the individual and his/her situation. We consider topics like cosmopolitanism, dandysm, autonomy of art, and the aesthetic cultivation of the self. Authors include: Delmira Agustini, Rubén Darío, Julián del Casal, Leopoldo Lugones, José Martí, Manuel Gutierrez Nájera, José Enrique Rodó, José Asunción Silva, and Abraham Valdelomar. Spanish proficiency required.

ILAC 149. The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures. 3-5 Units.

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Same as: COMPLIT 149, CSRE 149

ILAC 156. Brevity as an Art Form. 3-5 Units.

In both literature and film, brevity has been recognize as a superior artistic form. Augusto Monterroso's "El Dinosaurio" (only one line) has been celebrated as a perfect short story, and "Bagdah Messi" (18 minutes) by Sahim Omar Kalifa) could also be considered a work of art. This course will choose no less than 20 short stories and shorts, to analyze and comment, besides a couple of books on the theory of the short literature.

ILAC 157. Medieval and Early Modern Iberian Literatures. 3-5 Units.

Survey of Iberian literature from the medieval and early modern periods. When covering texts in languages other than Spanish, translations into English or Spanish will be made available. Taught in Spanish; prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

ILAC 159. Don Quijote. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes¿s prose masterpiece. The rise of the novel, the problems of authorship and signification, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, masochistic desire. This course will be conducted in English, and no prior knowledge of Spanish is necessary.

ILAC 161. Modern Latin American Literature. 3-5 Units.

From independence to the present. A survey of significant authors and works of Hispanic and Brazilian Portuguese literatures, focusing on fictional prose and poetry. Topics include romantic allegories of the nation; modernism and postmodernism; avant-garde poetry; regionalism versus cosmopolitanism; indigenous and indigenist literature; magical realism and the literature of the boom; Afro-Hispanic literature; and testimonial narrative. Authors may include: Bolívar, Bello, Gómez de Avellaneda, Isaacs, Sarmiento, Machado de Assis, Darío, Martí­, Agustini, Vallejo, Huidobro, Borges, Cortázar, Neruda, Guillon, Rulfo, Ramos, Garcí­a Marquez, Lispector, and Bolaño. Taught in Spanish.

ILAC 175. CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People. 3-5 Units.

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ITALIAN 175, URBANST 153

ILAC 193. The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar. 3-5 Units.

Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most recognizable auteur directors in the world today. His films express a hybrid and eclectic visual style and the blurring of frontiers between mass and high culture. Special attention is paid to questions of sexuality and the centering of usually marginalized characters. This course studies Pedro Almodóvar's development from his directorial debut to the present, from the "shocking" value of the early films to the award-winning mastery of the later ones. Prerequisite: ability to understand spoken Spanish. Readings in English. Midterm and final paper can be in English. Majors should write in Spanish.

ILAC 199. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

Open only to students in the department, or by consent of instructor.

ILAC 200E. War and the Modern Novel. 3-5 Units.

From the turn of the 19th century to well into the 20th century, novelists developed the theme of alienation and the decline of civilization. Along with the fall of centuries-old empires, World War I brought about the collapse of traditional European values and the dissociation of the subject. The aestheticizing of violence and the ensuing insecurity inaugurated the society of totally administered life, based on universal suspicion and pervasive guilt. The seminar will study narrative responses to these developments in some of the foremost authors of the 20th century from several European literatures: Knut Hamsun, Joseph Roth, Ernst Jünger, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Curzio Malaparte, Thomas Mann, Mercè Rodoreda, Antonio Lobo Antunes, and Jaume Cabré. Taught in English.
Same as: COMPLIT 200

ILAC 217. Fernando Pessoa: Aesthetics as Ontology. 3-5 Units.

The poetry and prose of Fernando Pessoa (1888-1935), Portugal's greatest modern poet. As famous for his written work as for his complex understanding of selfhood, Pessoa remains a towering and largely perplexing figure even today. Class discussions will focus on close readings of Pessoa's work along with the implications of his theory of subjectivity for our understanding of modernity, aesthetics, and the self. Taught in English. Readings in Portuguese and English.

ILAC 226. Impersonality and Anonymity in Contemporary Latin American Culture. 3-5 Units.

This course discusses a series of cultural and aesthetic interventions in Latin America -particularly within the realms of visual arts, literature, and cinema- that addresses a radical discussion of subjectivity, personal identity and "forms of living together" (BARTHES 2003). These interventions entail a deconstruction of personal identity and subjectivity, exploring figures of the impersonal and anonymous that insist in interrogating the intensity of a life irreducible to the notion of a self. Works by narrators like Teixeira Coelho (2006) or Diamela Eltit (2002), or installations by Rosângela Rennó (2008) or Gian Paolo Minelli (2007) -among many others- seem to have abandoned the concern with individuality and identity to explore figures of the impersonal out of which emerges a concern with collectivity and community. The course will cover literary works, installations and films by Chilean, Argentinean and Brazilian authors and artists. Course to be taught by Florencia Garramuño.

ILAC 241. Fiction Workshop in Spanish. 3-5 Units.

Spanish and Spanish American short stories approached through narrative theory and craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on the formal elements of fiction (e.g. character and plot development, point of view, creating a scene, etc.). Students will write, workshop, and revise an original short story throughout the term. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Readings may include works by Ayala, Bolaño, Borges, Clarín, Cortázar, García Márquez, Piglia, Rodoreda, and others. Enrollment limited.

ILAC 242. Poetry Workshop in Spanish. 3-5 Units.

Latin American and Spanish poetry approached through elements of craft. Assignments are creative in nature and focus on lyric subgenres (e.g. ode, elegy, prose poetry) and formal elements of poetry (e.g. meter, rhythm, rhetorical figures, and tropes). Students write original poems over the course of the quarter. No previous experience with creative writing is required. Authors include Dari­o, Machado, Jimenez, Vallejo, Huidobro, Salinas, Pales Matos, Lorca, Aleixandre, Cernuda, Neruda, Girondo. Course is offered every other year. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course taught in Spanish, or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 10 students.

ILAC 243. Latin American Aesthetics. 3-5 Units.

As the branch of philosophy that deals with the principles of beauty and artistic taste, aesthetics is, purportedly, universal. The course interrogates its conspicuous omission of Latin American theorization and cultural production. Three thematic axes are vanguardia, colonialidad, and populismo; a central concern is aesthetic responses to precariousness. Argentine, Brazilian, Chilean, Colombian, and Cuban essayism and visual arts from the mid 20th century to the present, notably origenismo, neo-baroque, and indigenismo. In collaboration with a cognate course at UC Berkeley. Taught in Spanish.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.

ILAC 256A. The Drug Wars in Latin America. 3-5 Units.

The course will study how Latin American narcos are represented in feature films, documentaries, and essays. We will choose different regions and times: Pablo Escobar's (1949-1993) Colombia, Central America, and Mexico (1990-2015), including the mass students kidnappings in Iguala, México, 2014.nBibliography/filmsnFilms: "Sins of my Father" (Entel, 2009); "Sumas y Restas" (Víctor Gaviria, 2003); "La Vida Loca" (Poveda, 2009); "La Bestia" (Pedro Ultreras, 2010); "Cartel Land" (Heineman, 2015); "The Missing 43" (Vice, 2015).nBook: "El Hombre sin Cabeza" de Sergio González (2009).

ILAC 269. Realismo Mágico vs. Real Maravilloso. 3-5 Units.

Two important concepts and theories realismo mágico and lo Real maravilloso have given sense and substance to Latin American literature during the last three decades. This course will focus on those concepts and on the works of Garcia Marquez and Alejo Carpentier, two key authors of modern Latin America.

ILAC 274. Aurality and Literature. 3-5 Units.

Theories of Aurality and the concepts of Writing by Ear and the Echopoetics will be applied to the reading of novels. Authors may include: Machado de Assis, Oswald de Andrade, João Guimarães Rosa, Clarice Lispector, Juan Rulfo, Mia Couto, Ana Miranda and Nuno Ramos. Taught in Portuguese/Spanish.

ILAC 277. Senior Seminar: Spanish and Society - Cultures of Salsa. 3-5 Units.

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. Salsa is the soundscape of 20th century Latin America. How is it possible that salsa stands for Latin American music? How can we understand its origin and its musical expansion? We learn how salsa voices transformation and self-exploration of different places and moments in all of Latin America and the US and we analyze how it travels across the world. We discuss musical examples in relation to colonialism, globalization, migration, nationalism, gender and ethnicity. As a core course of the Spanish major, Cultures of Salsa emphasizes the analysis of Spanish in real-world contexts. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.

ILAC 278A. Senior Seminar: Cervantes's Novelas Ejemplares. 3-5 Units.

Open to seniors in ILAC and Spanish; juniors by permission of instructor. Focus is on a close reading of Miguel de Cervantes's collection of short fiction, the Novelas ejemplares (1613). The rise of the novel, literature and ethics, modes of reading, the status of Muslim and Jewish converts in early modern Spain, the rise of capitalism, the Baroque aesthetic. This course will be conducted entirely in Spanish. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 5 units and a letter grade to be eligible for WIM credit.

ILAC 281E. Peripheral Dreams: The Art and Literature of Miró, Dalí, and other Surrealists in Catalonia. 3-5 Units.

Why was Salvador Dalí fascinated with the architecture of Gaudí? Why did André Breton, Paul Éluard and Federico García Lorca visit Barcelona? Moreover, why did Catalonia become such an important cradle for Surrealism? Why is the (Catalan) landscape such a relevant presence in the work of Miró and Dalí? Through a critical analysis and discussion of selected works of art and literature, this seminar focuses and follows the trajectories of Miró and Dalí, from Barcelona to Paris to New York, and explores the role of their Catalan background as a potentially essential factor in their own contributions to Surrealism and the reception of their work. The course will provide the materials and guide the student to conduct research on a specific work(s) of art, architecture, literature or cinema either by Miró, Dalí or one of his peers in relation to their cultural, social and political context. The course is intended for graduate students in Iberian and Comparative Literature, Art History, Cultural Studies, and related fields. Taught in English by Jordi Falgàs i Casanovas.
Same as: ARTHIST 221E

ILAC 293E. Baroque and Neobaroque. 3-5 Units.

The literary, cultural, and political implications of the 17th-century phenomenon formed in response to the conditions of the 16th century including humanism, absolutism, and early capitalism, and dispersed through Europe, the Americas, and Asia. If the Baroque is a universal code of this period, how do its vehicles, such as tragic drama, Ciceronian prose, and metaphysical poetry, converse with one another? The neobaroque as a complex reaction to the remains of the baroque in Latin American cultures, with attention to the mode in recent Brazilian literary theory and Mexican poetry.
Same as: COMPLIT 301, ENGLISH 233

ILAC 299. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

Open to department advanced undergraduates or graduate students by consent of professor. May be repeated for credit.

ILAC 305. Rhythm: Ethics and Poetics of the Premodern. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on the notion of rhythm as a theoretical frame for the analysis of medieval and early modern Iberian poetry. Topics include Ancient Greek and modern conceptions of rhythm and the links between poetics and ethics in the medieval period and beyond. Authors include: Aeschylus, Plato, Aristoxenus, Maurice Blanchot, Paul Celan, EmmanuelnnLevinas, Arcipreste de Hita, Ausiås March, Garcilaso de la Vega, and Luís de Camões. Taught in English.

ILAC 336. One World or Many? Representing Distance, Time, and Place in Iberian Expansion. 3-5 Units.

The travelers, missionaries, and historians that reflected on Iberian overseas expansion during the early modern period often asked themselves a crucial question: was there only one world or many? Could the New World, unknown to the ancients, be entirely detached from the rest of human history? Many of these chroniclers continued to think that the world was divided into three parts: Europe, Asia, and Africa. In their descriptions of the Americas, they drew heavily on histories and travel reports pertaining to other epochs and locales, especially contemporary Asia and ancient Rome. Local authors and artists in the New World in this period used world history and news of distant conflicts to reflect on the immediacy of their historical experience. In this course, we will consider the ways in which historians, conquistadors, missionaries, and indigenous authors in New Spain (Mexico), Brazil, and Peru contemplated themselves in the looking glass of remote times and places: from Greco-Roman Antiquity to Lutheran Germany, from the Ottoman Mediterranean to the Apocalyptic End of Times. Students will reassess the importance of this archive to early modern studies writ large and challenge the scholarly tendency to frame the Iberian Peninsula as the center and the Americas as the periphery. Primary sources will include sixteenth and seventeenth-century chronicles, reports, poetry, theater, pictographic codices, feather mosaics, and maps. Reading knowledge of Spanish and a willingness to work with Portuguese required. Course to be taught by Nicole T. Hughes.

ILAC 342. Meat. 3-5 Units.

"Carne" mistranslates as "meat," "Körper," or "chair." Does the word codify into language a certain culturally specific experience of the body and its mediation with nature? In which ways does "flesh" subordinate nonhumans? How does the theme of meat articulate natural and political histories? This advanced research seminar tackles these questions across Latin American corpora: Piñera, Eltit, Echeverría, Bolaño, Bombal, and Lispector. Theorists include: Singer, Santner, and Ortiz. Culturalist, new materialist debates on cattle and corpses. This course will be taught in Spanish.

ILAC 348. US-Mexico Border Fictions: Writing La Frontera, Tearing Down the Wall. 3-5 Units.

A border is a force of containment that inspires dreams of being overcome, crossed, and cursed; motivates bodies to climb over walls; and threatens physical harm. This graduate seminar places into comparative dialogue a variety of perspectives from Chicana/o and Mexican/Latin American literary studies. Our seminar will examine fiction and cultural productions that range widely, from celebrated Mexican and Chicano/a authors such as Carlos Fuentes (<em>La frontera de cristal</em>), Yuri Herrera (<em>Señales que precederan al fin del mundo</em>), Willivaldo Delgaldillo (<em>La Virgen del Barrio Árabe</em>), Américo Paredes (<em>George Washington Gómez: A Mexico-Texan Novel</em>), Gloria Anzaldúa (<em>Borderlands/La Frontera: The New Mestiza</em>), and Sandra Cisneros (<em>Carmelo: Puro Cuento</em>), among others, to musicians whose contributions to border thinking and culture have not yet been fully appreciated such as Herb Albert, Ely Guerra, Los Tigres del Norte, and Café Tacvba. Last but not least, we will screen and analyze Orson Welles' iconic border films <em>Touch of Evil</em> and Rodrigo Dorfman's <em>Los Sueños de Angélica</em>.nnProposing a diverse and geographically expansive view of the US-Mexico border literary and cultural studies, this seminar links the work of these authors and musicians to struggles for land and border-crossing rights, anti-imperialist forms of trans-nationalism, and to the decolonial turn in border thinking or pensamineto fronterizo. It forces us to take into account the ways in which shifts in the nature of global relations affect literary production and negative aesthetics especially in our age of (late) post-industrial capitalism.
Same as: COMPLIT 348

ILAC 349. Amerindia: Literature and Perspecitvism. 3-5 Units.

This course offers an intensive reading of the theory of Eduardo Viveiros de Castro. Literature and Anthropology. Amerindian Perspectivism and the Poetics of Translation. Taught in Portuguese.

ILAC 363. Visions of the Andes. 3-5 Units.

What visions of the Andes circulate in Latin American literature, photography and painting? How are they constructed? How is their value accrued? The course focuses on visual and written images of Andean landscapes. Beginning with 19th century technical photography, the course explores the visual economy of the Andes in representative texts and images from Peru, Bolivia and Chile, vis-à-vis critical discourses about Andean culture. In Spanish.

ILAC 370. Afro-Brazil: Oral Culture, Literature and Digital Media. 3-5 Units.

The African-Brazilian population in the state of Minas Gerais and the ritual of the coronation of the kings and the queens of the Congo in the Devotion to Our Lady of Rosario. Texts by Antonio Vieira, Guimarães Rosa and others. Multimedia digital experiments with videos and the production of sonic textures. Taught in Portuguese.

ILAC 373. Baroque Brazil. 3 Units.

In this course we will read texts from and about seventeenth- andneighteenth-century Brazil, with special emphasis on the baroquenaesthetic in literature, art, and music. Authors include AntónionVieira; Gregório de Matos; Bento Teixeira; Sebastião da Rocha Pita;nNuno Marques Pereira; Manuel Botelho de Oliveira; and Frei Itaparica.nReadings in English and Portuguese. Taught in English.

ILAC 399. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

For Spanish and Portuguese department graduate students only. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ILAC 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

.

ILAC 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

.

Portuguese Language Courses

PORTLANG 1. First-Year Portuguese, First Quarter. 5 Units.

Emphasis is on oral comprehension and proficiency in speaking. Students learn the language as they contrast Brazilian culture with their own. Lab. Completion of 3 fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

PORTLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Portuguese, Part 1. 5 Units.

For students with two years of college level study or equivalent of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in conversations, providing and obtaining information, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Students learn the language as they contrast Brazilian culture with their own. Lab. Completion of PORTLANG 2A fulfills the University's foreign language requirement.

PORTLANG 2. First-Year Portuguese, 2nd Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of 1. Speaking and oral comprehension and reading and writing skills. Lab. Prerequisite: placement test, or 1.

PORTLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Portuguese, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 1A. For students with two years of college level study or equivalent of a Romance language, preferably Spanish. Goal is to use socially and culturally appropriate forms in conversations, providing and obtaining information, describing and narrating, and expressing feelings, emotions, and opinions. Students learn the language as they contrast Brazilian culture with their own. Lab. Completion of PORTLANG 2A fulfills the University's foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test, or PORTLANG 1A.

PORTLANG 11A. Accelerated Second-Year Portuguese, Part 1. 5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 2A. Goal is to use linguistically and culturally appropriate forms in oral narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis is on expository speech. Prerequisite: Placement Test, PORTLANG 2A or PORTLANG 3.

PORTLANG 12A. Accelerated Second-Year Portuguese, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of PORTLANG 11A. Goal is to use linguistically and culturally appropriate forms in narrations, descriptions, and expression of ideas and opinions. Emphasis on expository writing. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 11A.

PORTLANG 99. Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.n (Staff).

PORTLANG 101. Reading Brazil. 3-4 Units.

Short expository readings, guest lectures, discussions, compositions on Brazilian issues. Review of grammatical structures. Vocabulary building with emphasis on common idiomatic expressions and troublesome lexical distinctions. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A or equivalent.

PORTLANG 102. Brazil in Text: Advanced Grammar and Composition. 3-4 Units.

3rd year course. Further development of academic writing. Short fictional and expository readings, guest lectures, discussions, compositions on Brazilian issues. Emphasis is on building paragraphs, organizing arguments, and justifying positions. May be used as workshop to write papers in Portuguese for another course. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A or equivalent.

PORTLANG 103. Advanced Conversation: Brazil Today. 3-4 Units.

3rd year course. Reading and discussions on issues from current newspapers and magazines, reading comprehension strategies with online news updates, and vocabulary building with emphasis on formal expository writing. Writing practice if desired. Students prepare short presentations and lead subsequent discussions. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 12A.

PORTLANG 161. Advanced Reading in Portuguese, Fourth-year Portuguese. 3-4 Units.

The course emphasizes high-level reading comprehension and leads to advanced development of communication skills for extended formal and informal discourse in Portuguese. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 101.

PORTLANG 162. Advanced Writing in Portuguese, Fourth-year Portuguese. 3-4 Units.

The course has two tracks, depending on the interest of the student: a) advanced expository writing (correspondence, technical reports, editorials, etc.) and b) creative writing (`crônicas' short stories, poems, etc.). Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 102.

PORTLANG 163. Contemporary Issues in the Lusophone World. Fourth-Year Portuguese. 3-4 Units.

The class emphasizes formal presentations/discussions in Portuguese, based on contemporary issues in the lusophone world. Students use as linguistic models newspaper and magazine articles, TV news broadcasts, online news services, films, art exhibits, news on scientific advances, etc. Focus is on mastering high-level vocabulary/structures, as well as reading and rhetorical strategies, for appropriate use in professional settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test or PORTLANG 103.

PORTLANG 164. Translating the Lusophone world, Fourth-Year Portuguese. 3-5 Units.

For advanced students. Literary and technical translation. Readings on theoretical topics on translation; discussion, analysis and comparison of existing translations (literary and technical); individual translation projects according to students field of study, and discussion and analysis of those projects in class. Final translation project to be undertaken individually. Prerequisite: PORTLANG 250 or completion of 3rd year sequence.

PORTLANG 297. Directed Reading. 1-4 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff).

PORTLANG 394. Graduate Studies in Portuguese Conversation. 1-3 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.nn (Staff).

PORTLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Portuguese. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.n (Staff).

Spanish Language Courses

SPANLANG 1. First-Year Spanish, First Quarter. 5 Units.

Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world.

SPANLANG 1A. Accelerated First-Year Spanish, Part 1. 5 Units.

Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Spanish, or those with a strong background in another Romance language. SPANLANG 2A fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement. Prerequisite: Placement Test.

SPANLANG 1G. Accelerated First-Year Business Spanish, Part 1. 4 Units.

For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 2. First-Year Spanish, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 1. Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Prerequisite Placement Test or SPANLANG 1.

SPANLANG 2A. Accelerated First-Year Spanish, Part 2. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 1A. Completes first-year sequence in two rather than three quarters. For students with previous knowledge of Spanish, or those with a strong background in another Romance language. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 1A. Fulfills the University language requirement.

SPANLANG 2G. Accelerated First-Year Business Spanish, Part 2. 4 Units.

Continuation of 1G. For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 3. First-Year Spanish, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 2. Emphasis is on developing socially and culturally appropriate proficiency in interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational spheres. Influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 2. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 3G. Spanish for Business Professionals. 4 Units.

For GSB students only. Limited enrollment.

SPANLANG 5A. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part A. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 1. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C.

SPANLANG 5B. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part B. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 2. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 1 or 5A.

SPANLANG 5C. Intensive First-Year Spanish, Part C. 5 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 3. Continuation of 5B. Continuation of 5A. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers in socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Only Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may register for 205A,B,C. Prerequisite 2 or 5B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 10. Beginning Oral Communication. 2 Units.

Additional pronunciation, vocabulary, and speaking skills. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: one quarter of Spanish, demonstrated oral proficiency above the novice level; may be taken concurrently with SPANLANG 2, SPANLANG 2A 2A, or SPANLANG 3.

SPANLANG 10SC. Spanish Immersion: Language and Community. 2 Units.

Wouldn't it be great if you could quickly increase your Spanish proficiency through an intensive immersion experience right here at Stanford? Wouldn't you love to gain the cultural and historical knowledge necessary to begin taking film, literature, and culture courses generally reserved for advanced students? This intensive Spanish immersion course is designed to help students who have completed a year of Spanish to move forward quickly toward greater linguistic and cultural competence. After a year of Spanish, students tend to be able to handle straightforward interactions related to basic needs and personal information, but they generally lack the ability to handle more abstract discussions or to combine short utterances into longer presentations of their ideas. Most students likewise have little knowledge of the rich and complex history that surrounds the Spanish language or the central role that Spanish has played in the cultural, artistic, and political life of California. In this course, a team of experienced instructors will help students improve their Spanish through intensive lessons that incorporate film, literature, and social issues. Through a focused discussion of the themes of immigration and democracy in Spain, Latin America, and the United States, as well as excursions and guest lectures by Stanford faculty and community leaders, this course will immerse students in Spanish and help them to gain advanced proficiency much more quickly.

SPANLANG 11C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.

SPANLANG 11R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `R' content focuses on international relations and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 2A or SPANLANG 3.

SPANLANG 11SL. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engaged learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. Requires one evening off campus per week in addition to four hours of regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, print-making, digital storytelling, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 3 or SPANLANG 2A.

SPANLANG 12C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 11C. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11Ror 11SL.

SPANLANG 12R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 11R. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `R' content focuses on international relations and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11 C or 11R or 11SL.

SPANLANG 12SL. Spanlang 12SL Second-Year: Empahasis on Service Learning, second qtr. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 11. Identity and community. Sequence integrating community engagd learning, culture and language with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and academic contexts. SL content focuses on artistic projects with Spanish-speaking youth organizations in the local community. May require additional hours off campus immediately before and after class, in addition to regular class time. Projects may vary from quarter to quarter (e.g., mural art, environmental projects, poetry, etc.) but focus on themes surrounding community and youth identity. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 11C, 11R, or 11SL.

SPANLANG 13C. Second-Year Spanish: Cultural Emphasis, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12C. Sequence integrating culture and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. `C' content focuses on societal and cultural components of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R. or 12SL Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 13R. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on International Relations, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12R. Sequence integrating geopolitics and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language, international relations, and socioeconomics of the Spanish-speaking world. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 12C,12R or 21SL. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 13SL. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Integration of community engagement and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based reciprocity and service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.

SPANLANG 15. Intermediate Oral Communication. 3 Units.

Emphasis is on interaction in Spanish locally and globally. Regional vocabularies and cultures at home and abroad. Interaction with local native Spanish speakers and communities globally via the Internet. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 2A, SPANLANG 3 and demonstrated oral proficiency above the low intermediate level.

SPANLANG 15S. Intermediate Oral Communication. 2 Units.

Emphasis is on interaction in Spanish locally and globally. Regional vocabularies and cultures at home and abroad. Interaction with local native Spanish speakers and communities globally via the Internet. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: first-year Spanish and demonstrated oral proficiency above the low intermediate level.

SPANLANG 21B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Third quarter focus is on the development of written and oral styles and registers used in more formal settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test.

SPANLANG 22B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, Second Quarter. 3-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 21B. Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG or 21B.

SPANLANG 23B. Second-Year Spanish for Heritage Language Students, Third Quarter. 3-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 22B. Emphasis is on ability to communicate orally and in writing. Spelling and the written accent. Goal is to understand, interpret, and analyze texts, movies, radio, and television. Written language skills include rules for editing written language. Third quarter Focus is on the development of written and oral styles and registers used in more formal settings. Prerequisite: Placement Test or SPANLANG 22B.

SPANLANG 25A. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part A. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 11. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socioculturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 25B. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part B. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 12. Continuation of 25A. Prerequisite: 25A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 25C. Intensive Second-Year Spanish, Part C. 4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 13. Continuation of 25B. Prerequisite: 25B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 99. Language Specials. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 100. Advanced Oral Communication. 3 Units.

For students who have completed second-year Spanish or who have oral skills above the intermediate level. Interactive activities require students to persuade, analyze, support opinions, and gather and interpret others' points of view. Focus is on vocabulary enrichment and idiomatic expressions. Cultural, literary, political, and journalistic readings. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

SPANLANG 100S. Advanced Oral Communication. 2 Units.

For students who have completed second-year Spanish or who have oral skills above the intermediate level. Interactive activities require students to persuade, analyze, support opinions, and gather and interpret others' points of view. Focus is on vocabulary enrichment and idiomatic expressions. Cultural, literary, political, and journalistic readings. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13 or equivalent.

SPANLANG 101. The Structure of Spanish. 4 Units.

Criteria and skills to analyze Spanish grammatical structure. Identification of word functions in sentences and texts, types of sentences, and terminology. Structure of nouns, adjectives, and verbs, and their relationship with meaning. The differences between Spanish grammar as a formal system and in everyday life.Students who wish to participate in the optional community engaged learning component should sign up for SPANLANG 101SL (below). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.

SPANLANG 101SL. The Structure of Spanish. 4 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 101, integrating service learning with course material. Assignments will be modified for students enrolled under 101SL to focus on principles and practice of community-engaged learning. Students and native Spanish-speaking Stanford workers exchange oral histories and create digital stories with testimonials, advice, or remembrances that workers wish to share. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.
Same as: Service Learning Option

SPANLANG 102. Composition and Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

Individual development of the ability to write in Spanish. Emphasis is on style and diction, and on preparing and writing essays on literary topics. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics more closely related to their studies for projects. Students who wish to participate in the optional community engaged learning component should sign up for SPANLANG 102SL (below). Prerequisite: two years of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 102B. Composition and Writing Workshop for Heritage Language Students. 3-5 Units.

For students with a good understanding of written accents, spelling, and syntax. Focus is on the craft of writing with emphasis on brainstorming, planning, outlining, drafting, revising, style, diction, and editing. Writing essays on literary topics. Non-Spanish majors or minors may choose topics related to their studies. Prerequisite: 23B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 102SL. Composition and Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

SPANLANG 102SL. Equivalent to SPANLANG 102, integrating service learning with course material. Assignments will be modified for students enrolled under 102SL to focus on principles and practice of community-engaged learning. Students and native Spanish-speaking Stanford workers exchange oral histories and create digital stories with testimonials, advice, or remembrances that workers wish to share. Cardinal Course (certified by Haas Center). In 2016-2017, Spring Quarter only. Prerequisite: SPANLANG 13C, SPANLANG 13R, SPANLANG 13SL, or SPANLANG 23B.

SPANLANG 121M. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

First quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on taking the medical history. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, pediatrics, nutrition, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: HRP 280

SPANLANG 122M. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

Second quarter of three-quarter series.Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on performing a physical examination. Topics include anatomy, general hospital procedures, reproductive health, emergency medicine, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: HRP 281

SPANLANG 123M. Spanish for Medical Students. 2 Units.

Third quarter of three-quarter series. Goal is a practical and culturally appropriate command of spoken Spanish. Emphasis is on different specialties and medical conditions. Topics include anatomy, diagnostic procedures, HIV, diabetes, hypertension, and essential doctor-patient phrases when dealing with Spanish-speaking patients. Series can be taken independently, depending on the level of prior knowledge. Undergraduates are welcome to enroll.
Same as: HRP 282

SPANLANG 131M. Spanish for Heritage and Foreign Language Pre-Med and Public Health Students. 3-4 Units.

For pre-med or public health students who grew up in homes where Spanish is spoken or for students who possess a considerable command of Spanish. Focus is on developing the ability to provide information on health-related topics to Spanish speakers in the U.S. Students participate in the organization and delivery of information on preventive health care in a workshop setting to a Spanish-speaking community.

SPANLANG 199. Individual Reading. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 205A. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part A. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 1. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units.

SPANLANG 205B. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part B. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 2. Continuation of 205A. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units. Prerequisite 205A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 205C. Intensive First-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part C. 3-5 Units.

Equivalent to SPANLANG 3. Continuation of 205B. For Stanford graduate students only. Goal is to engage in interactions with Spanish speakers using socially and culturally appropriate forms. Social and cultural influences shaping the production of oral and written texts in the Spanish- and English-speaking world. Stanford graduate students restricted to 9 units may take 205A,B,C for a total of 9 units or 2 of the courses for a total of 9 units. Prerequisite 205B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225A. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part A. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 11. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socioculturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: one year of college Spanish or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225B. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part B. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 12. Continuation of 225A. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Prerequisite 225A or equivalent.

SPANLANG 225C. Intensive Second-Year Spanish for Stanford Grads, Part C. 3-4 Units.

Same as SPANLANG 13. Continuation of 225B. For Stanford Graduate students restricted to 9 units. Prequisite 225B or equivalent.

SPANLANG 250. Reading Spanish. 3 Units.

Reading Spanish - For students who have already taken Spanish for at least one year or have superior reading proficiency in another Romance language. Emphasis is on academic texts. Fulfills University reading requirements for advanced degrees if students earn a grade of 'B.'.

SPANLANG 394. Graduate Studies in Spanish Conversation. 1-3 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SPANLANG 395. Graduate Studies in Spanish. 1-5 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.