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Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Contacts

Office: Building 460, Room 216
Mail Code: 94305-2022
Phone: (650) 723-3413
Email: feminist-staff@stanford.edu

https://feminist.stanford.edu/

Courses offered by the Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies are listed under the subject code FEMGEN on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies offers an undergraduate major and minor, and an interdisciplinary honors program that is open to students in all majors. Each Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies student builds an individual program of study around a self-defined thematic focus, integrating courses from multiple departments. The program encourages work in the arts and supports creative honors theses. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors may declare Arts & Culture, Global Studies, Health, or LGBT/Queer Studies as a subplan, or may design their own thematic focus. Subplans are printed on the diploma; individual thematic foci are not printed on the diploma. See the "Bachelor's" tab of this section of the bulletin for descriptions of the subplans.

Curriculum guidelines and forms for the undergraduate major, minor, and honors programs are available on the program web site. See the program web site for additional contact information.

The Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies offers the option of a Ph.D. minor to graduate students already enrolled in a Ph.D. program at Stanford University.  The Ph.D. minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies provides graduate students pursuing Ph.D.s broad interdisciplinary knowledge in the field and prepares them to teach courses in the subject. The goal of the program is to bring together graduate students and faculty from different departments, programs, and schools who use feminist and queer perspectives in their research.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The interdepartmental Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies provides students with knowledge and skills to investigate the significance of gender and sexuality in all areas of human life. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies examines how societies structure gender roles, relations, and identities, and how these intersect with other hierarchies of power, such as class, race, nationality, ethnicity, sexuality, ability, and age. The program coordinates courses offered across the University in feminist and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer studies. Students learn to employ critical gender and sexuality studies methodologies to analyze the assumptions about gender and sexuality that inform the study of individuals, cultures, social institutions, policy, and areas of scholarly inquiry. The program prepares majors for graduate study in humanities and social sciences and for professional schools.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The program expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. understanding of how social hierarchies related to gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity have developed historically, cross-culturally, and transnationally.
  2. knowledge of the histories of feminist, gender, sexuality, and/or LGBT/queer social movements and their intersections with other social movements.
  3. knowledge and comprehension of feminist, gender, sexuality, and/or LGBT/queer theories and methods for social, historical, literary and cultural analysis.
  4. skill in making and communicating feminist, gender, sexuality, and/or LGBT/queer analyses of data, texts, and arguments.
  5. competence in applying theory to practical experience for social transformation and citizenship.

Bachelor of Arts in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The major in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies requires 63 units and may be taken as a single major, as one of multiple majors, or as a secondary major. FEMGEN core courses must be taken for a letter grade. A student wishing to major in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies should declare the major via Axess, by Autumn Quarter of the junior year. The student then selects a subplan or develop an individualized proposal describing a thematic focus and outlining a course of study, approved by a prospective adviser from the list of affiliated faculty. The proposal is then submitted to the Program Office (Bldg. 460, Room 216) for approval by the Director.

A maximum of 10 of the 63 units for the major may be taken on a credit/no credit or satisfactory/no credit basis; a maximum of 10 units may be taken as independent study or directed reading.

If taken as one of multiple majors, none of the 63 units counted toward the major in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies may overlap with units counted toward the major in another department or program. If taken as a secondary major, up to 30 of the units counted toward the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies major may also be counted as fulfilling the major requirements in another department or program if that department or program consents.

Curriculum

The major in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies includes a total of at least 12 approved courses for a minimum of 63 units. The courses are divided among the core, the focus, and electives to reach the total course requirement. Not all courses are offered every year; consult ExploreCourses for current course offerings  Courses not listed below that relate to the themes of Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies may potentially be counted towards the major as well; contact the academic services administrator, (rmeisels@stanford.edu) for more information.

The Core

Units
1. Introductory Course (5)
FEMGEN 101Introduction to Feminist Studies5
2. Feminist Theories and Method (2-5)
FEMGEN 103Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines2-5
3. Junior and Senior Seminars and Practica (3)
FEMGEN 104AJunior Seminar and Practicum1
FEMGEN 104BSenior Seminar and Practicum2
4. One feminist, gender, or sexuality theory course from approved course list below. (3-5)3-5
Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention
History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering
Black Feminist Theory
The Changing American Family
Language as Social and Political Activism: Feminist and LGBTQ Social and Political Movements
Performing Identities
Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations
Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology
Gender and Modernism
Literature, History and Memory
5. One Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or a related course in the social sciences (3-5)3-5
Subjects include Anthropology, Communication, Education, History, Human Biology, Law, Medicine, Political Science, Psychology, or Sociology
6. One Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies or a related course in the humanities (3-5)3-5
Subjects include English, Linguistics, Philosophy, Religious Studies, the arts, and languages
Total Units19-28

Writing in the Major (WIM)

Majors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies may satisfy the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement by taking one of the approved WIM courses in the list below. Honors students satisfy the WIM requirement through their honors work. 

Units
WIM Courses for Majors (4-5)4-5
Language as Social and Political Activism: Feminist and LGBTQ Social and Political Movements
Perspectives on American Identity
Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology
Language in Society
Total Units4-5
Practicum

The practicum courses (FEMGEN 104A Junior Seminar and Practicum, FEMGEN 104B Senior Seminar and Practicum) bring together theory and practical experience. The practicum involves field research, community service, or other relevant experience such as a public service internship. Students plan their practicum during Winter Quarter of the junior year in FEMGEN 104A Junior Seminar and Practicum (1 unit). The practicum is normally done over the summer between junior and senior year and may be taken for additional units. It is followed by FEMGEN 104B Senior Seminar and Practicum (2 units), in Autumn Quarter of the senior year.

The Focus

All Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies majors must complete the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies major core requirements (7 courses) and an additional 5 courses constituting an area of focus. Those 5 courses should be chosen in consultation with the student’s adviser and the Associate Director. 

FGSS majors have the option of declaring a formal subplan or of designing an individualized thematic focus.  subplans are noted on student transcripts and diplomas; individually designed thematic foci are not.  The following are the four formal subplans:

  • The Arts & Culture subplan is appropriate for fields of study focusing on interpretation, production, and consumption of messages of feminism, gender, and sexuality through arts, media, literature and performance.   Courses that may fulfill requirements include but are not limited to:
Units
LINGUIST 52NSpoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality3
FEMGEN 94SMuscle Men and Iron Girls: Sex and Masculinity in Chinese and American History5
FEMGEN 109Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports3
FEMGEN 157Language as Social and Political Activism: Feminist and LGBTQ Social and Political Movements3-5
FEMGEN 188QImagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person4-5
FEMGEN 236Literature and Transgression3-5
FEMGEN 314Performing Identities4
  • The Health subplan is appropriate for fields of study focusing on feminist perspectives of science and technologies, gender justice and human rights, gender health and medicine, access/disparities/needs regarding health and sexuality, and women’s roles as practitioners and researchers.  Courses that may fulfill requirements include but are not limited to:        
HUMBIO 125Current Controversies in Women's Health2-3
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
FEMGEN 144History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering5
FEMGEN 193GPsychological Well-Being on Campus: A Focus on Gender and Sexual Identities1
FEMGEN 260Disability, Gender. & Identity5
  • The Global Studies subplan is appropriate for fields of study focusing cross-cultural perspectives on gender, gender justice and human rights, race/class/gender intersections, gender/spirituality/religion, geopolitical contexts of feminism and LGBTQ activism, and gender and education.  Courses that may fulfill requirements include but are not limited to:
FEMGEN 105CHuman Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives5
FEMGEN 111Transnational Reproductive Politics3-5
FEMGEN 144XTransforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
FEMGEN 206Global Medical Issues Affecting Women1
FEMGEN 297Education, Gender, and Development4
  • The LGBT/Queer Studies subplan is appropriate for fields of study focusing on history and theories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer identities, communities, cultural practices, politics, and legal and medical issues.  Courses that may fulfill requirements include but are not limited to:
FEMGEN 24Sexuality, Gender, and Religion2
LINGUIST 52NSpoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality3
FEMGEN 120Queer Raza3-5
FEMGEN 124Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine2
FEMGEN 140DLGBT/Queer Life in the United States4-5
FEMGEN 389EQueer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations3-5
SOC 155The Changing American Family4

Overseas Studies Courses in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site or the Bing Overseas Studies web site. Students should consult the Associate Director for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

Honors Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

For Majors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Admission—The honors program offers an opportunity to do independent research for a senior thesis. It is open to students with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.5 or better in course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, or demonstrated academic competence. Students should begin the application process by consulting with the Program Director or the Associate Director as early as possible in the junior year, preferably by the end of Winter Quarter.

During the application process, students design a project in consultation with their proposed thesis advisers and the Associate Director. A proposal describing the project and the number of units to be taken toward the honors directed project must be submitted to the program office for final approval. All projects must have a primary focus on gender or sexuality. See the honors section of the program web site for additional details.

Requirements

  1. Students enroll for 2-3 units per quarter in FEMGEN 199A, FEMGEN 199B, and FEMGEN 199C Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop.
  2. Students in the honors program also enroll for FEMGEN 105 Honors Work with their respective advisers, for an additional 2-3 units each quarter.  The combined number of units in 199 and 105 must be 5 per quarter, unless permission is granted by the Director or Associate Director for a different formulation.
  3. A semifinal draft of the thesis is due early in Spring Quarter of the senior year.
  4. The final thesis must be submitted by May 15 (or the following Monday should May 15 fall on a weekend). The completed thesis must be submitted with the Thesis Completion Form, which requires the adviser's signature of approval. Creative projects must include a section of critical analysis. For guidelines, see the honors section of the program web site.

For Majors in Other Departments

Interdisciplinary Honors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies for majors in other departments or programs, as distinguished from honors for students pursuing a major in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, is intended to complement study in any major. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies minors who wish to pursue honors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies should apply through the process for non-majors. 

Admission

The Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program is open to students majoring in any field with an overall GPA of 3.5 or better or demonstrated academic competence.

Students must complete the following with a grade of 'B+' or better:

  1. Either FEMGEN 101 Introduction to Feminist Studies or FEMGEN 103 Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines, and one other designated feminist theory course, or
  2. Three Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies courses and/or approved courses relevant to the proposed honors research.

Students should begin the application process by consulting with the Program Director or the Associate Director as early as possible in the junior year, preferably by the end of Winter Quarter. During the application process, students design a project in consultation with their proposed thesis advisers and the Associate Director. A proposal describing the project and the number of units to be taken toward the honors directed project must be submitted to the program office for final approval. All projects must have a primary focus on gender or sexuality. See the honors section of the program web site for additional details.

Requirements

  1. Students enroll for 2-3 units per quarter in FEMGEN 199A, FEMGEN 199B, and FEMGEN 199C Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop.
  2. Students in the honors program also enroll for FEMGEN 105 Honors Work with their respective advisers, for an additional 2-3 units each quarter.  The combined number of units in 199 and 105 must be 5 per quarter unless permission is granted by the Director or Associate Director for a different formulation.
  3. A semifinal draft of the thesis is due early in Spring Quarter of the senior year.
  4. The final thesis must be submitted by May 15 (or the following Monday should May 15 fall on a weekend). The completed thesis must be submitted with the Thesis Completion Form, which requires the adviser's signature of approval. Creative projects must include a section of critical analysis. For guidelines, see the honors section of the program web site.

Minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

A student wishing to minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies should apply to the minor via AXESS, preferably by winter quarter of the junior year. The student will then develop an individualized proposal describing a thematic focus and outlining a course of study, approved by a prospective adviser from the list of affiliated faculty. The proposal is then submitted to the Program Office (Bldg. 460, Room 216) for approval by the Director.

The minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies consists of at least six courses at the 100 level or above for a minimum of 30 and a maximum of 36 units. None of the units for the minor may count towards the student's major. The minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies should be declared by Winter Quarter of a student's junior year.

Requirements

Units
1. Introductory Course (5)
FEMGEN 101Introduction to Feminist Studies5
2. One of the feminist, gender, or sexuality theory courses from the approved course list below (3-5)3-5
FEMGEN 103 (FEMGEN 101 is a prerequisite of FEMGEN 103)
Queer Raza
Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention
History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering
Black Feminist Theory
The Changing American Family
Language as Social and Political Activism: Feminist and LGBTQ Social and Political Movements
Performing Identities
Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations
Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology
Gender and Modernism
Literature, History and Memory
Total Units8-10

The Focus

At least 4 of the courses for the minor should relate to a thematic focus defined by the student and faculty adviser.  See the suggested clusters listed in the "Bachelor of Arts in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies" section of this bulletin. At least one course within the thematic focus should address race/ethnicity and/or global perspectives on feminist, gender, and sexuality.

Ph.D Minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Ph.D. minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies provides graduate students pursuing Ph.D.s broad interdisciplinary knowledge in the field and prepares them to teach courses in the subject. The goal of the program is to bring together graduate students and faculty from different departments, programs, and schools who use feminist and queer perspectives in their research.

Application and Acceptance

Prospective students submit a Ph.D. minor application form outlining an academic plan with courses and quarters to satisfy the minor requirements. The form must be signed by the student’s home department faculty adviser.

This formal application to the minor must be submitted before advancement to candidacy at the end of the second year of graduate study. Prior to that time, students are expected to have been working with an adviser from the affiliated faculty in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies to ensure that all the requirements can be met without delaying progress to degree or to TGR status. Students are encouraged to consult with the Director or Associate Director as soon as they have develop an interest in pursuing the minor. A student who is planning to apply for a master's degree on the way to the Ph.D. should plan out the course of study carefully, since units for the minor may not also be counted toward a Stanford master's degree.

An accepted student selects a Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty adviser with assistance from the program director. The adviser meets with the student to discuss and sign the academic plan outlined on the Application for Ph.D. Minor form. The plan represents a student's best estimate of courses planned to meet the minor requirements. Students who wish to enroll in the minor after the Winter Quarter of their first year must demonstrate that their participation will not delay their time to degree or their time to TGR.

Students must remain in good academic standing in their home departments.

Requirements

To receive the Ph.D. Minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, students fulfill the following requirements, for a minimum of 20 units at the graduate level (typically 200-level or higher).

Units
FEMGEN 203Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines3-5
A feminist theory course such as:4-5
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology
Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention
Queer Raza
Latin@ Literature
Sociology of Gender
The Social Determinants of Health
The Changing American Family
Performing Identities
Two electives: graduate-level courses or related courses in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, one of which may be from the student's home department. The following are examples of appropriate elective courses. Check ExploreCourses for scheduling informaton.10
Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America
Medical Anthropology
Anthropology of Capitalism
Feminism and Contemporary Art
Critical Concepts in Chican@ Literature
Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves
Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China
Queer Literature and Film
Literature and Transgression
Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents
Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America
Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives
Women and Health Care
Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention
The Changing American Family
Graduate Workshop: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies
Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America
Disability, Gender. & Identity
The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia
Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America
Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present
Gender and Sexuality in Chinese History
Queer Raza
Critical Concepts in Chican@ Literature
Latin@ Literature
Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations
The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar
Queer Health and Medicine
Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine
Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature
Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment
Gender, Law, and Public Policy
Health and Human Rights Speaker Series
Physicians and Human Rights
Current Issues in Reproductive Health
Human Rights and Global Health
Social Movements and Collective Action
Interpersonal Relations
Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies Colloquium, 3 quarters
FEMGEN 299Graduate Workshop: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (must be taken for three quarters)3
Total Units20-23

Academic Progress

Students submit an annual progress report listing the courses completed towards the minor and courses planned in future quarters. This form is approved by both the main faculty adviser and the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty adviser. Students meet with their Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies faculty adviser to discuss their progress report.

Notation

Students who complete all the requirements receive the following notation on their transcript and diploma: “Ph.D. Minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.”

Sponsorship

The Ph.D. minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies is sponsored by the Program in Modern Thought and Literature. The minor is administered by the Program in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

Program Director

Christine Min Wotipka (Education)

Associate Director

Patti Hanlon-Baker

Faculty Affiliates

American Studies: Shelley Fisher Fishkin

Anthropology: Paulla Ebron, Miyako Inoue, S. Lochlann Jain, Matthew Kohrman, Barbara Voss, Sylvia Yanagisako

Art and Art History: Terry Berlier, Pamela Lee, Jean Ma, Richard Meyer

Comparative Literature: Petra Dierkes-Thrun, Patricia Parker

Developmental Biology: Ellen Porzig

East Asian Languages and Cultures: Haiyan Lee, Yoshiko Matsumoto, James Reichert, Melinda Takeuchi

Education: Myra Strober (emerita), Christine Min Wotipka

English: Eavan Boland, Helen Brooks, Terry Castle, Michele Elam, Shelly Fisher Fishkin, Barbara Gelpi (emerita), Claire Jarvis, Andrea Lunsford, Paula Moya, Stephen Orgel, Ramón Saldívar, Jennifer Summit, Elizabeth Tallent

Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: Nicole Baran, Andrea Rees Davies, Susan Krieger, Valerie Miner, Rabbi Patricia Karlin-Neumann

French and Italian: Cecile Alduy, Marisa Galvez, Carolyn Springer

German Studies: Russell Berman, Adrian Daub, Kathryn Strachota

History: Philippe Buc, Carolyn Lougee Chappell, Paula Findlen, Estelle Freedman, Allyson Hobbs, Katherine Jolluck, Nancy Kollmann, Ana Minian, Paul Robinson (emeritus), Londa Schiebinger, Matthew Sommer, Laura Stokes, Kären Wigen

Human Biology: Anne Firth Murray

Iberian and Latin American Cultures: Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano

Law: Deborah Rhode, Jane Schacter

Linguistics: Penelope Eckert, Rob Podesva

Medical School: Ann Arvin, Helen Blau, Gabriel Garcia, Cheryl Gore-Felton, Roy King, Cheryl Koopman, Iris Litt (emerita), Leah Millheiser, Marcia Stefanick

Music: Heather Hadlock

Philosophy: Helen Longino, Debra Satz

Political Science: Lisa Blaydes, Terry Karl

Psychology: Laura Carstensen, Hazel Markus

Religious Studies: Charlotte Fonrobert, Hester Gelber, Linda Hess

Slavic Languages and Literatures: Monika Greenleaf

Sociology: Shelley Correll, Cecilia Ridgeway

Theatre and Performance Studies: Jennifer Brody, Harry J. Elam, Leslie Hill, Jisha Menon, Cherríe Moraga, Helen Paris, Peggy Phelan

Overseas Studies Courses in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Units
OSPBER 174Sports, Culture, and Gender in Comparative Perspective5
OSPFLOR 34The Virgin Mother, Goddess of Beauty, Grand Duchess, and the Lady: Women in Florentine Art4
OSPFLOR 67The Celluloid Gaze: Gender, Identity and Sexuality in Cinema4
OSPMADRD 45Women in Art: Case Study in the Madrid Museums4
OSPOXFRD 57The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-18605
OSPOXFRD 117WGender and Social Change in Modern Britain4-5
OSPPARIS 60Representations of Women in Christian Art: Boldness and Virtue4
OSPSANTG 14Women Writers of Latin America in the 20th Century4-5

Related Courses

The following is a partial list of related courses for Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. See ExploreCourses for course descriptions and General Education Requirements (GER) information. See degree requirements above or check with the program associate director for applicability of these courses toward specific major or minor program requirements.

Units
AMSTUD 139BAmerican Women Writers, 1850-19205
AMSTUD 156HWomen and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors5
AMSTUD 161Women in Modern America4-5
AMSTUD 183Re- Imagining American Borders5
AMSTUD 214The American 1960s: Thought, Protest, and Culture5
AMSTUD 258Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America4-5
ANTHRO 201Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ARTHIST 176Feminism and Contemporary Art4
CHILATST 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CHINGEN 135Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves3-5
CHINGEN 136The Chinese Family3-5
COMPLIT 11QShakespeare, Playing, Gender3
COMPLIT 112Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents3-5
COMPLIT 190Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought3-5
COMPLIT 226AQueer Literature and Film3-5
COMPLIT 236Literature and Transgression3-5
COMPLIT 312Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents3-5
CSRE 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CSRE 103SNative American Women, Gender Roles, and Status5
CSRE 162Women in Modern America4-5
CSRE 177Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals5
CSRE 179GIndigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America3-5
CSRE 183Re- Imagining American Borders5
CSRE 192ETopics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America4-5
CSRE 200Latin@ Literature3-5
DANCE 160Rethinking the Ballerina4
EDUC 100AEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
EDUC 100BEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
EDUC 193GPsychological Well-Being on Campus: A Focus on Gender and Sexual Identities1
ENGLISH 65NContemporary Women Fiction Writers3
ENGLISH 150DWomen Poets5
ENGLISH 160Poetry and Poetics5
FEMGEN 205Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics3-5
FILMSTUD 102Theories of the Moving Image4
HISTORY 36NGay Autobiography4
HISTORY 44History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering3
HISTORY 130AIn Sickness and In Health: Medicine and Society in the United States: 1800-Present5
HISTORY 144History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering5
HISTORY 161Women in Modern America4-5
HISTORY 166BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
HISTORY 221BThe 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia5
HISTORY 258Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America4-5
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
HUMBIO 140Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease2-3
HUMBIO 143Adolescent Sexuality4
HUMBIO 144Boys' Psychosocial Development3
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
ILAC 280Latin@ Literature3-5
ILAC 287Queer Raza3-5
ILAC 382Latin@ Literature3-5
ILAC 393The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
INDE 215Queer Health and Medicine1
JAPANGEN 187Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature3-4
JAPANGEN 287Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature3-4
LAW 255Constitutional Law: The Fourteenth Amendment3
LAW 307Gender, Law, and Public Policy3
LINGUIST 150Language in Society4-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
MED 205Health and Human Rights Speaker Series1
MED 242Physicians and Human Rights1
MUSIC 14NWomen Making Music3
NATIVEAM 103SNative American Women, Gender Roles, and Status5
OBGYN 216Current Issues in Reproductive Health1
OSPOXFRD 57The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-18605
PEDS 223Human Rights and Global Health3
PHIL 153Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines2-5
PHIL 253Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines2-5
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
RELIGST 24Sexuality, Gender, and Religion2
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 120Interpersonal Relations4
SOC 134Education, Gender, and Development4
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 142Sociology of Gender5
SOC 152The Social Determinants of Health4
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
TAPS 314Performing Identities4

Courses

FEMGEN 5C. Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning and offers an optional service-learning component.
Same as: HISTORY 5C, HUMBIO 178T, SOMGEN 205.

FEMGEN 17. Gender and Power in Ancient Greece. 4 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGEN 17.) Introduction to the sex-gender system of ancient Greece, with comparative material from modern America. How myths, religious rituals, athletics, politics and theater reinforced gender stereotypes and sometimes undermined them. Skills: finding clues, identifying patterns and making connections amongst the components of a strange and beautiful culture very different from our own. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Same as: CLASSICS 32.

FEMGEN 24. Sexuality, Gender, and Religion. 2 Units.

From ancient times to the present, religious texts, authority figures, adherents, and critics have had a great deal to say about sexuality and gender, with powerful impacts in personal, social and political spheres. Today these debates are more wide ranging and public than ever. In this lecture and discussion series, distinguished scholars from within and beyond Stanford will consider how sexuality and gender become ¿religious¿ in Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism.
Same as: RELIGST 24.

FEMGEN 24N. Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Same as: CLASSICS 16N.

FEMGEN 29S. The Animal Other: Humans and Animals in Western History. 5 Units.

Enter a world in which war was waged not by tanks but on horseback and oceans brimmed with fantastic monsters. This class explores the animal-human divide in Western cultural history through topics including: the rise of natural history; the centralized state and its relationship to nature; monstrosity and witchcraft; the ethics of metaphor; scapegoating, sexism, racism; history of animal-rights. Students will have the opportunity to help curate a Green Library exhibition on this subject. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Same as: HISTORY 29S.

FEMGEN 36N. Gay Autobiography. 4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?
Same as: HISTORY 36N.

FEMGEN 52N. Spoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality. 3 Units.

The many ways language is used in the construction of sexuality and sexual identity. How language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, questions such as: Is there a gay accent? Why isn't there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked (heterosexual) identities linguistically constructed? Sexuality as an issue of identity, as well as of desire. Iconic relations between elements of language such as breathy voice quality and high pitch, and aspects of desire such as arousal and excitement. How language encodes ideologies about sexuality; how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. How language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts. Discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Final research paper on a topic of student choice.
Same as: LINGUIST 52N.

FEMGEN 54N. African American Women's Lives. 3-4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Same as: AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, HISTORY 54N.

FEMGEN 63N. The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality. 3-4 Units.

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Same as: AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, HISTORY 63N.

FEMGEN 86Q. Love as a Force for Social Justice. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Biological, psychological, religious, social and cultural perspectives on the concept of agape love. How love is conceptualized across cultures; agape love as the basis of many religions; different kinds of love; the biology of love; love in action for social justice; the languages of love, including art, literature, music, and poetry. Emphasis is on blog writing, participation, and oral presentation.
Same as: HUMBIO 86Q.

FEMGEN 94S. Muscle Men and Iron Girls: Sex and Masculinity in Chinese and American History. 5 Units.

How is masculinity represented and experienced in different cultural contexts? How do gender, sexuality, race, and class inform the construction of American and Chinese masculinities? How do historians use primary sources to make arguments? Examines visual and textual sources including magazines, photographs, propaganda posters, legal cases and film. Analyzes transnational history of masculinity in China and the United States from the late 1800s to the present. Topics include bodybuilding, martial arts, female masculinity, homosexuality, Cold War, and 1960s social movements. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Same as: HISTORY 94S.

FEMGEN 101. Introduction to Feminist Studies. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Same as: AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, TAPS 108.

FEMGEN 103. Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines. 2-5 Units.

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 253 or FEMGEN 203) Concepts and questions distinctive of feminist and LGBT scholarship and how they shape research: gender, intersectionality, disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, standpoint, "queering," postmodern critiques, postcolonial critiques.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Same as: FEMGEN 203, PHIL 153, PHIL 253.

FEMGEN 103S. Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status. 5 Units.

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
Same as: CSRE 103S, NATIVEAM 103S.

FEMGEN 104A. Junior Seminar and Practicum. 1 Unit.

Preference to and required of Feminist Studies majors; others require consent of instuctor. Feminist experiential learning projects related to critical studies in gender and sexuality. Identifying goals, grant proposal writing, and negotiating ethical issues in feminist praxis. Developing the relationship between potential projects and their academic focus in the major.

FEMGEN 104B. Senior Seminar and Practicum. 2 Units.

Required for Feminist Studies majors. Non-majors enrolled with consent of instructor. Students develop oral reports on their practicum and its relationship to their academic work, submit a report draft and revised written analysis of the practicum, and discuss applications of feminist scholarship. May be repeated once for credit.

FEMGEN 105. Honors Work. 1-15 Unit.

(Staff).

FEMGEN 105C. Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution and labor exploitation, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning and offers an optional service-learning component.
Same as: HISTORY 105C, INTNLREL 105C.

FEMGEN 107A. Ripped from the Headlines: Current Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Issues and Questions. 1-2 Unit.

Discussion of current issues and questions related to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

FEMGEN 107B. EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education. 1 Unit.

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.nnNotes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave.
Same as: EDUC 100B.

FEMGEN 107C. You're Majoring in What?! Why Feminism is Still Relevant. 1-2 Unit.

Stanford Feminist Study alum and community activists will join this weekly seminar to share how studying feminism has helped them professionally. Together speakers and students will explore answers to questions such as: ¿Why study feminism, sexuality, or gender studies?¿ ¿Why is feminism still relevant?¿.

FEMGEN 108. Internship in Feminist Studies. 1-5 Unit.

Supervised field, community, or lab experience in law offices, medical research and labs, social service agencies, legislative and other public offices, or local and national organizations that address issues related to gender and/or sexuality. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Majors may not receive 108 credit for their required practicum, as they are to sign up for FEMGEN 104 A & B instead. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units.

FEMGEN 109. Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports. 3 Units.

In 1972, Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports." But what would it take to get more women's sports featured on ESPN or more female athletes on the cover of Sports Illustrated? And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports? This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses.
Same as: FEMGEN 209.

FEMGEN 110X. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 110, COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 310X.

FEMGEN 111. Transnational Reproductive Politics. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the issues and debates surrounding women's reproduction in a transnational framework, including birth control, abortion, surrogacy, prenatal diagnosis, labor and delivery, menstruation, sex trafficking, and the reproductive justice movement. It pays special attention to how knowledge and technology travel across national/cultural borders and how women's reproductive functions are deeply connected to international politics and events abroad.
Same as: AMSTUD 111.

FEMGEN 112. "When We Dead Awaken": Breakthroughs in Conceptions of the Gendered Self in Literature and the Arts. 4-5 Units.

Remarkable breakthroughs In conceptions of the gendered self are everywhere evident in literature and the arts, beginning primarily with the Early Modern world and continuing into today. Many of these works inhere in innovations in literary and artistic forms in order to capture and even evoke the strong cognitive, or psychological, dimension of such ¿awakenings.¿ The reader, or viewer, is often challenged to adapt her or his mind to new forms of thought, such as John Donne¿s seventeenth century creation of the Dramatic Monologue, a form popular with modern writers, which requires the reader¿s cognitive ¿presence¿ in order to fill out the dramatic scene. In so doing, the reader often supplies the presence of the female voice and thereby enters into her self-consciousness and inner thoughts. Adrienne Rich, for example, specifically ¿rewrites¿ one of Donne¿s major poems from the female perspective. This can be, in Rich¿s words, an ¿awakening¿ for the active reader, as he or she assumes that often-unspoken female perspective. The course will also explore male conceptions of the self and how such conceptions are often grounded in cultural attitudes imposed on male subjects, which can contribute to gender-bias toward women, a subject often neglected in exploring gendered attitudes, but which is now gaining more study, for example, in Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello.¿ Readings from recent developments in the neurosciences and cognitive studies will be included in our study of artistic forms and how such forms can activate particular mindsets. Writers and artists will include Shakespeare, Michelangelo, John Donne, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, June Wayne, and Edward Albee¿s 1960¿s play, ¿Who¿s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?¿
Same as: FEMGEN 212.

FEMGEN 115. Queer Reading and Queer Writing in Early Modern England. 5 Units.

Considers the possibility of identifying queer reading and writing practices in early modern England as well the theoretical and historical obstacles such a project necessarily encounters. Focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. Study of Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, law, and politics on the other. Readings include plays, poems, and prose narratives as well as letters, pamphlets, and ephemeral literature. Both major and minor authors will be represented.

FEMGEN 120. Queer Raza. 3-5 Units.

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?
Same as: CHILATST 120, ILAC 287.

FEMGEN 123. Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society. 3 Units.

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
Same as: SOC 123, SOC 223.

FEMGEN 124. Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine. 2 Units.

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Same as: FEMGEN 224.

FEMGEN 126D. Victorian Sex. 5 Units.

How can we make sense of a culture of extraordinary sexual repression that nevertheless seemed fully preoccupied with sex? Examination of the depictions of sex in Victorian literary and cultural texts. Authors include: Collins, Braddon, the Brownings, Swinburne, Stoker and Wilde.
Same as: ENGLISH 126D.

FEMGEN 129. Critical Issues in International Women's Health. 4 Units.

Women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women's health that depend on women's capacity to exercise their human rghts including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 129.

FEMGEN 130. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. 3 Units.

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Same as: JEWISHST 120, RELIGST 130.

FEMGEN 138. Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention. 3-4 Units.

[Technical error is capping enrollment prematurely; come to first day of class] Course offers an interdisciplinary feminist perspective on the causes of gender violence, addresses the multi-leveled approaches to ending gender violence, and explores the relationship between violence against women and other forms of oppression: racism, economic exploitation, heterosexism and social class. Framework examines institutional barriers maintaining gender violence in our culture and considers multi-dimensional solutions. Students from every discipline, women and men, apply theoretical perspectives to professional goals and an optional service-learning project. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center)
Same as: FEMGEN 238.

FEMGEN 139. Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism. 4 Units.

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Same as: JEWISHST 139.

FEMGEN 140A. Destroying Dichotomies: Exploring Multiple Sex, Gender, and Sexual Identities. 3-5 Units.

This course is designed to broaden the student's awareness of the human experience by introducing scholarly debates about sex, gender and sexual identities and expressions. We will consider the socially constructed nature of sex, gender and sexuality and examine the history and community of those who identify as intersexual, transgender, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, pansexual and/or queer through texts, discussion, films, and class presentations.

FEMGEN 140D. LGBT/Queer Life in the United States. 4-5 Units.

An introductory course on LGBT social, cultural, and political history in the United States. This course explores how categories of sexuality have changed over time, with particular emphasis on the relationship among homosexuality, heterosexuality, and transgenderism. Students will analyze how the intersections of race, class, and sexuality influenced the constitution of these categories and the politics of social relations. Historical and literary sources will be used to examine changes in LGBT experiences and identities, primarily in the twentieth century.
Same as: FEMGEN 240D, HISTORY 257C.

FEMGEN 140H. New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.. 5 Units.

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Same as: ANTHRO 169A, CHILATST 168, CSRE 168.

FEMGEN 140P. Queer Art and Performance. 4-5 Units.

Examines the late 19th, 20th and 21st century forms of performance-- including examples from drama, theater, cabaret, and performance art -- through the perspectives of contemporary critical gender and queer theories. Texts and movements range from early avant-garde (Dada, Futurism) to gay and lesbian drama (Lillian Hellmann, Joe Orton, Tony Kushner) to post-liberation Queer performance and video (Split Britches, Carmelita Tropicana, Kalup Linzy). Theorists include Judith Butler, Michel Foucault, and Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.
Same as: TAPS 164T, TAPS 364T.

FEMGEN 142. Sociology of Gender. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.
Same as: FEMGEN 242, SOC 142, SOC 242.

FEMGEN 144. History of Women and Gender in Science, Medicine and Engineering. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 44. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in HISTORY 144.) Men's and women's roles in science, medicine, and engineering over the past 200 years with a focus on the present. What efforts are underway globally to transform research institutions so that both men's and women's careers can flourish? How have science and medicine studied and defined males and females? How can we harness the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation?
Same as: HISTORY 144.

FEMGEN 144X. Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class. 5 Units.

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Same as: ASNAMST 144, CSRE 144.

FEMGEN 145. Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950. 4 Units.

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Same as: AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 145, ARTHIST 345.

FEMGEN 150. Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China. 3-5 Units.

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Same as: CHINGEN 150, CHINGEN 250, FEMGEN 250.

FEMGEN 150A. Minaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to women's culture and art in Muslim countries of Central Asia. Women, bearers of family rites and folklore, are the key figures in transmission of traditional culture and guardians of folk Islam. Women helped to keep the continuity of Islamic education in Central Asia during the harsh times of Communist dominance. The whole wealth of women's oral tradition will be demonstrated and examined to the extent possible. The course will make broad use of audio-visual materials.
Same as: ANTHRO 150A, ANTHRO 250A, REES 250A.

FEMGEN 150D. Women Poets. 5 Units.

The development of women's poetry from the 17th to the 20th century. How these poets challenge and enhance the canon, amending and expanding ideas of tone, voice and craft, while revising societal expectations of the poet's identity. Poets include Katharine Philips, Letitia Barbauld, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charlotte Mew, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich.
Same as: ENGLISH 150D.

FEMGEN 152. 'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World. 5 Units.

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.
Same as: FEMGEN 252.

FEMGEN 153Q. Creating the Gendered Story. 4-5 Units.

Exploration of novels, stories, memoirs and micro-narratives in which gender plays a major role. The texts are by writers of varied genders and sexual orientations as well as varied class, racial and national backgrounds. Written assignments present a mixture of academic and creative options.

FEMGEN 154. Black Feminist Theory. 5 Units.

This course will examine black feminist theoretical traditions, marking black women¿s analytic interventions into sexual and pleasure politics and reproduction, critical culture and race theory, citizenship, identity, power and agency, representation, and questions of the body. Exploring concepts such as intersectionality, controlling images, the politics of respectability and the particularities of a black feminist liberation politic, we will look to black feminist scholars, activists, and artists from the 19th century to today.
Same as: AFRICAAM 154.

FEMGEN 155. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 255, SOC 155, SOC 255.

FEMGEN 156. Happiness, Well-Being, Gender. 1-3 Unit.

Exploring the meaning and attainment of psychological well-being and happiness, this course will address gender differences in well-being and approaches that can be used by all individuals to improve their state of happiness and well-being. Course literature will be drawn primarily from social, clinical, and positive psychology, but will be drawn from other disciplines as well. Students will actively engage with course material by critiquing studies, discussing research, and applying methods for improving well-being to their daily lives.
Same as: PSYCH 129.

FEMGEN 156H. Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors. 5 Units.

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Same as: AMSTUD 156H, HISTORY 156G.

FEMGEN 156X. Language and Gender. 4 Units.

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Same as: LINGUIST 156.

FEMGEN 157. Language as Social and Political Activism: Feminist and LGBTQ Social and Political Movements. 3-5 Units.

How does a social or political movement gain traction? For example, how did 20th-century movements of the disenfranchised, such as the Civil Rights movement or Women¿s Suffrage, gain a voice an eventually enact change? In the mediascape of today, where everyone with access to a computer has voice, how does a movement like Occupy Wall Street change the national conversation? How do written and verbal choices of the movements impact their success? In this course, students will write and revise their own arguments in order to best understand the writing in these movements and to best produce future work for social change. We¿ll examine the role of rhetoric¿the use of argument to persuade¿in social movements working toward social justice.

FEMGEN 158. Black Queer Theory. 5 Units.

This course takes a multifaceted approach to black queer theory, not only taking up black theories of gender and queer sexuality, but queer theoretical interrogations of blackness and race. The course will also examine some of the important ways that black queer theory reads and is intersected with issues like affect, epistemology, space and geography, power and subjectivity, religion, economy, the body, and the law, asking questions like: How have scholars critiqued the very language of queer and the ways it works as a signifier of white marginality? What are the different spaces we can find queer black relationality, eroticism, and kinship? How do we negotiate issues like trans*misogyny or tensions around gender and sexuality in the context of race? Throughout the course, students will become versed in foundational and emerging black queer theory as we engage scholars like Sharon Holland, Cathy Cohen, Hortense Spillers, Marlon B. Ross, Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman, Barbara Smith, Roderick Ferguson, Robert Reid-Pharr, E. Patrick Johnson, and many others. Students will also gain practice applying black queer theory as an interpretive lens for contemporary social issues and cultural production including film, music, art, and performance.

FEMGEN 160. Rethinking the Ballerina. 4 Units.

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Same as: DANCE 160, TAPS 160, TAPS 260.

FEMGEN 161. Women in Modern America. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern womanhood in the U.S. from the 1890s to the end of the 20th century, including the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women. It asks how, when, and why the majority of American women become wage earners, gained full citizenship, and enacted political opportunities; how race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood changed in popular culture; and how women have redefined their reproductive and sexual relations.
Same as: AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, HISTORY 161.

FEMGEN 168. Writing for the Stage and Screen. 4 Units.

This is a script analysis and film criticism course from the vantage point of the scriptwriter -- both playwrights and screenplay writers. We will do comparative analysis of films that were adapted from plays and use published plays and/or student-authored plays to write original script adaptations. Students will also develop short video films based on a segment of such adaptations.May be repeated for credit.
Same as: TAPS 168.

FEMGEN 177. Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals. 5 Units.

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Same as: CSRE 177, TAPS 177, TAPS 277.

FEMGEN 179C. Chroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

This course emphasizes the study and practice of personal memoir writing and literary journalism. The class will explore those writings that contain a public and private story, navigating an intimate and institutional world. Student writers will serve as public chroniclers whose subjective point of view and experience attempt to provide a truth greater than what ¿the facts¿ can offer.
Same as: CSRE 179C, CSRE 279C, TAPS 179C, TAPS 279C.

FEMGEN 179G. Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America. 3-5 Units.

This "gateway" core course to the IDA emphasis in CSRE offers a 21st century examination of people of color aesthetics and related politics, drawing from contemporary works (literature, music, visual and performing arts) in conversation with their native (especially American Indigenous and African) origins. Issues of gender and sexuality in relation to cultural identity are also integral to this study. Students will be required to produce a final work, integrating critical writing with a creative project.
Same as: CSRE 179G, CSRE 279G, TAPS 279G.

FEMGEN 181A. Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt. 4 Units.

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Same as: ANTHRO 181A.

FEMGEN 183. Re- Imagining American Borders. 5 Units.

How novelists, filmmakers, and poets perceive racial, ethnic, gender, sexual preference, and class borders in the context of a national discussion about the place of Americans in the world. How Anna Deavere Smith, Sherman Alexie, or Michael Moore consider redrawing such lines so that center and margin, or self and other, do not remain fixed and divided. How linguistic borderlines within multilingual literature by Caribbean, Arab, and Asian Americans function. Can Anzaldúa's conception of borderlands be constructed through the matrix of language, dreams, music, and cultural memories in these American narratives? Course includes examining one's own identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 183, CSRE 183.

FEMGEN 187. Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature. 3-4 Units.

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Same as: JAPANGEN 187, JAPANGEN 287.

FEMGEN 188Q. Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person. 4-5 Units.

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Same as: CSRE 188Q.

FEMGEN 191Q. Writing Women's Lives. 2 Units.

Creative writing through dialogue focusing on prose about the lives of women in different cultures and generations. Novels, short stories, and micro-narrative including fiction and memoir. Students produce work using research, memory, imagination, and metaphor.

FEMGEN 193G. Psychological Well-Being on Campus: A Focus on Gender and Sexual Identities. 1 Unit.

This course examines mental health and psychological well-being across the spectrum of gender and sexual identities. It addresses the unique challenges that face LGBTQ-identified students, and provides tools for supporting peers as they navigate these challenges. Discussion topics include current conceptualizations of gender identity and sexual orientation, including sexual and gender fluidity; the intersection of queer identities with multiple identities such as ethnic/racial identify and faith/spirituality; unpacking stereotypes; queer relationships and sexuality, coming out and disclosure, and mental health issues.
Same as: EDUC 193G.

FEMGEN 195. Directed Reading. 1-15 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. (Staff).

FEMGEN 199A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Participants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

FEMGEN 199B. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Particippants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FEMGEN 199C. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Particippants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FEMGEN 203. Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines. 2-5 Units.

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 253 or FEMGEN 203) Concepts and questions distinctive of feminist and LGBT scholarship and how they shape research: gender, intersectionality, disciplinarity and interdisciplinarity, standpoint, "queering," postmodern critiques, postcolonial critiques.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.
Same as: FEMGEN 103, PHIL 153, PHIL 253.

FEMGEN 205. Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics. 3-5 Units.

Analysis of medieval love, satirical and Crusade lyrics of the trouabdours. Study of deictic address, corporeal subjectivity, the female voice, love debates, and the body as a figure of political conflict. Course readings include medieval treatises on lyric and modern translations of the troubadour tradition. Works by Ovid, Bernart de Ventadorn, Bertran de Born, La Comtessa de Dia, Thibaut de Champagne, Raimon Vidal, Dante, and Pound. Taught in English. Course includes a lab component for creation of multi-media translation projects: trobar. stanford.edu.
Same as: FRENCH 205.

FEMGEN 206. Global Medical Issues Affecting Women. 1 Unit.

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Same as: SOMGEN 206.

FEMGEN 208B. Women Activists' Response to War. 4-5 Units.

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Same as: HISTORY 208B, HISTORY 308B.

FEMGEN 209. Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports. 3 Units.

In 1972, Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports." But what would it take to get more women's sports featured on ESPN or more female athletes on the cover of Sports Illustrated? And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports? This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses.
Same as: FEMGEN 109.

FEMGEN 212. "When We Dead Awaken": Breakthroughs in Conceptions of the Gendered Self in Literature and the Arts. 4-5 Units.

Remarkable breakthroughs In conceptions of the gendered self are everywhere evident in literature and the arts, beginning primarily with the Early Modern world and continuing into today. Many of these works inhere in innovations in literary and artistic forms in order to capture and even evoke the strong cognitive, or psychological, dimension of such ¿awakenings.¿ The reader, or viewer, is often challenged to adapt her or his mind to new forms of thought, such as John Donne¿s seventeenth century creation of the Dramatic Monologue, a form popular with modern writers, which requires the reader¿s cognitive ¿presence¿ in order to fill out the dramatic scene. In so doing, the reader often supplies the presence of the female voice and thereby enters into her self-consciousness and inner thoughts. Adrienne Rich, for example, specifically ¿rewrites¿ one of Donne¿s major poems from the female perspective. This can be, in Rich¿s words, an ¿awakening¿ for the active reader, as he or she assumes that often-unspoken female perspective. The course will also explore male conceptions of the self and how such conceptions are often grounded in cultural attitudes imposed on male subjects, which can contribute to gender-bias toward women, a subject often neglected in exploring gendered attitudes, but which is now gaining more study, for example, in Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello.¿ Readings from recent developments in the neurosciences and cognitive studies will be included in our study of artistic forms and how such forms can activate particular mindsets. Writers and artists will include Shakespeare, Michelangelo, John Donne, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, June Wayne, and Edward Albee¿s 1960¿s play, ¿Who¿s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?¿
Same as: FEMGEN 112.

FEMGEN 216. Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century. 4-5 Units.

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Same as: ARTHIST 206H, HISTORY 216, HISTORY 316.

FEMGEN 221B. The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia. 5 Units.

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Same as: HISTORY 221B.

FEMGEN 224. Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine. 2 Units.

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Same as: FEMGEN 124.

FEMGEN 226A. Queer Literature and Film. 3-5 Units.

Close analysis of major works of LGBTQ literature, film, and visual art from the 1890s to today. Students will gain deeper knowledge and appreciation of historical and contemporary forms of queer representation in various national literatures, film, and visual art; understand relevant social and political debates; and gain a basic knowledge of feminist and queer theory. Course will include an optional online component to reach out to the public (class website queerlitfilm.wordpress.com, social media).
Same as: COMPLIT 226A.

FEMGEN 230. Human Sexual Diversity in Medical Practice. 1-3 Unit.

Goal is the development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, including sexual orientation and gender identity, age (pediatric to geriatric), sociocultural & religious values, medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, such as spinal cord injury, etc). Features guest speakers representing a range of sexualities, including asexuality, polyamory and kink, as well as medical professionals and researchers specializing in a diversity of sexuality topics. Attendance (in-class feedback) requirements.MD and graduate students may enroll for 1-3 units; enrollment for 3 units requires attendance at two sessions per week and in-class presentation requirements; enrollment for 2 units requires attendance at two sessions per week. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units and attend two weekly class meetings.
Same as: SOMGEN 230.

FEMGEN 236. Literature and Transgression. 3-5 Units.

Close reading and analysis of erotic-sexual and aesthetic-stylistic transgression in selected works by such authors as Baudelaire, Wilde, Flaubert, Rachilde, Schnitzler, Kafka, Joyce, Barnes, Eliot, Bataille, Burroughs, Thomas Mann, Kathy Acker, as well as in recent digital literature and online communities. Along with understanding the changing cultural, social, and political contexts of what constitutes "transgression" or censorship, students will gain knowledge of influential theories of transgression and conceptual limits by Foucault, Blanchot, and contemporary queer and feminist writers.
Same as: COMPLIT 236.

FEMGEN 237. Medical Impact of Sexual and Relationship Abuse Throughout the Life Course. 1 Unit.

Provides an overview of the acute and chronic physical, mental, and emotional trauma from sexual abuse through the perspective of the survivor and the offender. The experience of sexual abuse varies for each individual with respect to age, gender, sexual identity, ethnicity, and many other societal factors. Focuses on investigating sexual abuse within various populations from a medical perspective. Discusses the physical, psychological, behavioral, and medical implications of sexual abuse for each demographic explored in the course, along with prevention efforts that would be most effective in these populations.
Same as: INDE 237.

FEMGEN 238. Violence Against Women: Theory, Issues, and Prevention. 3-4 Units.

[Technical error is capping enrollment prematurely; come to first day of class] Course offers an interdisciplinary feminist perspective on the causes of gender violence, addresses the multi-leveled approaches to ending gender violence, and explores the relationship between violence against women and other forms of oppression: racism, economic exploitation, heterosexism and social class. Framework examines institutional barriers maintaining gender violence in our culture and considers multi-dimensional solutions. Students from every discipline, women and men, apply theoretical perspectives to professional goals and an optional service-learning project. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center)
Same as: FEMGEN 138.

FEMGEN 240D. LGBT/Queer Life in the United States. 4-5 Units.

An introductory course on LGBT social, cultural, and political history in the United States. This course explores how categories of sexuality have changed over time, with particular emphasis on the relationship among homosexuality, heterosexuality, and transgenderism. Students will analyze how the intersections of race, class, and sexuality influenced the constitution of these categories and the politics of social relations. Historical and literary sources will be used to examine changes in LGBT experiences and identities, primarily in the twentieth century.
Same as: FEMGEN 140D, HISTORY 257C.

FEMGEN 241. Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease. 2-3 Units.

Chromosomal, hormonal and environmental influences that lead to male and female reproductive systems and neuroendocrine regulation and intersex variants. Masculinizing and feminizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones and other factors, in particular gender, on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, immunological and other systems and tissues, e.g. adipose, skin, etc. over the lifecourse, from conception to puberty, through reproductive phases (including changes during the menstrual cycle up to and beyond menopause in women, and with aging in both sexes). Transgender health issues. Guest lecturers. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Undergraduate students must enroll for 3 units.
Same as: HUMBIO 140, MED 240.

FEMGEN 242. Sociology of Gender. 5 Units.

(Graduate students register for 242.) Gender inequality in contemporary American society and how it is maintained. The social and relative nature of knowledge and the problems this poses for understanding sex differences and gendered behavior in society. Analytical levels of explanation for gender inequalities: socialization, interaction processes, and socioeconomic processes; arguments and evidence for each approach. The social consequences of gender inequality such as the feminization of poverty, and problems of interpersonal relations.
Same as: FEMGEN 142, SOC 142, SOC 242.

FEMGEN 250. Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China. 3-5 Units.

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Same as: CHINGEN 150, CHINGEN 250, FEMGEN 150.

FEMGEN 252. 'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World. 5 Units.

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.
Same as: FEMGEN 152.

FEMGEN 255. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 155, SOC 155, SOC 255.

FEMGEN 256. Current Controversies in Women's Health. 2-3 Units.

Interdisciplinary. Focus is primarily on the U.S., with selected global women's health topics. Topics include: leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the life course; reproductive (e.g. gynecologic & obstetric) health issues; sexual function; importance of lifestyle (e.g. diet, exercise, weight control), including eating disorders; mental health; sexual and relationship abuse; issues for special populations. In-class Student Debates on key controversies in women's health. Guest lecturers. Undergraduates must enroll in HUMBIO 125 for 3 units. PhD minor in FGSS, enroll in FEMGEN 256 for 3 units and for a letter grade. Med students enroll in OBGYN 256 for 2 units. Spring.
Same as: HUMBIO 125.

FEMGEN 258. Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America. 4-5 Units.

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores recent historical interpretations of the history of sexuality, with a focus on sexual violence. The readings cover changing definitions and laws, cultural representations, and the role of gender, race, and age in the construction of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Topics include slavery; incest, seduction, and statutory rape reform; the racialization of rape and the anti-lynching movement; street harassment; men and boys as victims; war and conquest; and feminist responses to rape.
Same as: AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358.

FEMGEN 260. Disability, Gender. & Identity. 5 Units.

Course explores visible and invisible disabilities. focusing on issues of gender and identity. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, cross-cultural variables, diversity of disability experiences, legal and political aspects, work and home accommodations, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and the difference gender makes to how disabilities are experienced. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of physical assistance.
Same as: AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 360, HUMBIO 141.

FEMGEN 260X. Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine. 1 Unit.

Sponsored by the Stanford WSDM Center. Course focuses on health research on women and sex differences in medicine, acknowledges the "wisdom" of research and education on sex (e.g. chromosomes, gonads, gonadal hormones) and gender (sociocultural) factors influencing health. Brings alumni to share their professional journeys in the world of Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. Meets Women's Health Scholarly Concentration Requirement.
Same as: INDE 260.

FEMGEN 293B. Queer History in Comparative Perspective. 4-5 Units.

Comparative history of homoerotic desire, relations, and identity through scholarship on different historical periods and parts of the world: the classical Mediterranean, early modern European cities, late imperial and modern China, Tokugawa and modern Japan, and the U.S.
Same as: HISTORY 293B, HISTORY 393B.

FEMGEN 295J. Chinese Women's History. 5 Units.

The lives of women in the last 1,000 years of Chinese history. Focus is on theoretical questions fundamental to women's studies. How has the category of woman been shaped by culture and history? How has gender performance interacted with bodily disciplines and constraints such as medical, reproductive, and cosmetic technologies? How relevant is the experience of Western women to women elsewhere? By what standards should liberation be defined?
Same as: CHINLIT 295J, HISTORY 295J.

FEMGEN 297. Education, Gender, and Development. 4 Units.

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes.
Same as: EDUC 197, SOC 134.

FEMGEN 299. Graduate Workshop: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 1-3 Unit.

Theory, methods, and research in feminist, gender, and sexuality studies, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies, feminist pedagogy and career development issues. Restricted to doctoral students. Repeatable for credit. Required for PhD Minors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (3 quarters min.).
Same as: EDUC 370X.

FEMGEN 310X. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 110, COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X.

FEMGEN 314. Performing Identities. 4 Units.

This course focuses on contemporary South Asian and Black diasporic art work that concerns itself with questions of atrocity and activism. We will ask how artists engage world-historical events and what constitutes activism. Theoretical work will be wide-ranging as will the kinds of art and topics studied: indeed, we will discuss everything from Agamben to AIDS, Ai Wei-Wei to feminist punk in Russia, female circumcision in Sweden to U.N. aid workers in Afghanistan, queer subjects and global ideas freedom.
Same as: TAPS 314.

FEMGEN 358. Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America. 4-5 Units.

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores recent historical interpretations of the history of sexuality, with a focus on sexual violence. The readings cover changing definitions and laws, cultural representations, and the role of gender, race, and age in the construction of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Topics include slavery; incest, seduction, and statutory rape reform; the racialization of rape and the anti-lynching movement; street harassment; men and boys as victims; war and conquest; and feminist responses to rape.
Same as: AMSTUD 258, CSRE 192E, FEMGEN 258, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358.

FEMGEN 360. Disability, Gender. & Identity. 5 Units.

Course explores visible and invisible disabilities. focusing on issues of gender and identity. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, cross-cultural variables, diversity of disability experiences, legal and political aspects, work and home accommodations, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and the difference gender makes to how disabilities are experienced. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of physical assistance.
Same as: AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 260, HUMBIO 141.

FEMGEN 363D. Feminist Theory: Thinking Through/With/About the Gendered Body. 5 Units.

Organized around a series of case studies, this graduate feminist theory course will consider issues related to the complex relationship between sex, gender, sexuality, biological reproduction, violence, and social power. It is a core course for the PhD minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Enrollment is limited to PhD-level students.
Same as: ENGLISH 363D.

FEMGEN 389E. Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations. 3-5 Units.

Examines major questions and issues that arise in considering race, sex, and gender together. Focus on critical and theoretical texts queering ethnic and diaspora studies and bringing race and ethnicity into queer studies. Close reading of texts in a variety of media negotiating racialized sexualities and sexualized identities. How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and structures of power?
Same as: CSRE 289E, ILAC 389E.

FEMGEN 395. Graduate Independent Study. 1-15 Unit.

Students pursue a special subject of investigation under supervision of an affiliated faculty member. May be repeated for credit.

FEMGEN 444. Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering. 5 Units.

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Same as: HISTORY 444.