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English

Contacts

Office: Building 460, Room 201
Mail Code: 94305-2087
Phone: (650) 723-2635
Web Site: http://english.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of English are listed under the subject code ENGLISH on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Department of English

To study English at Stanford is to explore -- deeply and rewardingly -- the rich legacy of literature written in English, past and present. We offer a wealth of courses on individual authors, the history of literary genres, literary theory, new media, and creative writing. Given the emphasis on critical thinking and interpretation, the English major is in turn an excellent preparation for many professional fields, including teaching, journalism, law, publishing, medicine, and business. The graduate program features rigorous training in the research and analysis of British, American, and Anglophone literary histories and texts, preparing students to produce scholarship of originality and importance, and to teach literature at the highest levels.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an understanding of major theories, methods, and concepts of literary study and critical analysis.
  2. an awareness of how authors and texts develop in relation to their historical contexts.
  3. a comprehension of the formal qualities of key literary genres, forms, and styles.
  4. an effective style of writing and a powerful use of language.

Bachelor of Arts in English

In the undergraduate program, students explore the traditions of literature in English. Courses emphasize interpretive thinking and creative writing, examining the dynamics of literary and cultural history, the structures of literary form and genre, and the practices of reading, writing, and critical analysis.

Graduate Program in English

The graduate program features rigorous training in the research and analysis of British, American and Anglophone literary histories and texts, preparing students to produce scholarship of originality and importance, and to teach literature at advanced levels.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the master's program is to further develop knowledge and skills in English and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through completion of courses, in the primary field as well as related areas, and experience with independent work and specialization.

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in English. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to make original contributions to the knowledge of English and to interpret and present the results of such research.

Other Programs in English

Ph.D. in Modern Thought and Literature

Stanford also offers a Ph.D. degree in Modern Thought and Literature. Under this program, students devote approximately half of their time to a modern literature from the Enlightenment to the present, and the other half to interdisciplinary studies. Interested students should see the "Modern Thought and Literature" section of this bulletin and consult the director of the program.

Creative Writing Fellowships

The Creative Writing Program each year offers five two-year fellowships in poetry and five two-year fellowships in fiction. These are not degree-granting fellowships. Information is available in the Creative Writing office, (650) 725-1208.


 


 

Bachelor of Arts in English

The English major is designed to provide students with both an understanding of the development of literatures in English and an appreciation of the variety and richness of literary texts. It offers a rigorous training in interpretive thinking and precise expression.

Suggested Preparation for the Major

Prospective English majors are advised to consider Thinking Matters courses that relate to literature to satisfy this requirement. Also recommended is any introductory seminar taught by English department faculty through Stanford Introductory Studies. 

Units
Thinking Matters Courses (11)
ESF 1Education as Self-Fashioning: The Active, Inquiring, Beautiful Life7
THINK 7Journeys4
Introductory Seminars (19)
ENGLISH 47NSports and Culture3
ENGLISH 51NThe Sisters: Poetry & Painting3
ENGLISH 64NGrowing Up in America3
ENGLISH 65NContemporary Women Fiction Writers3
ENGLISH 68NMark Twain and American Culture4
ENGLISH 88NGraphic Novels Asian American Style3

Degree Requirements

Students interested in majoring in English are encouraged to declare during their sophomore year, but no later than the beginning of their junior year. They are urged to discuss their plans with the undergraduate student services specialist as early as possible, and to take recommended preparatory courses for the major in their freshman and sophomore years. To declare the major, a student must fill out the Declaration of Major in Axess; choose a faculty adviser; and submit a completed program proposal form approved by the adviser. It is recommended that a student meet with the adviser at least once per quarter to discuss progress towards degree completion. Students who declared prior to September 2012 should refer to previous guidelines and requirements for the major.

With the exception of the required courses listed below, which must be taken for a letter grade, any two of the elective courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis at the discretion of the instructor. Students may apply as many as four literature courses taken at approved universities towards the English major electives. Approval of such courses towards the major is at the discretion of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Requests for transfer credit, including course syllabi and official transcript, should be submitted to the undergraduate student services specialist, and to the Office of the University Registrar's external credit evaluation section.

The total number of units required to graduate for each degree option is specified in the relevant section following. All courses should be taken for 5 units. Irrespective of field of study or degree option, all English majors must complete the following requirements:

Required Courses (40 units)

Units
Historical courses (15)
ENGLISH 100ALiterary History I5
ENGLISH 100BLiterary History II5
ENGLISH 100CLiterary History III5
Methodology courses (15)
ENGLISH 160Poetry and Poetics5
ENGLISH 161Narrative and Narrative Theory5
or ENGLISH 161A Narrative & Narrative Theory: Power, Difference, and The Construction of Fictional Worlds
ENGLISH 162ACritical Methods: Readings in Feminist and Queer Criticism5
or ENGLISH 115A Shakespeare and Modern Critical Developments
Also Required (10)
ENGLISH 164Senior Seminar (WIM) 15
One additional history of literature course 2 35
Total Units40

1

For those students accepted into the Honors program this can be fulfilled with ENGLISH 196A Honors Seminar: Critical Approaches to Literature.

2

In 2012-13 the following courses satisfy the history of literature requirement:

3

This requirement may also be fulfilled with the following Thinking Matters or SLE courses:

  • ESF 1 Education as Self-Fashioning: The Active, Inquiring, Beautiful Life
  • THINK 7 Journeys
  • SLE 91 Structured Liberal Education, SLE 92 Structured Liberal Education, and SLE 93 Structured Liberal Education.

Rules that apply to all English majors irrespective of field of study or degree option

  1. Courses can only be counted once, i.e. can only satisfy one requirement.
  2. Two of the elective courses may be taken on a credit/no credit basis at the discretion of the instructor.

Fields of Study

Because the Department of English recognizes that the needs and interests of literature students vary, it has approved several major programs of study. Each of these has different objectives and requirements; students should consider carefully which program of study corresponds most closely to their personal and intellectual objectives. The department offers the following fields of study for degrees in English:

  • Literature
  • Literature with Creative Writing Emphasis
  • Literature and Interdisciplinary Studies
  • Literature and Foreign Language Literature
  • Literature and Philosophy

I. Literature

This field of study is not declared in Axess. It does not appear on either the official transcript or the diploma. This program provides for the interests of students who wish to understand the range and historical development of British, American and Anglophone literatures and a variety of critical methods by which their texts can be interpreted. The major emphasizes the study of literary forms and genres and theories of textual analysis. In addition to the degree requirements required of all majors and listed above, students must complete at least 30 additional units of courses consisting of:

  1. Six to eight additional approved elective courses, only one of which may be a creative writing course, chosen from among those offered by the Department of English. In place of one of these six to eight elective courses, students may choose one upper-division course in a foreign literature read in the original language.

II. Literature with Creative Writing Emphasis

This subplan is printed on the transcript and diploma and is elected in Axess.This program is designed for students who want a sound basic knowledge of the English literary tradition as a whole and at the same time want to develop skills in writing poetry or prose. In addition to the degree requirements required of all majors and listed above, students must complete at least 35 additional units of approved courses, in either the prose or poetry concentration:

Prose Concentration

Units
ENGLISH 90Fiction Writing5
or ENGLISH 91 Creative Nonfiction
ENGLISH 92Reading and Writing Poetry (Can be fulfilled with a poetry literature seminar)5
ENGLISH 146Development of the Short Story: Continuity and Innovation5
ENGLISH 190Intermediate Fiction Writing (or any 190 series or 191 series)5
or ENGLISH 191 Intermediate Creative Nonfiction
3 elective literature courses (One of the courses may be fulfilled with a creative writing workshop).15
Total Units35

Poetry Concentration

Units
ENGLISH 90Fiction Writing (Can be fulfilled with a prose literature seminar)5
or ENGLISH 91 Creative Nonfiction
ENGLISH 92Reading and Writing Poetry5
ENGLISH 192Intermediate Poetry Writing (or any 192 series)5
One literature course in poetry approved by a Creative Writing Professor5
Three elective literature courses (One of the courses may be fulfilled with a creative writing workshop)15
Total Units35

III. Literature and Interdisciplinary Studies

This subplan is printed on the transcript and diploma and is elected in Axess. This program is intended for students who wish to combine the study of one broadly defined literary topic, period, genre, theme or problem with an interdisciplinary program of courses (generally chosen from one other discipline) relevant to that inquiry. In addition to the degree requirements required of all majors and listed above, students must complete at least 35 additional units of approved courses including:

  1. Four elective literature courses chosen from among those offered by the Department of English. Students must select two of these courses in relation to their interdisciplinary focus.
  2. Three courses related to the area of inquiry. These courses may be chosen from another department or interdisciplinary program within the School of Humanities and Sciences including (but not limited to) such as African American Studies, Anthropology, Art and Art History, Classics, Comparative Literature, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Feminist Studies, Human Biology, Music, Philosophy, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Science, Technology, and Society, and Sociology. These courses should form a coherent program and must be relevant to the focus of the courses chosen by the student to meet the requirement. Each of these courses must be approved in advance by the interdisciplinary program director. In addition, students in this program must write at least one interdisciplinary paper.
    This may be:
    1.  Select one of the following:
    2. Units
      ENGLISH 194Individual Research5
      ENGLISH 197Seniors Honors Essay1-10
      ENGLISH 198Individual Work1-5
      ENGLISH 199Senior Independent Essay1-10
    3. or a paper integrating the material in two courses the student is taking in two different disciplines.

The final course plan and interdisciplinary paper must be approved by the faculty adviser and the interdisciplinary adviser by the time the student applies to graduate.

IV. Literature and Foreign Language Literature

This subplan is printed on the transcript and diploma and is elected in Axess. This track provides a focus in British and American literature with additional work in French literature; German literature; Italian literature; or Spanish literature. These subplans appear on the diploma as follows: English & French Literature, English & German Literature, English & Italian Literature, and English & Spanish Literature. In addition to the degree requirements required of all majors and listed above, students must complete at least 35 additional units of approved courses including:

  1. Three elective courses chosen from among those offered by the Department of English, one of which may be a creative writing course.
  2. A coherent program of four courses in the foreign language literature, read in the original language, approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies in English and by the relevant foreign language department.

V. Literature and Philosophy

This subplan is printed on the transcript and diploma and is elected in Axess. Students should meet with the undergraduate director concerning the Literature and Philosophy focus. This track is for students who wish to explore interdisciplinary studies at the intersection of literature and philosophy while acquiring knowledge of the English language literary tradition as a whole. In addition to the degree requirements required of all majors and listed above, students must complete at least 35-45 additional units of approved courses including:

  1. PHIL 80 Mind, Matter, and Meaning (WIM): Prerequisite: introductory philosophy course.
  2. Gateway course: ENGLISH 81 Philosophy and Literature. This course should be taken as early as possible in the student's career, normally in the sophomore year.
  3. Aesthetics, Ethics, Political Philosophy: one course from PHIL 170 Ethical Theory series.
  4. Language, Mind, Metaphysics, and Epistemology: one course from PHIL 180 Metaphysics series.
  5. History of Philosophy: one course in the history of Philosophy, numbered above PHIL 100 Greek Philosophy.
  6. Two upper division courses of special relevance to the study of Philosophy and Literature. Both of these courses must be in the English department. A list of approved courses is available on the Philosophy and Literature web site.
  7. One additional elective course in the English department.
  8. One capstone seminar of relevance to the study of Philosophy and Literature.

Honors Program 

Students wishing to undertake a formal program of advanced literary criticism and scholarship, including the honors seminar and independent research, are invited to apply for the honors program in the Winter Quarter of the junior year. Any outstanding student is encouraged to engage in an honors thesis project.

Admission is selective. Provisional admission is announced in March. Permission to continue in the program is contingent upon submission, by May 15 of the junior year, of a senior honors essay proposal with a bibliography. Honors students are encouraged to complete before the start of their senior year the three methodology courses that are English major requirements:

Units
ENGLISH 160Poetry and Poetics5
ENGLISH 161Narrative and Narrative Theory5
or ENGLISH 161A Narrative & Narrative Theory: Power, Difference, and The Construction of Fictional Worlds
ENGLISH 162ACritical Methods: Readings in Feminist and Queer Criticism5
or ENGLISH 115A Shakespeare and Modern Critical Developments

In September before the senior year, students are encouraged to participate in the Bing Honors College. In Autumn Quarter of the senior year, students take a 3-unit honors seminar on critical approaches to literature. The senior-year seminar is designed to introduce students to the analysis and production of advanced literary scholarship. In addition, in Autumn Quarter of the senior year, honors students take a 2-unit essay workshop focused on the process of researching and writing the essay. Students who are studying at Oxford or at other institutions may be exempted from these requirements on request and with the approval of the director of the honors program.

In Winter and Spring quarters of the senior year, honors students complete the senior honors essay for 10 units under supervision of a faculty adviser.

The deadline for submitting the honors essay is May 15. Essays that receive a grade of 'A-' or above are awarded honors.

Students in the honors program complete the requirements of the major and the following:

Units
ENGLISH 196AHonors Seminar: Critical Approaches to Literature3
ENGLISH 196BHonors Essay Workshop2
ENGLISH 197Seniors Honors Essay1-10

Advanced Research Options

Individual Research

Students taking 100- or 200-level courses may, with the consent of the instructor, write a follow-up 5-unit paper based on the course material and due no later than the end of the succeeding quarter (register for ENGLISH 194 Individual Research). The research paper is written under the direct supervision of the professor; it must be submitted first in a preliminary draft and subsequently in a final version.

Senior Independent Essay

The senior independent essay gives senior English majors the opportunity to work throughout the year on a sustained piece of critical or scholarly work of around 10,000 words on a topic of their choice, with the close guidance of a faculty adviser. Each student is responsible for finding an adviser, who must approve the proposed topic before the end of the third quarter prior to expected graduation. The senior essay is read and graded by the adviser and one other member of the English faculty. Senior independent essay students register for ENGLISH 199 Senior Independent Essay.

Overseas Studies or Study Abroad

The flexibility of the English major permits students to attend an overseas campus in any quarter, but it is advisable, and in some cases essential, that students spend their senior year at Stanford if they wish to participate in the Honors Program or in a special in-depth reading course. For more information on Stanford overseas programs, see the "Overseas Studies" section of this bulletin.

Students should consult their advisers and the undergraduate program officer to make sure that they can fulfill the requirements before graduation. The Stanford Program in Oxford usually offers courses which apply toward both University requirements and area requirements for the English major. In either case, students should save the syllabi from their courses if they wish to apply to use them to fulfill an English major requirement.

Overseas Studies Courses in English

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site or the Bing Overseas Studies web site. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

Units
OSPOXFRD 17Novels of Sensation: Gothic, Detective Story, Prohibition, and Transgression in Victorian Fiction5
OSPOXFRD 57The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-18605
OSPOXFRD 60Shakespeare and his Contemporaries5

Minor in English or in Creative Writing

Both the Department of English and the Creative Writing program offer a distinct minor.

Minor in English Literature

The minor in English Literature offers some flexibility for those students who want to pursue specific interests within British and American literature, while still requiring certain courses that ensure coverage of a variety of periods, genres, and methods of studying literature.

Degree Requirements

In order to graduate with a minor in English, students must complete the following program of seven 5-unit courses, at least one of which must be a seminar, for a total of 35 units:

Required Courses for the Minor

Units
Historical courses (10)
Select two of the following:10
Literary History I
Literary History II
Literary History III
Methodology courses (15)
Select two of the following:10
Poetry and Poetics
Narrative and Narrative Theory
Narrative & Narrative Theory: Power, Difference, and The Construction of Fictional Worlds
ENGLISH 162ACritical Methods: Readings in Feminist and Queer Criticism5
or ENGLISH 115A Shakespeare and Modern Critical Developments
Elective courses (15)
Three elective courses from those offered in the English department (only one of which may be a course in Creative Writing).15
Total Units40

Minor in Creative Writing

The minor in Creative Writing offers a structured environment in which students interested in writing prose or poetry develop their skills while receiving an introduction to literary forms. Students choose a concentration in either prose or poetry.

Degree Requirements

In order to graduate with a minor in Creative Writing, students must complete the following program of six 5-unit courses for a total of 30 units. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. Courses taken abroad or at other institutions may not be counted towards the minor.

Required Courses for the Minor

Students must complete at least 30 units of approved courses, in either the prose or poetry concentration:

Prose concentration

Units
ENGLISH 90Fiction Writing5
or ENGLISH 91 Creative Nonfiction
ENGLISH 92Reading and Writing Poetry5
ENGLISH 94Creative Writing Across Genres5
ENGLISH 146Development of the Short Story: Continuity and Innovation5
Select two of the following intermediate or advanced prose classes: 10
any ENGLISH 190 series
any ENGLISH 191 series
Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial
Total Units30

 Poetry concentration

Units
ENGLISH 90Fiction Writing5
or ENGLISH 91 Creative Nonfiction
ENGLISH 92Reading and Writing Poetry5
ENGLISH 94Creative Writing Across Genres5
ENGLISH 160Poetry and Poetics5
Select two of the following intermediate or advanced poetry classes:10
any ENGLISH 192 series
Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial
Advanced Poetry Writing
Total Units30

Master of Arts in English

University requirements for the M.A. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in English Literature

Students in the major who are interested in further postgraduate work in English may apply for Stanford’s coterminal master’s program. Candidates for a coterminal master’s degree must fulfill all requirements for the M.A. in English (including the graduate language requirement), as well as general and major requirements for the B.A. in English.

A minimum GPA of 3.7 in the major is required of those applying for the coterminal master’s degree. Students must also take the general GRE exam in the year in which they apply.

No courses used to satisfy the B.A. requirements (either as General Education Requirements or department requirements) may be applied toward the M.A. No courses taken more than two quarters prior to admission to the coterminal master’s program may be used to meet the 45-unit University minimum requirement for the master’s degree.

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the Stanford Undergrad Coterm Guide.

Degree Requirements

  • M.A. candidates must complete with a 3.0 (B) grade point average (GPA) at least nine courses (a minimum of 45 units), at least two of which must be 300-level courses.
  • Ordinarily, graduate students enroll in courses numbered 200 and above. They may take no more than two 100-level courses without the consent of the Director of Graduate Studies, and no more than two courses outside the department.
  • The master's student may take no more than 10 units of directed reading and research (ENGLISH 398 Research Course).
  • No creative writing courses may be used to fulfill the requirements.
  • M.A. candidates must also demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language, which may be fulfilled in any of the following ways:
  1. A reading examination given each quarter by the various language departments, except for Latin and Greek.
  2. For Latin and Greek, an examination given by one of the Department of Classics faculty.
  3. Passage with a grade of 'B' or higher of a course in literature numbered 100 or higher in a foreign language department at Stanford. As an alternative for Latin, French, Italian, German, and Spanish, passage of the following, respectively, with a grade of 'B' or higher:
Units
FRENLANG 250Reading French4
FRENLANG 250SReading French2-4
GERLANG 250Reading German4
ITALLANG 250Reading Italian4
SPANLANG 250Reading Spanish3

Required Courses

  1. Two courses in literature before 1800 (5 units each)
  2. Two courses in literature after 1800 (5 units each)

Elective Courses

Five courses (5 units each) which should represent a mixture of survey and specialized courses chosen to guarantee familiarity with a majority of the works on the qualifying exam reading list for doctoral candidates. Candidates who can demonstrate unusually strong preparation in the history of English literature may undertake a 40 to 60 page master's thesis. Each student is responsible for finding an adviser, who must approve the proposed topic before the end of Autumn Quarter prior to anticipated graduation. Candidates register for up to 10 units of ENGLISH 399 Thesis with the faculty member who supervises the thesis work. The thesis is read and graded by the adviser and one other member of the English faculty.

Candidates who write a master's thesis may petition to be excused from up to 10 units of the electives described above. The additional 35 units normally consist of the four required courses and three elective courses. These courses are chosen by the student and approved by the adviser and the Director of Graduate Studies.

Coterminal Program with School of Education 

Students interested in becoming middle school and high school teachers of English may apply for admission to the coterminal teaching program (CTP) of the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) in the School of Education.

CTP students complete a special curriculum in English language, composition, and literature that combines a full English major with supplemental course work in subjects commonly taught in California public schools and a core program of foundational courses in educational theory and practice. They are then admitted to STEP for a fifth year of pedagogical study and practice teaching. Students who complete the curriculum requirements are able to enter STEP without the necessity of taking either the GRE or the usual subject matter assessment tests.

At the end of five years, CTP students receive a B.A. in English, an M.A. in Education, and a California Secondary Teaching Credential.

Students normally apply to the coterminal teaching program at the end of their sophomore year or at the beginning of their junior year. For complete program details and for information on how to apply, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies in English or the CTP coordinator in the School of Education.

Doctor of Philosophy in English

Admission

Students with a bachelor's degree in English or a closely related field may apply to pursue graduate work toward an advanced degree in English at Stanford. Applicants for admission to graduate work must take the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination and the Subject Test in Literature. International students whose first language is not English are also required to take the TOEFL examination (with certain exceptions: see the Office of Graduate Admissions web site).

University Degree Requirements

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Department Degree Requirements

The following department degree requirements, which apply to students entering the program in Autumn Quarter 2013, deal with such matters as residence, dissertation, and examinations, and are in addition to the University's basic requirements for the doctorate. Students should also consult the most recent edition of the English Ph.D. Handbook.

A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must complete three years (nine quarters) of full-time work, or the equivalent, in graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree. Candidates are required to complete at least 135 units of graduate work in addition to the doctoral dissertation. At least three consecutive quarters of graduate work, and the final course work in the doctoral program, must be taken at Stanford.

A student may count no more than 65 units of non-graded courses toward the 135 course units required for the Ph.D., without the written consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. A student takes at least 70 graded units (normally fourteen courses) of the 135 required total units. 5 of these 70 units may be fulfilled with ENGLISH 398 Research Course or ENGLISH 398R Revision and Development of a Paper. ENGLISH 396L Pedagogy Seminar I, and ENGLISH 397A Pedagogy Seminar II do not count toward the 70 graded units. No more than 10 units (normally two courses) may come from 100-level courses.

This program is designed to be completed in five years.

One pedagogical seminar and four quarters of supervised teaching constitute the teaching requirement for the Ph.D. Typically a student will teach three times as a teaching assistant in a literature course. For the fourth course, students will have the option of applying to design and teach a tutorial for undergraduate English majors or teaching a fourth quarter as a T.A..

  • 1st year: One quarter as T.A. (leading 1-2 discussion sections of undergraduate literature)
  • 2nd year: One quarter as T.A. (leading 1-2 discussion sections of undergraduate literature)
  • 4th/5th years: Two quarters of teaching, including the possibility of TA'ing or teaching an undergraduate tutorial.

I. English and American Literature

Students are expected to do course work across the full range of English and American literature. Students are required to fulfill the following requirements. Note: fulfillment of requirements 1, 2, and 3 must be through Stanford courses; students will not be excused from these three requirements or granted credit for course work done elsewhere.

  1. Units
    Required Courses:
    ENGLISH 396Introduction to Graduate Study for Ph.D. Students5
    ENGLISH 396LPedagogy Seminar I2
  2. Graduate-level (at least 200-level) course work in English literature before 1700, and English and American literature after 1700 (at least 5 units of each).
  3. Graduate-level (at least 200-level) course work in some aspect of literary theory such as courses in literary theory itself, narrative theory, poetics, rhetoric, cultural studies, gender studies (at least 5 units).
  4. Students concentrating in British literature are expected to take at least one course (5 units) in American literature; students concentrating in American literature are expected to take at least one course (5 units) in British literature.
  5. Of all courses taken, a minimum of six courses for a letter grade must be graduate colloquia and seminars, of which at least three must be graduate seminars. The colloquia and seminars should be from different genres and periods, as approved by the adviser.
  6. The remaining units of graded, graduate-level courses and seminars should be distributed according to the adviser's judgment and the candidate's needs. A student may receive graduate credit for no more than two 100-level courses in the Department of English.
  7. Consent of the adviser if courses taken outside the Department of English are to count toward the requirement of 70 graded units of course work.
  8. An oral qualifying examination based on a reading guide, to be taken at the end of the summer after the first year of graduate work. The final decision as to qualification is made by the graduate studies committee in consideration of the student's overall record for the first year's work in conjunction with performance on the examination. Note: A student coming to the doctoral program who has done graduate work at another university must petition in the first year at Stanford for transfer credit for course work completed elsewhere. The petition should list the courses and grades, and describe the nature and scope of course work, as well as the content, contact hours, and writing requirements. A syllabus must be included. The Director of Graduate Studies considers the petition in conjunction with the student's overall performance.
  9. University Oral Examination—A University oral examination covering the field of concentration (as defined by the student and the student's adviser). Students will take 10 units of an Orals Preparation workshop led by the Director of Graduate Studies in Spring quarter of the second year.  The oral examination, based on a reading list established by the candidate in consultation with his or her adviser, will be taken taken no later than the Autumn Quarter of the third year of graduate study.
  10. Dissertation—As early as possible during graduate study, a Ph.D. candidate is expected to find a topic requiring extensive original research and to seek out a member of the department as his or her adviser. The adviser works with the student to select a committee to supervise the dissertation. candidates should take this crucial step as early in their graduate careers as possible. The committee may well advise extra preparation within or outside the department, and time should be allowed for such work. After the dissertation topic has been approved, the candidate should file a formal reading committee form as prescribed by the University. Once a first chapter has been drafted, the student will meet with the full reading committee for a one hour colloquium.  The dissertation must be submitted to the adviser as a rough draft, but in substantially final form, at least four weeks before the University deadline in the quarter during which the candidate expects to receive the Ph.D. degree.
  11. Closing Colloquium—Prior to the submission of the dissertation the student and the dissertation committee will hold a closing colloquium designed to look forward toward the next steps; identify the major accomplishments of the dissertation and the major questions/issues/problems that remain; consider possibilities for revision, book or article publication, etc. and to provide some intellectual closure to the dissertation.

II. English and Comparative Literature

The Ph.D. program in English and Comparative Literature is designed for students wishing an extensive knowledge of the literature, thought, and history of England and of at least one foreign country, for one period. Approximately half of the student's course work and reading is devoted to this period, with the remainder of the time given to other periods of English and American literature since 1350.

This degree, administered by the Department of English, is to be distinguished from the Ph.D. in Comparative Literature. The latter program is intended for students unusually well prepared in foreign languages and involves advanced work in three literatures, one of which may be English. Interested students should consult a Department of English adviser, but faculty from Comparative Literature may also provide useful supplementary information.

The requirements are as follows:

  1. Knowledge of the basic structure of the English language and of Chaucer. This requirement may be met by examination, or by taking 10 units of courses chosen from among those offered in linguistics, English philology, and early and middle English literature including Chaucer. No particular courses are required of all students.
  2. Units
    Required Courses:
    ENGLISH 396Introduction to Graduate Study for Ph.D. Students5
    ENGLISH 396LPedagogy Seminar I2
  3. A knowledge of one foreign language sufficient to take graduate-level literature courses in a foreign-language department and an advanced reading knowledge of a second language.
  4. A minimum of 45 units in the history, thought, and literature of one period, in two or more languages, one of which must be English and one foreign. Students normally include at least two courses in a foreign literature read in the original language and two courses listed under Comparative Literature or Modern Thought and Literature. As many as 20 units of this requirement may be satisfied through courses in reading and research. A student may receive graduate credit for no more than two 100-level courses in the Department of English.
  5. A minimum of six courses for a letter grade from graduate colloquia and graduate seminars, of which three must be graduate seminars and of which at least four must be in the Department of English. Among these courses, students should take one in literary theory or criticism. These colloquia and seminars should be in different genres and periods as approved by the adviser.
  6. An oral qualifying examination: see item 8 under requirements of the Ph.D. program in English Literature. For qualifications in the doctoral program in English and Comparative Literature, candidates are not held responsible for literature before 1350, but instead include on their reading list a selection of works from a foreign literature read in the original language.
  7. University Oral Examination—A University oral examination covering the field of concentration (as defined by the student and the student's adviser). Students will take 10 units of an Orals Preparation workshop led by the Director of Graduate Studies in Spring quarter of the second year.  The oral examination, based on a reading list established by the candidate in consultation with his or her adviser, will be taken taken no later than the Autumn Quarter of the third year of graduate study.
  8. Dissertation—As early as possible during graduate study, a Ph.D. candidate is expected to find a topic requiring extensive original research and to seek out a member of the department as his or her adviser. The adviser works with the student to select a committee to supervise the dissertation. candidates should take this crucial step as early in their graduate careers as possible. The committee may well advise extra preparation within or outside the department, and time should be allowed for such work. After the dissertation topic has been approved, the candidate should file a formal reading committee form as prescribed by the University. Once a first chapter has been drafted, the student will meet with the full reading committee for a one hour colloquium.  The dissertation must be submitted to the adviser as a rough draft, but in substantially final form, at least four weeks before the University deadline in the quarter during which the candidate expects to receive the Ph.D. degree.
  9. Closing Colloquium—Prior to the submission of the dissertation the student and the dissertation committee will hold a closing colloquium designed to look forward toward the next steps; identify the major accomplishments of the dissertation and the major questions/issues/problems that remain; consider possibilities for revision, book or article publication, etc. and to provide some intellectual closure to the dissertation.

Language Requirements

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree (except those in English and Comparative Literature, for whom special language requirements prevail) must demonstrate a reading knowledge of two foreign languages. Candidates in the earlier periods must offer Latin and one of the following languages: French, German, Greek, Italian, or Spanish. In some instances, they may be required to offer a third language. Candidates in the later period (that is, after the Renaissance) must offer either French, German, or Latin as one language and may choose the second language from the following: Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Russian, or another language relevant to the student's field of study. In all cases, the choice of languages offered must have the approval of the candidate's adviser. Any substitution of another language must be approved by the Director of Graduate Studies.

The graduate studies committee does not accept courses taken as an undergraduate in satisfaction of the language requirement for doctoral candidates. For students coming to doctoral work at Stanford from graduate work done elsewhere, satisfaction of a foreign language requirement is determined by the Director of Graduate Studies based on the contact hours, syllabus, reading list, etc. Transfer is not automatic.

The candidate must satisfy one language requirement by the end of the first year (that is, before the qualifying examination), and the other by the end of the third year.

Foreign language requirements for the Ph.D. may be fulfilled in any of the following ways:

  1. A reading examination given each quarter by the various language departments, except for Latin and Greek.
  2. For Latin and Greek, an examination given by one of the Department of English faculty.
  3. Passage with a grade of 'B' or higher of a course in literature numbered 100 or higher in a foreign language department at Stanford. As an alternative for Latin, French, Italian, German, and Spanish, passage of the following, respectively, with a grade of 'B' or higher:
Units
FRENLANG 250Reading French4
FRENLANG 250SReading French2-4
GERLANG 250Reading German4
ITALLANG 250Reading Italian4
SPANLANG 250Reading Spanish3

Emeriti: (Professors) George H. Brown, W. B. Carnochan, W. S. Di Piero, John Felstiner, Albert J. Gelpi, Barbara C. Gelpi, David Halliburton, Shirley Heath, John L’Heureux, Herbert Lindenberger, Andrea A. Lunsford, Thomas C. Moser, Nancy H. Packer, Marjorie G. Perloff, Robert M. Polhemus, Arnold Rampersad, David R. Riggs, Lawrence V. Ryan, Wilfred H. Stone, Elizabeth C. Traugott, Wesley Trimpi; (Associate Professor) Sandra Drake; (Professor, Teaching) Larry Friedlander; (Senior Lecturer) Helen B. Brooks; (Lecturer) David MacDonald

Chair: Gavin Jones

Director of Creative Writing Program: Eavan Boland

Director of Program in Writing and Rhetoric: Nicholas Jenkins

Professors: John B. Bender (English, Comparative Literature, on leave), Eavan Boland, Terry Castle, Michele Elam (on leave), Kenneth W. Fields, Shelley Fisher Fishkin, Denise Gigante, Roland Greene (English, Comparative Literature, on leave), Gavin Jones, Mark McGurl, Franco Moretti (English, Comparative Literature), Sianne Ngai, Stephen Orgel (on leave winter, spring), Patricia A. Parker (English, Comparative Literature, on leave winter), Peggy Phelan (English, Drama), Richard Powers, Nancy Ruttenburg, Ramón Saldívar (English, Comparative Literature), Jennifer Summit, Elizabeth Tallent, Elaine Treharne, Blakey Vermeule, Tobias Wolff

Associate Professors: Blair Hoxby, Nicholas Jenkins, Adam Johnson (on leave), Paula Moya, Alex Woloch

Assistant Professors: Claire Jarvis (on leave), Michelle Karnes, Ivan Lupić, Saikat Majumdar, G. Vaughn Rasberry (on leave), Stephen Sohn

Senior Lecturer: Judith Richardson

Courtesy Professors: Joshua Landy, David Palumbo-Liu, Bryan Wolf

Lecturers: Mark Algee-Hewitt, Molly Antopol-Johnson, Kai Carlson-Wee, Harriet Clark, Marvin Diogenes, Keith Ekiss, John Evans, Ingrid Fernandez, Sarah Frisch, Maria Hummel, Scott Hutchins, Tom Kealey, Dana Kletter, Anthony Marra,  Hilton Obenzinger, Brittany Perham, Shannon Pufahl, Kirstin Quade, Nina Schloesser, Stephanie Soileau, Adena Spingarn, Alice Staveley, Shimon Tanaka, Greg Wrenn

Consulting Professor: Valerie Miner

Visiting Professors: Richard Bausch, Louise Gluck, D.A. Powell

Overseas Studies Courses in English

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


Units
OSPOXFRD 17Novels of Sensation: Gothic, Detective Story, Prohibition, and Transgression in Victorian Fiction5
OSPOXFRD 57The Rise of the Woman Writer 1660-18605
OSPOXFRD 60Shakespeare and his Contemporaries5

Courses

ENGLISH 1. History and Theory of Novel Group. 1 Unit.

For undergraduates in English, the DLCL, and East Asian literatures interested in the novel and the events sponsored by the Center for the Study of the Novel (CSN) and to prepare them to attend CSN events with some understanding of the material presented. Each CSN event¿the New Book Events, the Ian Watt Lecture on the History and/or Theory of the Novel, and the Center's annual conference¿will either be preceded or followed by a colloquium, led by a member of the graduate student staff. In these colloquia, students will engage with the material under discussion, usually written by the speaker(s) on whose work the events are based. Participation at 75% of events and colloquia is mandatory for course credit. Precirculated readings will be made available for all colloquia preceding an event, and often for those held after the event, to enable students to develop a familiarity with issues pertaining to the theoretical and historical study of the novel.
Same as: DLCL 1.

ENGLISH 9CE. Creative Expression in Writing. 3 Units.

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests.nn.

ENGLISH 10AX. Fiction Writing. 2 Units.

"Of the many definitions of a story, the simplest may be this: it is a piece of writing that makes the reader want to find out what happens next. Good writers, it is often said, have the ability to make you keep on reading them whether you want to or not-the milk boils over, the subway stop is missed." - Bill Buford, former fiction editor of The New YorkernnThis course will introduce students to an assortment of short stories by past and contemporary masters, from Ernest Hemingway to ZZ Packer. We will explore the basic elements of fiction writing, including story structure, point of view, dialogue, and exposition, always keeping in mind the overarching goal of trying to get the reader to turn the page in anticipation. Some summer reading and participation in an online blog will prepare us for discussions we'll have together when the class begins. The course will indeed be "intensive," as we will write a complete draft of a short story in the first week and then distribute these stories for feedback sessions in the second week. Along the way, we'll write additional short exercises to stimulate our imaginations and to practice elements of craft. Field trips will include visits to some of the vibrant literary hotspots in San Francisco as well as a conversation with Stephen Elliott, editor of The Rumpus and a writer and member of the Writer's Grotto collective.

ENGLISH 15SC. The New Millennium Mix: Crossings of Race & CultureCentury. 2 Units.

Recently, The New York Times and the National Geographic have hailed the "new face of America" as young, global, and hybrid. The NY Times gave this demographic a name: Generation E.A. (Ethnically Ambiguous). Our course examines the political and aesthetic implications of Generation E.A., and the hot new vogue for all things mixed. Galvanized by the 2000 census with its "mark one or more" (MOOM) racial option, dozens of organizations, websites, affinity and advocacy groups, modeling and casting agencies, television pilots, magazines, and journals--all focused on multi-racial/multi-cultural experiences--have emerged in the last few years. We will analyze representations of mixed race and multiculturalism in law, literature, history, art, performance, film, comedy, and popular culture. These cultural and legal events are changing the way we talk and think about race. nImportantly, our seminar also broadens this discussion beyond race, exploring how crossings of the color-line so often intersect with other aspects of experience related to gender, religion, culture, or class.nField trips, films, communal lunches, and interactive assignments help us explore the current controversies over mixed-race identification and, more generally, the expressive and political possibilities for representing complex identities. Requirements include three two- to three-page analytical writing assignments, a presentation that can include an optional artistic or media component, and a final group-designed project. nIf you are a citizen of the 21st century, this class is for and about you.

ENGLISH 23. American Literature and Culture to 1855. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for ENGLISH 123 or AMSTUD 150). A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Same as: AMSTUD 150, ENGLISH 123.

ENGLISH 42D. Talking Back: Intertextuality in Contemporary Fiction. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 142D.) Why do so many contemporary writers create fictions that contend with the past by rewriting, revising, or otherwise 'talking back' to their literary forebears? Is everything intertextual or are post-WW II experiments in intertextuality characteristic of historical, cultural, and geopolitical changes particular to the twentieth century? How does intertextuality inform narrative voice, constructions of authorship, character portrayal, political and aesthetic interpretation, and contemporary claims to - or critiques of - fame and canonization? Students will be encouraged to make comparative connections with the contemporary media scene, while comparing EM Forster and Zadie Smith; Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham; George Orwell and Margaret Atwood; Charotte Bronte and Jean Rhys; Oscar Wilde and Tom Stoppard.
Same as: ENGLISH 142D.

ENGLISH 44B. Contemporary British Fiction. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units should register for 144B). How do contemporary British novelists represent the dramatic changes in culture, class, landscape, economy, gender, race, and national identity that followed the allied victory in the Second World War (1939-1945) when Britain is said to have `won the war but lost the empire'? Focusing on writers born in the aftermath of the war, and the successive generation, this course asks what political, cultural, and literary concerns shape historical consciousness in novels by Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi, Julian Barnes Flaubert's, and Ali Smith.
Same as: ENGLISH 144B.

ENGLISH 47N. Sports and Culture. 3 Units.

Stanford has the most successful student-athlete program in the country (maybe ever) and athletics are an enormously important aspect of Stanford¿s student culture. This course looks in depth at sports in American culture. Through film, essays, fiction, poetry and other media, we will explore an array of topics including representations of the athlete, violence, beauty, the mass media, ethics, college sports, race and gender.

ENGLISH 51N. The Sisters: Poetry & Painting. 3 Units.

Poetry and painting have often been called the "sister arts". Why? Sometimes a poem or a painting stands out to us, asking that we stay with it, that we remember it, although we cannot exactly say why. Poems have a way of making pictures in the mind, and paintings turn "rhymes" amid the people, places, and things they portray. Each is a concentrated world, inviting an exhilarating closeness of response: why does this line come first? Why does the artist include that detail? Who knows but that as we write and talk about these poems and pictures we will be doing what John Keats said a painter does: that is, arriving at a "trembling delicate and snail-horn perception of Beauty." Each week explore the kinship between a different pair of painter and poet and also focuses on a particular problem or method of interpretation. Some of the artist/poet combinations we will consider: Shakespeare and Caravaggio; Jorie Graham and (the photographer) Henri Cartier-Bresson; Alexander Pope and Thomas Gainsborough; William Wordsworth and Caspar David Friedrich; Christina Rossetti and Mary Cassatt; Walt Whitman and Thomas Eakins; Thomas Hardy and Edward Hopper.
Same as: ARTHIST 160N.

ENGLISH 64N. Growing Up in America. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. To what extent is it possible to describe an "American" experience? How are different people included in or excluded from the imagined community that is America? How do a person's race, class, gender and sexuality affect his or her experience of belonging to this country? These are just some of the questions we will consider as we familiarize ourselves with the great diversity of childhood and young adult experiences of people who have grown up in America. We will read and discuss narratives written by men and women, by urban, suburban, and rural Americans, and by Asian Americans, African Americans, Native Americans, Latina/os, and European Americans.
Same as: PSYCH 29N.

ENGLISH 65N. Contemporary Women Fiction Writers. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Novels and story collections addressing childhood, coming of age, and maturity; love, sexuality, orientation; the experience of violence and the politics, domestic and global, of women¿s lives. Texts include Gordimer, Eisenberg, Latiolais, Munro, O'Brien, and others.

ENGLISH 68N. Mark Twain and American Culture. 4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Mark Twain has been called our Rabelais, our Cervantes, our Homer, our Tolstoy, our Shakespeare. Ernest Hemingway maintained that all modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. President Franklin D.nRoosevelt got the phrase New Deal from A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court. Class discussions will focus on how Twain's work illuminates and complicates his society's responses to such issues as race, technology, heredity versus environment, religion, education, and what it means to be American.
Same as: AMSTUD 68N.

ENGLISH 81. Philosophy and Literature. 5 Units.

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track: majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. Issues may include authorship, selfhood, truth and fiction, the importance of literary form to philosophical works, and the ethical significance of literary works. Texts include philosophical analyses of literature, works of imaginative literature, and works of both philosophical and literary significance. Authors may include Plato, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Borges, Beckett, Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas, Pavel, and Pippin. Taught in English.
Same as: CLASSGEN 81, COMPLIT 181, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181.

ENGLISH 88N. Graphic Novels Asian American Style. 3 Units.

Though genre fiction has occasionally been castigated as a lowbrow form only pandering to the uneducated masses, this course reveals how Asian American writers transform the genre to speak to issues of racial difference and social inequality.
Same as: ASNAMST 88N.

ENGLISH 90. Fiction Writing. 5 Units.

The elements of fiction writing: narration, description, and dialogue. Students write complete stories and participate in story workshops. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: PWR 1 (waived in summer quarter).

ENGLISH 91. Creative Nonfiction. 5 Units.

(Formerly 94A.) Historical and contemporary as a broad genre including travel and nature writing, memoir, biography, journalism, and the personal essay. Students use creative means to express factual content.

ENGLISH 92. Reading and Writing Poetry. 5 Units.

Prerequisite: PWR 1. Issues of poetic craft. How elements of form, music, structure, and content work together to create meaning and experience in a poem. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 94. Creative Writing Across Genres. 5 Units.

For minors in creative writing. The forms and conventions of the contemporary short story and poem. How form, technique, and content combine to make stories and poems organic. Prerequisite: 90, 91, or 92.

ENGLISH 100A. Literary History I. 5 Units.

First in a three quarter sequence. Team-taught, and ranging in subject matter across almost a millennium from the age of parchment to the age of Facebook, this required sequence of classes is the department's account of the major historical arc traced so far by literature in English. It maps changes and innovations as well as continuities, ideas, and aesthetic forms, providing a grid of knowledge and contexts for other, more specialized classes.

ENGLISH 100B. Literary History II. 5 Units.

Second in a three quarter sequence. Team-taught, and ranging in subject matter across almost a millennium from the age of parchment to the age of Facebook, this required sequence of classes is the department's account of the major historical arc traced so far by literature in English. It maps changes and innovations as well as continuities, ideas as well as aesthetic forms, providing a grid of knowledge and contexts for other, more specialized classes.

ENGLISH 100C. Literary History III. 5 Units.

Third in a three quarter sequence. Team-taught, and ranging in subject matter across almost a millennium from the age of parchment to the age of Facebook, this required sequence of classes is the department's account of the major historical arc traced so far by literature in English. It maps changes and innovations as well as continuities, ideas as well as aesthetic forms, providing a grid of knowledge and contexts for other, more specialized classes.

ENGLISH 102A. The Material Book. 5 Units.

When was the form of the book invented? Why has it proven the most significant and long-lived of all text technologies? This course will (literally) deconstruct the material book and examine its inventiveness; its metaphorical capaciousness; its role as icon, fetish, container, weapon and monument of collective memory. We shall focus on pairs of medieval manuscripts and contemporary artists' books to investigate the book's meaning, learning also how to produce simple handmade books in a series of creative workshops.

ENGLISH 103H. The Active Life or the Contemplative Life?. 5 Units.

Which is more valuable: knowledge or action? Which is the greater accomplishment: wisdom or material success? What kind of life is best to lead, an active life or a life of spiritual or intellectual contemplation? Are the two necessarily at odds, or can we achieve a balance between them?.

ENGLISH 105A. Queer Reading and Queer Writing in Early Modern England. 5 Units.

Considers the possibility of identifying queer reading and writing practices in early modern England as well the theoretical and historical obstacles such a project necessarily encounters. Focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. Study of Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, law, and politics on the other. Readings include plays, poems, and prose narratives as well as letters, pamphlets, and ephemeral literature. Both major and minor authors will be represented.
Same as: FEMGEN 115.

ENGLISH 115A. Shakespeare and Modern Critical Developments. 5 Units.

Approaches include gender studies and feminism, race studies, Shakespeare's geographies in relation to the field of cultural geography, and the importance of religion in the period.

ENGLISH 115B. Late Shakespeare: Genre, Style, Authorship. 5 Units.

Shakespearean scholarship regularly observes a marked shift of interest in Shakespeare's late plays. Can we speak of "late Shakespeare," and how might that be useful in our understanding of plays such as The WInter's Tale or The Tempest? Can Coriolanus be considered a "late" play, and what do we make of Shakespeare's collaboration with John Fletcher on Henry VIII, The Two Noble Kinsmen, and possibly Cardenio? Our study of Shakespeare"s late plays will be guided by considerations of changing tastes, theatrical conditions, and authorial sensibility.

ENGLISH 118. Literature and the Brain. 5 Units.

Recent developments in and neuroscience and experimental psychology have transformed the way we think about the operations of the brain. What can we learn from this about the nature and function of literary texts? Can innovative ways of speaking affect ways of thinking? Do creative metaphors draw on embodied cognition? Can fictions strengthen our "theory of mind" capabilities? What role does mental imagery play in the appreciation of descriptions? Does (weak) modularity help explain the mechanism and purpose of self-reflexivity? Can the distinctions among types of memory shed light on what narrative works have to offer?
Same as: FRENCH 118, FRENCH 318, PSYCH 118F.

ENGLISH 122A. Austen and Woolf. 5 Units.

Reading of three novels by Jane Austen¿arguably the most influential and gifted of British female novelists-¿and three novels by Virginia Woolf, whose debt to Austen was immense. Topics include the relationship between women writers and the evolution of the English novel; the extraordinary predominance of the marriage plot in Austen¿s fiction (and the various transformations Woolf works on it); each novelist¿s relationship to the cultural and social milieu in which she wrote.

ENGLISH 123. American Literature and Culture to 1855. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for ENGLISH 123 or AMSTUD 150). A survey of early American writings, including sermons, poetry, captivity and slave narratives, essays, autobiography, and fiction, from the colonial era to the eve of the Civil War.
Same as: AMSTUD 150, ENGLISH 23.

ENGLISH 123F. The Elusive Mr. Poe: An Introduction to the Works of Edgar Allan Poe. 5 Units.

Mystic? Pragmatic capitalist? Mysterious eccentric? Poe is one of America¿s most widely-read authors, often characterized as bizarre and emotionally-fractured. Are these accurate or interpretations after the fact? If we look at nineteenth-century America, Poe figures as an author highly attuned to the sensibilities of his time, especially concerning appeal to a wide audience and their everyday interests. To truly enjoy Poe, we need to understand the way he sees himself as creator and the atmosphere of his times. In this class, we will explore his work within its historical context and set out to better locate the "real" Mr. Poe.

ENGLISH 124. THE AMERICAN WEST. 4 Units.

The American West is characterized by frontier mythology, vast distances, marked aridity, and unique political and economic characteristics. This course integrates several disciplinary perspectives into a comprehensive examination of Western North America¿its history, geology, climate, literature, art, film, institutions, politics, demography, economy, and continuing policy challenges. Students will examine several themes fundamental to understanding the region: borders (including how we define the West), space and distance, Native Americans, water, and boom and bust cycles.
Same as: AMSTUD 124A, ARTHIST 152, HISTORY 151, POLISCI 124A.

ENGLISH 131A. The Picaresque Novel. 3-5 Units.

Theft, trickery, mischief, and violence: such were the tools the charming anti-heroes of picaresque fiction relied on to get by. Such pícaros (Spanish for rascal or rogue) were often lowborn bastards and orphans, down-on-their-luck never-do-wells often entered the world naive bumpkins only to discover its endemic nastiness. We¿ll trace the picaresque novel¿s early origins and consider how these novels shaped other literary forms, including romance fiction, satire, criminal biography, adventure fiction, children¿s literature, and even life writing itself in England and America. Authors include: Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Henry Fielding, Tobias Smollett and Mark Twain.

ENGLISH 132G. Love in Nineteenth Century Fiction and Poetry. 3-5 Units.

introduction to literature of the 19th century with emphasis on the portrayals of love that pervade it. How 19th century poets and novelists imagined love and how it was shaped for them by genre, geography and gender. Does love redeem? What are the barriers to love? Readings include fiction by Bronte, Dickens, Eliot, Wilde, James and Hardy, and poetry by Keats, Browning, Rosetti, Tennyson, and others.

ENGLISH 136. Romantic Poetry and Poetics. 5 Units.

Major Romantic writers including William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats. Focus on form in the lyrical ballad, ode, epic romance, and closet drama.

ENGLISH 139B. American Women Writers, 1850-1920. 5 Units.

The ways in which female writers negotiated a series of literary, social, and intellectual movements, from abolitionism and sentimentalism in the nineteenth century to Progressivism and avant-garde modernism in the twentieth. Authors include Harriet Beecher Stowe, Harriet Jacobs, Rebecca Harding Davis, Emily Dickinson, Kate Chopin, Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein, Willa Cather, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman.
Same as: AMSTUD 139B.

ENGLISH 141B. World Literature in English. 5 Units.

One of the most significant cultural consequences of British colonialism has been the emergence of global varieties of English. This is a diverse and diffuse body of literature, including work from spaces with vastly different histories ¿ the colonies in sub-Saharan Africa, the Caribbean, and South Asia, the settler colonies of Australia, New Zealand and Canada, and the even more unclassifiable contexts of Ireland and South Africa, just to mention some of its major sites. In this course we shall try to sample a small selection of the richness and the complexity of English as a language of world literature outside its canonical location of England and the US.

ENGLISH 142C. The Hollywood Novelists. 3-5 Units.

Why is it that watching a movie rarely raises questions about the poor soul who has written it? Looking to the few screenwriters who have managed to transcend the murky oblivion of their profession, we will ask: how did they do it? What does their success teach us about style? What does their prominence as writers allow them to do, and what are the limitations that their stylistic idiosyncrasies impose on them? Through short responses, creative writing assignments and a research paper into the work of one cinematic "author" students will explore these questions in detail.

ENGLISH 142D. Talking Back: Intertextuality in Contemporary Fiction. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 142D.) Why do so many contemporary writers create fictions that contend with the past by rewriting, revising, or otherwise 'talking back' to their literary forebears? Is everything intertextual or are post-WW II experiments in intertextuality characteristic of historical, cultural, and geopolitical changes particular to the twentieth century? How does intertextuality inform narrative voice, constructions of authorship, character portrayal, political and aesthetic interpretation, and contemporary claims to - or critiques of - fame and canonization? Students will be encouraged to make comparative connections with the contemporary media scene, while comparing EM Forster and Zadie Smith; Virginia Woolf and Michael Cunningham; George Orwell and Margaret Atwood; Charotte Bronte and Jean Rhys; Oscar Wilde and Tom Stoppard.
Same as: ENGLISH 42D.

ENGLISH 144B. Contemporary British Fiction. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units should register for 144B). How do contemporary British novelists represent the dramatic changes in culture, class, landscape, economy, gender, race, and national identity that followed the allied victory in the Second World War (1939-1945) when Britain is said to have `won the war but lost the empire'? Focusing on writers born in the aftermath of the war, and the successive generation, this course asks what political, cultural, and literary concerns shape historical consciousness in novels by Zadie Smith, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi, Julian Barnes Flaubert's, and Ali Smith.
Same as: ENGLISH 44B.

ENGLISH 144F. Female Modernists: Women Writers in Paris Between the Wars. 5 Units.

The course will focus on expatriate women writers - American and British - who lived and wrote in Paris between the wars. Among them: Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, H.D., Djuna Barnes, Margaret Anderson, Janet Flanner, Natalie Barney, Kay Boyle, Mina Loy, Romaine Brooks, Mary Butts, Radclyffe Hall, Colette, and Jean Rhys. A central theme will be Paris as a lure and inspiration for bohemian female modernists, and the various alternative and emancipatory literary communities they created.

ENGLISH 145D. Jewish American Literature. 5 Units.

Fiction of Jewish-American writers across the 20th and into the 21st centuries, both immigrants and subsequent generations of native-born Jews, to show how the topic of assimilation is thematized in the literature and to evaluate the distinctiveness of Jewish-American literature as a minority literature.
Same as: JEWISHST 155D, REES 145D.

ENGLISH 145G. American Fiction since 1945. 5 Units.

A survey of the American novel and short story since WWII focusing on themes of mass media and mass marketing, technology and information, poverty and prosperity, race and ethnicity. Included are works by Flannery O'Connor, Thomas Pynchon, Philip Roth, Raymond Carver, Maxine Hong Kingston, Sandra Cisneros and others.

ENGLISH 146. Development of the Short Story: Continuity and Innovation. 5 Units.

Exploration of the short story form's ongoing evolution as diverse writers address love, death, desire. Maupassant, D.H. Lawrence, Woolf, Flannery O'Connor, Hurston, and others. Required for Creative Writing emphasis. All majors welcome.

ENGLISH 148. Family Drama: American Plays about Families. 5 Units.

Plays written by 20th century writers that concentrate on the family as the primary source of dramatic conflict and comedy. Writers include Williams, O'Neill, Wilder, Albee, Vogel, Parks, Lindsay-Abaire, and Hwang.
Same as: TAPS 248.

ENGLISH 150D. Women Poets. 5 Units.

The development of women's poetry from the 17th to the 20th century. How these poets challenge and enhance the canon, amending and expanding ideas of tone, voice and craft, while revising societal expectations of the poet's identity. Poets include Katharine Philips, Letitia Barbauld, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Charlotte Mew, Sylvia Plath, and Adrienne Rich.
Same as: FEMGEN 150D.

ENGLISH 151F. Angelheaded Hipsters: Beat Writers of San Francisco and New York. 5 Units.

Reading of central writers of the Beat movement (Ginsberg, Kerouac, di Prima, Snyder, Whalen) as well as some related writers (Creeley, Gunn, Levertov). Issues explored include NY and SF, Buddhism and leftist politics, poetry and jazz. Some exposure to reading poems to jazz accompaniment. Examination of some of the writers and performers growing out of the Beats: Bob Dylan, rock music, especially from San Francisco, and jazz.

ENGLISH 151H. Wastelands. 5 Units.

Beginning with a sustained examination of T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land," this class will explore the trope of ecological and/or spiritual devastation as it enters into other modernist (Hemingway, Cather, Faulkner, O'Neill) and postmodernist (Ballard, Atwood, McCarthy) projects, tracing this theme to its culmination in the contemporary zombie apocalypse.

ENGLISH 152E. African American Literature. 5 Units.

What is African American literature? This course is both an introduction to some of the great works of black literary expression and an examination of this category. We will examine the formal and rhetorical strategies that figure most prominently in this literary tradition and investigate the historical circumstances (including slavery, Reconstruction, the Great Migration, and Jim Crow) that have shaped¿and been shaped by¿this body of literature. Topics to be addressed include canon formation, negotiations between fiction and history, sectional tensions (between North and South), gender politics, and folk culture.
Same as: AFRICAAM 152E, AMSTUD 152E.

ENGLISH 157. American Literary Journalism. 5 Units.

Literary journalism merges the factual reporting of traditional journalism with the narrative techniques of fiction. This course will follow the development of this influential genre of writing in the U.S. from the 1890s to the present, with special attention to the particularly American emergence of this form in the non-fiction writing published in the New Yorker during the 1930s and 40s and the New Journalism of the 1960s and 70s. Engaging with the form¿s most prominent writers, themes, and techniques, we will investigate questions of objectivity and subjectivity, tensions between fact and fiction, and the genre¿s position as a particularly American cultural form.

ENGLISH 160. Poetry and Poetics. 5 Units.

Introduction to the reading of poetry, with emphasis on how the sense of poems is shaped through diction, imagery, and technical elements of verse.

ENGLISH 161. Narrative and Narrative Theory. 5 Units.

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative.

ENGLISH 161A. Narrative & Narrative Theory: Power, Difference, and The Construction of Fictional Worlds. 5 Units.

An introduction to narrative and narrative theory challenging students through the larger thematic of power and subjection, whether routed through class and gender dynamics as portrayed in the work of Jane Austen and Virgina Woolf, or the elements of race and oppression as depicted in the representational terrains offered by Fae Myenne Ng and Adrian Tomine.

ENGLISH 162A. Critical Methods: Readings in Feminist and Queer Criticism. 5 Units.

Kinships and friendships, publics and counterpublics, scenes and networks; feminist, gay/lesbian and queer theorists have long been preoccupied with the forms of social association. Some of these forms are relatively codified or institutionalized, while others are not. The text will help us think about how specific forms of association depend on but also potentially destabilize existing concepts of gender and sex; abouthow social forms are shot through with political as well as erotic desire; how they contribute to the making of specific subjects and narratives; how they make certain modes of collective life possible while also impeding others. We will do this not just by reading key essays in feminist and queer theory but literary works by Tennessee Williams, Henry James, Juliana Spahr, and Octavia Butler.

ENGLISH 163C. Early Shakespeare: Poet and Playwright. 5 Units.

Examination of Shakespeare's early career in the literary and cultural context of the early 1590s. How did Shakespeare become a successful writer? Why did he write an erotic narrative poem like "Venus and Adonis"? Are his "Sonnets" part of a literary vogue or a reaction against it? Where did he learn to write his early comedies? What was the impact of his early history plays? What¿s special about his early tragedies? While undertaking detailed analyses of individual texts, we will consider these texts in relation to some larger formal and historical forces, such as: the classical tradition; vernacular literary production; literary form, genre, and style; print culture and literary authorship; theater culture, collaboration, and performance.

ENGLISH 164. Senior Seminar. 5 Units.

Small-class format focused on the close reading of literary texts and analysis of literary criticism. This class answers the questions: How do literary critics do what they do? What styles and gambits make criticism vibrant and powerful? Goal is to examine how one goes about writing a lucid, intelligent, and convincing piece of literary criticism based on original research.

ENGLISH 167. Contemporary Science Fictions and Technofutures. 3-5 Units.

How do visions of the future shape the way we think about the present, and even the past? How does science fiction interrogate technological and scientific innovations as a versatile pop culture medium? We will consider the techniques the genre uses to creatively respond to ecological crisis, biologically engineered organisms, artificial intelligence, and information technology. Where does science fiction draw the line between humans and machines, technology and nature, and fact and fiction? This course will trace the genre¿s evolution, from its origins in Mary Shelley¿s Frankenstein, to more recent examples in contemporary literature, film, television and digital media.

ENGLISH 167H. Gangster Fiction and FIlm. 5 Units.

Why are gangster stories so fascinating? What do they tell us about crime, justice, gender relations, psychology, and ethics? We will study the greatest hits of gangster fiction and film, from Fielding's Jonathan Wild to The Sopranos..

ENGLISH 169B. Asian American Fiction. 5 Units.

Why are stories told in particular voices and from particular perspectives? This course explores such a question from the vantage point of Asian American fiction, where we will investigate dynamic and equivocal narrative voices, including "we" narration, "you" narration, multi-person narratives, and unreliable storytellers. We will further engage how these storytelling constructs affect and help to augment our understandings of racial formation. Selections may include: Julie Otsuka's "The Budda in the Attic," Ed Park's "Personal Days," among others.
Same as: AMSTUD 169B.

ENGLISH 171H. History of the English Language. 5 Units.

This course traces the history of the English language from its roots through its earliest written records into the present. It will trace the fundamental changes that English has undergone in terms of morphology, phonology, syntax, semantics, and vocabulary. It will also explore some of the social, cultural, and historical forces that affect language. The course emphasizes the pre-modern history of English.
Same as: LINGUIST 163.

ENGLISH 172D. Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. 5 Units.

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows.
Same as: ANTHRO 33, CSRE 196C, SOC 146, TAPS 165.

ENGLISH 172E. The Literature of the Americas. 5 Units.

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
Same as: AMSTUD 142, COMPLIT 142, CSRE 142.

ENGLISH 172F. Growing Up Different: Coming-of-Age Stories in a Diversifying America. 3-5 Units.

Young people searching for identity are iconic in American literature. But when America is transforming radically, what happens to the genre of finding one¿s place there? What if there is no place for you? This seminar examines the diversity of American coming-of-age stories from 1960 to today, a period when issues of personal identity, socialization, and national identity collide with Civil Rights struggles, identity movements, and upheavals in immigration. As America grapples with differences of race, class, sexuality, and nativity, these stories register the trials and hopes. Authors include Junot Díaz, Toni Morrison, Harper Lee, Monique Truong, and Noviolet Bulawayo.

ENGLISH 173H. Passions, Emotions, Moods. 5 Units.

An examination of theories as well as representations and enactments of three genres of feeling¿passions, emotions, and moods¿in western literature, philosophy, and social theory. Reading across five centuries and also across diverse literary genres, we will track changes and continuities in the cultural understanding of one particular cluster of feelings¿envy, jealousy, and competitiveness¿which has played an especially central role in the social life of subjects organized by the institution of the family and also by the economic system of capitalism.

ENGLISH 184. The Novel, The World. 5 Units.

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Hellenistic age to the present.
Same as: COMPLIT 123.

ENGLISH 184E. Introduction to Critical Text Mining. 5 Units.

The application of computational and quantitative methods to the study of literature is a rapidly growing and sometimes controversial new field. This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of these techniques as we combine hands on experience in the Literary Lab with discussions of the ways in which these techniques reshape our understanding of literature. Together, we will learn how to ¿read¿ large collections of literary texts using a variety of methods that draw upon literary studies, computer science and the social sciences, including authorship attribution, topic modeling, sentiment analysis, and named entity extraction.

ENGLISH 184H. Text Technologies: A History. 5 Units.

Beginning with cave painting, carving, cuneiform, hieroglyph, and other early textual innovations, survey of the history of writing, image, sound, and byte, all text technologies employed to create, communicate and commemorate. Focus on the recording of language, remembrance and ideas explicating significant themes seen throughout history; these include censorship, propaganda, authenticity, apocalypticism, technophobia, reader response, democratization and authority. The production, transmission and reception of tablet technology, the scroll, the manuscript codex and handmade book, the machine-made book, newspapers and ephemera; and investigate the emergence of the phonograph and photograph, film, radio, television and digital multimedia.The impact of these various text technologies on their users, and try to draw out similarities and differences in our cultural and intellectual responses to evolving technologies. STS majors must have senior status to enroll in this senior capstone course.
Same as: STS 200D.

ENGLISH 186. Tales of Three Cities: New York, Chicago, Los Angeles. 5 Units.

How urban form and experience shape literary texts and how literary texts participate in the creation of place, through the literature of three American cities as they ascended to cultural and iconographical prominence: New York in the early to mid 19th century; Chicago in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and Los Angeles in the mid to late 20th century.
Same as: AMSTUD 186.

ENGLISH 186F. Heroic Traitors: The Whistleblower in American Literature and Culture. 3-5 Units.

Edward Snowden¿s leak of classified government documents has provoked mixed reactions: is Snowden hero or traitor, patriot or coward? It has also foregrounded the notion of whistleblowing, and drawn our attention to America¿s longstanding cultural interest in the character of the whistleblower across contemporary literature, film, and television. We will compare cultural representations of whistleblowing to recent historical examples of it. What does the difference between ¿fictional¿ and ¿real¿ whistleblowers say about how we feel about whistleblowers? Why do they repeatedly crop up in American culture? What makes whistleblowers such memorable characters, yet such contentious real people?.

ENGLISH 190. Intermediate Fiction Writing. 5 Units.

May be taken twice for credit. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 90 or 91.

ENGLISH 190F. Fiction into Film. 5 Units.

Workshop. For screenwriting students. Story craft, structure, and dialogue. Assignments include short scene creation, character development, and a long story. How fictional works are adapted to screenplays, and how each form uses elements of conflict, time, summary, and scene. Priority to seniors and Film Studies majors. Prerequisite: 90.

ENGLISH 190G. The Graphic Novel. 5 Units.

Interdisciplinary. Evolution, subject matter, form, conventions, possibilities, and future of the graphic novel genre. Guest lectures. Collaborative creation of a graphic novel by a team of writers, illustrators, and designers. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGLISH 190H. The Graphic Novel. 5 Units.

Continuation of ENGLISH 190G. Interdisciplinary. Evolution, subject matter, form, conventions, possibilities, and future of the graphic novel genre. Guest lectures. Collaborative creation of a graphic novel by a team of writers, illustrators, and designers. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGLISH 190T. Special Topics in Intermediate Fiction Writing. 5 Units.

Focus on a particular topic or process. Work includes aspects of reading short stories and novels, writing at least 30-50 pages of fiction, and responding to peers' work in workshop. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.

ENGLISH 190V. Reading for Writers. 5 Units.

Taught by the Stein Visiting Fiction Writer. Prerequisite: 90.

ENGLISH 191. Intermediate Creative Nonfiction. 5 Units.

Continuation of 91. Workshop. The application of advanced storytelling techniques to fact-based personal narratives, emphasizing organic writing, discovering audience, and publication. Guest lecturers, collaborative writing, and publication of the final project in print, audio, or web formats. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.

ENGLISH 191T. Special Topics in Intermediate Creative Nonfiction. 5 Units.

Workshop. Continuation of 91. Focus is on forms of the essay. Works from across time and nationality for their craft and technique; experimentation with writing exercises. Students read and respond to each other's longer nonfiction projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 91 or 90.

ENGLISH 192. Intermediate Poetry Writing. 5 Units.

May be taken twice. Lottery. Priority to last quarter/year in school, majors in English with Creative Writing emphasis, and Creative Writing minors. Prerequisite: 92.

ENGLISH 192V. The Occasions of Poetry. 5 Units.

Taught by the Mohr Visiting Poet. Prerequisite: 92.

ENGLISH 194. Individual Research. 5 Units.

See section above on Undergraduate Programs, Opportunities for Advanced Work, Individual Research.

ENGLISH 195B. How to Write a Great Essay: A Writing Bootcamp for Undergraduates. 5 Units.

Practical workshop for undergraduates on how to improve essay-writing skills. Just like any other complex and demanding human activity --scuba diving, working out a mathematical proof, learning to pole vault, cooking the perfect soufflé, arguing a court case--the ability to write clear and compelling prose requires practice, alertness, psychological intensity, and a certain amount of imaginative and emotional daring. Focus will be on the finer points of vocabulary, grammar, mechanics, logic, timing, intellectual precision; how to connect with (and delight) an audience; how to magnify a theme; how to deflect counter-arguments; how to develop your own sophisticated authorial 'style'; how to write sentences (and papers!) your reader will care about and admire and maybe even remember.

ENGLISH 195W. Writing Center Peer Tutor Seminar. 3 Units.

For students selected to serve as peer writing tutors in the Stanford Writing Center and/or at other campus sites. Readings on and reflection about writing processes, the dynamics of writing and tutoring situations, tutoring techniques, learning styles, diversity, and ethics. Observation of tutoring sessions, written responses to readings, and other written work.
Same as: PWR 195, PWR 295.

ENGLISH 196A. Honors Seminar: Critical Approaches to Literature. 3 Units.

Overview of literary-critical methodologies, with a practical emphasis shaped by participants' current honors projects. Restricted to students in the English Honors Program. Offered in conjunction with ENGLISH 196B. Honors Writing Workshop.

ENGLISH 196B. Honors Essay Workshop. 2 Units.

Required of English honors students.

ENGLISH 197. Seniors Honors Essay. 1-10 Unit.

In two quarters.

ENGLISH 198. Individual Work. 1-5 Unit.

Undergraduates who wish to study a subject or area not covered by regular courses may, with consent, enroll for individual work under the supervision of a member of the department. 198 may not be used to fulfill departmental area or elective requirements without consent. Group seminars are not appropriate for 198.

ENGLISH 198L. Individual Work: Levinthal Tutorial. 5 Units.

Undergraduate writers work individually with visiting Stegner Fellows in poetry, fiction, and if available, nonfiction. Students design their own curriculum; Stegner Fellows act as writing mentors and advisers. Prerequisites: 90, 91, or 92; submitted manuscript.

ENGLISH 199. Senior Independent Essay. 1-10 Unit.

Open, with department approval, to seniors majoring in non-Honors English who wish to work throughout the year on a 10,000 word critical or scholarly essay. Applicants submit a sample of their expository prose, proposed topic, and bibliography to the Director of Undergraduate Studies before preregistration in May of the junior year. Each student accepted is responsible for finding a department faculty adviser. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 209. Paleography of Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts. 3-5 Units.

Introductory course in the history of writing and of the book, from the late antique period until the advent of printing. Opportunity to learn to read and interpret medieval manuscripts through hands-on examination of original materials in Special Collections of Stanford Libraries as well as through digital images. Offers critical training in the reading of manuscripts for students from departments as diverse as Classics, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, English, and the Division of Languages Cultures and Literatures.
Same as: CLASSGEN 311, DLCL 209, HISTORY 309G, RELIGST 204.

ENGLISH 253. Meaning and Mining: Method and Interpretation in the Digital Humanities. 5 Units.

Explore how to use the methodologies of the Digital Humanities to augment critical literary studies. Drawing upon digital texts from the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries, we will combine digital and critical methodologies to explore a project whose specifics will be determined by the interests of the participants. Together, we will learn how to apply digital methods to questions of literary significance and run a wide range of analyses including exploratory clustering, word frequency analysis, classification, stylometry and topic modeling. We will also examine how to interpret the results for both statistical and literary significance.

ENGLISH 270A. Text in Context: Beowulf from Then `til Now. 5 Units.

"Beowulf" is the first great English epic--a tale of heroes, monsters, and the futility of conflict. It influenced the "Lord of the Rings", but was described as a 'featureless heap of gangrened elephant's sputum' by novelist Kingsley Amis. It exists in one early eleventh-century manuscript plus countless editions, translations, films, comic books and, now, a fully digitized e-manuscript. We shall experience manifold instances of "Beowulf" and ask what, then, is the 'text' of "Beowulf"? What constitutes the 'real' poem? Can we reclaim an 'original' work of art and should that even be part of the scholarly endeavor?.

ENGLISH 290G. Fiction Workshop for Graduate Students. 3 Units.

Fiction Workshop for Graduate Students. No prerequisites or previous workshop experience required. For graduate students from all fields, this workshop encourages exploration of diverse experiences through fiction.

ENGLISH 292. Advanced Poetry Writing. 5 Units.

Focus is on generation and discussion of student poems, and seeking published models for the work.

ENGLISH 293. Literary Translation. 3-5 Units.

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Same as: DLCL 293.

ENGLISH 300. Medieval Methodologies. 3 Units.

An introduction to the essential tool-kit for medievalists, this course will give all medievalists a great head start in knowing how to access and interpret major works and topics in the field. Stanford's medieval faculty will explain the key sources and methods in the major disciplines from History to Religion, French to Arabic, English to Chinese, and Art History to German and Music. In so doing, students will be introduced to the breadth and interdisciplinary potential of Medieval Studies. A workshop devoted to Digital Technologies and Codicology/Palaeography will offer elementary training in these fundamental skills.
Same as: DLCL 300, MUSIC 300C.

ENGLISH 301D. Medieval Visionaries. 5 Units.

Study of medieval mystics and their efforts to communicate ineffable experience through such devices as ekphrasis, figuration, and apophasis. Readings will include the works of Pseudo-Dionysius, commentaries by Grosseteste and Aquinas, and mystical texts by Hildegard, Marguerite Porete, the author of the Cloud of Unknowing, and Julian of Norwich. All readings will be in Middle or Modern English. No prior knowledge of medieval literature or Middle English will be expected.

ENGLISH 303B. Sexuality and Terror: The British Gothic Novel from Walpole to Mary Shelley. 5 Units.

Examination of the phantasmagoric side of eighteenth-century sensibility--the literary representation of fantastic and marvelous events, violations of natural law, and landscapes of terror, pathology, sublimity and horror. Particular emphasis will fall on women and the Gothic: whether there is in fact an encoded `sexual plot' in classic Gothic fiction, and why the genre typically emphasizes scenarios of erotic vulnerability, abjection, violation, and perversion. Besides reading the acknowledged Gothic classics, we will also consider recent psychoanalytic and social and historical treatments of the genre.

ENGLISH 304A. Romanticism and Antiquarianism. 5 Units.

The forward thrust of modernity in Romantic-period Britain bred a fetishization of the past. Ballads on mermen translated from the Danish, the historical landscapes of Sir Walter Scott, epic inspired by the Elgin marbles, the minstrelsy of the Scottish border and ¿reliques¿ of early English poetry, irreverent treatises on old books, gastronomical writing on ancient food theory, and conversational essays on the genealogy of all things, were all aspects of the phenomenon of antiquarianism to be explored in this course.

ENGLISH 305D. Dickens and Eliot. 5 Units.

Major novels by Charles Dickens and George Eliot, with a focus on our readerly, critical and aesthetic engagement with this basic category (¿major novel¿). Why such long narratives, such complicated plots, such multifarious character-systems? Why such strange mixtures of social purpose and aesthetic eccentricity? How do we experience and conceptualize the conspicuous scale, density, energy, and excess of such novels as Bleak House, Our Mutual Friend, Romola, Middlemarch? The focus of the seminar will be reading these challenging, demanding, seductive texts; on the peculiar reading experiences produced by the nineteenth-century novel; and the history of critical response to this experience.

ENGLISH 313A. The Novel of Ideas. 5 Units.

Is the "novel of ideas" rightly regarded as a free-standing genre with a distinctive trajectory of historical development or does the term more truthfully point to a nebulous or latent tendency in the novel in general? An investigation of this synthesis of criticism/theory and fiction with an eye to larger historical and theoretical questions surrounding the novel as form. Authors will likely include: Balzac, Stendhal, Melville, Mann, Sartre, Huxley, Bechdel, Powers.

ENGLISH 314. Epic and Empire. 5 Units.

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Same as: COMPLIT 320A.

ENGLISH 330. Narrative Medicine. 5 Units.

How does writing help healing? What is the connection between the 'feel of a sentence' and the 'feel of a body'? Why do we love Oliver Sacks' work and why are doctors asked to read novels?.

ENGLISH 334A. Concepts of Modernity I: Philosophical Foundations. 5 Units.

In the late eighteenth century Immanuel Kant proclaimed his age to be "the genuine age of criticism." He went on to develop the critique of reason, which set the stage for many of the themes and problems that have preoccupied Western thinkers for the last two centuries. This fall quarter course is intended as an introduction to these themes and problems. We begin this course with an examination of Kant's philosophy before approaching a number of texts that extend and further interrogate the critique of reason. In addition to Kant, we will read texts by Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, Freud, Lukács, and Heidegger.nThis course is the first of a two-course sequence. Priority to graduate students in MTL and English. The course will be capped at 12 students.
Same as: MTL 334A.

ENGLISH 334B. Concepts of Modernity II: The Study of Culture in the Age of Globalization. 5 Units.

A survey of 20th-century theory with focus on the concept of culture and methods of studying it from diverse disciplines including, anthropology, historical sociology, literary and cultural studies. Discussions will emphasize modernization, transmodernization and globalization processes in their relations to culture broadly understood, cultures in their regional, national and diasporic manifestations, and cultures as internally differentiated (high and low culture, subcultures, media cultures).
Same as: COMPLIT 334B, MTL 334B.

ENGLISH 338. The Gothic in Literature and Culture. 5 Units.

This course examines the Gothic as a both a narrative subgenre and an aesthetic mode, since its 18th century invention. Starting with different narrative genres of Gothic expression such as the Gothic novel, the ghost tale, and the fantastic tale by writers such as Walpole, Radcliffe, Sade, Poe, and E.T.A. Hoffmann, the course goes on to ask how the Gothic sensibility permeates a wide range of 19th century cultural phenomena that explore the dark side of Enlightenment, from Romantic poetry and art to melodrama, feuilleton novels, popular spectacles like the wax museum and the morgue. If time permits, we will also ask how the Gothic is updated into our present in popular novels and cinema. Critical readings will examine both the psychology of the Gothic sensibility and its social context, and might be drawn from theorists such as Benjamin, Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, and Zizek.
Same as: COMPLIT 338, FRENCH 338.

ENGLISH 360B. The Theory of the Novel. 5 Units.

Topics will include: theories of the novel's origin; novelistic subjectivity; voice and text; body and text; the problem of the quotidian; democracy, revolution and novelistic form; and the peculiar dynamic of the novelistic trinity (author, character, reader).
Same as: COMPLIT 360B.

ENGLISH 361B. East Goes West: Transnational Asia/Pacific Spatial Geographies. 5 Units.

East goes west as a metaphor to invoke the conceptions of fantasy and desire that play out in transnational scope. What attracts diasporic Asian/American subjects to the locations that they travel to, whether it be an identified homeland with which a character attaches a strong affinity, or to a new country where the promise of economic possibilities await?.

ENGLISH 365E. The 1790s: The Aftershock of Revolution. 5 Units.

The purpose of this course is to trace the articulation of a new symbolic order in political-theoretical and literary texts written in the Anglo-American 1790s. Course content will be framed by the creation of the Bill of Rights (ratified in 1791) and the evisceration of the First Amendment in the Alien and Sedition Acts of 1798, the first instance of what historian Richard J. Hofstader famously called "the paranoid style in American politics." We will explore the 1790s through 1) an examination of the Federalist/Anti-Federalist debates concerning the pros and cons of establishing a national government rather than a confederation of states; 2) the range of American and British responses to the French Revolution; 3) the growth of democratic radicalism in Anglo-America; 4) the fear of radical-democratic infiltration of the United States from the European Continent, Ireland, and Haiti; and 5) the American literary expression of these questions written in the late 1790s, on the cusp of the post-revolutionary and "early national" eras. Our overall goal is to gain a historical understanding of the overlapping cultural contexts for American ¿republicanism,¿ ¿democracy,¿ and ¿liberalism,¿ and the evolution of their meanings. We will focus particularly on the co-production of democratic and novelistic subjectivity in relation to natural right theory, the evolution of "conscience," voice, the body, individuation, sovereignty, representation, equality, and freedom.

ENGLISH 365F. American Renaissance Literature: The Invention of the American Author. 5 Units.

Investigation of the problematic production of an American national literature in the antebellum period. Readings include generically diverse range of texts in which the particular requirements of an ¿American¿ authorship are specifically at issue. Focus upon various theories and problems of authorship as they appear explicitly or implicitly in the fiction, poetry, correspondence, and criticism of the period. These issues include the impact of the democratic-revolutionary legacy upon the development of American literary form; the rise of a literary cultural elite and its importance to the formation of an American public sphere; elite anxieties concerning the marginal status of United States literature in relation to European culture; the consequent marginalization of ¿Americanness¿ as that which resists cultural development; the literary appropriation of ¿commonness¿ as central to the representation of national character; theories of ¿the popular voice¿ and the textual emergence of voices resistant to such theories.

ENGLISH 375A. Renaissance Literature and Politics after the New Historicism. 5 Units.

A major critical and theoretical legacy, the New Historicism continues to inform, in both positive and negative ways, the recent scholarly work devoted to the relationship between literature and history in the early modern period. While focusing on issues of political meaning and political thought that both inform literary production and are partly shaped by it, the seminar will ask what it means to have a dominant critical paradigm for the understanding of fundamental relations between literary and non-literary (or at least less literary) discourses. Even though we will be studying major Renaissance authors such as Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare, the theoretical and methodological issues the course is designed to raise transcend period boundaries. We will look at recent scholarly production in the field of early modern studies to see how scholars go about defining and positioning their critical agendas in their attempts to offer new or modified conceptions of the relationship between Renaissance literature, and literature more generally, and politics.

ENGLISH 376. Milton in the Long Restoration. 5 Units.

Study of the creation and reception of Milton's major works in the context of English literary and cultural history from 1649 to 1746. Thus not just Milton but Restoration and Augustan literature more generally is our focus. Authors include Milton, Dryden, Pope, and their contemporaries. This seminar will be conducted in conjunction with a two day conference (bringing in thirty major scholars from around the world) to be held at Stanford in April. Full participation in the conference is required and built into our schedule and assignments.

ENGLISH 390. Graduate Fiction Workshop. 3 Units.

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGLISH 392. Graduate Poetry Workshop. 3 Units.

For Stegner fellows in the writing program. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGLISH 394. Independent Study. 1-10 Unit.

Preparation for first-year Ph.D. qualifying examination.

ENGLISH 395. Ad Hoc Graduate Seminar. 1-5 Unit.

Three or more graduate students who wish in the following quarter to study a subject or an area not covered by regular courses and seminars may plan an informal seminar and approach a member of the department to supervise it.

ENGLISH 396. Introduction to Graduate Study for Ph.D. Students. 5 Units.

Required for first-year graduate students in English. The major historical, professional, and methodological approaches to the study of literature in English.

ENGLISH 396L. Pedagogy Seminar I. 2 Units.

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English, Modern Thought and Literature, and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Same as: COMPLIT 396L.

ENGLISH 396P. Publication Workshop: The Article. 3-5 Units.

A practical and theoretical study of the genre of the journal article, with critical reflection on its status as a gateway to academic professionalization and as a highly specialized form of public address. We will be reading articles published over the last decade across a diverse range of journals, focusing on issues surrounding methodology, style, tone, and audience. Participants will also work on developing an already polished piece of writing into the form of an article potentially publishable by a peer-reviewed publication. Admission by application in Fall quarter .

ENGLISH 397A. Pedagogy Seminar II. 1 Unit.

Apprenticeship for second-year graduate students in English, Modern Thought and Literature, and Comparative Literature who teach in the Program in Writing and Rhetoric. Each student is assigned as an apprentice to an experienced teacher and sits in on classes, conferences, and tutorials, with eventual responsibility for conducting a class, grading papers, and holding conferences. Meetings explore rhetoric, theories and philosophies of composition, and the teaching of writing. Each student designs a syllabus in preparation for teaching PWR 1.

ENGLISH 397X. Teaching the Humanities: Lighting a Fire. 2-4 Units.

This course, designed for graduate students in the humanities and education, will explore approaches to teaching the humanities at both the secondary and collegiate levels. Our focus will be primarily on the teaching of text, and how the humanities can help students develop their ability to read critically. The course will explore the purposes and pedagogical approaches for teaching humanities. We will explore these topics through a variety of texts and perspectives. The course is also designed as an opportunity for doctoral students in the Humanities both to enrich their own teaching and to broaden their understanding of professional teaching opportunities (to include community college and secondary school teaching).
Same as: EDUC 405X.

ENGLISH 398. Research Course. 1-18 Unit.

A special subject of investigation under supervision of a member of the department. Thesis work is not registered under this number.

ENGLISH 398L. Literary Lab. 2-5 Units.

Gathering and analyzing data, constructing hypotheses and designing experiments to test them, writing programs [if needed], preparing visuals and texts for articles or conferences. Requires a year-long participation in the activities of the Lab.

ENGLISH 398R. Revision and Development of a Paper. 4-5 Units.

Students revise and develop a paper under the supervision of a faculty member with a view to possible publication.

ENGLISH 398W. Orals, Publication and Dissertation Workshop. 2 Units.

For third- and fourth-year graduate students in English. Strategies for studying for and passing the oral examination, publishing articles, and for writing and researching dissertations and dissertation proposals. May be repeated for credit.

ENGLISH 399. Thesis. 1-10 Unit.

For M.A. students only. Regular meetings with thesis advisers required.

ENGLISH 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.