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East Asian Studies

Contacts

Office: Knight Building, 521 Memorial Way, Stanford, CA 94305-5001
Mail Code: 6023
Phone: (650) 736-1759, 723-3362; fax: (650) 725-3350
Email: CEAS-Admissions@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://ceas.stanford.edu

Mission

The Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS) supports teaching and research on East Asia-related topics across all disciplines; disseminates knowledge about East Asia through projects of local, regional, national, and international scope; and serves as the intellectual gathering point for a collaborative and innovative community of scholars and students of East Asia. CEAS works with all schools, departments, research centers, and student groups to facilitate and enhance all aspects of East Asia-related research, teaching, outreach and exchange across the Stanford campus.

CEAS is part of Stanford Global Studies in the School of Humanities and Sciences. As an East Asia National Resource Center (NRC), supported by the U.S. Department of Education, CEAS serves to strengthen access to and training in the major languages of East Asia, and to broaden East Asia area studies training across all disciplines.

Courses offered by the Center for East Asian Studies are listed under the subject code EASTASN on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site. The EASTASN courses listed on ExploreCourses deal primarily with China, Japan, and Korea. Literature courses are listed with the subject codes of CHINGEN, CHINLIT, JAPANGEN, JAPANLITKORGEN, and KORLIT on ExploreCourses.

Many other theoretical and methodological courses within various departments at Stanford are taught by faculty who are East Asian specialists; these courses often have a substantial East Asian component and a list of current applicable courses from outside departments may be found on the "Approved Courses" tab of this bulletin.

Courses in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean language instruction use the subject codes CHINLANG, JAPANLNG, and KORLANG. Courses in Classical Chinese are listed under the subject code CHINLIT.

Undergraduate Programs in East Asian Studies

Undergraduates interested in East Asia can become involved by attending CEAS events, taking courses in the subject codes listed above, or earning a Minor or Bachelor of Arts degree in East Asian Studies. These undergraduate degrees in East Asian Studies are now administered by the Department of East Asian Cultures and Languages.  Stanford Global Studies offers internship opportunities in East Asia, and the Bing Overseas Study Program offers study abroad opportunities in East Asia.

For language study, CEAS provides undergraduate fellowships for language study in China, Japan, or Korea; students must simultaneously apply to a pre-approved language program abroad. Applications are due in February each year. Deadlines and application information can be found on the CEAS web site. In addition, undergraduates can obtain a coterminal M.A. degree in East Asian Studies while concurrently working on their undergraduate major by applying during the regular admissions cycle no later than their senior year.

Graduate Programs in East Asian Studies

Master's Program

Stanford's interdisciplinary M.A. program in East Asian Studies is designed both for students who plan to complete a Ph.D. but who have not yet decided on the particular discipline in which they prefer to work, and for students who wish to gain a background in East Asian Studies in connection with a career in nonacademic fields such as business, law, education, journalism, or government service. The program permits the student to construct a course of study suited to individual intellectual interests and career needs, and may be completed within 1 to 3 years, depending on the course load taken and the amount of foreign language training required. Advanced language students or students who are native speakers of Chinese, Japanese, or Korean can potentially complete the program within one year. Students interested in pursuing professional careers are encouraged to plan for additional training through internships or additional graduate professional programs, in conjunction with obtaining an M.A. in East Asian Studies.

The M.A. program allows students a great deal of flexibility in combining language training, interdisciplinary area studies, and a disciplinary concentration. Students are required to demonstrate third year level proficiency in Chinese, Korean or Japanese, according to their research-area focus (either through coursework at Stanford or testing at the 4th year or higher in language-placement exams), to take the one-unit core course in East Asian Studies, and to complete at least nine area studies graduate courses, three of which must be in a single department or in the same thematic focus. An M.A. thesis, usually an expansion of a paper written for a graduate seminar or colloquium, is required.

Learning Outcomes

The purpose of the master's program is to further develop specialized knowledge and skills in East Asian Studies, and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through completion of East Asia content courses, language training as necessary, and experience with independent research.

Postdoctoral Programs

The Center for East Asian Studies offers postdoctoral fellowships in Chinese and Japanese Studies each year. Postdoctoral fellowships in other areas are also available from the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center, the Stanford Humanities Center, and various other campus units.

Financial Aid

CEAS offers various types of funding for new and continuing students. Please visit the fellowships page of the CEAS web site for the most up-to-date offerings..

Master of Arts in East Asian Studies

University requirements for the master's degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The master's degree program allows a great deal of flexibility in combining language training, interdisciplinary area studies, and a disciplinary concentration. The director of the center assigns preliminary faculty advisers to all students. Members of the staff and faculty are available for academic and career planning. The M.A. program is normally completed in two academic years, but students can shorten this time by receiving credit for prior language work or by attending summer sessions. Students are urged to complete the degree requirements within one academic year (3 quarters) unless their goals and background dictate otherwise.

Applicants must submit scores for the General Test of the Graduate Record Examination, official transcripts and a writing sample along with their online application. Foreign applicants are also required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Applications for admission and financial aid should be made online; see the Graduate Admissions web site. The deadline for submitting applications for the 2015-2016 academic year is December 9, 2014.

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Program in East Asian Studies

The center admits a limited number of Stanford undergraduates to work toward a coterminal M.A. degree in East Asian Studies. Applications are accepted once a year during the regular CEAS M.A. application cycle. The deadline for the 2015-16 academic year is December 9, 2014. Students may apply after completing 120 units, but no later than the quarter prior to the expected completion of the undergraduate degree. Applicants are expected to meet the same standards as those seeking admission to the M.A. program, and they must submit the following directly to the Center's office:

  • a completed coterminal application form
  • a written statement of purpose
  • an unofficial Stanford transcript
  • three letters of recommendation, at least two of which should be from members of the department of concentration
  • first 15 pages of a representative writing sample (seminar paper, term paper, honors thesis, journal article, etc.). Do not submit more than 15 pages.
  • copy of scores from the General Test of the Graduate Record Exam (official score should be sent to Stanford's school code 4704)
  • a list of courses the applicant intends to take to fulfill degree requirements.

Coterm applications are reviewed along with peer applications by the M.A. Admissions Committee of the Center for East Asian Studies (CEAS).

Students must meet all requirements for both B.A. and M.A. degrees. They must complete a total of 15 full-time quarters or the equivalent, or three full quarters after completing 180 units for a total of 226 units. Coterms are not eligible for University financial aid, but are eligible to apply for Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) and other fellowships administered by CEAS.

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the Registrar's web site.

Degree Requirements

Language Requirement

Students must complete the equivalent of Stanford's first three full years of language training in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean. Other East Asian languages may be accepted by petition. Students entering the program without any language preparation should complete first- and second-year Chinese, Japanese, or Korean within the first year of residence at Stanford if they intend to graduate within two years (this would necessitate completing a summer language program). All language courses taken at Stanford used towards fulfilling the language requirement must be for letter grades and completed with a grade of 'B' or higher. Conversation classes cannot be used for meeting this requirement, and units from the language courses numbered 1-99 do not count toward the 46 units required required for the degree. Language courses numbered 100 and above can be used towards meeting the 46 units minimum for the degree, but cannot be used towards fulfilling the content courses requirement unless the language course is at the fourth-year level or above, and the student is specializing in literature.

The language requirement may be satisfied in part or in full by placing into an appropriate Stanford language class through the language proficiency exam given by the Language Center. Students who fulfill this minimum three-year language requirement before completing other requirements are encouraged to continue language study, or take courses in which Chinese, Japanese, or Korean are used, for as long as they are in the program.

The language used to meet the three-year language proficiency requirement should match the student's country/region of focus.

Students in the M.A. program are also eligible to apply for the Inter-University language programs in Beijing and Yokohama. Work completed in one of these programs may be counted toward the M.A. degree's language requirement if students take and pass the corresponding Stanford language proficiency exam after the program. Work completed in these overseas programs will not be counted towards the overall unit requirements.

Language courses are listed under the following subject codes on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site: CHINLANG, JAPANLNG, and KORLANG.

M.A. Thesis Requirement

A master's thesis, representing a substantial piece of original research, should be filed with the center's program office as part of the graduation requirements. With the adviser's approval, the master's thesis requirement may be satisfied by expanding a research paper written for an advanced course, and should have a minimum of 10,000 words in the main body of the thesis (excluding references, citations, appendices, etc.). The M.A. thesis is due at noon on the last day of classes, of the quarter in which the student applies to graduate; see the Academic Calendar for specific dates.

Area Studies and Unit Requirements

Students must complete a minimum total of 46 units for the degree at Stanford, comprised of: 

  1. 1-unit core course, EASTASN 330 Core Seminar: Issues and Approaches in East Asian Studies
  2. At least 9 approved content courses, at least 30 units of which must be at or above the 200 level (at or above 300 level for HISTORY courses) and meeting the following criteria: 
    1. Are on the approved East Asian Studies course list (see Approved Courses tab), or have been approved by petition (maximum 3 petitions)
    2. Taken for a letter grade and completed with a 'B' or higher
    3. Taken for 3 units or more
    4. Do not count as part of the language requirement (language courses beyond third-year level are accepted for students specializing in literature)
    5. At least 3 of the 9 course must be either in the same department or within the same thematic focus across several departments (see sample themes below).
  3. Additional courses as necessary to reach the minimum 46 units for the degree meeting the following criteria:
    1. Taken for a letter grade
    2. At least level 100 or above (above 200 for HISTORY courses)
    3.  Must be an academic content course - such as a lecture, seminar, or colloquium (no activity courses, EFS language classes, etc.).  Language classes are okay if the course number is above level 100 and it is taken for a letter grade.
  4. The cumulative grade point average (GPA) for all courses must be 3.0 or higher; grades for the 9 content courses must be a 'B' or higher.

Sample Theme 1

ANTHRO 253APopulation and social trends in Japan3-5
HISTORY 392DJapan in Asia, Asia in Japan4-5
HISTORY 396DModern Japan4-5

Sample Theme 2

KORGEN 201Kangnam Style: Korean Media and Pop Culture4
EASTASN 289KThe Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market?3
HISTORY 392GModern Korea4-5

Sample Theme 3

IPS 246China on the World Stage3-5
POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
POLISCI 348Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform5

Course Petitions and Directed Reading

Some theory-oriented or methodological courses may be used to meet part of the 9 courses requirements, provided that they are demonstrably useful for understanding East Asian problems. A course petition and syllabus must be submitted no later than the end of the second week of the quarter in which the course is offered.  Students are limited to 3 petitions total.  Credit toward the area studies requirement is not given for courses taken before entering the M.A. program, however students may take courses for exchange credit at the University of California, Berkeley, with the approval of their adviser and the Office of the University Registrar.

Students may choose to do a directed reading course with a faculty member if the current course offerings do not meet a particular research or study need.  Directed reading courses are independent study projects a student may undertake with a relevant Stanford faculty member. Once the student has found a faculty member to support his or her studies, the student must inform the Student Services Coordinator immediately so that the appropriate section can be added for EASTASN 300 Graduate Directed Reading. The limitations for directed reading units are:

  1. A maximum of 5 units may apply towards the 46-unit degree requirement.
  2. If applying the units to the 9 courses requirement, the student must submit a detailed syllabus approved by their directed reading instructor prior to enrolling in the course.
  3. It must be taken for a letter grade.

Joint and Dual Degree Programs in East Asian Studies

East Asian Studies and Law

This joint degree program grants an M.A. degree in East Asian Studies and a Doctor of Jurisprudence (J.D.) degree. It is designed to train students interested in a career in teaching, research, or the practice of law related to East Asian legal affairs. Students must apply separately to the East Asian Studies M.A. program and to the Stanford School of Law and be accepted by both. Completing this combined course of study requires approximately four academic years, depending on the student's background and level of training in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean. Up to 45 units of approved courses may be counted towards both degrees. For more information, see the "Joint Degree Programs" section of this bulletin and the Stanford Law School's web site. Students who have been accepted by both programs should consult with the departments to determine which courses can be double-counted.

East Asian Studies and Education

This dual degree program grants an M.A. degree in East Asian Studies and a secondary school teaching credential in social studies. To be eligible for this program, students should apply to the M.A. program in East Asian Studies and then apply to the Stanford Teacher Education Program during the first year at Stanford. Completing the dual program requires at least two years, including one summer session when beginning the education component of the program.  Admissions processes for both programs are completely independent of each other and units from courses can only be applied to one degree or the other, not both.

East Asian Studies and Business

This dual degree program grants an M.A. degree in East Asian Studies and a Master of Business Administration degree. Students must apply separately to the East Asian Studies M.A. program and the Graduate School of Business and be accepted by both. Completing this combined course of study requires approximately three academic years (perhaps including summer sessions), depending on the student's background and level of training in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean language.  Admissions processes for both programs are completely independent of each other and units from courses can only be applied to one degree or the other, not both.

Director: Gordon Chang

Affiliated Faculty and Staff:

Anthropology: Harumi Befu (emeritus), Lisa M. Curran, Miyako Inoue, Matthew Kohrman, Alma B. Kunanbaeva, Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, Barbara Voss, Sylvia J. Yanagisako

Art and Art History: Jean Ma, Melinda Takeuchi, Richard Vinograd, Xiaoze Xie

Biology: Marcus W. Feldman

Business: Charles M. Lee, Hau Lee, William F. Miller (emeritus)

Center for International Security and Cooperation: Chaim Braun

Civil and Environmental Engineering: David Freyberg, Renate Fruchter, Leonard Ortolano 

Communications: James Fishkin (on leave 2014-15)

Comparative Literature: David Palumbo-Liu

Earth Sciences: Stephan A. Graham

East Asian Languages and Cultures: Thomas Bartlett, Steven Carter (on leave Winter & Spring), Albert E. Dien (emeritus), Ronald Egan, Paul Festa, Yanli Gao, Haiyan Lee, Indra Levy, Li Liu, Regina Llamas, Yoshiko Matsumoto, Barbara Mittler, James Reichert, Paul Roquet, Chao Fen Sun (on leave Spring), Melinda Takeuchi, Ban Wang (on leave Autumn & Winter), John C. Y. Wang (emeritus), Yiqun Zhou, Dafna Zur

East Asian Studies: Rebecca Corbett (postdoctoral fellow), Karen Eggleston, Cyrus Chen (postdoctoral fellow), Scott Rozelle

Economics: Kalina Manova

Education: Anthony L. Antonio, Martin Carnoy, Francisco O. Ramirez, Christine M. Wotipka

Electrical Engineering: Richard Dasher

Environmental Earth System Science: Eric F. B. Lambin

Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies: Karl W. Eikenberry, Thomas Fingar, Takeo Hoshi, John W. Lewis, David Straub, Li-Tai Xue

History: Gordon Chang, Mark E. Lewis, Martin Lewis, Yumi Moon, Thomas Mullaney, Matthew Sommer, Jun Uchida, Lyman P. Van Slyke (emeritus), Kären Wigen (on leave 2014-15), Mikael D. Wolfe

Ho Center for Buddhist Studies: John Kieschnick, Irene H. Lin, Tenzin Tethong

Hoover Institution: Larry Diamond, Thomas Henriksen, Tai-Chun Kuo, Hsiao-ting Lin, Alice L. Miller, Toshio Nishi, William Ratliff, Charles Wolf Jr.

Human Biology: Arthur P. Wolf

Iris and B. Gerald Cantor: Xiaoneng Yang

Law: Jeffrey Ball, Thomas Heller, Erik Jenson, Mei Gechlik

Linguistics: Daniel Jurafsky

Management Science and Engineering: Siegfried S. Hecker, Pamela Hinds, William J. Perry, Edison Tse, Yinyu Ye

Music: Jingdong Cai, Jaroslaw Kapuscinski (on leave Spring), Stephen Sano, Linda Uyechi, Hui Daisy You

Political Science: Phillip Lipscy, Jean C. Oi

Religious Studies: Carl W. Bielefeldt (emeritus), Paul M. Harrison, Lee H. Yearley

Shorenstein APARC: Michael Armacost, Rafiq Dossani, Karen N. Eggleston, Donald K. Emmerson, Kenji E. Kushida, Scott Rozelle, Daniel C. Sneider

Sociology: Gi-Wook Shin, Andrew Walder (on leave Autumn), Xueguang Zhou

Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research (SIEPR): Nicholas Charles Hope

Stanford Language Center: Marina Chung, Robert Clark, Sik Lee Dennig, Michelle DiBello, Hee-sun Kim, Nina Yushin Lin, Momoyo Kubo Lowdermilk, Emiko Yasumoto Magnani, Emi Mukai, Chie Muramatsu, Yu-hwa Liao Rozelle, Momoe Saito Fu, Le Tang, Yoshiko Tomiyama, Huazhi Wang, Hannah Yoon, Hong Zeng, Youping Zhang

Overseas Studies Courses in East Asian Studies

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

OSPBEIJ 24China's Economic Development5
OSPBEIJ 34Urban Studies in Contemporary China4
OSPBEIJ 42Chinese Media Studies4
OSPBEIJ 48Chinese Literature: Tradition in Transformation4
OSPBEIJ 67China-Africa and Middle East Relations4
OSPKYOTO 11Experiencing Ma: Time & Space in Japanese Arts4
OSPKYOTO 27Japanese Popular Culture4-5
OSPKYOTO 67Kyoto in the Literature of Japan4-5

Approved Content Courses

Because East Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary major, the majority of the courses that apply toward the degree are listed under other departments. In addition to courses listed under the EASTASN subject code, students should check the list below, as well as on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses site for courses in other departments that will meet the degree requirements for East Asian Studies; such departments include (but are not limited to) Anthropology, East Asian Languages and Cultures, History, Political Science, Religious Studies, and Sociology.  Not all courses offered by other departments that have East Asia content may be listed below or on the CEAS web site. If there is a course not listed below that has East Asia content, check with the Center for East Asian Studies to verify whether or not it can be used to fulfill the degree requirements.

The following course list represents courses that may, with the adviser's approval, be used to fulfill degree requirements (please see the Law School or GSB web sites for instructions on how to enroll in their courses):

China

AMSTUD 256America- China Relations4-5
ANTHRO 243Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom4-5
ANTHRO 248Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China4-5
ANTHRO 251AContemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film3-5
ARCHLGY 304CThe Archaeology of Ancient China5
ARTHIST 188BFrom Shanghai Modern to Global Contemporary: Frontiers of Modern Chinese Art4
ARTHIST 288BThe Enduring Passion for Ink: Contemporary Chinese Ink Painting5
ARTHIST 289AMaking the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China5
ARTHIST 388AThe History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism4
ARTHIST 489Connoisseurship Studies of Chinese Painting, Calligraphy, and Seals5
ARTHIST 489AMaking the Masterpiece in Song Dynasty China5
CHINGEN 173Chinese Language, Culture, and Society4
CHINGEN 219Popular Culture and Casino Capitalism in China3-4
CHINGEN 220Soldiers and Bandits in Chinese Culture3-5
CHINGEN 233Literature in 20th-Century China4-5
CHINGEN 234Early Chinese Mythology3-5
CHINGEN 235Chinese Bodies, Chinese Selves3-5
CHINGEN 236The Chinese Family3-5
CHINGEN 237Tiananmen Square: History, Literature, Iconography3-5
CHINGEN 239Cultural Revolution as Literature4
CHINGEN 240Chinese Justice: Law, Morality, and Literature3-5
CHINGEN 241Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces3-4
CHINGEN 243Images of Women in Ancient China and Greece3-5
CHINGEN 246Gods, Ghosts, and Ancestors: Anthropology of Chinese Folk Religion3-5
CHINGEN 250Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China3-5
CHINGEN 251Manuscripts, Circulation of Texts, Printing3-4
CHINGEN 252Beijing: Microcosm of Modern China3-4
CHINGEN 260New Directions in the Study of Poetry and Literati Culture3-4
CHINGEN 269What is Chinese Theater? The Formation of a Tradition3-4
CHINGEN 294The History and Culture of Peking Opera3-4
CHINGEN 393EFemale Divinities in China3-5
CHINLIT 205Beginning Classical Chinese, First Quarter2-5
CHINLIT 206Beginning Classical Chinese, Second Quarter2-5
CHINLIT 207Beginning Classical Chinese, Third Quarter2-5
CHINLIT 221Advanced Classical Chinese: Philosophical Texts3-5
CHINLIT 222Advanced Classical Chinese: Historical Narration2-5
CHINLIT 223Advanced Classical Chinese: Literary Essays2-5
CHINLIT 230Lyrical and Local Prose3-5
CHINLIT 232Chinese Biographies of Women2-5
CHINLIT 235Ghost Stories and Other Strange Tales3-4
CHINLIT 255Classical Poetry: Reading, Theory, Interpretation4
CHINLIT 266Chinese Ci Poetry (Song Lyrics)3-4
CHINLIT 273Readings in Chinese Drama2-4
CHINLIT 292The History of Chinese4
CHINLIT 295JChinese Women's History5
CHINLIT 369Late Imperial Chinese Fiction2-5
CHINLIT 371Aesthetics, Politics, Modernity and China2-5
CHINLIT 379For Love of Country: National Narratives in Chinese Literature and Film3-5
CHINLIT 392BLaw and Society in Late Imperial China4-5
COMPLIT 371Aesthetics, Politics, Modernity and China2-5
EASTASN 262Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present3-5
EASTASN 294The Rise of China in World Affairs3-5
EDUC 306BThe Politics of International Cooperation in Education3-5
EDUC 309XEducational Issues in Contemporary China3-4
FEMGEN 250Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China3-5
FEMGEN 295JChinese Women's History5
FILMSTUD 333Contemporary Chinese Auteurs4
FILMSTUD 336Gender and Sexuality in Chinese Cinema4
FILMSTUD 436Chinese Cinema5
GSBGEN 336Energy Markets and Policy4
HISTORY 356America- China Relations4-5
HISTORY 391BThe City in Imperial China5
HISTORY 392BLaw and Society in Late Imperial China4-5
HISTORY 393BQueer History in Comparative Perspective4-5
HISTORY 393CLate Imperial China4-5
HISTORY 393EFemale Divinities in China4-5
HISTORY 395JGender and Sexuality in Chinese History4-5
HUMBIO 147Population and Society in Europe and China4
IPS 246China on the World Stage3-5
IPS 274International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development4-5
LAW 245China Law and Business3
LAW 413OPolicy Practicum: China's Solar Industry and its Global Implications2-3
MS&E 244Economic Growth and Development3
PEDS 226Famine in the Modern World3
POLISCI 314DDemocracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
POLISCI 340LChina in World Politics5
POLISCI 348Chinese Politics: The Transformation and the Era of Reform3-5
POLISCI 443SPolitical Economy of Reform in China5
POLISCI 443TApproaches to Chinese Politics5
RELIGST 150The Lotus Sutra: Story of a Buddhist Book4
RELIGST 212Chuang Tzu5
RELIGST 315Third Bhavanakrama & the Writings of Héshang Moheyan: Scripture in Buddhist Scholastic Polemics3-5
RELIGST 315AChinese Buddhism3-5
RELIGST 347Chinese Buddhist Texts3-5
RELIGST 352AThe Story of a Buddhist Megascripture: Readings in the Avatamsaka3-5
RELIGST 356The Brahma Net Sutra (Fanwang Jing)4
SOC 207China After Mao5
SOC 216Chinese Organizations and Management5
SOC 217AChina Under Mao5
STRAMGT 583The Challenges in/with China2
URBANST 145International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development4-5

Japan

ANTHRO 253APopulation and social trends in Japan3-5
ARTHIST 287Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture5
ARTHIST 287AThe Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime5
ARTHIST 384Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting4
ARTHIST 386Theme and Style in Japanese Art4
ARTHIST 387Arts of War and Peace: Late Medieval and Early Modern Japan, 1500-18684
ARTHIST 388AThe History of Modern and Contemporary Japanese and Chinese Architecture and Urbanism4
ARTHIST 485The Situation of the Artist in Traditional Japan5
EASTASN 251Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan4
HISTORY 195CModern Japanese History: From Samurai to Pokemon5
HISTORY 302GPeoples, Armies and Governments of the Second World War4-5
HISTORY 392DJapan in Asia, Asia in Japan4-5
HISTORY 393BQueer History in Comparative Perspective4-5
HISTORY 396DModern Japan4-5
HISTORY 498CJapanese Imperial Archives, Part 14-5
HISTORY 498DJapanese Imperial Archives, Part 24-5
JAPANGEN 124Manga as Literature3-5
JAPANGEN 179Japanese Ghosts: The Supernatural in Japanese Art and Entertainment4
JAPANGEN 184Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting4
JAPANGEN 220The Situation of the Artist in Traditional Japan5
JAPANGEN 221Translating Japan, Translating the West3-4
JAPANGEN 227JAPANimals: Fauna in the Cultural History of Japan3-5
JAPANGEN 229Topophilia: Place in Japanese Visual Culture through 19th Century5
JAPANGEN 233Japanese Media Culture2-4
JAPANGEN 237Classical Japanese Literature in Translation4
JAPANGEN 238Introduction to Modern Japanese Literature and Culture3-4
JAPANGEN 241Japanese Performance Traditions3-4
JAPANGEN 242Gender, Sex, and Text in Early Modern Japan3-4
JAPANGEN 248Modern Japanese Narratives: Literature and Film3-5
JAPANGEN 249Screening Japan: Issues in Crosscultural Interpretation3-4
JAPANGEN 251Japanese Business Culture and Systems3-5
JAPANGEN 260Early Modern Japan: The Floating World of Chikamatsu4
JAPANGEN 286Theme and Style in Japanese Art4
JAPANGEN 287Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature3-4
JAPANGEN 287AThe Japanese Tea Ceremony: The History, Aesthetics, and Politics Behind a National Pastime5
JAPANGEN 384Aristocrats, Warriors, Sex Workers, and Barbarians: Lived Life in Early Modern Japanese Painting4
JAPANLIT 201Proseminar: Introduction to Graduate Study in Japanese2-5
JAPANLIT 236Academic Readings in Japanese II2-4
JAPANLIT 246Introduction to Premodern Japanese3-5
JAPANLIT 247Readings in Premodern Japanese2-5
JAPANLIT 248Readings in Classical Japanese5
JAPANLIT 257Points in Japanese Grammar2-4
JAPANLIT 260Japanese Poetry and Poetics2-4
JAPANLIT 266Introduction to Sino-Japanese3-5
JAPANLIT 270The Tale of Genji and Its Historical Reception4
JAPANLIT 279Research in Japanese Linguistics2-4
JAPANLIT 281Japanese Pragmatics2-4
JAPANLIT 287Pictures of the Floating World: Images from Japanese Popular Culture5
JAPANLIT 296Modern Japanese Literature2-5
JAPANLIT 395Early Modern Japanese Literature2-4
JAPANLIT 396Modern Japanese Literature Seminar2-5
MATSCI 159QJapanese Companies and Japanese Society3
POLISCI 218JJapanese Politics and International Relations5
RELIGST 113BJapanese Religion Through Film4
RELIGST 115Women and Pilgrimage in Japan4
RELIGST 150The Lotus Sutra: Story of a Buddhist Book4
RELIGST 358Japanese Buddhist Texts3-5
TAPS 153SJapanese Theater: Noh to Contemporary Performance4

Korea

EASTASN 289KThe Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market?3
HISTORY 392DJapan in Asia, Asia in Japan4-5
HISTORY 392FCulture and Religions in Korean History4-5
HISTORY 392GModern Korea4-5
HISTORY 395Modern Korean History5
HISTORY 498CJapanese Imperial Archives, Part 14-5
HISTORY 498DJapanese Imperial Archives, Part 24-5
KORGEN 201Kangnam Style: Korean Media and Pop Culture4
KORGEN 220Narratives of Modern and Contemporary Korea4-5
KORGEN 221Doing the Right Thing: Ethical Dilemmas in Korean Film and Literature3-4
KORGEN 240Childhood and Children: Culture in East Asia3-5
KORLIT 231Topics in Korean Literature4-5
KORLIT 330Intimate Encounters: Reading and Translating Korean Literature4-5
SOC 211State and Society in Korea4

East Asia

ARCHLGY 235Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology3-5
ARTHIST 485AExhibiting East Asian Art1-5
ASNAMST 295FRace and Ethnicity in East Asia4-5
CHINGEN 218Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology3-5
COMM 277YSpecialized Writing and Reporting: Foreign Correspondence in the Middle East and Asia4-5
EASTASN 217Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia3-5
EASTASN 220EEast Asian Internets4
EASTASN 297The International Relations of Asia since World War II3-5
EDUC 202Introduction to Comparative and International Education4-5
EDUC 306DWorld, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives4-5
FILMSTUD 316International Documentary4
HISTORY 391East Asia in the Early Buddhist Age4-5
HISTORY 392DJapan in Asia, Asia in Japan4-5
HISTORY 395FRace and Ethnicity in East Asia4-5
HISTORY 397The Cold War and East Asia5
HUMBIO 148Kinship and Marriage4
IPS 230Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law5
IPS 244U.S. Policy toward Northeast Asia5
IPS 264Behind the Headlines: An Introduction to US Foreign Policy in South and East Asia3-5
LAW 407International Deal Making2
LINGUIST 284AWriting Systems in a Digital Age2-3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
POLISCI 211Political Economy of East Asia3-5
POLISCI 315AThe Rise of Asia3-5
RELIGST 136Buddhist Yoga4
RELIGST 352AThe Story of a Buddhist Megascripture: Readings in the Avatamsaka3-5
RELIGST 381Asian Religions in America; Asian American Religions4
SOC 267AAsia-Pacific Transformation4
SOC 309Nations and Nationalism4-5
SOC 315Topics in Economic Sociology5
TAPS 251ATheater of the Asia-Pacific Region4

Courses

EASTASN 94. The Rise of China in World Affairs. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: EASTASN 294

EASTASN 97. The International Relations of Asia since World War II. 3-5 Units.

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Same as: EASTASN 297

EASTASN 117. Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia. 3-5 Units.

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Same as: EASTASN 217

EASTASN 120E. East Asian Internets. 4 Units.

This course examines the social, cultural, aesthetic, and political dimensions of internet culture in China, Japan, and the two Koreas. Working with web texts, social media, streaming music and video, and film and fiction engaging with online culture, we will trace the social impact of networked life in East Asia over the last three decades.
Same as: EASTASN 220E

EASTASN 151. Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan. 4 Units.

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Same as: EASTASN 251

EASTASN 162. Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Same as: EASTASN 262

EASTASN 189K. The Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market?. 3 Units.

This course aims to understand the role of government and market in the process of economic development in East Asia and change in the role depending upon development stages, political ideology, and cultural traditions. The course will examine a couple of leading forces, market and government, in encouraging each national economy, and how the dynamic combination has been changed, is being changed, and will be changed. For this purpose, we will explore a political economic framework for analyzing the economic development stages; then concentrate on comparative and case studies; and try to seek informative hypotheses and propositions for East Asian experiences, and reach persuasive lessons which can be applied to other developing countries.
Same as: EASTASN 289K

EASTASN 191. Journal of East Asian Studies. 1 Unit.

(Staff).

EASTASN 217. Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia. 3-5 Units.

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Same as: EASTASN 117

EASTASN 220E. East Asian Internets. 4 Units.

This course examines the social, cultural, aesthetic, and political dimensions of internet culture in China, Japan, and the two Koreas. Working with web texts, social media, streaming music and video, and film and fiction engaging with online culture, we will trace the social impact of networked life in East Asia over the last three decades.
Same as: EASTASN 120E

EASTASN 251. Innovation-Based Economic Growth: Silicon Valley and Japan. 4 Units.

Innovation is essential for the growth of a matured economy. An important reason for Japan's economic stagnation over the past two decades was its failure to transform its economic system from one suited for catch-up growth to one that supports innovation-based economic growth. This course examines the institutional factors that support innovation-based economic growth and explores policies that may encourage innovation-based growth in Japan. The course is a part of a bigger policy implementation project that aims to examine the institutional foundations of innovation-based economic growth, to suggest government policies that encourage innovation-based growth in Japan, and to help implement such policies. The central part of the course will be several group research projects conducted by the students. Each student research project evaluates a concrete innovation policy idea. Each student research group is to report the findings to the class and prepare the final paper.
Same as: EASTASN 151

EASTASN 262. Seminar on the Evolution of the Modern Chinese State, 1550-Present. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will assess the evolving response of the late imperial, early Republican, Nanjing Republic, and the PRC regimes in response to China's changing international setting, to successive revolutions in warfare, and to fundamental economic, social and demographic trends domestically from the 16th century to present. It will assess the capacities of each successive Chinese state to extract resources from society and economy and to mobilize people behind national purposes, to elaborate centralized institutions to pursue national priorities, to marshal military forces for national defense and police forces to sustain domestic order, and to generate popular identities loyal to national authority.
Same as: EASTASN 162

EASTASN 289K. The Political Transition for Economic Development in East Asian: Government or Market?. 3 Units.

This course aims to understand the role of government and market in the process of economic development in East Asia and change in the role depending upon development stages, political ideology, and cultural traditions. The course will examine a couple of leading forces, market and government, in encouraging each national economy, and how the dynamic combination has been changed, is being changed, and will be changed. For this purpose, we will explore a political economic framework for analyzing the economic development stages; then concentrate on comparative and case studies; and try to seek informative hypotheses and propositions for East Asian experiences, and reach persuasive lessons which can be applied to other developing countries.
Same as: EASTASN 189K

EASTASN 294. The Rise of China in World Affairs. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the impact and implications of the rise of China in contemporary world politics from a historical and international relations perspective. It reviews China's halting progress into the international system, sketches the evolution of PRC foreign policy since 1949, and analyzes China's developmental priorities and domestic political context as they figure into Beijing's interactions with the world. It sketches American policy toward the PRC, and it assesses alternative approaches to dealing with China on such issues as arms and nuclear proliferation, regional security arrangements, international trade and investment, human rights, environmental problems, and the Taiwan and Tibet questions.
Same as: EASTASN 94

EASTASN 297. The International Relations of Asia since World War II. 3-5 Units.

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Same as: EASTASN 97

EASTASN 300. Graduate Directed Reading. 1-7 Unit.

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.

EASTASN 330. Core Seminar: Issues and Approaches in East Asian Studies. 1 Unit.

For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.

EASTASN 390. Practicum Internship. 1 Unit.

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.

EASTASN 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

.