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Office: Building 260, Rooms 114-128
Mail Code: 94305-2005
Phone: (650) 724-1333; Fax: (650) 725-9306
Email: dlcl@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages are listed under the subject code DLCL on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages consists of five academic departments (Comparative Literature, French and Italian, German Studies, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures), five focal groups (Digital Humanities, Humanities Education, Philosophy and Literature, Poetics, and Renaissances) as well as the Language Center, which oversees language instruction at Stanford.

All the departments of the division offer academic programs leading to B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees.

The division brings together scholars and teachers dedicated to the study of literatures, cultures, and languages from humanistic and interdisciplinary perspectives. The departments in the division are distinguished by the quality and versatility of their faculty, a wide variety of approaches to cultural traditions and expressions, and the intense focus on the mastery of languages. This wealth of academic resources, together with small classes and the emphasis on individual advising, creates a superior opportunity for students who wish to be introduced to or develop a deeper understanding of non-English speaking cultures.

The division's departments and the Language Center offer instruction at all levels, including introductory and general courses that do not require knowledge of a language other than English. These courses satisfy a variety of undergraduate requirements and can serve as a basis for developing a minor or a major program in the member departments. The more advanced and specialized courses requiring skills in a particular language are listed under the relevant departments, as are descriptions of the minor and major programs.

The DLCL itself offers four undergraduate minor programs, one Ph.D. minor program, and several graduate courses focused on the teaching of second languages, the teaching of literature, and academic professionalization.

Focal Groups

While the five departments in the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages serve common interests in literary and cultural traditions and their languages, the DLCL's Focal Groups bring together faculty members and graduate students who share topics and approaches that range across languages and national literatures. These groups are designed to respond directly to the research interests of the faculty as a community, and reflect long-term commitments by the participants. They are conceived as portals that open from the Division outward to the wider community of literary and humanities scholars at Stanford. The membership may include any member of the Stanford faculty or any Ph.D. student with an interest in the topic. Most Focal Groups include participants from several humanities departments outside the DLCL.

Thus the DLCL is characterized by two axes of intellectual inquiry:

  • the departmental axis, which is organized by language, nation, and culture
  • the focal axis, which may be organized by genre, period, methodology, or other criteria.

The convergence of the two axes, departments and Focal Groups, locates faculty members and graduate students in at least two intersecting communities. The DLCL believes that this convergence gives institutional form to the intellectual conditions under which many scholars of literature and culture presently work.

Each Focal Group maintains a standing research workshop at which both faculty and graduate student members discuss their work. Several Focal Groups offer formal courses; and all groups are responsible for overseeing research-oriented activities and extracurricular events in the relevant area, including sponsoring conferences, publications, podcasts, and other activities that disseminate the outcomes of their research.

Digital Humanities

Chairs: Amir Eshel (Comparative Literature, German Studies) Mike Widner (Academic Technology Specialist)

Faculty Members: Cécile Alduy (French and Italian), John Bender (Comparative Literature, English), Russell Berman (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Dan Edelstein (French and Italian), Amir Eshel (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Roland Greene (Comparative Literature, English), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), Marília Librandi-Rocha (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature), Kathryn Starkey (German Studies)

The Digital Humanities Focal Group (DHFG) promotes faculty and graduate research in the digital humanities through lectures series, praxis workshops, curriculum, and the identification and development of digital humanities research projects, especially those eligible for grant-funding opportunities. DHFG sponsors a lecture series and convenes regular workshops alternating between praxis and theory. These activities provide fora in which faculty and graduate students can share work in progress, discuss the state of the field, and identify important research that should be shared with the DLCL and broader academic communities. Crucially, the DHFG promotes digital research on underrepresented literatures and cultures to counteract the English-language dominance of much work in the field.

The DHFG also establishes strategic partnerships with similar endeavors at Stanford such as the Center for Spatial and Textual Analysis, the Literary Lab, HCI, etc. and with the larger academic community through organizations like the Association for Computers and the Humanities, the Praxis Network, and HASTAC.

Humanities Education

Chair: Lisa Surwillo (Iberian and Latin American Cultures)

Faculty Members: Cécile Alduy (French and Italian), Elizabeth Bernhardt (German Studies, Language Center), Eamonn Callan (School of Education), Adrian Daub (German Studies), Thomas Ehrlich (School of Education), Marisa Galvez (French and Italian), Pam Grossman (School of Education), David Lummus (French and Italian), Orrin Robinson (German Studies), Gabriella Safran (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Kathryn Starkey (German Studies), Mitchell Stevens (School of Education), Guadalupe Valdés (School of Education)

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/humanities-education

The Focal Group on Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.

Philosophy and Literature

Chairs: R. Lanier Anderson (Philosophy), Joshua Landy (French and Italian)

Faculty Members: Keith Baker (History), John Bender (Comparative Literature, English), Russell Berman (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Alexis Burgess (Philosophy), Martón Dornbach (German Studies), Jean-Pierre Dupuy (French and Italian), Amir Eshel (Comparative Literature, German Studies), Gregory Freidin (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Robert Harrison (French and Italian), David Hills (Philosophy), Héctor Hoyos (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Michelle Karnes (English), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), Sianne Ngai (English), Marília Librandi Rocha (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Joan Ramon Resina (Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Comparative Literature), Nariman Skakov (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Blakey Vermeule (English), Laura Wittman (French and Italian), Lee Yearley (Religious Studies)

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/humanities-education-0

The Focal Group on Philosophy and Literature brings together faculty and students from nine departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. The group offers undergraduate tracks within eight majors, a graduate workshop, and a lecture series.

Workshop in Poetics

Chairs: Roland Greene (Comparative Literature, English), Nicholas Jenkins (English)

Faculty Members: Marisa Galvez (French and Italian), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), David Lummus (French and Italian), Michael Predmore (Iberian and Latin American Cultures)

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/workshop-poetics-0+

The Workshop in Poetics Focal Group is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the four years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are:

• poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice.

• historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.

The core mission is to offer Stanford graduate students a space to develop and critique their current projects.

Renaissances

Chair: Roland Greene (Comparative Literature, English)

Faculty Members: Cécile Alduy (French and Italian), Shahzad Bashir (Religious Studies), Paula Findlen (History), Tamar Herzog (History), Nicholas Jenkins (English), Alexander Key (Comparative Literature), David Lummus (French and Italian), Bissera Pentcheva (Art and Art History), Morten Steen Hansen (Art and Art History).

Web Site: http://dlcl.stanford.edu/groups/renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from over a dozen departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.

Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (PATH)

Chair: Alexander Key (Comparative Literature) on leave 2016-17

PATH is a DLCL focal group that is considering the future of Persian, Arabic, Turkish, and Hebrew languages, literatures, and cultures in the DLCL. The PATH conversation includes scholars, artists, and intellectuals working in and around these languages, literatures, and cultures from across Stanford and from peer institutions internationally.
 

Minor in Medieval Studies

Faculty Director: Kathryn Starkey

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Medieval Studies. The minor in Medieval Studies:

  • provides Stanford students with the historical knowledge and framework through which to view globalism;
  • embeds the study of medieval culture in a coherent framework that resonates with contemporary issues of community building, the virtual world and mobility;
  • and promotes an innovative crossdisciplinary and skill-based approach to Medieval Studies.

Students in any field qualify for the minor by meeting the following requirements:

Students complete a total of 25 units (including a core course) in courses relevant to the major in departments across the University including, but not restricted to, English, East Asian Studies, History, Religious Studies, Music, and DLCL courses (Comparative Literature, German, French, Italian, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures), and Classics. 

One of the following three introductory core courses is required to be taken for 5 units. The core courses are offered on a regular basis by faculty across the University.

Units
DLCL 121Performing the Middle Ages3-5
DLCL 122The Digital Middle Ages3-5
DLCL 123Medieval Journeys: Tales of Devotion and Discovery3-5
FRENCH 205Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics (counts for DLCL 121)3-5


Electives may be selected from a large number of offerings in a variety of disciplines according to student interests, but they must follow a coherent course of study. This course of study must be approved by the faculty director. Up to 5 units may be taken in a medieval language, such as (but not limited to) Old English, Old Norse, Medieval Latin, Old French, Middle High German, Classical Arabic. No transfer credit may be used toward the Medieval Studies minor. Appropriate courses offered through BOSP may count toward this minor.

Course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. Advanced placement credit and transfer credit do not apply to this minor. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. By University policy, no more than 36 units may be required in this minor.  Students declare the Minor in Medieval Studies through Axess. 

Minor in Modern Languages

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor that draws upon courses in literature and language within the division's departments and elsewhere in the University.  The minor in Modern Languages is offered to students who want to supplement the course work in their major with course work in modern languages and literatures. The minor must be approved by Professor Adrian Daub at daub@stanford.edu.  Appropriate courses offered through BOSP may count toward this minor with Professor Daub’s pre-approval. 

Students in any field qualify for the minor by meeting the following requirements:

Units
A minimum of 16 units (4 courses and 8 units per language) at the intermediate level (second year) or beyond, not including conversational, oral communication, business, or medical language courses in two languages other than English offered by the DLCL.16
At least two additional courses of 3 units or more, one in each modern language being studied in the minor. These courses must be taught by DLCL Academic Council members or other senior members of the DLCL faculty.6-10

Students are recommended to study, work, or intern abroad for at least eight weeks at a location where one of the languages is spoken. Course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. Advanced Placement credit and transfer credit do not apply to this minor. All courses must be taken for a letter grade. By University policy, no more than 36 units may be required in this minor.  Students declare the minor in Modern Languages through Axess.

For further information including procedures for declaring the minor, contact Denise Winters at denisew1@stanford.edu.

Minor in Translation Studies

Faculty Director: Indra Levy

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, in cooperation with East Asian Languages and Cultures and the English Department, teaches undergraduates to develop and apply their foreign language knowledge to the production and analysis of translations. The minor is designed to give students majoring in a variety of fields the tools to consider the practical and theoretical issues brought up by translation as an aesthetic, cultural, and ethical practice.

Course work in this minor may not duplicate work counted toward other majors or minors. Course selection must be approved by the minor adviser.  For further information, contact the minor adviser, Cintia Santana.

Students must take a minimum of 23 units for a letter grade, in fulfillment of the following requirements:

Units
1. Prerequisite: Complete or test out of a first-year course in the language of interest.
2. Core course: At least 4 units in a Translation Studies core course: ENGLISH/DLCL 293, COMPLIT 142B/ JAPANGEN 121 or JAPANGEN 122/KORGEN 122 *4
3. Language study: At least 8 units, second year or beyond (not including conversation/oral communication) and/or relevant literature courses taught in the target language. OSP and transfer units may be considered in consultation with the minor adviser. 8
4. Literature study: At least 7 units in relevant literature courses at the 100-level or above, taught in a DLCL department, East Asian Languages and Cultures, or Classics, and determined in consultation with the minor adviser. For students interested in translation from English into another language, appropriate literature courses in the English department may be substituted.7
5. Electives: At least 4 units in a creative writing course, or a course that foregrounds translation in departments such as Anthropology, any DLCL department, English, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Classics, Linguistics (e.g., LINGUIST 130A), or Computer Science (e.g., CS 124), determined in consultation with the minor adviser.4
6. Final Project: Students must also complete a capstone project: a significant translation and/or translation studies project (e.g. 20 pages of prose, 10 poems, or similar appropriate amount to be determined in consultation with the minor adviser). This work may be carried out under the supervision of an instructor in a required course or as an independent study.
Total Units23

  JAPANGEN 122/KORGEN 122 is not offered in 2016-17.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

Faculty Director: Marie Huber

The undergraduate minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures (MELLAC) has been designed to give students majoring in other departments an opportunity to gain a substantial introduction to Arabic, Hebrew, Middle Eastern, and African languages, and the cultures and civilizations of the Middle East and Africa. Contact the faculty director, Marie Huber at marieh@stanford.edu before declaring the minor:

  • Courses for the minor must be taken for a letter grade unless only offered for faculty-elected satisfactory/no credit. All courses must be completed with a letter grade of 'C' or better.
  • Students may not overlap (double-count) courses for completing major and minor requirements
  • Students declaring the minor must do so no later than the last day of Spring Quarter of their junior year.

The minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures and Cultures (MELLAC) has two tracks. Their requirements are as follows.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Arabic Track

Requirements for the minor include:

  • Completion of four ARABLANG courses at the second-year level or higher, for a total of 20 units
  • Up to 5 units of transfer credit may count towards this minor with the Faculty Director's approval.
  • Two literature courses taught with Arabic texts, generally offered in Comparative Literature (COMPLIT) for a total of 6-10 units
  • One course relating to Arabic taught with English texts, generally offered in Comparative Literature (COMPLIT), for a total of 3-5 units.
  • Students must test for Proficiency in Arabic through the Language Center by Winter Quarter of their senior year.
    • Students should minimally receive a notation of intermediate-high.
    • Those requiring outside tutoring are advised to seek resources are available through the DLCL.
  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Minor in Middle Eastern Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, or African Languages, Literatures and Cultures Track

Requirements for the minor include:

  • Three language classes in Hebrew, Persian, Turkish, or an African language.
    • All three courses must be in the same language and first year or beyond.
  • 20 additional units from relevant literature and culture courses.
    • Courses are offered through the Language Center and DLCL departments.
    • One of these courses must be a (COMPLIT) Comparative Literature course.
    • Additional courses are offered through Jewish Studies (JEWISHST), and the Center for African Studies (AFRICAST).
  • The faculty director may approve some upper-level language classes to count towards the 20 additional units.
  • All courses must be approved by the faculty director.

Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities

Faculty Director: Matthew W. Smith

Faculty Director, Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan: R. Lanier Anderson, Philosophy

Director of Graduate Studies, Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan: Adrian Daub, German Studies

Overview

The Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities provides interdisciplinary training in the humanities through programs in two tracks:

  • a general Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities
  • a Ph.D. minor with a subplan in philosophy, literature, and the arts

The general minor prepares students for interdisciplinary humanities research and teaching by providing broad training in cultural history, focused around five period seminars (ancient, medieval, early-modern, enlightenment, and modern).

The track in Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts prepares students for focused interdisciplinary work at the boundary between philosophy and literary/arts criticism; the program offers structured, disciplined training in the student’s minor field together with in-depth investigation of special topics arising from connections across the two domains of research.

Application and Admission

Students declare the minor after admission to candidacy and before attaining TGR status by submitting:

  • an Application for Ph.D. Minor form
  • a one-page statement of intent
  • students pursuing the philosophy, literature, and the arts track should indicate this on the form.

Requirements

  • Students in the general minor must meet with the faculty director every Spring Quarter to review progress.
  • Students in the philosophy, literature, and the arts subplan must meet annually with the subplan director of graduate studies (DGS) or with the minor adviser designated by the DGS who reports the results of the meeting to the DGS.
  • Fulfillment of all program requirements must be completed before the student attains TGR status. The minor and subplan, if declared, are published on the transcript.
  • All students in the minor from both tracks participate in the Autumn Quarter Interdisciplinary Humanities Symposium; the symposium features student presentations of their independent work on the role of the interdisciplinary humanities scholar/teacher in the changing university.
  • Per University requirements, all course work taken toward the Ph.D. minor must be completed at Stanford; no transfer units from other institutions may be counted toward the Ph.D. minor.
  • To be awarded the Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities, students must have satisfied all requirements of the admitting department for their Ph.D. degree, and they must complete a minimum of 20 units of graduate-level course work as described below. The 20 units required for the Ph.D. minor may count toward the University residency requirement.

Note 1: Mastery of one or more foreign language(s) may be needed to support the interdisciplinary work of the minor. Although the minor itself has no foreign language requirement, students should work closely with their minor adviser to identify any needed language skills; students are advised to begin developing these skills early in their graduate careers.

Note 2: Although official declaration of the minor must occur after a student advances to candidacy, students are advised to begin planning a course of study and taking courses toward the minor earlier, particularly if the candidacy decision occurs at the end of the second year or later, so that they have ample time to complete the requirements before turning TGR.

Requirements for the General Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities

Students complete preparatory work for the symposium plus three interdisciplinary seminars from the set covering five historical periods: antiquity, medieval, early-modern, enlightenment, and modern.

Units
DLCL 220Humanities Education (or DLCL 222, or other independent work in preparation for the Interdisciplinary Humanities symposium)1
Complete three of the five core seminars
DLCL 321Classical Seminar: Rethinking Classics (CLASSICS 341 [taught by Prof. Peponi] satisfies this requirement as DLCL 321 is not being offered in AY 16-17)4-5
DLCL 322Medieval Seminar (GERMAN 220/ GERMAN 320 [taught by Prof. Starkey] satisfies this requirement as DLCL 323 is not being offered in AY 16-17)3-5
DLCL 323Early Modern Seminar (Not Offered in AY 16-17)3-5
DLCL 324The Enlightenment3-5
DLCL 325Modern Seminar (Schedule TBA)3-5
Take one additional graduate course (numbered 200 or above) on one of these periods (usually corresponding to the student's area of specialization) in a department other than the student's home department.
If the required courses for the minor do not total 20 units, students may satisfy the 20 unit requirement by taking units of DLCL 220: Humanities Education, or else by taking additional period seminars at their discretion.

Requirements for the Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities, Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan

The Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan of the Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities offers rigorous, structured training for students interested in the interdisciplinary intersection of philosophy with criticism in literature and the arts.

All students in the Ph.D. Minor in the Humanities, Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Subplan take:

  1. PHIL 333/DLCL 333 Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar, team taught by faculty from philosophy and from a literature or arts department.
  2. At least 3 units of independent work registered either under a departmental independent work number, or under DLCL 220 Humanities Education or DLCL 222 Philosophy and Literature. This work should be undertaken with a faculty adviser identified to the subplan DGS; it should lead up to the student’s participation in the Autumn Quarter Interdisciplinary Humanities Symposium, and should concern interdisciplinary humanities research and teaching.
  3. Two additional courses at the 200 level or above which are deemed by the subplan Committee in Charge to include material of substantial special relevance to the domain of philosophy, literature, and the arts. At least one of these courses should be offered in a participating department other than the student’s major department (e.g., a philosophy course for students in literature and arts departments, a literature or arts course for philosophy students).
  4. All students in the subplan take two graduate-level courses providing a structured program of course work in the student’s minor field (such as philosophy for literature and arts students, or literary or arts criticism for philosophy students):
    • Graduate students in Philosophy take two graduate-level courses in a single literature, or in one of the arts.
    • Graduate students in literature or arts departments, including Classics, take two graduate-level courses in Philosophy, at least one of which must be in metaphysics, epistemology, or the philosophies of language, mind, or action (the PHIL 280s series and related upper-level seminars), and at least one of which must be in value theory (understood to include ethics, aesthetics, and political philosophy, the PHIL 270s series and related upper-level seminars)
    • Graduate students in other departments submit a plan of study for approval by the DGS reflecting graduate-level course work that provides a background both within philosophy and within the study of literature or the arts that is substantially equivalent to that achieved by philosophy, literature, or arts students in their minor field. Students are advised that this plan of study may involve more course work than would be needed for students whose major field is in literature, arts, or philosophy departments.
  5. If the six required courses do not total 20 units, students may satisfy the 20 unit requirement by taking units of DLCL 222 Philosophy and Literature or by taking additional graduate level courses of special relevance at their discretion and with the agreement of their minor adviser. 
Notes:
  • Students are encouraged to include a member from the minor field on the University Oral Committee or on another of the general examination committees if that is judged more appropriate by the student’s departmental and minor advisers. Students in departments which deploy the University Oral as a dissertation defense are advised that a member from the student’s minor field should be involved on the dissertation committee throughout the dissertation writing period.
  • Students are encouraged to develop crossdisciplinary breadth through course work for the minor, particularly through the courses of special relevance in section 3 above. The period seminars of the general Ph.D. minor in the Humanities (DLCL 321, DLCL 322, DLCL 323, DLCL 324, and DLCL 325) are often eligible to count as courses of special relevance.

Certificate in Language Program Management

Faculty Director: Elizabeth Bernhardt

Programs in contemporary foreign language teaching preparation entail a knowledge base that has grown over the past 30 years, rooted in data from an explosion of linguistic as well as applied linguistic research.

In tandem with the Language Center's primary focus on learning research and theory, which graduate students explore in the teaching preparation program, the Language Program Management certificate focuses on developing the professional leadership and academic skills necessary for a career that includes the coordination and management of language learning.

The program funds summer internships which enable the completion of a certificate in Language Program Management and are intended to help Stanford graduate students prepare themselves for such work in complement to their literary studies. The certificate program is not declared on Axess and does not appear on the transcript or diploma.

Prerequisites

  1. Foreign language acquisition: Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) rating of at least advanced mid
  2. Academic and professional development:
  • DLCL 301 The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages
  • Modified Oral Proficiency Interview (MOPI) Assessment workshop (2 days)
  • Limited OPI Tester Certification (average 6 months)
  • Teaching of three first-year language courses through the Language Center

These are generally met by the end of a graduate student's second year in the PhD program. Once meeting these criteria, the student may be admitted to the Program.

Requirements

Upon admission to the program, students must complete the following:

  1. DLCL 302 The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures: a course designed to focus student attention on the development of oral language proficiency through the upper levels and emphasize the need for upper register speaking and writing for literature learning and teaching.
  2. OPI workshop (additional 2 days of training at the Advanced and Superior levels): this workshop is the extension of the MOPI. It focuses on upper register performance on the FSI-ACTFL scale. Hosted by either the Language Center, regional workshop, or at the national meeting of the ACTFL.
  3. Completion of Writing Proficiency Familiarization workshop (Winter Quarter): Workshop conducted by a certified writing tester and structured in parallel to the MOPI/OPI assessment paradigm.
  4. DLCL 303 Language Program Management (Summer Quarter): an administrative internship including, but not limited to, experiences with the following:
  • Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL
  • Placement testing and student advisement
  • Technology in teaching and learning
  • Processes for teacher observation and feedback
  • Procedures in staff supervision and human resources
  • Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches
  • Interface with external programs (e.g., BOSP, Bechtel, VPTL)

Division Chair: Dan Edelstein

DLCL Senior Lecturer: Cintia Santana (on leave)

Courses

DLCL 1. CSN Undergraduate Colloquium. 1 Unit.

This colloquium is intended for undergraduates who are interested in the history and theory of the novel, and who would like to attend the Center for the Study of the Novel's (CSN) annual conference. Before the conference, students will meet with CSN's graduate student staff, to read and discuss a small number of key texts by participating scholars, whose presentations students will then attend. After the conference, the colloquium will meet again, to discuss both the readings and conference papers, and explore their broader implications for the study of the novel. Attendance at both meetings of the colloquium, and at least one panel at the conference, is required for course credit.
Same as: ENGLISH 1

DLCL 12. Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern. 3 Units.

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? The second quarter focuses on the transition from the Middle Ages to Modernity, Europe's re-acquaintance with classical antiquity and its first contacts with the New World. Authors include Dante, Shakespeare, Machiavelli, Cervantes, and Milton.
Same as: ENGLISH 112A, FRENCH 12

DLCL 13. Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe: Modern. 3 Units.

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Same as: FRENCH 13, PHIL 13

DLCL 50. Humanities House student research workshop. 1 Unit.

For Humanities House student residents; research workshop.

DLCL 98. Independent Study for Modern Languages Minor. 1-2 Unit.

Independent study for language students pursuing a Modern Languages minor. Instructor consent required before enrolling in this course.

DLCL 100. Capitals. 3 Units.

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, , and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges.

DLCL 101. Translation Matters: Applications in the 21st Century. 1-2 Unit.

For students interested in translation, interpreting, and translationnnstudies. The course will highlight guest speakers who apply translation innna variety of professional contexts (e.g. medical, legal, literary,nnreligious contexts, localization, machine-translation).

DLCL 105. Going Medieval: Introduction to Freiburg, Germany, and its Surrounding Region. 1 Unit.

This course offers an introduction to materials that are pertinent to the BOSP summer seminar "Going Medieval" offered in summer 2015. It is a required course for participants of the seminar.
Same as: GERMAN 105

DLCL 111Q. Spanish-English Literary Translation Workshop. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the theoretical knowledge and practicalnskills necessary to translate literary texts from Spanish to English andnEnglish to Spanish. Topics may include comparative syntaxes, morphologies,nand semantic systems; register and tone; audience; the role of translationnin the development of languages and cultures; and the ideological andnsocio-cultural forces that shape translations. Students will workshop andnrevise an original translation project throughout the quarter.
Same as: ILAC 111Q

DLCL 113Q. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Same as: ILAC 113Q

DLCL 121. Performing the Middle Ages. 3-5 Units.

Through an analysis of medieval courtly love, religious, satirical, and Crusade lyrics, we will study the rise of a new subjectivity; the female voice; the roles of poet, audience, and patron; oral and manuscript transmission; and political propaganda. Special attention will be given to performance as a reimagining of self and social identity. Authors include Bertran de Born, Marie de France, Hildegard von Bingen, Walther von der Vogelweide, Dante, and Chaucer. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about performance into dialogue with modern conceptions. The course will satisfy the Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference. Taught in English, all texts in translation.
Same as: FRENCH 151

DLCL 122. The Digital Middle Ages. 3-5 Units.

How can we make historical materials, social and cultural practices and extant sites accessible in the present day? In this course, students will have the opportunity to design and create an innovative digital project based on a medieval primary source. In the first part of the course, we will familiarize ourselves with medieval European cultural history, focusing on different kinds of sources, including historical and religious texts, narrative and music, architecture, images, objects, and textiles. Then we will examine and evaluate digital resources and approaches to medieval sources, including digital facsimiles, experiments with virtual spaces, and informational sites. In order to contemporize and vivify the medieval, an integral component of this course will be the California Missions, since they so dramatically represent a medieval modus operandi in a modern, and, for Stanford, local, world.

DLCL 123. Medieval Journeys: Tales of Devotion and Discovery. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages with an array of written texts from the period. Narratives of medieval journeys are studied across a wide range of categories, including pilgrimages, crusades, quests, and sagas. The journey as metaphor, along with the resulting and very real cultural interactions, will provide a main focus for examining this rich tradition of literature. Students will have the opportunity to produce a creative project that brings medieval ideas about travel into dialogue with modern conceptions. The course will satisfy the Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference.
Same as: ARTHIST 105B

DLCL 127. Revolutions from Ancient Greece to the Arab Spring. 3-5 Units.

This course looks at theories of revolution and political or social change from ancient Greece to the Arab Spring. The course will provide a close reading of a selection of texts from ancient Greek political writing (Plato, Aristotle), medieval and early modern political advice literature (Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli), and modern political thought (Tocqueville). Later sections of the course look at how the insights derived from the history of political thought can help generate a new framework for the study of modern revolutions, such as the Iranian Revolution and the Arab Spring.

DLCL 141. Poems, Poetry, Worlds. 5 Units.

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. Readings include: classical Chinese poetry, English Romantic poetry, and modern Arabic, American, Brazilian, Japanese, German, Spanish poetry, with specific attention to landscape, terrain, the environment, and the role of the poet.
Same as: COMPLIT 121

DLCL 142. Literature as Performance: The Potentials of Theater. 5 Units.

An introduction to the "theatrical" dimensions of literature in different cultures based on a view of the staging arts as a specific segment within phenomena of "performance". Documentation and discussions of the history of western drama as a central axis within the debate about the cultural status of other forms of performance art that are normally not culturally canonized within this genre (eg. sports).
Same as: COMPLIT 122

DLCL 152A. DLCL Film Series: Films on Film. 1 Unit.

Join us for the DLCL Film Series' Spring theme, FILMS ON FILM, as we look at how the cinema portrays itself in international film. Starting with Dziga Vertov's revolutionary film The Man with the Movie Camera (1929), we will briefly examine the history of early cinema and pre-cinematic technologies and how the camera adapted itself to modern urban experiences. Passing to Ventura Pons' Actresses (1996), we will examine the voices and bodies of actors and actresses that make up the raw material of cinema. The fantastically self-reflexive New Wave movement of Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 (1963) introduces the anxiety of film production and the blurring of the lines between reality and film that we will see in Michel Gondry's surreal The Science of Sleep (2006) and Spike Jonze¿s cripplingly self-conscious Adaptation (2002). We will also look at Federico Veiroj's The Useful Life (2010) to examine the representation of the movie theatre, and the effects screening has on audiences and the projectionist. Les Blank's Burden of Dreams (1982), which features Werner Herzog and Klaus Kinski, and Wim Wender's The State of Things (1983) illustrate the struggle of filming, finding the necessary capital and labor for production, and wrangling the unexpected and unplanned aspects of reality. Whereas Pablo Berger's Torremolinos 73 shows the dreams of a desperate man who dreams of cinematic glory, David Lynch's unsettling Mulholland Drive (2001) uncovers the dark underbelly of Hollywood culture. Discussions will focus on the way that films flatter, critique, and repeat themselves, complexify or wear themselves out, and experiment with new aspects of their self-consciousness. In particular we will discuss how nationality, class, gender, and technology affect films' representation of their origins, production, and influence on the world.nPlease be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content. Viewers are advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing. All screenings are free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films.nPlease also note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance, which is taken at the end of each screening. Enrolled students MUST attend AT LEAST SEVEN screenings in order to obtain credit.
Same as: DLCL 354A

DLCL 189A. Honors Thesis Seminar. 4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.

DLCL 189B. Honors Thesis Seminar. 2-4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.

DLCL 189C. Honors Thesis Seminar. 2-4 Units.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.

DLCL 197. Designing a Digital Community: Human Rights. 2 Units.

This course will focus on helping to design, conceptualize, and populate an international human rights website. No knowledge of web design or of human rights is necessary to get started on this project. We have technical assistance available, though hopefully this course will attract students with those skills as well. Similarly, we will be learning about human rights as we build the site, explore and share resources and ideas, and reflect on the content. Preliminary site viewable at teachinghumanrights.org.
Same as: COMPLIT 197

DLCL 199. Honors Thesis Oral Presentation. 1 Unit.

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Regular advisory meetings required.

DLCL 202. Humanities+Design. 2 Units.

How do digital research practices effect the Humanities research process? From reading to writing, from review to publication, Humanities research relies increasingly on digital workfows. Keeping track of new software that promises to make writing easier, only to see it dissolve into oblivion before you've completed the second chapter of your dissertation is maddening. In this course you will learn the foundational tools of digital writing and design your own digital research process. Together we will explore the theoretical and practical challenges of publishing born-digital scholarship in the humanities. May be repeat for credit.

DLCL 209. Paleography of Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts. 3-5 Units.

Introductory course in the history of writing and of the book, from the late antique period until the advent of printing. Opportunity to learn to read and interpret medieval manuscripts through hands-on examination of original materials in Special Collections of Stanford Libraries as well as through digital images. Offers critical training in the reading of manuscripts for students from departments as diverse as Classics, History, Philosophy, Religious Studies, English, and the Division of Languages Cultures and Literatures.
Same as: CLASSICS 215, HISTORY 309G, RELIGST 204

DLCL 220. Humanities Education. 1 Unit.

Humanities Education explores issues concerning teaching and learning in the humanities, including research on student learning, innovation in pedagogy, the role of new technologies in humanities instruction, and professional issues for humanities teachers at all educational levels.

DLCL 222. Philosophy and Literature. 1 Unit.

Please refer to the Philosophy+Literature web site: nhttp://philit.stanford.edu/programs/dlcl222nnStudents may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must do one of the following three things:n(a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages;n(b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop;n(c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year¿s activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading.

DLCL 223. Renaissances. 1 Unit.

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from over a dozen departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives. Topic for 2012-14: "Nodes, Networks, Names.".

DLCL 224. Workshop in Poetics. 1 Unit.

The Workshop in Poetics is concerned with the theoretical and practical dimensions of the reading and criticism of poetry. During the three years of its existence, the Workshop has become a central venue at Stanford enabling participants to share their individual projects in a general conversation outside of disciplinary and national confinements. The two dimensions that the workshop sees as urgent are: poetics in its specificity as an arena for theory and interpretive practice, and historical poetics as a particular set of challenges for the reader and scholar.

DLCL 225. Digital Humanities. 1 Unit.

The Digital Humanities Focal Group (DHFG) will promote faculty and graduate research in the digital humanities through lectures series, praxis workshops, curriculum, and the identification and development of digital humanities research projects, especially those eligible for grant-funding opportunities. DHFG sponsors a lecture series and convenes regular workshops alternating between praxis and theory. These activities provide fora in which faculty and graduate students can share work in progress, discuss the state of the field, and identify important research that should be shared with the DLCL and broader academic communities. Crucially, the DHFG will promote digital research on underrepresented literatures and cultures to counteract the English-language dominance of much work in the field.

DLCL 226. Programming and Poetry. 2-4 Units.

How can we study computer code as literature? What can poetry teach us about programming and vice versa? These types of questions drive this course, which has two different tracks: one for computer science students and one for literature students. The focus is on the development of a shared conceptual middle ground at which these two tracks can meet. Topics include critical code studies, code poetry, and cognition. Authors include Elizabeth Bishop, Ada Lovelace, Hayden Carruth, and Donald Knuth.

DLCL 228. Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools. 1-3 Unit.

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.
Same as: COMPLIT 228D, COMPLIT 338D

DLCL 239. Borges and Translation. 3-5 Units.

Borges's creative process and practice as seen through the lens of translation. How do Borges's texts articulate the relationships between reading, writing, and translation? Topics include authorship, fidelity, irreverence, and innovation. Readings will draw on Borges's short stories, translations, and essays. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: 100-level course in Spanish or permission of instructor.
Same as: ILAC 239

DLCL 245. LA ALJAMÍA, ROMÁRABE LANGUAGE. 3-5 Units.

This specific course will offer an overview of Aljamía, language of the Moors, considered an "Islamic variant of Spanish" that serves them to approach respectfully the language of their religious cult-material reality, beyond their day-to-day communication. Students will study a crucial part of the history of medieval and early modern Spain and especially the history of Moors as a community of crypto Muslims.

DLCL 293. Literary Translation. 4 Units.

An overview of translation theories and practices over time. The aesthetic, ethical, and political questions raised by the act and art of translation and how these pertain to the translator's tasks. Discussion of particular translation challenges and the decision processes taken to address these issues. Coursework includes assigned theoretical readings, comparative translations, and the undertaking of an individual translation project.
Same as: ENGLISH 293

DLCL 299. DLCL CS+ CAPSTONE. 2 Units.

Only DLCL/CS+ joint majors may enroll in this course.

DLCL 300. Medieval Methodologies. 1-3 Unit.

An introduction to the essential tool-kit for medievalists, this course will give all medievalists a great head start in knowing how to access and interpret major works and topics in the field. Stanford's medieval faculty will explain the key sources and methods in the major disciplines from History to Religion, French to Arabic, English to Chinese, and Art History to German and Music. In so doing, students will be introduced to the breadth and interdisciplinary potential of Medieval Studies. A workshop devoted to Digital Technologies and Codicology/Palaeography will offer elementary training in these fundamental skills.
Same as: MUSIC 300C

DLCL 301. The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages. 3 Units.

Prepares DLCL graduate students to teach first- and second-year foreign languages. Participants learn about second-language acquisition research and participate in the initial stages of Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) training.

DLCL 302. The Learning and Teaching of Second-Language Literatures. 1-3 Unit.

Focuses on the research on advanced level reading and writing in second language contexts with a special focus on upper-level cultural texts. Discussion of second language writing and reading assessment including a writing familiarization workshop. Participants will focus on their cognizant language and literature for the completion of their assignments. Prerequisite: DLCL 301.

DLCL 303. Language Program Management. 1-3 Unit.

Administrative Internship in Language Program Management. Experiences can include, but are not limited to, the following: Shadow faculty and staff in select areas of administration and supervision within the Language Center and DLCL; Placement testing and student advisement; Technology in teaching and learning; Processes for teacher observation and feedback; Procedures in staff supervision and Human Resources; Course scheduling, budgeting, staffing, and searches; Interface with external programs (e.g. BOSP, Bechtel, CTL).

DLCL 311. Professional Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

Meets regularly throughout the year to discuss issues in the professional study of literature. Topics include the academic job market and the challenges of research and teaching at different types of institutions. Supervised by the graduate affairs committee of the DLCL. May be repeated for credit.

DLCL 320. Humanities Education in the Changing University. 3 Units.

Advanced study in the humanities faces changes within fields, the university and the wider culture. Considers the debate over the status of the humanities with regard to historical genealogies and current innovations. Particular attention on changes in doctoral education. Topics include: origins of the research university; disciplines and specialization; liberal education in conflict with professionalization; literature and literacy education; interdisciplinarity as a challenge to departments; education policy; digital humanities; accountability in education, assessment and student-centered pedagogies.
Same as: COMPLIT 275, GERMAN 250

DLCL 321. Classical Seminar: Rethinking Classics. 4-5 Units.

Literary and philosophical texts from Antiquity (including Homer, the Greek tragedians, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, and Augustine). In each case, we will examine the cultural contexts in which each text was composed (e.g. political regimes and ideologies; attitudes towards gender and sexuality; hierarchies of class and status; discourses on "barbarians" and resident aliens). We will study various theoretical approaches to these books in an effort to "rethink" these texts in the 21st century.
Same as: CLASSICS 244

DLCL 322. Medieval Seminar. 3-5 Units.

The cultural,literary, and artistic evolution of the Middle Ages. The barbarian invasions and the Germanic ethos, the Celtic heritage,and the monastic tradition. Romanesque art and architecture,pilgrimages,and the Crusades. Gothic aesthetics, chivalry and courtly love, scholasticism, and the rise of universities. The late Middle Ages, humanism, and the threshold of the Renaissance. Texts include: Beowulf, Mabinogion, Song of Roland, Chretien de Troyes' Lancelot and Yvain, Dante's Divine Comedy, Boc­caccio's Decameron, and Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.nn3-5 units.

DLCL 323. Early Modern Seminar. 3-5 Units.

Explores some of the key texts of European early modernity and the critical paradigms according to which the idea of the "Renaissance" has been formed, analyzed, and questioned since the 19th century. Will aim to provide a broad introduction to Early Modern studies from the point of view of the Italian Renaissance and its reception in different European contexts. Taught in English.
Same as: ITALIAN 220

DLCL 324. The Enlightenment. 3-5 Units.

The Enlightenment as a philosophical, literary, and political movement. Themes include the nature and limits of philosophy, the grounds for critical intellectual engagement, the institution of society and the public, and freedom, equality and human progress. Authors include Voltaire, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Hume, Diderot, and Condorcet.
Same as: FRENCH 244, HISTORY 234, HISTORY 334, HISTORY 432A, HUMNTIES 324

DLCL 325. Modern Seminar. 3-5 Units.

The postmodern condition as post-WWII rupture in Western tradition; moral, political, cultural, and aesthetical dimensions. Sources include literature, philosophy, essays, films, and painting. Authors and artists include: Primo Levi, Hannah Arendt, Alain Resnais, Samuel Beckett, Georges Bataille, Michel Foucault, Theodor Adorno, David Riesman, Georges Perec, Juliet Mitchell, and Francis Bacon. *Please note: course meets 9/6/16-9/16/16.

DLCL 333. Philosophy, Literature, and the Arts Core Seminar. 2-4 Units.

.
Same as: PHIL 333

DLCL 354A. DLCL Film Series: Films on Film. 1 Unit.

Join us for the DLCL Film Series' Spring theme, FILMS ON FILM, as we look at how the cinema portrays itself in international film. Starting with Dziga Vertov's revolutionary film The Man with the Movie Camera (1929), we will briefly examine the history of early cinema and pre-cinematic technologies and how the camera adapted itself to modern urban experiences. Passing to Ventura Pons' Actresses (1996), we will examine the voices and bodies of actors and actresses that make up the raw material of cinema. The fantastically self-reflexive New Wave movement of Federico Fellini's 8 1/2 (1963) introduces the anxiety of film production and the blurring of the lines between reality and film that we will see in Michel Gondry's surreal The Science of Sleep (2006) and Spike Jonze¿s cripplingly self-conscious Adaptation (2002). We will also look at Federico Veiroj's The Useful Life (2010) to examine the representation of the movie theatre, and the effects screening has on audiences and the projectionist. Les Blank's Burden of Dreams (1982), which features Werner Herzog and Klaus Kinski, and Wim Wender's The State of Things (1983) illustrate the struggle of filming, finding the necessary capital and labor for production, and wrangling the unexpected and unplanned aspects of reality. Whereas Pablo Berger's Torremolinos 73 shows the dreams of a desperate man who dreams of cinematic glory, David Lynch's unsettling Mulholland Drive (2001) uncovers the dark underbelly of Hollywood culture. Discussions will focus on the way that films flatter, critique, and repeat themselves, complexify or wear themselves out, and experiment with new aspects of their self-consciousness. In particular we will discuss how nationality, class, gender, and technology affect films' representation of their origins, production, and influence on the world.nPlease be aware that some films may include graphic or disturbing content. Viewers are advised to familiarize themselves with the films' content before viewing. All screenings are free and open to the public and audience members are encouraged to participate in the discussions following the films.nPlease also note that grades for this course are entirely dependent on attendance, which is taken at the end of each screening. Enrolled students MUST attend AT LEAST SEVEN screenings in order to obtain credit.
Same as: DLCL 152A

DLCL 369. Introduction to the Profession of "Literary Studies" for Graduate Students. 1-2 Unit.

A history of literary theory for entering graduate students in national literature departments and comparative literature.
Same as: COMPLIT 369, FRENCH 369, GERMAN 369, ITALIAN 369

DLCL 396. Humanities+Design: Visualizing the Grand Tour. 4-5 Units.

Study of the eighteenth-century Grand Tour of Italy through visualization tools of the digital age. Critical readings in both visual epistemology and current Grand Tour studies; interrogating the relationship between quantitative and qualitative approaches in digital humanities; what new insights in eighteenth-century British travel to Italy does data visualization offer us? Students will transform traditional texts and documents into digital datasets, developing individual data analysis projects using text mining, data capture and visualization techniques.
Same as: CLASSICS 396, HISTORY 336E