Skip navigation

Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE)

Contacts

Office: Building 360, Room 361F
Mail Code: 2152
Phone: (650) 724-2088
Email: jaime3@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://csre.stanford.edu

The Undergraduate Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity is home to five areas of study:

  • Asian American Studies (courses listed as ASNAMST on ExploreCourses)
  • Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies (courses listed as CHILATST on ExploreCourses)
  • Comparative Studies (courses listed as CSRE on ExploreCourses)
  • Jewish Studies (courses listed as JEWISHST on ExploreCourses)
  • Native American Studies (courses listed as NATIVEAM on ExploreCourses)

Students can pursue a major or minor in any of these five areas, and are encouraged to build their interdisciplinary study around a focus or theme. Students can then select from more than 150 course options from across many departments and schools to put together a curriculum, in consultation with our staff and faculty. The major requires 60 units of study and a culminating research project (either a senior paper or honors thesis).

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

The Interdepartmental Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE) is an interdisciplinary program offering students the opportunity to investigate the significance of race and ethnicity in all areas of human life.

Devoted to a rigorous analysis of race and ethnicity and using a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, CSRE is committed to promoting and deepening students' understanding of the multiple meanings of racial and ethnic diversity both in the United States and abroad in ways that prepare students for living and working effectively in a multicultural, global society.

The interdisciplinary and integrated nature of our academic programs means that students can take courses from across the university including: anthropology, art, communication, economics, education, history, languages, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, sociology, theater and performance, among others.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the undergraduate program. Students are expected to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of interdisciplinary approaches to the knowledge of experiences related to race and ethnicity in the United States.
  2. demonstrate the ability to employ diverse analytical resources and comparative modes of study as tools to frame and address research questions.
  3. be critical readers of both primary and secondary sources, who can use and properly cite both types of evidence in their written work.
  4. actively and critically engage in verbal and/or written discussion of issues.
  5. demonstrate analytical writing skills that convey their understanding of the topic.
  6. expand their ability to think critically about issues in political, social, scientific, economic and cultural life stemming from the diversity of experiences related to race and ethnicity.

Undergraduate Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Majors: Core Curriculum

The Interdepartmental Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CSRE) provides students the opportunity to structure a major or minor in comparative ethnic studies or to focus their course work in a single ethnic studies area. Five majors and minors (Asian American Studies, Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Comparative Studies, Jewish Studies, and Native American Studies) are offered as part of the IDP in CSRE. All core courses taken for the major must be taken for a letter grade. The directors of the program and of each major constitute the CSRE curriculum committee, the policymaking body for the interdisciplinary program.

Students who declare any of the five majors participate in a common curriculum consisting of at least two core courses, a methodologies course, and a senior seminar.

There are two types of introductory courses taught by senior CSRE affiliated faculty: core courses that are interdisciplinary and compare how race and ethnicity have historically appeared across groups; and foundational courses that focus on a specific racial or ethnic group. These requirements illustrate how different disciplines approach the study and interpretation of race and ethnicity and provide a foundation for the student's program of study.

Minors

Students who wish to minor in the study areas must complete a minimum of 30 units from the approved course list, one of which must be a core course and a second that is foundational to the area of study. Proposals for the minor must be approved by the director of each study area.

Directed Reading and Research

Directed reading and research allows students to focus on a special topic of interest. In organizing a reading or research plan, the student consults with the director of the major and one or more faculty members specializing in the area or discipline.

Courses that fulfill directed reading and research requirements:

ASNAMST 200RDirected Research1-5
ASNAMST 200WDirected Reading1-5
CHILATST 200RDirected Research1-5
CHILATST 200WDirected Reading1-5
CSRE 200RDirected Research1-5
CSRE 200WDirected Reading1-5
NATIVEAM 200RDirected Research1-5
NATIVEAM 200WDirected Reading1-5

Senior Seminar

Research and writing of the senior honors thesis or senior paper is under the supervision of a faculty project adviser. All majors in the IDP in CSRE, even those who opt to write honors theses in other departments and programs, must enroll in CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, offered in Autumn Quarter. The course takes students through the process of researching an honors thesis, including conceptualization, development of prospectus, development of theses, research, analysis, and finally the process of drafting and writing. This course meets the Writing in the Major requirement (WIM). Those who opt to write senior papers are organized into tutorial groups in Autumn Quarter.

Special Programs

CSRE majors have several unique opportunities available to them. The program supports full-time paid summer research internships for those who apply to complete a self-designed research project in collaboration with a community agency. The Public Policy Institute is a two week, pre-Autumn Quarter seminar that provides exposure to critical public policy issues. The residence-based institute provides room and board and all seminar materials for participants, including a visit to Sacramento to meet with policy makers. CSRE also sponsors quarterly luncheons and community programs for all majors and minors, and has a number of service learning courses that couple academic work with work in communities.

Murray House

Murray House, 566 Governor's Avenue, is an undergraduate residence with a CSRE focus that is devoted to developing an intellectual community amongst students interested in the study of race and ethnicity. Programs, including an in-house seminar, are developed with the guidance of CSRE faculty to increase the understanding of issues of race and ethnicity amongst its residents through social events and discussions. Students may apply for pre-assignment to Murray House to participate in the CSRE Focus. Contact Residential Education for more information.

Honors Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

For Majors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

The Interdepartmental Program in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity offers a program leading to honors for majors in:

  • Asian American Studies
  • Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies
  • Comparative Studies
  • Jewish Studies
  • Native American Studies

The honors program offers an opportunity to do independent research for a senior thesis. It is open to majors who have maintained a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.5 in the major and 3.3 overall. The honors thesis is intended to enable students to synthesize skills to produce a document or project demonstrating a measure of competence in their specialty.

The application for honors must be submitted by May 20 of the junior year, but students are encouraged to apply earlier. The application includes a proposal describing the project that is approved by the faculty adviser and director of the undergraduate program. Students are required to identify both a faculty adviser and a second reader for the thesis project. The faculty adviser for the honors thesis must be an academic council faculty member and affiliated faculty of the student's major. 

Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

An honors colloquium held near the end of Spring Quarter affords students an opportunity to present their research formally. Prizes for best undergraduate honors thesis are awarded annually by the CSRE curriculum committee.

Applications are available in the CSRE Undergraduate Program office and on the program web site.

For Majors in Other Departments

The Interdisciplinary Honors Program for Non-Majors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity is intended to complement study in any major. Students who participate in the honors program receive their degree from their program of study with departmental honors in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

Honors certification will be open to students majoring in any field with a GPA in their chosen major of 3.5 and an overall GPA of 3.3. As a prerequisite, students apply for entry by Spring Quarter of the junior year (deadline June 1), but students are encouraged to begin earlier. During the application process, students outline a plan for course work and design an honors project in consultation with their proposed thesis adviser and the CSRE senior seminar coordinator.

The application describes how the student may fulfill the course requirements for interdisciplinary honors in CSRE and includes a proposal describing the project that is approved by the faculty adviser and director of the undergraduate program. Students are required to identify both a faculty adviser and a second reader for the thesis project. The faculty adviser for the honors thesis must be an academic council faculty member and affiliated faculty of the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. Applications are available in the CSRE undergraduate program office and on the program web site.

Students pursuing a minor in Asian American Studies, Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies who wish to pursue honors in their area of study, apply through the process for non-majors. Students may use their course work for the minor toward the requirements of the interdisciplinary honors program.

Requirements:

Students applying for the interdisciplinary honors program in CSRE are required to take the following courses:

CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5

 And a second course identified as core or foundational to CSRE.

Core Courses

ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5

Foundational Courses

AFRICAAM 43Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
ASNAMST 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
CHILATST 180EIntroduction to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies5
NATIVEAM 138American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective4
NATIVEAM 139American Indians in Contemporary Society4

These courses must be completed with a grade of 'B+' or better for the honors program.

In addition, students are required to take:

A core, foundational, thematic, or cognate course related to the topic of the proposal or honors research (selected in consultation with the thesis advisor)
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 200YCSRE Senior Honors Research (in Winter and Spring quarters)1-10
CSRE 200ZCSRE Senior Honors Research (in Winter and Spring quarters)1-10

These courses must be completed with a minimum grade of 'B+'. Throughout the year, students work with faculty adviser and the senior seminar coordinator to complete their theses. Students must complete their theses with a minimum grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

An honors colloquium held near the end of Spring Quarter affords students an opportunity to present their research formally. Prizes for best undergraduate honors thesis are awarded annually by the CSRE curriculum committee.

Asian American Studies

Director: Anthony Antonio

Asian American Studies (AAS) provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the historical and current experiences of persons of Asian ancestry in the United States. In using the term Asian American, the AAS faculty recognize that the term seeks to name a rapidly developing, complex, and heterogeneous population and that there is neither a single Asian American identity nor one community that comprises all Asian Americans. Asian Americans include those with ancestral ties to countries or regions in East Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, or the Philippines, among others.

AAS brings together courses that address the artistic, historical, humanistic, political, and social dimensions of Asian Americans and is an appropriate course of study for students interested in a variety of concerns related to Asian Americans, including: artistic and cultural contributions; current social significance; historical experiences; immigration, intellectual, and policy issues; relationships with other social groups; and the construction of the notion of Asian American as it addresses important theoretical and practical issues.

  1. Core Curriculum

    Asian American majors must take the 15-unit CSRE core curriculum including two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course that focuses on a non-Asian ethnic group may be counted toward the 15-unit core requirement.

    ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
    CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
    CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
    CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
    CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
    CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
    CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
    CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
    HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
    PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
  2. Foundational Course

    Majors are required to take one foundational course in Asian American Studies. Students who completed  ENGLISH 43C/143C in a previous year may count this toward their Foundational Course Requirement.
    ASNAMST 146S/COMPLIT 146/CSRE 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
    HISTORY 593
  3. Area Study

    Majors must complete an additional 35 units of course work from an approved list. One course must have an international dimension, preferably a focus on Asia. One course should have a comparative focus, not restricted to Asian American identity. The remaining courses must have an Asian American focus and must be selected from social science and humanities departments.
  4. Language Study (optional)

    Students may obtain credit for their study of a related Asian language towards their degree. If students take 15 or more units of an Asian language relevant to Asian American Studies, they may apply 5 of those units toward their Asian American Studies degree.
  5. Research/Methodology Requirement

    Majors are required to complete 5 units of course work focused on research methods relevant to their disciplinary approach as a student in Asian American Studies. Students select the research and/or methodology course in consultation with their faculty adviser.
  6. Community Engagement Requirement

    All students in one of the CSRE majors are required to complete at least one service-learning experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a service-learning course, participating in a service-learning Alternative Spring Break, participating in the Community Summer Research Internship program, or enrolling in CSRE 198 – Public Service Internship while completing independent service work.
  7. Senior Paper or Honors Thesis

    All Asian American Studies majors complete a culminating research paper under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies

Director: Tomás Jiménez

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies is an interdisciplinary major focusing on the U.S. population with origins in the countries of Mexico, Latin America, and/or South America. Students who major or minor in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies have an opportunity to select from courses in the humanities, social sciences, and courses offered by affiliated faculty in the School of Education. The Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies program affords students an opportunity to explore the culture, society, economy, and politics of this important and growing segment of our national population.

Bachelor of Arts in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies

A total of 60 units of course work are required for the major.

  1. Core Curriculum

    Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies majors must take the 15-unit CSRE core curriculum including two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course that focuses on a non-Latino origin group may be counted toward the 15-unit core requirement.
    ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
    CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
    CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
    CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
    CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
    CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
    CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
    CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
    HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
    PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
  2. Foundational Courses

    Majors are required to take one foundational course in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. Students who completed CHICANST/SOC 166 in a previous year may count this toward their foundational course requirement.
    CHILATST 180EIntroduction to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies5
  3. Thematic Concentration

    Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies majors select a thematic concentration which allows students to customize their curriculum and to synthesize course work taken across various departments into a coherent focus. Majors complete an additional 35 units of courses relevant to the thematic concentration and approved by the adviser.
  4. Language Study (optional)

    Students may obtain credit for the study of the Spanish language towards their degree. If students take 15 or more units of Spanish language relevant to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies, they may apply 5 of those units toward their Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies degree.
  5. Research/Methodology Requirement

    Majors are required to complete 5 units of course work focused on research methods relevant to their disciplinary approach as a student in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. Students select the research and/or methodology course in consultation with their faculty adviser.
  6. Community Engagement Requirement

    All students in one of the CSRE majors are required to complete at least one service-learning experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a service-learning course, participating in a service-learning Alternative Spring Break, participating in the Community Summer Research Internship program, or enrolling in CSRE 198 – Public Service Internship while completing independent service work.
  7. Senior Paper or Honors Thesis

    All Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies majors complete a culminating research paper under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Director: David Palumbo-Liu

Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity does not focus on a particular ethnic group. Rather, a student in consultation with the adviser designs a curriculum in relation to a thematic concentration that compares various ethnic groups or explores topics that cut across group experiences in the United States and elsewhere in the world. For example, students may compare groups within the U.S., or compare groups in the U.S. to ethnic groups elsewhere, or study the diaspora of a single group or the sovereignty of indigenous peoples within and across different national contexts. Students in this major are able to take advantage of courses in over 22 fields offered by the affiliated faculty of CSRE.

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

A total of 60 units of course work are required for the major.

  1. Core Curriculum

    All CSRE majors enroll in the 15-unit core curriculum, which consists of two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15-unit core requirement.
    ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
    CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
    CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
    CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
    CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
    CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
    CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
    CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
    HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
    PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
  2. Thematic Concentration

    Comparative Studies majors complete another 40 units of course work relevant to the thematic concentration they have chosen in consultation with the adviser.
  3. Research/Methodology Requirement

    Majors are required to complete 5 units of coursework focused on research methods relevant to their disciplinary approach as a student in Comparative Studies. Students select the research and/or methodology course in consultation with their faculty adviser.
  4. Community Engagement Requirement

    All students in one of the CSRE majors are required to complete at least one service-learning experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a service-learning course, participating in a service-learning Alternative Spring Break, participating in the Community Summer Research Internship program, or enrolling in CSRE 198 – Public Service Internship while completing independent service work.
  5. Senior Paper or Honors Thesis

    All CSRE majors complete a culminating research paper under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

Jewish Studies

Director: Charlotte Fonrobert

The Jewish Studies major provides students with an understanding of Jewish history, language, literature, religion, thought and politics. Jewish culture originated in the ancient Near East and continues today in many different forms across the globe. Drawing from the Humanities, the Social Sciences and from courses offered by affiliated faculty in the School of Education, the Jewish Studies major seeks to help students understand Jewish identity, thought and self-expression within larger historical and social contexts, and to develop their ability to analyze human experience from different disciplinary perspectives.

In addition to the undergraduate major and minor offered through the interdepartmental program in CSRE, the Taube Center for Jewish Studies offers a full range of guest lectures, conferences, and symposia. Graduate students interested in Jewish Studies should see the separate Jewish Studies section of this bulletin for program information, opportunities, and additional course descriptions.

Bachelor of Arts in Jewish Studies

A total of 60 units of course work are required for the major.

  1. Core Curriculum

    Jewish Studies majors must take the 15-unit CSRE core curriculum including two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year.
    ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
    CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
    CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
    CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
    CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
    CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
    CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
    CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
    HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
    PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
  2. Foundational Courses

    Majors are required to take one foundational course in Jewish Studies. Courses offered this year include:
    JEWISHST 71Jews and Christians: Conflict and Coexistence3
    JEWISHST 84Zionism3
    JEWISHST 183The Holocaust4
  3. Thematic Concentration

    Jewish Studies majors select a thematic concentration which allows students to customize their curriculum and to synthesize course work taken across various departments into a coherent focus. Majors complete at least 20 units of courses at the 100 level or above relevant to the thematic concentration as approved by the Jewish Studies director.
  4. Language

    One year of Hebrew or another approved Jewish language. Students able to satisfy the first year Hebrew requirement through a proficiency exam are still expected to take an additional year of Hebrew at a higher level or a first year in an additional Jewish language. A maximum of 15 units of language may be counted toward the 60 unit total required for the major.
  5. Research/Methodology Requirement

    Majors are required to complete 5 units of coursework focused on research methods relevant to their disciplinary approach as a student in Jewish Studies. Students select the methodology course(s) in consultation with their faculty adviser.
  6. Community Engagement Requirement

    All students in one of the CSRE majors are required to complete at least one service-learning experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a service-learning course, participating in a service-learning Alternative Spring Break, participating in the Community Summer Research Internship program, or enrolling in CSRE 198 – Public Service Internship while completing independent service work.
  7. Senior Paper or Honors Thesis

    All Jewish Studies majors complete a culminating research paper under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

Native American Studies

Director: C. Matthew Snipp

Native American Studies (NAS) provides an intensive approach to understanding the historical and contemporary experiences of Native American people. Attention is paid not only to the special relationship between tribes and the federal government, but to issues across national boundaries, including tribal nations within Canada, and North, Central, and South America. In using the term Native American, the NAS faculty recognize the heterogeneous nature of this population. Native Americans include the Alaska Native population, which comprises Aleuts, Eskimo, and other Native American people residing in Alaska, as well as Native Hawaiian communities.

The purpose of the Native American Studies major and minor is to introduce students to approaches in the academic study of Native American people, history, and culture. Students who major in Native American Studies have the opportunity of doing advanced work in related fields, including literature, sociology, education, and law. In addition to specialized course work on Native American issues, students also are expected to concentrate in a traditional discipline such as anthropology, history, or psychology to ensure a well rounded educational experience. The area of concentration and related course work should be chosen in consultation with a faculty adviser in Native American Studies. All courses in the program promote the discussion of how academic knowledge about Native Americans relates to the historical and contemporary experiences of Native American people and communities.

Bachelor of Arts in Native American Studies

A total of 60 units of course work are required for the major.

  1. Core Curriculum

    Native American Studies majors must take the 15-unit CSRE core curriculum, including two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course that focuses on a non-Native American group may be counted toward the 15-unit core requirement.
    ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
    CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
    CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
    CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
    CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
    CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
    CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
    CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
    HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
    JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
    PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
  2. Foundational Courses

    Majors are required to take one foundational course in Native American Studies. Students who completed NATIVEAM/ANTHRO 16 in a previous year may count this course toward their Foundational Course requirement.
    Select one of the following:
    NATIVEAM 138American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective4
    NATIVEAM 139American Indians in Contemporary Society4
  3. Area Study

    Majors complete an additional 40 units of course work that satisfy three categories in their area of study: Native American focus, comparative focus, and a methodology/research course.
  4. Language Study (optional)

    Students may obtain credit for their study of a related native language towards their degree. If students take 15 or more units of a native language relevant to Native American Studies, they may apply 5 of those units toward their Native American Studies degree.
  5. Research/Methodology Requirement

    Majors are required to complete 5 units of coursework focused on research methods relevant to their disciplinary approach as a student in Native American Studies. Students select the research and/or methodology course in consultation with their faculty adviser.
  6. Community Engagement Requirement

    All students in one of the CSRE majors are required to complete at least one service-learning experience. This requirement may be fulfilled by enrolling in a service-learning course, participating in a service-learning Alternative Spring Break, participating in the Community Summer Research Internship program, or enrolling in CSRE 198 – Public Service Internship while completing independent service work.
  7. Senior Paper or Honors Thesis

    All Native American Studies majors complete a culminating research paper under the supervision of a faculty adviser. Honors students take CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar, which fulfills the program's WIM requirement, and also enroll in CSRE 200Y CSRE Senior Honors Research and CSRE 200Z CSRE Senior Honors Research, in Winter and Spring quarters to continue to access peer and faculty support as they write their theses. Senior Honors Research (CSRE 200Y and CSRE 200Z) courses cannot count for the 60 units towards your major but do count for the 180 units towards your bachelor's degree. Students must complete their theses with a grade of 'B+' to receive honors in CSRE.

Thematic Concentration in American Diversity

The American Diversity concentration is designed for students who wish to explore how the United States was and is constituted with relation to issues of race and ethnicity. The concentration investigates how American domestic and foreign policy, law, history, culture, and society are formed within conversations, debates, policies and studies regarding race and ethnicity. Issues of immigration, citizenship, empire and expansion, defense, diplomacy, human rights, public welfare, social justice and law, educational rights and other topics are explored from the angle of how racial and ethnic difference impacts debate and policy.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in the American Diversity thematic concentration should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The American Diversity concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). The remaining 40 units of course work should be  relevant to the thematic concentration and selected in consultation with the faculty adviser.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the American Diversity thematic concentration.

AFRICAAM 166Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle3-5
AMSTUD 143Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AMSTUD 183Re- Imagining American Borders5
CSRE 14NGrowing Up Bilingual3
CSRE 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society4
CSRE 108Introduction to Feminist Studies4-5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
CSRE 150Race and Political Sociology3
CSRE 164Immigration and the Changing United States4
CSRE 201BFrom Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era5
CSRE 203AThe Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education5
EDUC 114NGrowing Up Bilingual3
EDUC 201History of Education in the United States3-5
HISTORY 50B19th Century America3
HISTORY 150CThe United States in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 166BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
POLISCI 120BCampaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections4-5
POLISCI 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
POLISCI 327Minority Behavior and Representation5
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 150Race and Political Sociology3
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
SOC 164Immigration and the Changing United States4

Thematic Concentration in Education, Access, and Equity

The concentration in Education, Access, and Equity explores history, policy, and practice in education to understand how educational opportunity is shaped by issues of race, ethnicity, and difference. The goal of the concentration is to develop an understanding of the core issues facing educators and policy makers so that students may learn how they can contribute to the social and political discourse surrounding issues of education and opportunity policy in the U.S.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in the Education, Access, and Equity concentration should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The Education, Access, and Equity concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar(WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). The remaining 40 units of course work should be  relevant to the thematic concentration and selected in consultation with the faculty adviser.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Education, Access, and Equity thematic concentration.

AFRICAAM 112Urban Education3-4
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
CSRE 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
CSRE 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
CSRE 126BCurricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population3-4
CSRE 203AThe Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education5
CSRE 216XEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
CSRE 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
EDUC 100BEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
EDUC 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
EDUC 110Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
EDUC 112XUrban Education3-4
EDUC 120CEducation and Society4-5
EDUC 146XPerspectives on the Education of Linguistic Minorities3-4
EDUC 148XCritical Perspectives on Teaching and Tutoring English Language Learners3
EDUC 149Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism3-5
EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
EDUC 178XLatino Families, Languages, and Schools3-5
EDUC 197Education, Gender, and Development4
EDUC 277Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives4
HISTORY 158CHistory of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
SOC 132Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4

Thematic Concentration in Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics (IDA)

Students in the Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity major can choose a concentration in Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics (IDA).  The Identity, Diversity, and Aesthetics Concentration in Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity is a program designed to explore the intersections of culture, race, the arts, and social transformation. In IDA courses taught by Stanford faculty, lecturers, and distinguished Visiting Artists, students learn how the arts, activism, and the academy interact to produce aesthetic and societal change.

The concentration is not declared in Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in IDA should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The IDA concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. CSRE majors are also required to take a course in research methods (5 units). In addition to the core curriculum, students complete 40 units of course work relevant to the thematic concentration. Thematic courses may focus on artistic practice and performance, art history, creative writing, community arts, art and social change, writing for performance, critical studies in art and performance, and critical arts theory.

Additionally, IDA concentration students must complete a creative senior project. Possible senior projects include a stage production, a set of recorded music, an anthology of creative writing, a curated or solo exhibition, or a community arts workshop. Students who elect to write an honors thesis may incorporate their project as the basis for their thesis.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Identity, Diversity and Aesthetics (IDA) concentration.

CHILATST 179Chicano & Chicana Theater: Politics In Performance3-5
COMPLIT 290Ferguson in a Global Frame: Human Rights and the Arts3-5
CSRE 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CSRE 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
CSRE 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
CSRE 142The Literature of the Americas5
CSRE 172Out of Place: (W)riting Home4
CSRE 177Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals5
CSRE 177BIntroduction to Dance on the Global Stage4
CSRE 179CChroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop3-5
CSRE 179GIndigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America3-5
CSRE 201BFrom Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era5
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Movement Band Performance Workshop2
DANCE 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
DANCE 197Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America4
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
MUSIC 17QPerspectives in North American Taiko4
NATIVEAM 167Performing Indigeneity on Global Stage4
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4

Thematic Concentration in Intersectionality

The intersectionality concentration is designed for students who wish to explore the intersections between race and ethnicity and other social identities including gender, sexuality, class, and ability. This concentration investigates how notions of racial and ethnic identity are complicated by gender, sexuality and other categories. Students will examine the construction of power systems to better contextualize how certain identities become privileged over others. Drawing from contributions of women of color feminism and queer of color studies, this concentration challenges normative constructions of ‘race’ and ‘ethnicity’ by equipping students with analytical tools from feminist theory, queer theory, post-colonial theory, critical race theory, and other critical methods.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in Intersectionality thematic concentration should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The Intersectionality concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). The remaining 40 units of course work should be relevant to the thematic concentration and selected in consultation with the faculty adviser.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Intersectionality thematic concentration.

AFRICAAM 54NAfrican American Women's Lives3-4
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ARTHIST 176Feminism and Contemporary Art4
CHILATST 120Queer Raza3-5
COMPLIT 110Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
CSRE 28SIWhat is Whiteness? Historical and Contemporary Definitions of White Racial Identity in the U.S.1-2
CSRE 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CSRE 108Introduction to Feminist Studies4-5
CSRE 162Women in Modern America4-5
CSRE 168New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.5
CSRE 172Out of Place: (W)riting Home4
CSRE 179GIndigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America3-5
CSRE 192ETopics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America4-5
FEMGEN 188QImagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person4-5
HISTORY 257CLGBT/Queer Life in the United States4-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
NATIVEAM 103SNative American Women, Gender Roles, and Status5
PHIL 153Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines2-5
TAPS 160NChican@/Latin@ Performance in the U.S.4
TAPS 164TQueer Art and Performance4-5

Thematic Concentration in Public Service

The Public Service thematic concentration is open to students in any major in the Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity Undergraduate Program. The concentration allows a student to develop an area of study focused on community development, public service, and social change. Studying how issues of race and ethnicity impact and are impacted by community and social problems, this concentration is designed to ensure that students interested in service and community have access to a structured curriculum that provides a solid grounding in the theory and practice of community and civic engagement in order to provide the skills and experiences that enable students to become leaders and actors in the sphere of public life.

Students who wish to pursue a thematic concentration in public service must organize their studies to include 15 units, including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). Public Service concentration students should also prepare to complete 25 units (at least 5 courses) relevant to the theme of public service. Three of these courses should include a service learning component (i.e., require the student to participate in service in the local community as a central component to the course).

Students who select a thematic concentration in public service must complete an internship as part of their program of study. This internship can be completed during the academic year for credit or during the summer, but must be at least 300 hours.

Finally, students who pursue the concentration in public service should select a topic for their senior paper or honors thesis that reflects their interest in community work (i.e., service or organizing) or a community issue or concern that is addressed through public service.

This concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in this thematic concentration should contact the CSRE Undergraduate Program Office for details about its requirements.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements for the Public Service thematic concentration:

AFRICAAM 166Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle3-5
ANTHRO 169ANew Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.5
ASNAMST 112Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project4-5
ASNAMST 144Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
ASNAMST 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
CHILATST 177AWell-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course3
CHILATST 183XPracticum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting3-4
CSRE 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
CSRE 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CSRE 128WHAT WE WANT IS WE: Identity in Visual Arts, Social Engagement, and Civic Propositions4
CSRE 146Community Matters: Research and Service with Community Organizations2-4
CSRE 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
CSRE 162ASpirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation3
CSRE 168New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.5
CSRE 178Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
CSRE 201Introduction to Public History and Public Service4-5
CSRE 201BFrom Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era5
CSRE 203AThe Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education5
CSRE 260California's Minority-Majority Cities4-5
DANCE 197Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America4
EDUC 116XService Learning as an Approach to Teaching3
ETHICSOC 133Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
HISTORY 259APoverty and Homelessness in America4-5
HUMBIO 178Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
PHIL 175AEthics and Politics of Public Service5
POLISCI 133Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
PUBLPOL 103DEthics and Politics of Public Service5
RELIGST 162Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation3
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3
SOC 141Controversies about Inequality5
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4
URBANST 122Ethics and Politics of Public Service5

Thematic Concentration in Race and Health

The concentration in Race and Health is designed for students who are seeking an interdisciplinary exploration of health disparities, health access, and health policy. Through course work, students examine how health experiences are influenced by issues of race and ethnicity.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in the Race and Health concentration should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The Race and Health concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). The remaining 40 units of course work should be  relevant to the thematic concentration and selected in consultation with the faculty adviser.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Race and Health thematic concentration.

ANTHRO 82Medical Anthropology4
ANTHRO 138Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise5
ANTHRO 185ARace and Biomedicine3-5
HRP 212Cross Cultural Medicine3
HUMBIO 120Health Care in America: An Introduction to U.S. Health Policy4
HUMBIO 121EEthnicity and Medicine1-3
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
HUMBIO 128Community Health Psychology4
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
MED 159AService-Learning in Migrant Health2
MED 159BService-Learning in Migrant Health2
NATIVEAM 240Psychology and American Indian Mental Health3-5
PEDS 222Beyond Health Care: Seeking Health in Society3
PEDS 250Social and Environmental Determinants of Health3
PSYCH 101Community Health Psychology4

Thematic Concentration in Race and the American City

The Race and the American City concentration is designed for students who wish to develop methodologies, data, and theoretical and conceptual materials concerning how urban life, infrastructure, and policies are influenced by race and ethnicity. As virtual laboratories of social interaction, cities embody negotiations around resources, residences, financial districting, economic flow, health and educational resources, environmental policies, and city planning. A primary goal is for students to learn how they might contribute to the social and political discourse on race and ethnicity in the U.S. Participation in a public service internship and/or Stanford in Washington is encouraged.

The concentration is not declared on Axess; it does not appear on the transcript or diploma. Students interested in the Race and the American City concentration should contact the CSRE undergraduate program office.

The Race and the American City concentration requires 15 units including two approved CSRE core courses and CSRE 200X CSRE Senior Seminar (WIM), taken Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course may be counted toward the 15 unit core requirement. In addition to the core curriculum, students complete a Research/Methodology requirement (5 units). The remaining 40 units of course work should be  relevant to the thematic concentration and selected in consultation with the faculty adviser.

Students may find the following courses useful in fulfilling requirements in the Race and the American City thematic concentration.

CSRE 260California's Minority-Majority Cities4-5
PEDS 250Social and Environmental Determinants of Health3
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4
URBANST 114Urban Culture in Global Perspective5
URBANST 162Managing Local Governments4

Asian American Studies Minor

A total of 30 units of approved course work is required for the minor. One CSRE core course and at least one foundational course are needed to fulfill the requirements for the minor. Proposals must be approved by the director.

Students in Asian American Studies may find the following courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

Core Courses

ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5

Foundational Courses

Students who completed ASNAMST 159/HISTORY 159 or ENGLISH 43C/143C last year may count this toward their Foundational Course Requirement. These are not offered in 2012-13.

ASNAMST 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
HISTORY 593

Thematic Courses

ASNAMST 100CEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
ASNAMST 1885
ASNAMST 112Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project4-5
ASNAMST 52DAsian American Human Development: Cultural Perspectives on Psychology, Education and Critical Issues3
ASNAMST 74N3
ASNAMST 88N3
ASNAMST 185ARace and Biomedicine3-5
ASNAMST 187Geography, Time, and Trauma in Asian American Literature5
ASNAMST 189The Vietnamese Experience in America3
ASNAMST 265Writing Asian American History5

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies Minor

A total of 30 units of approved course work is required for the minor. One CSRE core course and at least one foundational course are needed to fulfill the requirements for the minor. Proposals must be approved by the director.

Students in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies may find the following courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

Core Courses

ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5

Foundational Courses

CHILATST 180EIntroduction to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies5

Thematic Courses

CHILATST 14NGrowing Up Bilingual3
CHILATST 125SChicano/Latino Politics5
CHILATST 175B5
CHILATST 179Chicano & Chicana Theater: Politics In Performance3-5
CHILATST 117N3-4
CHILATST 120Queer Raza3-5
CHILATST 125SChicano/Latino Politics5
CHILATST 140Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film3-5
CHILATST 183XPracticum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting3-4
CHILATST 200Latin@ Literature3-5
CHILATST 201BFrom Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era5
CHILATST 201CCritical Concepts in Chican@ Literature3-5
CHILATST 275BGovernance, Resistance, and Identity in Modern Mexico5

Comparative Studies Minor

Students who wish to minor in Comparative Studies must complete a minimum of 30 units from the approved course list. Two core courses (or one core and one foundational course) are needed to fulfill the minor requirements.

Students in Comparative Studies may find the following courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

Core Courses

ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5

Foundational Courses

AFRICAAM 43Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
ASNAMST 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
CHILATST 180EIntroduction to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies5
NATIVEAM 138American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective4
NATIVEAM 139American Indians in Contemporary Society4

Thematic Courses

CSRE 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
CSRE 104F5
CSRE 107The Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity4-5
CSRE 117N3-4
CSRE 117SHistory of California Indians5
CSRE 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
CSRE 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
CSRE 135ICSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford1-2
CSRE 142The Literature of the Americas5
CSRE 142AWhat is Hemispheric Studies?5
CSRE 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA5
CSRE 146SAsian American Culture and Community3-5
CSRE 14NGrowing Up Bilingual3
CSRE 162Women in Modern America4-5
CSRE 166BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
CSRE 16NAfrican Americans and Social Movements3
CSRE 177Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals5
CSRE 177BIntroduction to Dance on the Global Stage4
CSRE 179CChroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop3-5
CSRE 179GIndigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America3-5
CSRE 183Re- Imagining American Borders5
CSRE 189WLanguage and Minority Rights3
CSRE 192ETopics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America4-5
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 201BFrom Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era5
CSRE 201CCritical Concepts in Chican@ Literature3-5
CSRE 203AThe Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education5
CSRE 216XEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
CSRE 65N3
CSRE 28SIWhat is Whiteness? Historical and Contemporary Definitions of White Racial Identity in the U.S.1-2
CSRE 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society5
CSRE 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
CSRE 52DAsian American Human Development: Cultural Perspectives on Psychology, Education and Critical Issues3
CSRE 53JLove Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart3
CSRE 103SNative American Women, Gender Roles, and Status5
CSRE 106AGang Colors: The Racialization of Violence and the American City5
CSRE 135HConversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community1-2
CSRE 140G3-5
CSRE 145FRace and Power5
CSRE 150Race and Political Sociology3
CSRE 162ASpirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation5
CSRE 178Ethics and Politics of Public Service5
CSRE 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
CSRE 226XCurating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums4
CSRE 260California's Minority-Majority Cities4-5
CSRE 279CChroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop3-5
CSRE 279GIndigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America3-5
CSRE 289EQueer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations3-5
CSRE 51N5

Jewish Studies Minor

Students who wish to minor in Jewish Studies must complete one CSRE core course, one Jewish Studies foundational course, at least one quarter of the Hebrew language or another approved Jewish language, and draw remaining courses from an approved list of Jewish Studies courses. A total of 30 units of approved course work is required for the Jewish Studies minor. Proposals must be approved by the director.

Students in Jewish Studies may find the following courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

Core Courses

Jewish Studies minors must take the 15-unit CSRE core curriculum including two core courses and a senior seminar taken in Autumn Quarter of the senior year. One foundational course that focuses on a non-Jewish ethnic group may be counted toward the 15-unit core requirement.

Foundational Courses

JEWISHST 71Jews and Christians: Conflict and Coexistence3
JEWISHST 84Zionism3
JEWISHST 183The Holocaust4

Thematic Courses

Students may take any JEWISHST courses in fulfillment of this requirements

JEWISHST 4NA World History of Genocide3-5
JEWISHST 5Biblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 5BBiblical Greek3-5
JEWISHST 37QZionism and the Novel4
JEWISHST 101AFirst-Year Hebrew, First Quarter5
JEWISHST 102ASecond-Year Hebrew, First Quarter4
JEWISHST 104Hebrew Forum2-4
JEWISHST 104AFirst-Year Yiddish, First Quarter4
JEWISHST 120Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity3
JEWISHST 127DReadings in Talmudic Literature1
JEWISHST 139Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism4
JEWISHST 143Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
JEWISHST 144BPoetic Thinking Across Media4
JEWISHST 147AThe Hebrew Bible in Literature3-5
JEWISHST 199BDirected Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter1-5
JEWISHST 282Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II5
JEWISHST 286Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times4-5
JEWISHST 287SResearch Seminar in Middle East History4-5
JEWISHST 291XKnowing God: Learning Religion in Popular Culture4
JEWISHST 299ADirected Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter1-5

Native American Studies Minor

Students who wish to minor in Native American Studies must complete one CSRE core course and at least one foundational course in Native American Studies. Additional courses relevant to the area of concentration selected by the student in consultation with a faculty adviser must also be completed. A total of 30 units of approved course work is required for the minor. Proposals must be approved by the director.

Students in Native American Studies may find the following courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

Core Courses

ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
CSRE 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
CSRE 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
CSRE 196CIntroduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity5
CSRE 200XCSRE Senior Seminar5
CSRE 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
CSRE 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
CSRE 246Constructing Race and Religion in America4-5
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
JEWISHST 106Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature3-5
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5

Foundational courses

Students who completed NATIVEAM/ANTHRO 16 may count this course toward their Foundational Course requirement. This course is not offered in 2012-13.

NATIVEAM 138American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective4
NATIVEAM 139American Indians in Contemporary Society5

Thematic courses

NATIVEAM 103SNative American Women, Gender Roles, and Status5
NATIVEAM 115Introduction to Native American History5
NATIVEAM 139American Indians in Contemporary Society5
NATIVEAM 143AAmerican Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore3-5
NATIVEAM 167Performing Indigeneity on Global Stage4
NATIVEAM 240Psychology and American Indian Mental Health3-5

Asian American Studies

Director: Anthony Antonio (Education)  

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: Gordon Chang (History), Hien Do (Asian American Studies) Kathryn Gin Lum (Religious Studies), Pamela Lee (Art and Art History), Jean Ma (Art and Art History), David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature), Stephen Sano (Music), Stephen Sohn (English), Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu (Asian American Studies), Jeanne L. Tsai (Psychology), Linda Uyechi (Music), Barbara Voss (Anthropology), Christine Min Wotipka (Education), Sylvia Yanagisako (Anthropology)

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies

Director: Tomás Jiménez (Sociology)

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: Albert Camarillo (History), Susana Gallardo (Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies), Angela Garcia (Anthropology), Kenji Hakuta (Education), Tomás Jiménez (Sociology), Melissa Michaelson (Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies),  Ana Minian (History), Cherríe Moraga (Drama), Paula Moya (English), Amado Padilla (Education), José David Saldívar (Comparative Literature), Ramón Saldívar (English), Gary Segura (Political Science), Guadalupe Valdés (Education), Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano (Iberian and Latin American Cultures)

Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Director: David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature)

Core Affiliated Faculty: 

  • Anthropology: Duana Fullwiley, Angela Garcia, Barbara Voss, Sylvia Yanagisako
  • Comparative Literature: David Palumbo-Liu, José David Saldívar, Alexander Key
  • Drama: Jennifer Brody, Harry Elam, Cherrie Moraga
  • English: Michele Elam, Paula Moya, Vaughn Rasberry, Ramón Saldívar
  • History: Al Camarillo, James Campbell, Gordon Chang, Allyson Hobbs, Ana Minian, 
  • Iberian and Latin American Cultures: Lisa Surwillo, Hector Hoyos
  • Linguistics: John Rickford
  • Political Science: Gary Segura, Lauren Davenport
  • Psychology: Jennifer Eberhardt, Hazel Markus, Jeanne Tsai
  • Religious Studies: Kathryn Gin Lum, Charlotte Fonrobert
  • Sociology: Corey Fields, Tomás Jiménez, Matthew Snipp, Aliya Saperstein
  • Taube Center for Jewish Studies: Vered Shemtov
  • Graduate School Education: H. Samy Alim, Anthony Antonio, Prudence Carter, Teresa LaFromboise, Guadalupe Valdes, Christine Min Wotipka, Ari Kelman
  • School of Law: Richard Banks, Richard Ford
  • Lecturers: Karen Biestman, Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, Hilton Obenzinger, Laura Saldívar, James Steyer

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: David Abernethy (Political Science, emeritus), Arnetha Ball (Education), Lucius Barker (Political Science, emeritus), Donald Barr (Pediatrics), Bryan Brown (Education), Cheryl Brown (African and African American Studies), Martin Carnoy (Education), Clayborne Carson (History), Jeff Chang (Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Karen Cook (Sociology), Michele Dauber (Law), Linda Darling-Hammond (Education), Carolyn Duffey (American Studies), Jennifer Eberhardt (Psychology), Ala Ebtekar (Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Paulla Ebron (Anthropology), Penny Eckert (Linguistics), James Ferguson (Anthropology), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), James Fishkin (Communication), Estelle Freedman (History), Susana Gallardo (Chicana/o Studies), Gabriel Garcia (Medicine), Kathryn Gin Lum (Religious Studies), Leah Gordon (Education), David Grusky (Sociology), Sean Hanretta (History), Gina Hernandez-Clarke (Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Miyako Inoue (Anthropology), Shanto Iyengar (Communication), Tomás Jiménez (Sociology), Gavin Jones (English), Terry Karl (Political Science), Pamela Karlan (Law), Matthew Kohrman (Anthropology), Jan Krawitz (Art and Art History), Jon Krosnick (Communication), Teresa LaFromboise (Education), David Laitin (Political Science), Liisa Malkki (Anthropology), Hazel Markus (Psychology), Ruben Martinéz (Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz (Art and Art History), Douglas McAdam (Sociology), Jisha Menon (Theater and Performance Studies), Ana Minian (History), Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi (French and Italian), Thomas S. Mullaney (History), Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu (Asian American Studies), Hilton Obenzinger (American Studies), Susan Olzak (Sociology), Amado Padilla (Education), Arnold Rampersad (English), Vaughn Rasberry (English), Robert Reich (Political Science), Cecilia Ridgeway (Sociology), Richard Roberts (History), Aron Rodrigue (History), Michael Rosenfeld (Sociology), Joel Samoff (History), Debra Satz (Philosophy), Vered Shemtov (Division of Literatures, Cultures and Languages), C. Matthew Snipp (Sociology), Paul Sniderman (Political Science), Jayashiri Srikantiah (Law), Ewart Thomas (Psychology), Jeanne L. Tsai (Psychology), Linda Uyechi (Music), Gregory Walton (Psychology), Richard White (History), Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science), Michael Wilcox (Anthropology), Bryan Wolf (Art and Art History), Sylvia Yanagisako (Anthropology), Yvonne Yarbro-Bejarano (Iberian and Latin American Cultures), Steven Zipperstein (History)

Teaching Fellows: Adam Horowitz, Mark Gardiner

Senior Seminar Coordinator: Patricia Seo

Jewish Studies

Director: Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies)

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: Zachary Baker (Stanford University Libraries), Joel Beinin (History), Jonathan Berger (Music), Arnold Eisen (Religious Studies, emeritus), Amir Eshel (German Studies), John Felstiner (English, emeritus), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies), Avner Greif (Economics), Katherine Jolluck (History), Ari Kelman (Education), Jon Levitow (Language Center), Mark Mancall (History, emeritus), Norman Naimark (History), Reviel Netz (Classics), Jack Rakove (History), Aron Rodrigue (History), Noah Rosenberg (Biology), Gabriella Safran (Slavic Languages and Literatures), Vered Karti Shemtov (Language Center, Comparative Literature), Lee Shulman (Education, emeritus), Peter Stansky (History, emeritus), Marie-Pierre Ulloa (French), Amir Weiner (History), Sam Wineburg (Education), Steven Zipperstein (History)

Hebrew Instructional Staff: Gallia Porat, Estee Greif

Visiting Faculty:  Avi Tchamni (Music)

Writer in Residence: Maya Arad

Native American Studies

Director: C. Matthew Snipp (Sociology)

Affiliated Faculty and Teaching Staff: JoEllen Anderson (Native American Studies), Jared Aldern (Native American Studies), Karen Biestman (Native American Studies), Kenneth Fields (English), Teresa LaFromboise (Education), Samantha Peralto (Language Center), Delphine Red Shirt Shaw (Native American Studies), C. Matthew Snipp (Sociology), Michael Wilcox (Anthropology)

Overseas Studies Courses in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


OSPCPTWN 18Xhosa Language and Culture2
OSPCPTWN 33Southern Africa: from Liberation Struggles to Region-Building4
OSPCPTWN 38Genocide: African Experiences in Comparative Perspective3-5
OSPCPTWN 44Negotiating Home, Citizenship and the South African City4
OSPMADRD 62Spanish California: Historical Issues4
OSPMADRD 74Islam in Spain and Europe: 1300 Years of Contact4
OSPMADRD 75Sefarad: The Jewish Community in Spain4

Asian American Studies

Students in Asian American Studies may find the following related courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

COMPLIT 41QEthnicity and Literature5
EDUC 181Multicultural Issues in Higher Education4
EDUC 193FPsychological Well-Being on Campus: Asian American Perspectives1
HISTORY 166BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
HISTORY 265Writing Asian American History5
MUSIC 17QPerspectives in North American Taiko4
PSYCH 217Topics and Methods Related to Culture and Emotion1-3

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies

Students in Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies may find the following related courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

EDUC 146XPerspectives on the Education of Linguistic Minorities3-4
EDUC 149Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism3-5
EDUC 178XLatino Families, Languages, and Schools3-5
EDUC 193BPeer Counseling in the Chicano/Latino Community1
EDUC 277Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives4
HISTORY 165Mexican American History through Film4-5
HISTORY 166BImmigration Debates in America, Past and Present3-5
HISTORY 201Introduction to Public History and Public Service4-5
HISTORY 203EGlobal Catholicism5
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
POLISCI 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
POLISCI 327Minority Behavior and Representation5
RELIGST 203Myth, Place, and Ritual in the Study of Religion3-5
TAPS 160NChican@/Latin@ Performance in the U.S.4

Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity

Students in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity may find the following related courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

AFRICAAM 43Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 54NAfrican American Women's Lives3-4
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
AFRICAAM 147History of South Africa5
AFRICAAM 152GHarlem Renaissance5
AFRICAAM 166Introduction to African American History - the Modern Freedom Struggle3-5
AFRICAAM 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AMSTUD 140Stand Up Comedy and the "Great American Joke" Since 19455
AMSTUD 143Introduction to African American Literature3-5
ANTHRO 22NEthnographies of North America: An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology3-4
ANTHRO 30QThe Big Shift4
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ANTHRO 82Medical Anthropology4
ANTHRO 102Urban Ethnography5
ANTHRO 106AGang Colors: The Racialization of Violence and the American City5
ANTHRO 320ARace, Ethnicity, and Language3-4
ARTHIST 176Feminism and Contemporary Art4
CHILATST 179Chicano & Chicana Theater: Politics In Performance3-5
COMM 160The Press and the Political Process4-5
COMPLIT 41QEthnicity and Literature5
COMPLIT 110Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies3-5
COMPLIT 290Ferguson in a Global Frame: Human Rights and the Arts3-5
CSRE 108Introduction to Feminist Studies4-5
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Movement Band Performance Workshop2
DANCE 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
DANCE 197Dance in Prison: The Arts, Juvenile Justice, and Rehabilitation in America4
EDUC 100AEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
EDUC 100BEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
EDUC 112XUrban Education3-4
EDUC 116XService Learning as an Approach to Teaching3
EDUC 146XPerspectives on the Education of Linguistic Minorities3-4
EDUC 148XCritical Perspectives on Teaching and Tutoring English Language Learners3
EDUC 149Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism3-5
EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
EDUC 178XLatino Families, Languages, and Schools3-5
EDUC 193BPeer Counseling in the Chicano/Latino Community1
EDUC 193CPsychological Well-Being On Campus: Perspectives Of The Black Diaspora1
EDUC 193FPsychological Well-Being on Campus: Asian American Perspectives1
EDUC 193NPeer Counseling in the Native American Community1
EDUC 201History of Education in the United States3-5
EDUC 232Culture, Learning, and Poverty2-3
EDUC 242Language Use in the Chicano Community3-5
EDUC 367Cultural Psychology3-5
EDUC 381Multicultural Issues in Higher Education4
FEMGEN 140DLGBT/Queer Life in the United States4-5
FEMGEN 188QImagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person4-5
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions3
HISTORY 50B19th Century America3
HISTORY 50CThe United States in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 54NAfrican American Women's Lives3-4
HISTORY 150B19th-Century America5
HISTORY 150CThe United States in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 158CHistory of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
HISTORY 201Introduction to Public History and Public Service4-5
HISTORY 203EGlobal Catholicism5
HISTORY 255Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Social Gospel and the Struggle for Justice5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
HISTORY 257CLGBT/Queer Life in the United States4-5
HISTORY 259APoverty and Homelessness in America4-5
HISTORY 261Race, Gender, and Class in Jim Crow America5
HRP 212Cross Cultural Medicine3
HUMBIO 120Health Care in America: An Introduction to U.S. Health Policy4
HUMBIO 121EEthnicity and Medicine1-3
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
HUMBIO 129Critical Issues in International Women's Health4
ILAC 193The Cinema of Pedro Almodovar3-5
JEWISHST 183The Holocaust4
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 150Language in Society4-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
MED 159AService-Learning in Migrant Health2
MED 159BService-Learning in Migrant Health2
MUSIC 17QPerspectives in North American Taiko4
PHIL 153Feminist Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines2-5
POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
POLISCI 120BCampaigns, Voting, Media, and Elections4-5
POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
POLISCI 327Minority Behavior and Representation5
PSYCH 25NPsychology, Inequality, and the American Dream3
PSYCH 27NThe Psychology of Prejudice3
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
PSYCH 150Race and Crime3
PSYCH 183Mind, Culture, and Society Research Core2-3
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PSYCH 217Topics and Methods Related to Culture and Emotion1-3
PSYCH 245Social Psychological Perspectives on Stereotyping and Prejudice3
RELIGST 188AIssues in Liberation: El Salvador4
SOC 46NRace, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities3
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action4
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
SOC 120Interpersonal Relations4
SOC 132Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
SOC 133Law and Wikinomics: The Economic and Social Organization of the LegalnnProfession1-5
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States3
SOC 136Sociology of Law4
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 141Controversies about Inequality5
SOC 142Sociology of Gender5
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA4
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
TAPS 160NChican@/Latin@ Performance in the U.S.4
TAPS 164TQueer Art and Performance4-5
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass4
URBANST 114Urban Culture in Global Perspective5
URBANST 140Urban Ethnography5

Native American Studies

Students in Native American Studies may find the following related courses useful in fulfilling course requirements in the major or minor.

ANTHRO 162Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
EDUC 193NPeer Counseling in the Native American Community1
RELIGST 203Myth, Place, and Ritual in the Study of Religion3-5
RELIGST 303Myth, Place, and Ritual in the Study of Religion3-5
SPECLANG 189AFirst-Year Hawaiian, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 189BFirst-Year Beginning Hawaiian, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 189CFirst-Year Hawaiian, Third Quarter4
SPECLANG 247AFirst-Year Lakota, First Quarter4
SPECLANG 247BFirst-Year Lakota, Second Quarter4
SPECLANG 248Introduction to Siouan Language & Culture II5

 

Asian American Studies Courses

ASNAMST 52D. Asian American Human Development: Cultural Perspectives on Psychology, Education and Critical Issues. 3 Units.

In this course, we will examine the critical issues in Asian American growth and development with particular attention given to current theoretical and research perspectives within a diverse society. We will consider topics related to their cultural identity, cognitive, and socio-emotional development, engaging in the ethnic discourse on Confucian history and culture, Eastern and Western thought and learning, tiger parenting, gender roles, the model minority stereotype, acculturation and bicultural identity, and mental health. This course uniquely integrates the fields of history, education, psychology, human biology, and ethnic studies as we seek to understand the underlying processes of the Asian American person as an individual and as an effective member of the larger society.
Same as: CSRE 52D

ASNAMST 100C. EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education. 1 Unit.

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.nnNotes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Same as: EDUC 100C

ASNAMST 112. Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project. 4-5 Units.

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Same as: ANTHRO 112, ANTHRO 212

ASNAMST 118A. Digital Heritage: Bringing the Past Online with the Chinese American Historical Museum. 5 Units.

Interpreting the past is no longer just for people like historians and archaeologists, and it¿s no longer confined to the pages of books. More and more, community-based organizations are gathering stories and perspectives from everyday people, and they¿re putting them out for the world to see online. With these big changes, what will be the future of thinking about the past? In this course, students will work through the dynamics of digital heritage through readings, discussion, and original research. The course centers around artifacts unearthed at the Market Street Chinatown in San Jose. Each student will analyze and gather stories relating to a single artifact in order to contribute to a multimedia exhibit for the Chinese American Historical Museum in San Jose. Class time will be devoted both to discussion and to work on artifact-based projects, and will also include a fieldtrip to the museum and collaboration time with members of the Chinese Historical and Cultural Project.
Same as: ANTHRO 118A, CSRE 118A

ASNAMST 131. Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America. 3-5 Units.

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Same as: CSRE 131C

ASNAMST 144. Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class. 5 Units.

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Same as: CSRE 144, FEMGEN 144X

ASNAMST 146S. Asian American Culture and Community. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to the histories of Asians in America, specifically as these histories are part of a broader Asia-US-Pacific history that characterized the 20th century and now the 21st. We will combine readings in history, literature, sociology, with community-based learning.nnThe course takes place over two quarters. The first quarter focuses on gaining knowledge of Asian America and discussion key topics that students wish to focus on collaboratively. During this first quarter we also learn about community-based learning, set up teams and projects, and develop relationships with community organizations. The second quarter students work with student liaisons (senior students who have experience in service learning) and complete their work with the community¿there are no formal class meetings this second quarter. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
Same as: AMSTUD 146, COMPLIT 146, CSRE 146S

ASNAMST 185A. Race and Biomedicine. 3-5 Units.

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.
Same as: ANTHRO 185A

ASNAMST 187. Geography, Time, and Trauma in Asian American Literature. 5 Units.

The notion that homes can be stable locations for cultural, racial, ethnic, and similarly situated identity categories. Tthe possibility that there really is no place like home for Asian American subjects. How geography, landscape, and time situate traumas within fictional Asian American narratives.
Same as: AMSTUD 261A

ASNAMST 189. The Vietnamese Experience in America. 3 Units.

The purpose of this course to study the experience of the Vietnamese refugees from their exodus after the Vietnam War to their resettlement in America, and to examine larger historical, social, political, and economic processes at work. We will focus on the processes that lead to the formation of this community the variables leading to various locations.

ASNAMST 193F. Psychological Well-Being on Campus: Asian American Perspectives. 1 Unit.

Topics: the Asian family structure, and concepts of identity, ethnicity, culture, and racism in terms of their impact on individual development and the counseling process. Emphasis is on empathic understanding of Asians in America. Group exercises.
Same as: EDUC 193F

ASNAMST 200R. Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

ASNAMST 200W. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

(Staff).

ASNAMST 265. Writing Asian American History. 5 Units.

Recent scholarship in Asian American history, with attention to methodologies and sources. Topics: racial ideologies, gender, transnationalism, culture, and Asian American art history. Primary research paper.
Same as: AMSTUD 265, HISTORY 265, HISTORY 365

ASNAMST 281. Asian Religions in America; Asian American Religions. 4 Units.

This course will analyze both the reception in America of Asian religions (i.e. of Buddhism in the 19th century), and the development in America of Asian American religious traditions.
Same as: AMSTUD 281, RELIGST 281, RELIGST 381

ASNAMST 295F. Race and Ethnicity in East Asia. 4-5 Units.

Intensive exploration of major issues in the history of race and ethnicity in China, Japan, and Korea from the early modern period to the present day.
Same as: HISTORY 295F, HISTORY 395F

Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies Courses

CHILATST 13SL. Second-Year Spanish: Emphasis on Service Learning, Third Quarter. 4-5 Units.

Continuation of SPANLANG 12. Integration of community engagement and language, with emphasis on developing advanced proficiency in oral and written discourse. Targeted functional abilities include presentational and socioculturally appropriate language in formal and informal, community and professional contexts. SL content focuses on immersion in civics-based reciprocity and service learning in the Spanish-speaking local community. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Prerequisite: Placement Test, SPANLANG 12C, 12R, 12M or 12S. Fulfills the IR major Language Requirement.
Same as: SPANLANG 13SL

CHILATST 14N. Growing Up Bilingual. 3 Units.

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Same as: CSRE 14N, EDUC 114N

CHILATST 53J. Love Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart. 3 Units.

This course unfolds in three ways. First, we will begin by examining theories of love by women of color feminists and queer theorists. Secondly, we will position these theories alongside art, literature, photography, comics, and film by and about queers of color who partake in the cultural representation of the love story. Finally, we will interrogate the aesthetic politics of each work in order engage with the ways that the writers, artists, and filmmakers contribute to the theorization of love.
Same as: CSRE 53J

CHILATST 120. Queer Raza. 3-5 Units.

Examination of cultural representations by U.S. Latin@s that explore the following questions: How is the mutual constitution of race/sex/class/gender theorized and represented? How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts and what is the function of sex in racial (self)formation? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and other structures of power? How do these texts reinforce or contest stereotypes and the "ideal" bodies of national identity? How do these texts produce queerness as a web of social relations?.
Same as: FEMGEN 120, ILAC 287

CHILATST 125S. Chicano/Latino Politics. 5 Units.

The political position of Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.. Focus is on Mexican Americans, with attention to Cuban Americans, Puerto Ricans, and other groups. The history of each group in the American polity; their political circumstances with respect to the electoral process, the policy process, and government; the extent to which the demographic category Latino is meaningful; and group identity and solidarity among Americans of Latin American ancestry. Topics include immigration, education, affirmative action, language policy, and environmental justice.
Same as: POLISCI 125S

CHILATST 140. Migration in 21st Century Latin American Film. 3-5 Units.

Focus on how images and narratives of migration are depicted in recent Latin American film. It compares migration as it takes place within Latin America to migration from Latin America to Europe and to the U.S. We will analyze these films, and their making, in the global context of an evergrowing tension between "inside" and "outside"; we consider how these films represent or explore precariousness and exclusion; visibility and invisibility; racial and gender dynamics; national and social boundaries; new subjectivities and cultural practices. Films include: El niño pez, Bolivia, Ulises, Faustino Mayta visita a su prima, Copacabana, Chico y Rita, Sin nombre, Los que se quedan, Amador, and En la puta calle. Films in Spanish, with English subtitles. Discussions and assignments in Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 140

CHILATST 160N. Chican@/Latin@ Performance in the U.S.. 4 Units.

This course will introduce works by U.S. Latino and Latina performance artists producing from the margins of the mainstream Euro-American theater world. We will examine how performance art serves as a kind of dramatized political forum for Latino/a artists, producing some of the most transgressive explorations of queer and national/ethnic identities in the U.S. today. By the course's conclusion, each student will create and perform in a staged reading of an original performance piece.
Same as: TAPS 160N

CHILATST 164. Immigration and the Changing United States. 4 Units.

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Same as: CSRE 164, SOC 164, SOC 264

CHILATST 168. New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.. 5 Units.

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Same as: ANTHRO 169A, CSRE 168, FEMGEN 140H

CHILATST 171. Mexicans in the United States. 5 Units.

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.
Same as: AMSTUD 271, CSRE 171H, HISTORY 271

CHILATST 172. Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Same as: AMSTUD 272E, CSRE 172H, FEMGEN 272E, HISTORY 272E, HISTORY 372E

CHILATST 177A. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 3 Units.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CSRE 177E, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A

CHILATST 177B. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 1-3 Unit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CSRE 177F, EDUC 177B

CHILATST 177C. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 1-3 Unit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CSRE 177G, EDUC 177C

CHILATST 179. Chicano & Chicana Theater: Politics In Performance. 3-5 Units.

This is a practicum course, where the basic tenets and evolving politic and philosophies of Chicano and Latin American liberationist theater are examined through direct engagement with its theatrical forms, including, social protest & agit-prop, myth & ritual, scripting through improvisation, in-depth character and solo work, collective conceptualization and more. The course will culminate in an end-of-the quarter play performance in the Nitery Theater (Old Union) and at a Mission District theater in San Francisco.
Same as: TAPS 179, TAPS 379

CHILATST 179F. Flor y Canto: Poetry Workshop. 3-5 Units.

Poetry reading and writing. The poet as philosopher and the poet as revolutionary. Texts: the philosophical meditations of pre-Columbian Aztec poetry known as flor y canto, and reflections on the poetry of resistance born out of the nationalist and feminist struggles of Latin America and Aztlán. Required 20-page poetry manuscript.
Same as: CSRE 179F, TAPS 179F, TAPS 279F

CHILATST 180E. Introduction to Chicana/o-Latina/o Studies. 5 Units.

Historical and contemporary experiences that have defined the status of Latina/o peoples living in the U.S. Topics include the U.S./Mexico border and the borderlands; immigration and transnational migrations; literary and cultural traditions; music; labor; historical perspectives on Latina/o peoples in the U.S. and the Chicano movement; urban realities; gender relations; political and economic changes; and inter- and intra-group interactions. Sources include social science and humanities scholarship.

CHILATST 183X. Practicum in English-Spanish School & Community Interpreting. 3-4 Units.

This practicum will assist students in developing a set of skills in English-Spanish interpreting that will prepare them to provide interpretation services in school and community settings. The course will build students' abilities to transfer intended meanings between two or more monolingual individuals of who are physically present in a school or community setting and who must communicate with each other for professional (and personal) purposes.
Same as: EDUC 183X, EDUC 283X

CHILATST 189W. Language and Minority Rights. 3 Units.

Language as it is implicated in migration and globalization. The effects of globalization processes on languages, the complexity of language use in migrant and indigenous minority contexts, the connectedness of today's societies brought about by the development of communication technologies. Individual and societal multilingualism; preservation and revival of endangered languages.
Same as: CSRE 189W, EDUC 189X

CHILATST 198. Internship for Public Service. 1-5 Unit.

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Service-Learning (nadiad@stanford.edu) to develop or sign-up for a community service internship. Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: CSRE 198

CHILATST 200. Latin@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Same as: CSRE 200, ILAC 280, ILAC 382

CHILATST 200R. Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

.

CHILATST 200W. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

(Staff).

CHILATST 201B. From Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era. 5 Units.

How creative projects build and strengthen communities of common concern. Projects focus on cultural reclamation, multiculturalism, cultural equity and contemporary cultural wars, media literacy, independent film, and community-based art. Guest artists and organizers, films, and case studies.
Same as: CSRE 201B

CHILATST 201C. Critical Concepts in Chican@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Combines primary texts of Chican@ literature with a metacritical interrogation of key concepts informing Chican@ literary criticism, the construction of Chican@ literary history, and a Chican@ literary canon. Interrogates the resistance paradigm and the "proper" subject of this literature, and critiques established genealogies and foundational authors and texts, as well as issues of periodization, including the notion of "emergence" (e.g. of feminist voices or dissident sexualities). Considers texts, authors and subjects that present alternatives to the resistance paradigm.
Same as: CSRE 201C, ILAC 380E

CHILATST 275B. Governance, Resistance, and Identity in Modern Mexico. 5 Units.

Surveys the history of governance, resistance, and identity formation in Mexico from the nineteenth century to the present. Explores Mexico's historical struggles to achieve political stability, economic prosperity, and social justice and examines how regional, class, ethnic, and gender differences have figured prominently in the shaping of Mexican affairs. Topics include Mexico's wars and their legacies, the power of the state, violence and protest, debates over the meaning of "Mexicanness," youth culture, and the politics of indigenismo.

Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity Courses

CSRE 1A. Meet the Profs: Conversations on Race and Ethnicity. 1-2 Unit.

This course meets once a week for one hour, over lunch (provided). Students will meet with CSRE faculty who will share their work, their life stories, their reasons for believing that race and ethnicity are of central concern to all members of our society. Diverse fields will be represented: sociology, history, literature, psychology and others. The course may be taken for either one or two units. Open to freshmen and sophomores only.

CSRE 11W. Service-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity. 1 Unit.

Introduces students to a variety of issues at stake in the public education of at-risk high school youth in California. Participants will hear from some of the leading faculty in the School of Education as well as the Departments of Psychology, Sociology, and others, who will share perspectives on the problems and challenges of educating a diverse student body in the state's public school system. The service-learning component of the workshop is a mentoring project (Stanford Students for Educational Equity) with junior class history students from East Palo Alto Academy High School, a Stanford charter school.
Same as: HISTORY 11W

CSRE 14N. Growing Up Bilingual. 3 Units.

This course is a Freshman Introductory Seminar that has as its purpose introducing students to the sociolinguistic study of bilingualism by focusing on bilingual communities in this country and on bilingual individuals who use two languages in their everyday lives. Much attention is given to the history, significance, and consequences of language contact in the United States. The course focuses on the experiences of long-term US minority populations as well as that of recent immigrants.
Same as: CHILATST 14N, EDUC 114N

CSRE 16N. African Americans and Social Movements. 3 Units.

Theory and research on African Americans' roles in post-Civil Rights, US social movements. Topics include women¿s right, LGBT rights, environmental movement, and contemporary political conservativism.
Same as: AFRICAAM 16N, SOC 16N

CSRE 19N. "Land of Milk and Honey": Food, Justice, and Ethnic Identity in Jewish Culture. 3 Units.

Food is an essential aspect of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. nnThis seminar examines Jewish culture and the food practices and traditions that have shaped and continue to shape it. Why has Jewish culture been centered around food practices? How have religious laws and rituals about food and food production shaped Jewish culture and vice versa? Dietary laws prescribe which animals are and are not "kosher" and what can be eaten with them, holidays are celebrated with traditional foods, and regional foods contribute to the formation of distinct Jewish ethnic identities. More recently, American Jews have begun to organize around issues of food justice, and joined the sustainability movement, adapting Jewish traditions about food production into their cause. What is the significance of animal welfare, environmental issues, and labor practices in Jewish culture?nnThis multi-disciplinary seminar explores the connection between food practices and ethnic and religious identity(ies), the history of the dietary laws and their multiple interpretations, the cultural significance of the phenomenal success of kosher certification in the U.S. food market, and the rise of the Jewish food justice movement. These issues raise a multitude of comparative questions, and you are encouraged to engage in research into other religious and ethnic food cultures. Course materials include: biblical and later religious, legal, and philosophical texts; cook-books (as cultural and historical sources); literature (both fiction and academic); films; news media, and food experts. We will visit an urban farming community (Urban Adamah) to learn from those involved in the Jewish sustainability movement.
Same as: JEWISHST 19N, RELIGST 19N

CSRE 24D. Introduction to Dance in the African Diaspora. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to dance as an important cultural force in the African Diaspora. From capoeira in Brazil to dance hall in Jamaica to hip hop in the United States and Ghana, we will analyze dance as a form of resistance to slavery, colonialism, and oppression; as an integral component of community formation; and as a practice that shapes racial, gendered, and national identity. We will explore these topics through readings, film viewings, and movement workshops (no previous dance experience required). Students will have the option to do a creative performance as part of their final project.
Same as: AFRICAAM 24, DANCE 24, TAPS 152D

CSRE 27SI. Revolution and the Filipino Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities. 1-2 Unit.

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.

CSRE 28SI. What is Whiteness? Historical and Contemporary Definitions of White Racial Identity in the U.S.. 1-2 Unit.

This course will explore one central question: What does it means to be White, and how has that changed over time and place? From Abigail Fisher to Kreayshawn to the Tsarnaev brothers, we will use narratives and experiences of Whiteness to illuminate historical and contemporary understandings of what it means to be White in 2013. Through this class, students will share their own encounters with Whiteness, and will develop tools and strategies for navigating privileged identities and engaging within Stanford¿s diverse student community.

CSRE 32. Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective. 5 Units.

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 32

CSRE 32A. The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice. 1-5 Unit.

This course-series brings together leading scholars with critically-acclaimed artists, local teachers, youth, and community organizations to consider the complex relationships between culture, knowledge, pedagogy and social justice. Participants will examine the cultural meaning of knowledge as "the 5th element" of Hip Hop Culture (in addition to MCing, DJing, graffiti, and dance) and how educators and cultural workers have leveraged this knowledge for social justice. Overall, participants will gain a strong theoretical knowledge of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies and learn to apply this knowledge by engaging with guest artists, teachers, youth, and community youth arts organizations.
Same as: AFRICAAM 32, AMSTUD 32, EDUC 32X, EDUC 432X, TAPS 32

CSRE 45Q. Understanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society. 4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Historical overview of race in America, race and violence, race and socioeconomic well-being, and the future of race relations in America. Enrollment limited to 16.
Same as: SOC 45Q

CSRE 51Q. Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity. 4 Units.

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"?.
Same as: AMSTUD 51Q, COMPLIT 51Q

CSRE 52D. Asian American Human Development: Cultural Perspectives on Psychology, Education and Critical Issues. 3 Units.

In this course, we will examine the critical issues in Asian American growth and development with particular attention given to current theoretical and research perspectives within a diverse society. We will consider topics related to their cultural identity, cognitive, and socio-emotional development, engaging in the ethnic discourse on Confucian history and culture, Eastern and Western thought and learning, tiger parenting, gender roles, the model minority stereotype, acculturation and bicultural identity, and mental health. This course uniquely integrates the fields of history, education, psychology, human biology, and ethnic studies as we seek to understand the underlying processes of the Asian American person as an individual and as an effective member of the larger society.
Same as: ASNAMST 52D

CSRE 53J. Love Notes: Queers of Color on Politics of the Heart. 3 Units.

This course unfolds in three ways. First, we will begin by examining theories of love by women of color feminists and queer theorists. Secondly, we will position these theories alongside art, literature, photography, comics, and film by and about queers of color who partake in the cultural representation of the love story. Finally, we will interrogate the aesthetic politics of each work in order engage with the ways that the writers, artists, and filmmakers contribute to the theorization of love.
Same as: CHILATST 53J

CSRE 54N. African American Women's Lives. 3-4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.
Same as: AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, FEMGEN 54N, HISTORY 54N

CSRE 55M. MMUF Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty.

CSRE 63N. The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality. 3-4 Units.

This course explores the emergence of concepts of gender equality in world history. It asks how gender inequality relates to racial, ethnicity, and sexual identities, how men engage with feminism, whether gender equality is purely a western cultural tradition, and much more. We approach the long history of ideas about gender and equality by reading primary historical documents from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. Topics include education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, and politics.
Same as: AMSTUD 63N, FEMGEN 63N, HISTORY 63N

CSRE 64. Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America. 4-5 Units.

How ethnicity influenced the American experience and how prevailing attitudes about racial and ethnic groups over time have affected the historical and contemporary reality of the nation's major minority populations. Focus is on the past two centuries.
Same as: HISTORY 64

CSRE 65. Nation in Motion: Film, Race and Immigration in Contemporary French Cinema. 3-5 Units.

An examination of the current debates in France regarding national identity, secularism, and the integration of immigrants, notably from the former colonies. Confronts films' and other media's visual and discursive rhetorical strategies used to represent ethnic or religious minorities, discrimination, citizens' resistance to government policies, inter-racial marriages, or women's rights within immigrant communities. By embodying such themes in stories of love, hardships, or solidarity, the motion pictures make the movements and emotions inherent to immigration tangible: to what effect? Taught in French. Films in French with English subtitles. Additional paper for students enrolled in 235.
Same as: FRENCH 122

CSRE 66S. The Americans are Coming!: The Cold War at Home and Abroad. 5 Units.

This course explores the relationship between U.S. foreign and domestic policy from 1945 to 1975. How did fighting the "Communist menace" shape notions of race, gender, and national identity within the United States? In what ways did nation-building abroad trigger clashes over the meaning of democracy at home? Using textual sources, photographs, films, and cartoons, students will examine notions of what it meant to be "American," both inside and outside the nation's borders, in a Cold War climate. The course fulfills the departmental Sources and Methods requirement.
Same as: HISTORY 66S

CSRE 102. Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation. 3-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
Same as: ANTHRO 102C, ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, NATIVEAM 102

CSRE 103B. Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Same as: AFRICAAM 106, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337

CSRE 103S. Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status. 5 Units.

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
Same as: FEMGEN 103S, NATIVEAM 103S

CSRE 106A. Gang Colors: The Racialization of Violence and the American City. 5 Units.

Street gangs (e.g. Bloods, Crips, Mara Salvatrucha, M-18, etc.) serve as a window onto the experience of racial, ethnic and economic marginalization under late capitalism. This class explores the context that gives rise to gang violence through a combination of anthropological, sociological, and historical approaches. Students will be familiarized with the macro-social factors that shape both gangs and the politics of violence in the Americas, North and South.
Same as: ANTHRO 106A

CSRE 107. The Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity. 4-5 Units.

Explore problems of race and ethnicity as viable criteria in studying ancient societies and consider the question, What is the Mediterranean?, in relation to premodern evidence. Investigate the role of blackness as a marker of ethnicity; the demography of slavery and its roles in forming social identities; and environmental determinism as a factor in ethnic and racial thinking. Consider Greek and Roman perspectives and behavior, and their impact on later theories of race and ethnicity as well as the Mediterranean as a whole.
Same as: AFRICAAM 107C

CSRE 108. Introduction to Feminist Studies. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Same as: AMSTUD 107, FEMGEN 101, TAPS 108

CSRE 108S. American Indian Religious Freedom. 5 Units.

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Same as: NATIVEAM 108S

CSRE 109A. Federal Indian Law. 5 Units.

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Same as: NATIVEAM 109A

CSRE 112X. Urban Education. 3-4 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: AFRICAAM 112, EDUC 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X

CSRE 117S. History of California Indians. 5 Units.

Demographic, political, and economic history of California Indians, 1700s-1950s. Processes and events leading to the destruction of California tribes, and their effects on the groups who survived. Geographic and cultural diversity. Spanish, Mexican, and Anglo-American periods. The mission system.
Same as: HISTORY 250A

CSRE 118A. Digital Heritage: Bringing the Past Online with the Chinese American Historical Museum. 5 Units.

Interpreting the past is no longer just for people like historians and archaeologists, and it¿s no longer confined to the pages of books. More and more, community-based organizations are gathering stories and perspectives from everyday people, and they¿re putting them out for the world to see online. With these big changes, what will be the future of thinking about the past? In this course, students will work through the dynamics of digital heritage through readings, discussion, and original research. The course centers around artifacts unearthed at the Market Street Chinatown in San Jose. Each student will analyze and gather stories relating to a single artifact in order to contribute to a multimedia exhibit for the Chinese American Historical Museum in San Jose. Class time will be devoted both to discussion and to work on artifact-based projects, and will also include a fieldtrip to the museum and collaboration time with members of the Chinese Historical and Cultural Project.
Same as: ANTHRO 118A, ASNAMST 118A

CSRE 121. Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices. 5 Units.

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Same as: NATIVEAM 121

CSRE 121L. Racial-Ethnic Politics in US. 5 Units.

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. STATS 60 or ECON 1 is strongly recommended.
Same as: AMSTUD 121L, POLISCI 121L, PUBLPOL 121L

CSRE 121X. Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language. 3-4 Units.

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Same as: AFRICAAM 121X, AMSTUD 121X, ANTHRO 121A, EDUC 121X, LINGUIST 155

CSRE 122E. Art in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces. 4 Units.

This class will introduce students to both historical and contemporary public art practices and the expression of race and identity through murals, graffiti, site-specific works and performative interventions in public spaces. Involving lectures, guest speakers, field trips, and hands-on art practice, students will be expected to produce both an individual and group piece as a final project.
Same as: AFRICAAM 122E

CSRE 123A. American Indians and the Cinema. 5 Units.

Hollywood and the film industry have had a major influence on American society for nearly a century. Initially designed to provide entertainment, the cinema broadened its impact by creating images perceived as real and essentialist. Hollywood's Indians have been the main source of information about who American Indians are and Hollywood has helped shape inaccurate and stereotypical perceptions that continue to exist today. This course looks chronologically at cinematic interpretations and critically examines accurate portrayals of American Indians and of American history.
Same as: NATIVEAM 123A

CSRE 123B. Literature and Human Experimentation. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to the relationship between literature and ethics in human subjects research and experimental care. Students will gain a substantive understanding of two important fields: research bioethics and narrative ethics, and how their modes of analysis have long intersected in traditions of imaginative writing. We will focus on readings that imaginatively revisit experiments conducted on vulnerable populations, namely groups placed at risk by their classification according to racial, ethnic, gender, class and religious differences. We will begin with Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818), and continue our study via later works of fiction (Morrison, le Carré, Ishiguro), drama (Feldshuh), memoir (Burney, Gilman), journalism (Arendt, Skloot) and theoretical reflection (Fanon, Nussbaum, Butler). Each literary reading will be paired with medical, philosophical and policy publications of the period. And our aim will be to understand literature¿s place in developing ethical thought concerned with humane research and care.
Same as: COMPLIT 223, HUMBIO 175H, MED 220

CSRE 125V. The Voting Rights Act. 5 Units.

Focus is on whether and how racial and ethnic minorities including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos are able to organize and press their demands on the political system. Topics include the political behavior of minority citizens, the strength and effect of these groups at the polls, the theory and practice of group formation among minorities, the responsiveness of elected officials, and the constitutional obstacles and issues that shape these phenomena.
Same as: AFRICAAM 125V, POLISCI 125V

CSRE 126B. Curricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population. 3-4 Units.

Recently two laws in Brazil (10639/2003 and 13465/2008), which came about due to intense pressure from Black and Indigenous social movements throughout the 20th century, have introduced changes in public education curriculum policies. These new curriculum policies mandate that the study of Afro-Brazilian, African, and Indigenous histories and cultures must be taught at all educational levels including at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. As part of this mandate, educators are now directed to incorporate considerations of ethnic-racial diversity in relation to people's thinking and experiences. These policies aim to fight racism as well as other forms of discrimination, and moreover, encourage the building of more equitable pedagogies. This course will discuss past and current policies and practices in Brazilian education from the point of view of different social projects organized by Indigenous Peoples, Afro-Brazilians, Asian-Brazilians, as well as Euro-Brazilians. It will also focus on Latin American efforts to promote equity in education, as well as to articulate different points of view, and reinforce and build epistemologies that support the decolonization of thinking, behaviors, research and policies. As part of this process, the course will study the experiences of people demanding these new public policies in terms of the extent to which they were able to influence institutional structures and to establish particular policy reforms. The course will also analyze theoretical frameworks employed by opponents of these movements to resist policies that might challenge their privileged place in society. In doing this, the course will offer theoretical and methodological avenues to promote research that can counter hegemonic curricular policies and pedagogical practices. The course will be fully participatory and oriented towards generating ongoing conversations and discussion about the various issues that arose in Brazil in relation to these two recent laws. To meet these goals, we will do a close reading of relevant scholarly works, paying particular attention to their theoretical frameworks, research designs, and findings.
Same as: AFRICAAM 126B, EDUC 136B, EDUC 236B, PUBLPOL 126B

CSRE 127A. Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts. 4 Units.

This course explores the history and development of the hip-hop arts movement, from its precursor movements in music, dance, visual arts, literature, and folk and street cultures to its rise as a neighborhood subculture in the Bronx in the early 1970s through its local, regional and global expansion and development. Hip-hop aesthetics, structures, and politics will be explored within the context of the movement¿s rise as a post-multicultural form in an era of neoliberal globalization.
Same as: AFRICAAM 127A

CSRE 128. WHAT WE WANT IS WE: Identity in Visual Arts, Social Engagement, and Civic Propositions. 4 Units.

This studio practicum examines contemporary culture through case studies on visual art, race theory, urban studies, and resistance legacies. This class looks at strategies of socially engaged art practices, community building endeavors, and the complications peculiar to these projects. From these case studies, students will make public art/text/performative experiments and learn research and grant writing approaches for designing long-term political projects. Students will translate their research into grant proposals that will be judged by a professional panel during the final week. Course guests include granting agencies/arts foundations and international artists, curators, city planners, and activists (live/video conferences).

CSRE 129B. Literature and Global Health. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the ways writers in literature and medicine have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with an introduction to global health ethics as a field rooted in philosophy and policy that address questions raised by practice in resource-constrained communities abroad. We will then spend the quarter understanding the way literature may deepen and even alter those questions. For instance: how have writers used scenes of practice in Africa, the Caribbean or Latin America to think through ideas of mercy, charity, beneficence and justice? How differently do they imagine such scenes when examining issues of autonomy, paternalism and language? To what extent, then, do novels and memoirs serve as sites of ethical inquiry? And how has literary study revealed the complexities of narrating care for underserved communities, and therefore presented close reading as a mode of ethics for global health? Readings will include prose fiction by Albert Camus, Joseph Conrad, Amitav Ghosh and Susan Sontag as well as physician memoirs featuring Frantz Fanon, Albert Schweitzer, Abraham Verghese and Paul Farmer.
Same as: COMPLIT 229, FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234

CSRE 130. Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms. 3-5 Units.

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques. Prerequisite: graduate status or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 130, EDUC 123X, EDUC 322

CSRE 131. Genes and Identity. 5 Units.

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Same as: AFRICAAM 131, ANTHRO 131

CSRE 131C. Trauma, healing, and empowerment in Asian America. 3-5 Units.

This course will look at the ways in which Asian Americans are affected by the legacy of war, occupation and colonialism through themes of home, displacement, community, roots, identity, and inter-generational trauma. The approach is integrative, including scholarly investigation, embodied practice, and creative approach. This self-reflective process uses narrative, oral and written, as a means of becoming whole and healing personal, historical, and collective wounds.
Same as: ASNAMST 131

CSRE 133A. Anthropology of the Middle East. 3-5 Units.

This course examines social, political, and religious dimensions of various Middle Eastern societies. Key topics include the development of the modern nation-state, the Islamic revival, human rights, and discourses of democracy. Course materials include ethnographic studies, novels, and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.
Same as: ANTHRO 133A

CSRE 135H. Conversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community. 1-2 Unit.

Race, ethnicity, gender, and religion using the tools, analytical skills and concepts developed by anthropologists.
Same as: ANTHRO 135H

CSRE 135I. CSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford. 1-2 Unit.

Race, ethnicity, gender, and religion using the tools, analytical skills and concepts developed by anthropologists.
Same as: ANTHRO 135I

CSRE 138. Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise. 5 Units.

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Same as: ANTHRO 138, ANTHRO 238

CSRE 140C. Stand Up Comedy and the "Great American Joke" Since 1945. 5 Units.

Development of American Stand Up Comedy in the context of social and cultural eruptions after 1945, including the Borscht Belt, the Chitlin¿ Circuit, the Cold War, censorship battles, Civil Rights and other social movements of the 60s and beyond. The artistry of stories, monologues, jokes, impersonations, persona, social satire, scatology, obscenity, riffs, rants, shtick, and more by such artists as Lenny Bruce, Dick Gregory, Richard Pryor, George Carlin, Margaret Cho, Sarah Silverman, Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, as well as precursors such as Mark Twain, minstrelsy and vaudeville and related films, TV shows, poems and other manifestations of similar sensibilities and techniques.
Same as: AMSTUD 140

CSRE 142. The Literature of the Americas. 5 Units.

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
Same as: AMSTUD 142, COMPLIT 142, ENGLISH 172E

CSRE 142A. What is Hemispheric Studies?. 5 Units.

Will attempt to open up "America," beyond the United States. Have we reached the end of an era in our national literary imaginations? What is the utility and durability of the idea of the nation in a global era? New developments in hemispheric, Black Atlantic, and trans-american studies have raised questions about the very viability of US literary studies. Should we, as Franco Moretti suggests, map, count, and graph the relationships in our close (rhetorical) and "distant" readings of texts in the Americas? Topics include the definitions of concepts such as coloniality, modernity, time and the colonial difference, the encounters between world views of Europeans and indigenous Native American peoples, and the inventions of America, Latinamericanism, and Americanity.

CSRE 144. Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class. 5 Units.

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Same as: ASNAMST 144, FEMGEN 144X

CSRE 145. Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 245.) Race and ethnic relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. The processes that render ethnic and racial boundary markers, such as skin color, language, and culture, salient in interaction situations. Why only some groups become targets of ethnic attacks. The social dynamics of ethnic hostility and ethnic/racial protest movements.
Same as: SOC 145, SOC 245

CSRE 145B. Africa in Atlantic Writing. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the central place Africa has held in prose writing emerging during periods of globalization across the Atlantic, including the middle passage, colonialism, black internationalism, decolonization, immigration and diasporic return. We will begin with Equiano's Interesting Narrative (1789), a touchstone for the Atlantic prose tradition, and study ways traveling writers have continued to depict Africa: to dramatize departure or arrival and shape new selves, to represent racial and historical unity or explore social and individual fragmentation, to imagine new national communities or question their norms and borders. Readings will be selected from English, French, Portuguese and Spanish-language traditions. And we will pay close attention to narrative forms, namely prose fiction (e.g. Adichie, Condé, Olinto), prose poetry (Césaire, Neto, Walcott), theoretical essays (Fanon, Glissant), reportage (Gide, Gourevitch), ethnography (Leiris, Ouologuem) and, notably, autobiography (Equiano, Barack Obama).
Same as: COMPLIT 145B, COMPLIT 345B, FRENCH 145B, FRENCH 345B

CSRE 145F. Race and Power. 5 Units.

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.
Same as: ANTHRO 145, ANTHRO 245

CSRE 146. Community Matters: Research and Service with Community Organizations. 2-4 Units.

Methods and principles for academic research in community settings and social action for students preparing to enter summer experiences with community organizations. Lectures, readings, and discussions help students conceptualize a research project. Students develop a research proposal and memorandum of understanding in collaboration with the community agency to define the work, relationship, and mutual benefit of the research partnership.

CSRE 146S. Asian American Culture and Community. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to the histories of Asians in America, specifically as these histories are part of a broader Asia-US-Pacific history that characterized the 20th century and now the 21st. We will combine readings in history, literature, sociology, with community-based learning.nnThe course takes place over two quarters. The first quarter focuses on gaining knowledge of Asian America and discussion key topics that students wish to focus on collaboratively. During this first quarter we also learn about community-based learning, set up teams and projects, and develop relationships with community organizations. The second quarter students work with student liaisons (senior students who have experience in service learning) and complete their work with the community¿there are no formal class meetings this second quarter. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
Same as: AMSTUD 146, ASNAMST 146S, COMPLIT 146

CSRE 147J. Studies in Music, Media, and Popular Culture: The Soul Tradition in African American Music. 3-4 Units.

The African American tradition of soul music from its origins in blues, gospel, and jazz to its influence on today's r&b, hip hop, and dance music. Style such as rhythm and blues, Motown, Southern soul, funk, Philadelphia soul, disco, Chicago house, Detroit techno, trip hop, and neo-soul. Soul's cultural influence and global reach; its interaction with politics, gender, place, technology, and the economy. Pre-/corequisite (for music majors): MUSIC 22. (WIM at 4 units only.).
Same as: AFRICAAM 19, AMSTUD 147J, MUSIC 147J, MUSIC 247J

CSRE 148. Comparative Ethnic Conflict. 4 Units.

Causes and consequences of racial and ethnic conflict, including nationalist movements, ethnic genocide, civil war, ethnic separatism, politics, indigenous peoples' movements, and minority rights movements around the world.
Same as: SOC 148, SOC 248

CSRE 150. Race and Political Sociology. 3 Units.

How race informs the theories and research within political sociology. The state's role in creation and maintenance of racial categories, the ways in which racial identity motivates political actors, how race is used to legitimate policy decisions, comparisons across racial groups. Emphasis on understanding the ways race operates in the political arena.
Same as: SOC 150, SOC 250

CSRE 151H. ID21 STRATLAB: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Improvising Identities. 4-5 Units.

A quarter-long exploration of improvisation in relationship to identity and race in the 21st century in which students investigate new dynamics of doing and thinking identities through the arts. Panel discussions, performances, and talks that engage critically with the theme, concept, and practice of improvising identity across a variety of contexts and genres such as jazz music, modern dance, contemporary art, race comedy, food, and hip-hop poetry/freestyle. Strategies that artists/scholars have used to overturn essentializing notions of identity in theory and practice.
Same as: AMSTUD 151H, DANCE 151H, DANCE 251H, TAPS 151H, TAPS 351H

CSRE 154. Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity. 5 Units.

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Same as: ANTHRO 154, ANTHRO 254B

CSRE 154D. Law, Slavery, and Race. 5 Units.

(Same as LAW 747.) This course will explore the interaction of law, slavery and race in the United States, as well as from a comparative perspective. We will read original documents, including excerpts of trial transcripts, appellate opinions, treatises, codes, and first-person narratives. We will study the way law, politics and culture interacted to shape the institution of slavery and the development of modern conceptions of race. Course lectures and discussions will focus on questions such as: Did different legal regimes (Spanish, French, British) foster different systems of race and slavery in the Americas? How did/does law work "on the ground" to shape the production of racial hierarchy and creation of racial identities? In what ways did slavery influence the U.S. Constitution? How has race shaped citizenship in the U.S., and how can we compare it to other constitutional regimes? The course will begin with the origins of New World slavery, race and racism, and move chronologically to the present day.
Same as: AFRICAAM 254D, HISTORY 254D, HISTORY 354

CSRE 159M. Movement and Meaning: Dance Studies in Global Comparative Context. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to various approaches to studying dance in a humanities context. We will explore how people create meaning through dance and how dance, in turn, shapes social norms, political institutions, and cultural practices across time and space. The course's structure challenges the Western/non-Western binary that still pervades many academic disciplines by comparing dance forms across the globe on the basis of functional similarities. At the same time, we will keep in mind the unequal power hierarchies shaping our modern world, and therefore we will examine how and why certain forms have become delineated as 'Western' and others as 'world' or 'ethnic,' despite similarities in movement, meaning, or purpose.
Same as: DANCE 23, TAPS 159M, TAPS 259M

CSRE 162. Women in Modern America. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern womanhood in the U.S. from the 1890s to the end of the 20th century, including the experiences of Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women. It asks how, when, and why the majority of American women become wage earners, gained full citizenship, and enacted political opportunities; how race- and class-specific ideals of womanhood changed in popular culture; and how women have redefined their reproductive and sexual relations.
Same as: AMSTUD 161, FEMGEN 161, HISTORY 161

CSRE 162A. Spirituality and Nonviolent Urban and Social Transformation. 3 Units.

A life of engagement in social transformation is often built on a foundation of spiritual and religious commitments. Case studies of nonviolent social change agents including Rosa Parks in the civil rights movement, César Chávez in the labor movement, and WIlliam Sloane Coffin in the peace movement; the religious and spiritual underpinnings of their commitments. Theory and principles of nonviolence. Films and readings. Service learning component includes placements in organizations engaged in social transformation. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: RELIGST 162, URBANST 126

CSRE 164. Immigration and the Changing United States. 4 Units.

The role of race and ethnicity in immigrant group integration in the U.S. Topics include: theories of integration; racial and ethnic identity formation; racial and ethnic change; immigration policy; intermarriage; hybrid racial and ethnic identities; comparisons between contemporary and historical waves of immigration.
Same as: CHILATST 164, SOC 164, SOC 264

CSRE 166B. Immigration Debates in America, Past and Present. 3-5 Units.

Examines the ways in which the immigration of people from around the world and migration within the United States shaped American nation-building and ideas about national identity in the twentieth century. Focuses on how conflicting ideas about race, gender, ethnicity, and citizenship with respect to particular groups led to policies both of exclusion and integration. Part One begins with the ways in which the American views of race and citizenship in the colonial period through the post-Reconstruction Era led to the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 and subsequently to broader exclusions of immigrants from other parts of Asia, Southern and Eastern Europe, and Mexico. Explores how World War II and the Cold War challenged racial ideologies and led to policies of increasing liberalization culminating in the passage of the 1965 Immigration Act, which eliminated quotas based on national origins and opened the door for new waves of immigrants, especially from Asia and Latin America. Part Two considers new immigration patterns after 1965, including those of refugees, and investigates the contemporary debate over immigration and immigration policy in the post 9/11 era as well as inequalities within the system and the impact of foreign policy on exclusions and inclusions.
Same as: HISTORY 166B, HISTORY 366B

CSRE 168. New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.. 5 Units.

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Same as: ANTHRO 169A, CHILATST 168, FEMGEN 140H

CSRE 171H. Mexicans in the United States. 5 Units.

This course explores the lives and experiences of Mexicans living in the United States, from 1848 to the present. Themes and topics include: the legacies of colonialism, the Mexican-American War, transnational migration, the effects of economic stratification, race and racialization, and the impact of sexual and gender ideologies on the lives of Mexicans residing north of the border.
Same as: AMSTUD 271, CHILATST 171, HISTORY 271

CSRE 172. Out of Place: (W)riting Home. 4 Units.

A creative writing workshop; all genres. This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of a productive creative writing practice, including ¿the beginner¿s mind¿ (as founded in Eastern spiritual practices); and, an indigenous approach to ¿authenticity¿ in one¿s work and one¿s words. Through w(riting), one returns to the body of home-knowledges, languages, and geographies to uncover what is profoundly original in us as artists, writers and thinkers.¿.
Same as: TAPS 172, TAPS 272

CSRE 172H. Theories of Citizenship and Sovereignty in a Transnational Context. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the multiple meanings of citizenship and the ways in which they change when examined using different geographic scales (from the local to the transnational). The course will pair theoretical readings on citizenship with case studies that focus on North America. Topics include: definitions of citizenship; the interrelation of ideas of citizenship with those of race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality; the relationship between sovereignty and territoriality; human and civil rights; and immigration.
Same as: AMSTUD 272E, CHILATST 172, FEMGEN 272E, HISTORY 272E, HISTORY 372E

CSRE 174S. When Half is Whole: Developing Synergistic Identities and Mestiza Consciousness. 5 Units.

This is an exploration of the ways in which individuals construct whole selves in societies that fragment, label, and bind us in categories and boxes. We examine identities that overcome the destructive dichotomies of ¿us¿ and ¿them, ¿ crossing borders of race, ethnicity, culture, nation, sex, and gender. Our focus is on the development of hybrid and synergistic forms of identity and mestiza consciousness in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

CSRE 176S. Finding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing. 5 Units.

We can find meaning in life's struggles through narrative ways of healing. The self-reflective, dynamic process of finding, telling, and living our stories connects us with our whole selves as well as with others. We find our stories through vulnerability and courage; tell them with humility and honesty; and live them authentically and responsibly. Our shared stories will focus on gratitude, acceptance, reconciliation, forgiveness and compassion, empowering us to overcome personal, community, and historical traumas and wounds. In a respectful, caring community we will discover our hidden wholeness by improvising with various experiential and embodied means of finding our stories; telling our stories in diverse ways, including writing, storytelling, music, and art; and living our stories by putting values into action.
Same as: TAPS 176S

CSRE 177. Writing for Performance: The Fundamentals. 5 Units.

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Same as: FEMGEN 177, TAPS 177, TAPS 277

CSRE 177B. Introduction to Dance on the Global Stage. 4 Units.

The course will examine and engage with dance cultures from around the world. Through historical and theoretical readings, film screenings, and viewing performances, this course aims to introduce students to a number of theoretical issues central to the study of dance across various disciplines. As a class we set out to explore how dance is more than a set of organized bodily movements, pleasurable to both do and watch. We will consider what cultural work dance performance accomplishes in the world.
Same as: DANCE 177

CSRE 177E. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 3 Units.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CHILATST 177A, EDUC 177A, HUMBIO 29A

CSRE 177F. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 1-3 Unit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CHILATST 177B, EDUC 177B

CSRE 177G. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 1-3 Unit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CHILATST 177C, EDUC 177C

CSRE 178. Ethics and Politics of Public Service. 5 Units.

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford. [This class is capped but there are some spaces available with permission of instructor. If the class is full and you would like to be considered for these extra spaces, please email sburbank@stanford.edu with your name, grade level, and a paragraph explaining why you want to take the class.].
Same as: ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, PUBLPOL 103D, URBANST 122

CSRE 178B. Intensive Playwriting. 5 Units.

Intermediate level study of fundamentals of playwriting through an intensive play development process. Course emphasizes visual scripting for the stage and play revision. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Suzan-Lori Parks, Tony Kushner, Adrienne Kennedy, Edward Albee, Maria Irene Fornes and others. Table readings of full length work required by quarter¿s end.
Same as: TAPS 178B, TAPS 278

CSRE 179C. Chroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

This course emphasizes the study and practice of personal memoir writing and literary journalism. The class will explore those writings that contain a public and private story, navigating an intimate and institutional world. Student writers will serve as public chroniclers whose subjective point of view and experience attempt to provide a truth greater than what ¿the facts¿ can offer.
Same as: CSRE 279C, FEMGEN 179C, TAPS 179C, TAPS 279C

CSRE 179F. Flor y Canto: Poetry Workshop. 3-5 Units.

Poetry reading and writing. The poet as philosopher and the poet as revolutionary. Texts: the philosophical meditations of pre-Columbian Aztec poetry known as flor y canto, and reflections on the poetry of resistance born out of the nationalist and feminist struggles of Latin America and Aztlán. Required 20-page poetry manuscript.
Same as: CHILATST 179F, TAPS 179F, TAPS 279F

CSRE 179G. Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America. 3-5 Units.

This "gateway" core course to the IDA emphasis in CSRE offers a 21st century examination of people of color aesthetics and related politics, drawing from contemporary works (literature, music, visual and performing arts) in conversation with their native (especially American Indigenous and African) origins. Issues of gender and sexuality in relation to cultural identity are also integral to this study. Students will be required to produce a final work, integrating critical writing with a creative project.
Same as: CSRE 279G, FEMGEN 179G, TAPS 279G

CSRE 183. Re- Imagining American Borders. 5 Units.

How novelists, filmmakers, and poets perceive racial, ethnic, gender, sexual preference, and class borders in the context of a national discussion about the place of Americans in the world. How Anna Deavere Smith, Sherman Alexie, or Michael Moore consider redrawing such lines so that center and margin, or self and other, do not remain fixed and divided. How linguistic borderlines within multilingual literature by Caribbean, Arab, and Asian Americans function. Can Anzaldúa's conception of borderlands be constructed through the matrix of language, dreams, music, and cultural memories in these American narratives? Course includes examining one's own identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 183, FEMGEN 183

CSRE 187A. The Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality. 5 Units.

As recently as the 40s, the S, Africa government labeled indigenous San people part of the animal landscape. Using the San example as a starting point, course examines socially, culturally, and politically constructed ideas about race, animality, and nature in the cultural and geographic settings of N. America, Australia, and Africa. How connections between race and nature have served as terrains of power through which people and governments have claimed territories and justified violence. Classic texts by nature writers and philosophers and current social science works that focus on race and ethnicity. Concepts such as gender, sex, and nature; environmental tourism; natural resource development; and indigeneity and animality. How ideas about race and nature have come together around concepts such as the myth of wilderness and the violence of considering certain people to be less-than-human. Issues of environmental politics and activism.
Same as: ANTHRO 187A

CSRE 188Q. Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person. 4-5 Units.

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Same as: FEMGEN 188Q

CSRE 189W. Language and Minority Rights. 3 Units.

Language as it is implicated in migration and globalization. The effects of globalization processes on languages, the complexity of language use in migrant and indigenous minority contexts, the connectedness of today's societies brought about by the development of communication technologies. Individual and societal multilingualism; preservation and revival of endangered languages.
Same as: CHILATST 189W, EDUC 189X

CSRE 192E. Topics in the History of Sexuality: Sexual Violence in America. 4-5 Units.

This undergraduate/graduate colloquium explores recent historical interpretations of the history of sexuality, with a focus on sexual violence. The readings cover changing definitions and laws, cultural representations, and the role of gender, race, and age in the construction of rape and other forms of sexual violence. Topics include slavery; incest, seduction, and statutory rape reform; the racialization of rape and the anti-lynching movement; street harassment; men and boys as victims; war and conquest; and feminist responses to rape.
Same as: AMSTUD 258, FEMGEN 258, FEMGEN 358, HISTORY 258, HISTORY 358

CSRE 196C. Introduction to Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. 5 Units.

How different disciplines approach topics and issues central to the study of ethnic and race relations in the U.S. and elsewhere. Lectures by senior faculty affiliated with CSRE. Discussions led by CSRE teaching fellows. Includes an optional Haas Center for Public Service certified Community Engaged Learning section.
Same as: ENGLISH 172D, PSYCH 155, SOC 146, TAPS 165

CSRE 198. Internship for Public Service. 1-5 Unit.

Students should consult with CCSRE Director of Service-Learning (nadiad@stanford.edu) to develop or sign-up for a community service internship. Group meetings may be required. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: CHILATST 198

CSRE 200. Latin@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Examines a diverse set of narratives by U.S. Latin@s of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Guatemalan, and Dominican heritage through the lens of latinidad. All share the historical experience of Spanish colonization and U.S. imperialism, yet their im/migration patterns differ, affecting social, cultural, and political trajectories in the US and relationships to "home" and "homeland," nation, diaspora, history, and memory. Explores how racialization informs genders as well as sexualities. Emphasis on textual analysis. Taught in English.
Same as: CHILATST 200, ILAC 280, ILAC 382

CSRE 200R. Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

.

CSRE 200W. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

.

CSRE 200X. CSRE Senior Seminar. 5 Units.

Required for CSRE-related students, including those who opt to write honors theses in other departments and programs. Research and the writing of the senior honors thesis or senior paper under the supervision of a faculty project adviser. The process of research including conceptualization, development of prospectus, development of theses, research, analysis, and writing.

CSRE 200Y. CSRE Senior Honors Research. 1-10 Unit.

.

CSRE 200Z. CSRE Senior Honors Research. 1-10 Unit.

.

CSRE 201. Introduction to Public History and Public Service. 4-5 Units.

Gateway course for the History and Public Service interdisciplinary track. Topics include the production, presentation, and practice of public history through narratives, exhibits, web sites, and events in museums, historical sites, parks, and public service settings in nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: AFRICAAM 102, HISTORY 201, HISTORY 301

CSRE 201B. From Racial Justice to Multiculturalism: Movement-based Arts Organizing in the Post Civil Rights Era. 5 Units.

How creative projects build and strengthen communities of common concern. Projects focus on cultural reclamation, multiculturalism, cultural equity and contemporary cultural wars, media literacy, independent film, and community-based art. Guest artists and organizers, films, and case studies.
Same as: CHILATST 201B

CSRE 201C. Critical Concepts in Chican@ Literature. 3-5 Units.

Combines primary texts of Chican@ literature with a metacritical interrogation of key concepts informing Chican@ literary criticism, the construction of Chican@ literary history, and a Chican@ literary canon. Interrogates the resistance paradigm and the "proper" subject of this literature, and critiques established genealogies and foundational authors and texts, as well as issues of periodization, including the notion of "emergence" (e.g. of feminist voices or dissident sexualities). Considers texts, authors and subjects that present alternatives to the resistance paradigm.
Same as: CHILATST 201C, ILAC 380E

CSRE 203A. The Changing Face of America: Building Leaders for Civil Rights and Education. 5 Units.

For students with leadership potential who have studied these topics in lecture format. Race discrimination strategies, their relation to education reform initiatives, and the role of media in shaping racial attitudes in the U.S. A service-learning component will be offered as an option in this course in partnership with East Palo Alto organizations.nnApplication Required! Please apply here: http://bit.ly/CSRE_203A before 5pm on Friday, March 21st.

CSRE 216X. Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-1990. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. The relationship among race, power, inequality, and education from the 1880s to the 1990s. How schools have constructed race, the politics of school desegregation, and ties between education and the late 20th-century urban crisis.
Same as: AFRICAAM 116, EDUC 216, HISTORY 255E

CSRE 220. Public Policy Institute. 3-5 Units.

Public Policy Institute serves to: provide students with information and perspectives on important public policy issues that have particular relevancy to matters of race and ethnicity in American society, past and present; expose students to faculty and other professionals working on public policy-related issues; and provide insight into the legislative process of public policy making at the state and local levels. Students are expected to conduct research necessary to write a policy brief on a particular issue, and makena presentation based on the policy brief. A field trip to Sacramento introduces students to policymakers and current policy matters of importance to marginalized communities in California.

CSRE 226. Race and Racism in American Politics. 5 Units.

Topics include the historical conceptualization of race; whether and how racial animus reveals itself and the forms it might take; its role in the creation and maintenance of economic stratification; its effect on contemporary U.S. partisan and electoral politics; and policy making consequences.
Same as: AMSTUD 226, POLISCI 226, POLISCI 326

CSRE 226X. Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums. 2-4 Units.

In an age when some 50% of museum visitors only "visit" museums online and when digital technologies have broken open archival access, anyone can be a curator, a critic, an historian, an archivist. In this context, how do museums create experiences that teach visitors about who they are and about the world around them? What are the politics of representation that shape learning in these environments? Using an experimental instructional approach, students will reconsider and redefine what it means to curate experience.
Same as: AMSTUD 226X, EDUC 226X

CSRE 233A. Counseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective. 3-5 Units.

In an era of globalization characterized by widespread migration and cultural contacts, professionals face a unique challenge: How does one practice successfully when working with clients/students from so many different backgrounds? This course focuses upon the need to examine, conceptualize, and work with individuals according to the multiple ways in which they identify themselves. It will systematically examine multicultural counseling concepts, issues, and research. Literature on counselor and client characteristics such as social status or race/ethnicity and their effects on the counseling process and outcome will be reviewed. Issues in consultation with culturally and linguistically diverse parents and students and work with migrant children and their families are but a few of the topics covered in this course.
Same as: AFRICAAM 233A, EDUC 233A

CSRE 243. Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction. 3-5 Units.

Theoretical perspectives that have dominated the literature on writing research. Reports, articles, and chapters on writing research, theory, and instruction; current and historical perspectives in writing research and research findings relating to teaching and learning in this area.
Same as: EDUC 145, EDUC 243

CSRE 245. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development. 3-5 Units.

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Same as: AFRICAAM 245, EDUC 245

CSRE 246. Constructing Race and Religion in America. 4-5 Units.

This seminar focuses on the interrelationships between social constructions of race, and social interpretations of religion in America. How have assumptions about race shaped religious worldviews? How have religious beliefs shaped racial attitudes? How have ideas about religion and race contributed to notions of what it means to be "American"? We will look at primary and secondary sources, and at the historical development of ideas and practices over time.
Same as: HISTORY 256G, HISTORY 356G, RELIGST 246, RELIGST 346

CSRE 260. California's Minority-Majority Cities. 4-5 Units.

Historical development and the social, cultural, and political issues that characterize large cities and suburbs where communities of color make up majority populations. Case studies include cities in Los Angeles, Santa Clara, and Monterey counties. Comparisons to minority-majority cities elsewhere in the U.S. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: HISTORY 260

CSRE 279C. Chroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

This course emphasizes the study and practice of personal memoir writing and literary journalism. The class will explore those writings that contain a public and private story, navigating an intimate and institutional world. Student writers will serve as public chroniclers whose subjective point of view and experience attempt to provide a truth greater than what ¿the facts¿ can offer.
Same as: CSRE 179C, FEMGEN 179C, TAPS 179C, TAPS 279C

CSRE 279G. Indigenous Identity in Diaspora: People of Color Art Practice in North America. 3-5 Units.

This "gateway" core course to the IDA emphasis in CSRE offers a 21st century examination of people of color aesthetics and related politics, drawing from contemporary works (literature, music, visual and performing arts) in conversation with their native (especially American Indigenous and African) origins. Issues of gender and sexuality in relation to cultural identity are also integral to this study. Students will be required to produce a final work, integrating critical writing with a creative project.
Same as: CSRE 179G, FEMGEN 179G, TAPS 279G

CSRE 289E. Queer of Color Critique: Race, Sex, Gender in Cultural Representations. 3-5 Units.

Examines major questions and issues that arise in considering race, sex, and gender together. Focus on critical and theoretical texts queering ethnic and diaspora studies and bringing race and ethnicity into queer studies. Close reading of texts in a variety of media negotiating racialized sexualities and sexualized identities. How is desire racialized? How is racial difference produced through sex acts? How to reconcile pleasure and desire with histories of imperialism and (neo)colonialism and structures of power?.
Same as: FEMGEN 389E, ILAC 389E

CSRE 290. Ferguson in a Global Frame: Human Rights and the Arts. 3-5 Units.

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts of international human rights and uses these concepts to frame problems of inequality, marginality, exclusion and injustice that are chronic across the globe¿including the United States. Focusing on Ferguson as a point of inflection, this course will consider police repression of political protest in a comparative context. The course will also use the lens of fundamental human rights to explore a state¿s failure to investigate and prosecute, and its failure to protect its citizens from violations committed by agents or from non-state agents. In each thematic unit, we will examine the United States in a comparative lens, and will consider how we understand, frame, mourn and contest the violations of rights in literature, the visual arts, and in social and political action. We will continuously examine the role of the arts in disseminating, shaping and deepening our understanding of multiple dimensions of human rights violations. At the same time, we will consider how these cultural products reflect on, illuminate, contest or problematize advocacy texts and sources of international law. We will examine texts from the United States, Brazil, South Africa, among other countries, as well as documents from international and regional human rights bodies.
Same as: AFRICAAM 290, COMPLIT 290

Jewish Studies Courses

JEWISHST 4N. A World History of Genocide. 3-5 Units.

Reviews the history of genocide from ancient times until the present. Defines genocide, both in legal and historical terms, and investigates its causes, consequences, and global dimensions. Issues of prevention, punishment, and interdiction. Main periods of concern are the ancient world, Spanish colonial conquest; early modern Asia; settler genocides in America, Australia, and Africa; the Armenian genocide and the Holocaust; genocide in communist societies; and late 20th century genocide.
Same as: HISTORY 4N

JEWISHST 5. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGRK 5.) This is a one term intensive class in Biblical Greek. After quickly learning the basics of the language, we will then dive right into readings from the New Testament and the Septuagint, which is the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible. No previous knowledge of Greek required. If demand is high for a second term, an additional quarter will be offered in the Spring.
Same as: CLASSICS 6G, RELIGST 171A

JEWISHST 5B. Biblical Greek. 3-5 Units.

This is a continuation of the Winter Quarter Biblical Greek Course. We will be reading selections primarily from the New Testament (both Gospels and Epistles) as well as focusing on knowledge of key vocabulary and grammar needed to read the Greek Bible with ease. Readings will be supplemented with sections from the Septuagint and Early Christian texts (Apostolic Fathers and Early Creeds). Pre-requisite: ClassGrk 5 or a similar introductory course in Ancient Greek.
Same as: CLASSICS 7G

JEWISHST 18N. Religion and Politics: Comparing Europe to the U.S.. 3-4 Units.

Interdisciplinary and comparative. Historical, political, sociological, and religious studies approaches. The relationship between religion and politics as understood in the U.S. and Europe. How this relationship has become tense both because of the rise of Islam as a public religion in Europe and the rising influence of religious groups in public culture. Different understandings and definitions of the separation of church and state in Western democratic cultures, and differing notions of the public sphere. Case studies to investigate the nature of public conflicts, what issues lead to conflict, and why. Why has the head covering of Muslim women become politicized in Europe? What are the arguments surrounding the Cordoba House, known as the Ground Zero Mosque, and how does this conflict compare to controversies about recent constructions of mosques in Europe? Resources include media, documentaries, and scholarly literature.
Same as: RELIGST 18N

JEWISHST 19N. "Land of Milk and Honey": Food, Justice, and Ethnic Identity in Jewish Culture. 3 Units.

Food is an essential aspect of the human experience. The decisions and choices we make about food define who we have been, who we are now, and who we want to become. nnThis seminar examines Jewish culture and the food practices and traditions that have shaped and continue to shape it. Why has Jewish culture been centered around food practices? How have religious laws and rituals about food and food production shaped Jewish culture and vice versa? Dietary laws prescribe which animals are and are not "kosher" and what can be eaten with them, holidays are celebrated with traditional foods, and regional foods contribute to the formation of distinct Jewish ethnic identities. More recently, American Jews have begun to organize around issues of food justice, and joined the sustainability movement, adapting Jewish traditions about food production into their cause. What is the significance of animal welfare, environmental issues, and labor practices in Jewish culture?nnThis multi-disciplinary seminar explores the connection between food practices and ethnic and religious identity(ies), the history of the dietary laws and their multiple interpretations, the cultural significance of the phenomenal success of kosher certification in the U.S. food market, and the rise of the Jewish food justice movement. These issues raise a multitude of comparative questions, and you are encouraged to engage in research into other religious and ethnic food cultures. Course materials include: biblical and later religious, legal, and philosophical texts; cook-books (as cultural and historical sources); literature (both fiction and academic); films; news media, and food experts. We will visit an urban farming community (Urban Adamah) to learn from those involved in the Jewish sustainability movement.
Same as: CSRE 19N, RELIGST 19N

JEWISHST 37Q. Zionism and the Novel. 4 Units.

At the end of the nineteenth century, Zionism emerged as a political movement to establish a national homeland for the Jews, eventually leading to the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. This seminar uses novels to explore the changes in Zionism, the roots of the conflict in the Middle East, and the potentials for the future. We will take a close look at novels by Israelis, both Jewish and Arab, in order to understand multiple perspectives, and we will also consider works by authors from the North America and from Europe.
Same as: COMPLIT 37Q

JEWISHST 38A. Germany and the World Wars. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 138A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. International conflict, social upheaval, and state transformation during Bismarck's wars of unification, World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Same as: HISTORY 38A

JEWISHST 71. Jews and Christians: Conflict and Coexistence. 3 Units.

The relationship between Judaism and Christianity has had a long a controversial history. Christianity originated as a dissident Jewish sect but eventually evolved into an independent religion, with only tenuous ties to its Jewish past and present. At the same time, Judaism has at times considered Christianity a form of idolatry. It seems that only since the catastrophe of the Holocaust, Jews and Christians (Catholics and Protestants) have begun the serious work of forging more meaningful relationships with each other. This course explores the most significant moments, both difficult and conciliatory ones, that have shaped the relationship between Judaism and Christianity, and introduces students to some of the most important literature, art, and music that are part of it. nSelected literature: Gospel according Matthew, the letters of St. Paul, St. Augustine, the Talmud (selections), Maimonides, Martin Luther's sermons on the Jews, Nostra Aetate (Vatican II)nArt and Music: Medieval art and sculpture, Haendel's Messiah.
Same as: RELIGST 71

JEWISHST 80T. Jewish Music in the Lands of Islam. 4 Units.

An Interdisciplinary study of Music, Society, and Culture in communities of the Jewish Diaspora in Islamic countries. The course examines the diverse and rich musical traditions of the Jews in North Africa and the Middle East. Based on the "Maqamat" system, the Arabic musical modes, Jewish music flourished under Islamic rule, encompassing the fields of sacred music, popular songs, and art music. Using musicological, historical, and anthropological tools, the course compares and contrasts these traditions from their original roots through their adaptation, appropriation, and re-synthesis in contemporary art music and popular songs.
Same as: MUSIC 80T

JEWISHST 84. Zionism. 3 Units.

Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Same as: HISTORY 84, REES 84

JEWISHST 85B. Jews, 1500 to the Present. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) Topics include the restructuring of Jewish existence during the Enlightenment and legal emancipation at the end of the 18th century in W. Europe; the transformation of Jewish life in E. Europe under the authoritarian Russian regime; colonialism in the Sephardic world; new ideologies (Reform Judaism and Jewish nationalisms); the persistence and renewal of antisemitism; the destruction of European Jewry under the Nazis; new Jewish centers in the U.S.; and the State of Israel.

JEWISHST 101A. First-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 5 Units.

.
Same as: AMELANG 128A

JEWISHST 101B. First-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128A.
Same as: AMELANG 128B

JEWISHST 101C. First-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 5 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128B. Fulfill the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 128C

JEWISHST 102A. Second-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 128C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128C.
Same as: AMELANG 129A

JEWISHST 102B. Second-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129A.
Same as: AMELANG 129B

JEWISHST 102C. Second-Year Hebrew, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129B. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129B.
Same as: AMELANG 129C

JEWISHST 103A. Third-Year Hebrew, First Quarter. 3-4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 129C. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129C.
Same as: AMELANG 130A

JEWISHST 104. Hebrew Forum. 2-4 Units.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew.
Same as: AMELANG 131A

JEWISHST 104A. First-Year Yiddish, First Quarter. 4 Units.

Reading, writing, and speaking.
Same as: AMELANG 140A

JEWISHST 104B. First-Year Yiddish, Second Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140A. Prerequisite: AMELANG.
Same as: AMELANG 140B

JEWISHST 104C. First-Year Yiddish, Third Quarter. 4 Units.

Continuation of AMELANG 140B. Prerequisite: AMELANG 140B. Fulfills the University Foreign Language Requirement.
Same as: AMELANG 140C

JEWISHST 105. Hebrew Forum. 2-4 Units.

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew.
Same as: AMELANG 131B

JEWISHST 106. Reflection on the Other: The Jew and the Arab in Literature. 3-5 Units.

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views.nnGuest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music.
Same as: AMELANG 126, COMPLIT 145

JEWISHST 107A. Biblical Hebrew, First Quarter. 2 Units.

Establish a basic familiarity with the grammar and vocabulary of Biblical Hebrew and will begin developing a facility with the language. Students that are enrolled in this course must also enroll in Beginning Hebrew. This course requires no prior knowledge of Hebrew and will begin with learning the alphabet. By the end of the year, students will be able to translate basic biblical texts, will be familiar with common lexica and reference grammars, and will have sufficient foundational knowledge to enable them to continue expanding their knowledge either in a subsequent course or own their own.
Same as: AMELANG 170A, RELIGST 170A

JEWISHST 107B. Biblical Hebrew, Second Quarter. 1 Unit.

Continuation of 170A.
Same as: AMELANG 170B

JEWISHST 116. Lessons in Ecological Restoration: Israel and the Middle East. 3 Units.

The environment in the Middle East reflects the impacts of millennia of continued human activities, with degraded soils, biodiversity loss and contaminated water resources. In a trial and error process since its inception, Israel has pursued an ambitious program of ecological restoration through afforestation, aggressive water management and environmental conservation. This course evaluates the effectiveness of different environmental policies from ecological perspectives. It also assesses potential regional ecological cooperation as part of a Middle Eastern peace process.
Same as: BIO 162

JEWISHST 120. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. 3 Units.

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Same as: FEMGEN 130, RELIGST 130

JEWISHST 127D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 129. Modern Jewish Thought. 4 Units.

From 1870 to the late twentieth century, Jewish thought and philosophy attempted to understand Judaism in response to the developments and crises of Jewish life in the modern world. In this course we shall explore the responses of figures such as Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Hermann Cohen, Abraham Joshua Heschel, Joseph Soloveitchik, Emil Fackenheim, and Emmanuel Levinas. Central topics will concern ethics and politics, faith and revelation, redemption and messianism, and the religious responses to catastrophe and atrocity. We shall discuss Judaism in European culture before and after World War I and in North America in the postwar period and after the Six Day War. A central theme will be the ways in which attempts to understand Jewish experience are related to history.
Same as: RELIGST 129

JEWISHST 138A. Germany and the World Wars. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 38A. Majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 138A.) Germany's tumultuous history from the Second Empire through the end of the Cold War. International conflict, social upheaval, and state transformation during Bismarck's wars of unification, World War One, the Weimar Republic, the rise of Nazism, World War Two, the Holocaust, the division of communist East and capitalist West Germany, and the fall of the Iron Curtain.
Same as: HISTORY 138A

JEWISHST 139. Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism. 4 Units.

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Same as: FEMGEN 139

JEWISHST 143. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts, as well as excerpts of Francophone theater. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Required readings include: Aimé Césaire, "Cahier d'un retour au pays natal," Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Kaouther Adimi, "L'envers des autres", Maryse Condé, "La Vie sans fards". Movies include "Goodbye Morocco", "Aya de Yopougon", "Rome plutôt sue Vous". Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: AFRICAAM 133, FRENCH 133

JEWISHST 144B. Poetic Thinking Across Media. 4 Units.

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.
Same as: COMPLIT 154B, COMPLIT 354B, GERMAN 154, GERMAN 354

JEWISHST 145. Masterpieces: Kafka. 3-5 Units.

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers.
Same as: COMPLIT 114, GERMAN 150

JEWISHST 146. Co-Existence in Hebrew Literature. 4-5 Units.

Is co-existence possible? Does pluralism require co-existence? Can texts serve as forms of co-existence? The class will focus on these and other questions related to coexistence and literature. Through reading works mostly by Jewish authors writing in Europe, Israel and the US we will explore attempts for complete equality, for a variety of hierarchical systems and for different kinds of co-dependence. Guest speaker: professor Anat Weisman, Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Same as: AMELANG 175, COMPLIT 161

JEWISHST 147. German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka. 3-5 Units.

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers. (Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement).
Same as: COMPLIT 111, COMPLIT 311C, GERMAN 190, GERMAN 390, JEWISHST 349

JEWISHST 147A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: COMPLIT 147A, COMPLIT 347A, JEWISHST 347A

JEWISHST 148. Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature. 3-5 Units.

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Same as: JEWISHST 348, SLAVIC 198, SLAVIC 398

JEWISHST 155D. Jewish American Literature. 5 Units.

Fiction of Jewish-American writers across the 20th and into the 21st centuries, both immigrants and subsequent generations of native-born Jews, to show how the topic of assimilation is thematized in the literature and to evaluate the distinctiveness of Jewish-American literature as a minority literature.
Same as: REES 145D

JEWISHST 183. The Holocaust. 4 Units.

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Same as: HISTORY 137, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 383

JEWISHST 184. Zionism. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 84.) Hotly contested still, this course will open up the movement's ideas, practices, achievements and crises in such a way as to allow students to hear the fullest range of voices - Jewish, Arab, religious, secular, etc. It will track the movement from its appearance in the late nineteenth century until the establishment of State of Israel in 1948, and beyond.
Same as: HISTORY 184, REES 184

JEWISHST 199B. Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.

JEWISHST 205. Reading Hebrew, First Quarter. 2-4 Units.

Introduction to Hebrew literature through short stories and poetry by notable Israeli writers. In Hebrew. Prerequisite: one year of Hebrew or equivalent.
Same as: AMELANG 250A

JEWISHST 224. Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics, Philosophy and Religion. 4 Units.

Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) is a major French philosopher of the second half of the twentieth century and is among the half-dozen most important Jewish thinkers of the century. Born in Lithuania, Levinas lived most of his life in France; he was primarily a philosopher but also a deeply committed Jewish educator who often lectured and wrote about Judaism and Jewish matters. Levinas was influenced by Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, and others, like Buber and Rosenzweig. We will look at the philosophical world in which he was educated and explore his unique development as a philosopher in the years after World War Two. Levinas reacted against the main tendencies of Western philosophy and religious thought and as a result shaped novel, powerful, and challenging ways of understanding philosophy, religion, ethics, and politics. n In this course, we will examine works from every stage of Levinas's career, from his early study of Husserl and Heidegger to the emergence of his new understanding of the human condition and the primacy of ethics, the face-to-face encounter with the human other, the role of language and the relationship between ethics and religion, and finally his understanding of Judaism and its relationship to Western philosophy. We will be interested in his philosophical method, the relevance of his thinking for ethics and religion, the role of language in his philosophy and the problem of the limits of expressibility, and the implications of his work for politics. We shall also consider his conception of Judaism, its primary goals and character, and its relation to Western culture and philosophy.
Same as: JEWISHST 324, RELIGST 234, RELIGST 334

JEWISHST 227D. Readings in Talmudic Literature. 1 Unit.

Readings of the talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred. The ongoing seminar is designed to study the making of the talmudic sugya (unit of discourse), along with classic commentaries. Students will consider some of the recent developments in the academic study of Talmudic literature, introduced by the instructor. The goal of the ongoing seminar is to provide Stanford students and faculty with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts. Class meets on Fridays, from 12:00-1:15 pm in Hillel (Koret Pavilion Taube Hillel House; Ziff Center for Jewish Life). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: JEWISHST 127D, RELIGST 170D

JEWISHST 242. Beyond Casablanca: North African Cinema and Literature. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the emergence of Francophone cinema and literature from North Africa (Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco) in the post-indepence era: aesthetics, exile, language message, race and gender relations, collective memory, parallax, nationalism, laicité, religion, emigration and immigration, and the Arab Spring will be covered. Special attention will be given to judeo-maghrebi history, and to the notions of francophone / maghrebi / "beur" / diasporic cinema and literature. Readings from Frantz Fanon, Albert Memmi, Kateb Yacine, Albert Camus, Colette Fellous, Abdelkebir Khatibi, Leila Sebbar, Benjamin Stora, Lucette Valensi, Abdelwahab Meddeb. Movies include Viva Laldjérie, Tenja, Le Chant des Mariées, Française, Bled Number One, Omar Gatlato, Casanegra, La Saison des Hommes. Taught in French. Films in French and Arabic with English subtitles.
Same as: COMPLIT 247F, FRENCH 242

JEWISHST 243. Masterpieces of Hebrew Literature from the Bible to the Present. 3-5 Units.

This course presents and reflects on some of the canonical works of Hebrew literature, from biblical era to the present. Discussing works such as the Wisdom Books and selections from the Midrash; and reflecting on important periods such as the Golden Age of Jewish Culture in Spain, the Renaissance, and contemporary Israeli literature, we will highlight linguistic innovation, as well as crucial thematic and philosophical concerns. Readings include the Book of Job, Psalm, Ibn Gabirol, Mapu, Rachel, Goldbegr, Agnon, S. Yizhar, Amichai, Oz and more.
Same as: COMPLIT 283

JEWISHST 271C. Campaigns and Elections in Israel. 5 Units.

Employing a theoretical and comparative framework, this seminar focuses on campaigns and elections in Israel. The seminar is divided into two interrelated sections. In the first section, we will cover voting behavior. Here we will look at Israel¿s election laws, its political culture, socialization and cleavages, turnout, political sophistication, ideology, partisanship and issue voting. In the second half of the semester we will examine elections from the perspective of candidates and campaign strategists. The topics we will focus on include election laws, public and private campaign finance, campaign strategy, media, polling, and advertising. In examining these topics, we will cover a variety of elections campaigns since Israel¿s birth, with an emphasis on the most recent ones.
Same as: POLISCI 241C

JEWISHST 279P. Introduction to Israeli Politics. 5 Units.

This course aims to introduce students to Israel¿s political system and its major actors. We will survey Israel¿s political landscape, both chronologically and thematically, covering the major issues and conflicts which have dominated Israeli politics since its inception.
Same as: INTNLREL 163, POLISCI 249P

JEWISHST 282. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 382

JEWISHST 283D. The Holocaust in Recent Memory: Conflicts - Commemorations - Challenges. 5 Units.

This course offers an in-depth approach to the study of the Holocaust as a historical point of reference for European memory, or for the memory cultures of European nations, where the international context in particular the USA and Israel will also be taken into consideration. The starting point is the transformations in Holocaust memory: after 1945, in the era of European postwar myths, the Holocaust was on the periphery of historical thinking, of scholarly and public interest. Today the Holocaust is acknowledged as a 'break in civilization', a watershed event in human history. This approach has only evolved since the 1980s.
Same as: HISTORY 203D, HISTORY 303D, JEWISHST 383D

JEWISHST 284C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 384C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 286. Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times. 4-5 Units.

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Same as: HISTORY 286, HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 386

JEWISHST 287S. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 481

JEWISHST 288. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. 4-5 Units.

This course examines some salient issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the late 19th century to the present. At the end of the course you should be able to articulate the positions of the major parties to the conflict, with the understanding that there is no single, unified Zionist (or Jewish) or Palestinian (or Arab) position. One quarter does not allow sufficient time to cover even all of the important topics comprehensively (for example, the role of the Arab states, the USA and the USSR, and the internal history of Israel receive less attention than is desirable). Some prior knowledge of Middle East history is desirable, but not required. Vigorous debate and criticism are strongly encouraged. Criticism and response expressed in a civil tone is an important way to get a fuller and more truthful picture of something. This is not only a fundamental democratic right and a basic citizenship skill, but it is essential to interpreting information and making good policy. Rights not used are easily lost.
Same as: HISTORY 288, JEWISHST 388

JEWISHST 291X. Knowing God: Learning Religion in Popular Culture. 4 Units.

This course will examine how people learn religion outside of school, and in conversation with popular cultural texts and practices. Taking a broad social-constructivist approach to the variety of ways people learn, this course will explore how people assemble ideas about faith, identity, community, and practice, and how those ideas inform individual, communal and global notions of religion. Much of this work takes place in formal educational environments including missionary and parochial schools, Muslim madrasas or Jewish yeshivot. However, even more takes place outside of school, as people develop skills and strategies in conversation with broader social trends. This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to questions that lie at the intersection of religion, popular culture, and education.
Same as: AMSTUD 231X, EDUC 231X, RELIGST 231X

JEWISHST 297X. American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America. 2-4 Units.

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Same as: AMSTUD 279X, EDUC 279X, HISTORY 288D, RELIGST 279X

JEWISHST 299A. Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter. 1-5 Unit.

Directed Reading in Yiddish, First Quarter.

JEWISHST 324. Emmanuel Levinas: Ethics, Philosophy and Religion. 4 Units.

Emmanuel Levinas (1906-1995) is a major French philosopher of the second half of the twentieth century and is among the half-dozen most important Jewish thinkers of the century. Born in Lithuania, Levinas lived most of his life in France; he was primarily a philosopher but also a deeply committed Jewish educator who often lectured and wrote about Judaism and Jewish matters. Levinas was influenced by Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, and others, like Buber and Rosenzweig. We will look at the philosophical world in which he was educated and explore his unique development as a philosopher in the years after World War Two. Levinas reacted against the main tendencies of Western philosophy and religious thought and as a result shaped novel, powerful, and challenging ways of understanding philosophy, religion, ethics, and politics. n In this course, we will examine works from every stage of Levinas's career, from his early study of Husserl and Heidegger to the emergence of his new understanding of the human condition and the primacy of ethics, the face-to-face encounter with the human other, the role of language and the relationship between ethics and religion, and finally his understanding of Judaism and its relationship to Western philosophy. We will be interested in his philosophical method, the relevance of his thinking for ethics and religion, the role of language in his philosophy and the problem of the limits of expressibility, and the implications of his work for politics. We shall also consider his conception of Judaism, its primary goals and character, and its relation to Western culture and philosophy.
Same as: JEWISHST 224, RELIGST 234, RELIGST 334

JEWISHST 347A. The Hebrew Bible in Literature. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of major biblical stories and poems that influenced modern literature written in English and Hebrew. Hebrew texts will be read in translation to English. Each class will include a section from the Hebrew Bible as well as a modern text or film based on the biblical story/poem. Discussion of questions such as: the meaning and function of myths and the influence of the Hebrew Bible on the development of literary styles and genres.
Same as: COMPLIT 147A, COMPLIT 347A, JEWISHST 147A

JEWISHST 348. Writing Between Languages: The Case of Eastern European Jewish Literature. 3-5 Units.

Eastern European Jews spoke and read Hebrew, Yiddish, and their co-territorial languages (Russian, Polish, etc.). In the modern period they developed secular literatures in all of them, and their writing reflected their own multilinguality and evolving language ideologies. We focus on major literary and sociolinguistic texts. Reading and discussion in English; students should have some reading knowledge of at least one relevant language as well.
Same as: JEWISHST 148, SLAVIC 198, SLAVIC 398

JEWISHST 349. German Capstone: Reading Franz Kafka. 3-5 Units.

This class will address major works by Franz Kafka and consider Kafka as a modernist writer whose work reflects on modernity. We will also examine the role of Kafka's themes and poetics in the work of contemporary writers. (Meets Writing-in-the-Major requirement).
Same as: COMPLIT 111, COMPLIT 311C, GERMAN 190, GERMAN 390, JEWISHST 147

JEWISHST 382. Circles of Hell: Poland in World War II. 5 Units.

Looks at the experience and representation of Poland's wartime history from the Nazi-Soviet Pact (1939) to the aftermath of Yalta (1945). Examines Nazi and Soviet ideology and practice in Poland, as well as the ways Poles responded, resisted, and survived. Considers wartime relations among Polish citizens, particularly Poles and Jews. In this regard, interrogates the traditional self-characterization of Poles as innocent victims, looking at their relationship to the Holocaust, thus engaging in a passionate debate still raging in Polish society.
Same as: HISTORY 228, HISTORY 328, JEWISHST 282

JEWISHST 383. The Holocaust. 4 Units.

The emergence of modern racism and radical anti-Semitism. The Nazi rise to power and the Jews. Anti-Semitic legislation in the 30s. WW II and the beginning of mass killings in the East. Deportations and ghettos. The mass extermination of European Jewry.
Same as: HISTORY 137, HISTORY 337, JEWISHST 183

JEWISHST 383D. The Holocaust in Recent Memory: Conflicts - Commemorations - Challenges. 5 Units.

This course offers an in-depth approach to the study of the Holocaust as a historical point of reference for European memory, or for the memory cultures of European nations, where the international context in particular the USA and Israel will also be taken into consideration. The starting point is the transformations in Holocaust memory: after 1945, in the era of European postwar myths, the Holocaust was on the periphery of historical thinking, of scholarly and public interest. Today the Holocaust is acknowledged as a 'break in civilization', a watershed event in human history. This approach has only evolved since the 1980s.
Same as: HISTORY 203D, HISTORY 303D, JEWISHST 283D

JEWISHST 384C. Genocide and Humanitarian Intervention. 3 Units.

Open to medical students, graduate students, and undergraduate students. Traces the history of genocide in the 20th century and the question of humanitarian intervention to stop it, a topic that has been especially controversial since the end of the Cold War. The pre-1990s discussion begins with the Armenian genocide during the First World War and includes the Holocaust and Cambodia under the Khmer Rouge in the 1970s. Coverage of genocide and humanitarian intervention since the 1990s includes the wars in Bosnia, Rwanda, Kosovo, the Congo and Sudan.
Same as: HISTORY 224C, HISTORY 324C, JEWISHST 284C, PEDS 224

JEWISHST 385A. Core Colloquium in Jewish History, 17th-19th Centuries. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 385A

JEWISHST 385B. Core in Jewish History, 20th Century. 4-5 Units.

Instructor consent required.
Same as: HISTORY 385B

JEWISHST 386. Jews Among Muslims in Modern Times. 4-5 Units.

The history of Jewish communities in the lands of Islam and their relations with the surrounding Muslim populations from the time of Muhammad to the 20th century. Topics: the place of Jews in Muslim societies, Jewish communal life, variation in the experience of communities in different Muslim lands, the impact of the West in the Modern period, the rise of nationalisms, and the end of Jewish life in Muslim countries.
Same as: HISTORY 286, HISTORY 386, JEWISHST 286

JEWISHST 388. Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict. 4-5 Units.

This course examines some salient issues of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict from the late 19th century to the present. At the end of the course you should be able to articulate the positions of the major parties to the conflict, with the understanding that there is no single, unified Zionist (or Jewish) or Palestinian (or Arab) position. One quarter does not allow sufficient time to cover even all of the important topics comprehensively (for example, the role of the Arab states, the USA and the USSR, and the internal history of Israel receive less attention than is desirable). Some prior knowledge of Middle East history is desirable, but not required. Vigorous debate and criticism are strongly encouraged. Criticism and response expressed in a civil tone is an important way to get a fuller and more truthful picture of something. This is not only a fundamental democratic right and a basic citizenship skill, but it is essential to interpreting information and making good policy. Rights not used are easily lost.
Same as: HISTORY 288, JEWISHST 288

JEWISHST 393X. The Education of American Jews. 4 Units.

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the question of how American Jews negotiate the desire to retain a unique ethnic sensibility without excluding themselves from American culture more broadly. Students will examine the various ways in which people debate, deliberate, and determine what it means to be an "American Jew". This includes an investigation of how American Jewish relationships to formal and informal educational encounters through school, popular culture, religious ritual, and politics.
Same as: EDUC 313X, RELIGST 313X

JEWISHST 481. Research Seminar in Middle East History. 4-5 Units.

Student-selected research topics.
Same as: HISTORY 481, JEWISHST 287S

JEWISHST 486A. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

.
Same as: HISTORY 486A

JEWISHST 486B. Graduate Research Seminar in Jewish History. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: HISTORY 486A.
Same as: HISTORY 486B

Native American Studies Courses

NATIVEAM 102. Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation. 3-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and students, and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus component of the seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and short writing assignments. Students can choose between a final exam, paper or video project. Lunch is provided.
Same as: ANTHRO 102C, ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, CSRE 102

NATIVEAM 103S. Native American Women, Gender Roles, and Status. 5 Units.

Historical and cultural forces at work in traditional and contemporary Native American women's lives through life stories and literature. How women are fashioning gendered indigenous selves. Focus is on the diversity of Native American communities and cultures.
Same as: CSRE 103S, FEMGEN 103S

NATIVEAM 108S. American Indian Religious Freedom. 5 Units.

The persistence of tribal spiritual beliefs and practices in light of legal challenges (sacred geography and the 1st Amendment), treatment of the dead and sacred objects (repatriation), consumerism (New Age commodification), and cultural intellectual property protection (trademark, copyright, patent law). Focus is on contemporary issues and cases, analyzed through interdisciplinary scholarship and practical strategies to protect the fundamental liberty of American Indian religious freedom.
Same as: CSRE 108S

NATIVEAM 109A. Federal Indian Law. 5 Units.

Cases, legislation, comparative justice models, and historical and cultural material. The interlocking relationships of tribal, federal, and state governments. Emphasis is on economic development, religious freedom, and environmental justice issues in Indian country.
Same as: CSRE 109A

NATIVEAM 111B. Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Same as: ANTHRO 111B, ARCHLGY 111B

NATIVEAM 115. Introduction to Native American History. 5 Units.

This course surveys Native American history beginning with the forced removal of the Cherokee and other tribes from their eastern homelands to the geographic area of what is now the state of Oklahoma. This course will examine key issues including specific cases, i.e. the Marshall trilogy through a historic lens. The course material will cover Native American history to events leading up to the era of the civil rights movement in the twentieth century. The subject of sovereignty and self-determination will be discussed as part of the historic experience of Native Americans through assigned readings, short films, and other media.

NATIVEAM 121. Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices. 5 Units.

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Same as: CSRE 121

NATIVEAM 123A. American Indians and the Cinema. 5 Units.

Hollywood and the film industry have had a major influence on American society for nearly a century. Initially designed to provide entertainment, the cinema broadened its impact by creating images perceived as real and essentialist. Hollywood's Indians have been the main source of information about who American Indians are and Hollywood has helped shape inaccurate and stereotypical perceptions that continue to exist today. This course looks chronologically at cinematic interpretations and critically examines accurate portrayals of American Indians and of American history.
Same as: CSRE 123A

NATIVEAM 138. American Indians in Comparative Historical Perspective. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 238.) Demographic, political, and economic processes and events that shaped relations between Euro-Americans and American Indians, 1600-1890. How the intersection of these processes affected the outcome of conflicts between these two groups, and how this conflict was decisive in determining the social position of American Indians in the late 19th century and the evolution of the doctrine of tribal sovereignty.
Same as: SOC 138, SOC 238

NATIVEAM 139. American Indians in Contemporary Society. 4 Units.

(Graduate students register for 239.) The social position of American Indians in contemporary American society, 1890 to the present. The demographic resurgence of American Indians, changes in social and economic status, ethnic identification and political mobilization, and institutions such as tribal governments and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Recommended: 138 or a course in American history.
Same as: SOC 139, SOC 239

NATIVEAM 143A. American Indian Mythology, Legend, and Lore. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143A.) Readings from American Indian literatures, old and new. Stories, songs, and rituals from the 19th century, including the Navajo Night Chant. Tricksters and trickster stories; war, healing, and hunting songs; Aztec songs from the 16th century. Readings from modern poets and novelists including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, and Leslie Marmon Silko, and the classic autobiography, "Black Elk Speaks.".
Same as: ENGLISH 43A, ENGLISH 143A

NATIVEAM 163. Endangered Languages and Language Revitalization. 3-4 Units.

Languages around the world are dying at such a rapid rate that the next century could see half of the world's 6800 languages and cultures become extinct unless action is taken now. This course looks at how and why languages die, and what is lost from a culture when that occurs. We will investigate how this trend can be reversed by methods of language documentation and description, the use of innovative technologies, multimodal fieldwork, writing dictionaries and grammars for different audiences, language planning, and data creation, annotation, preservation, and dissemination. We will focus on a number of current programs around the world to revitalize languages. Finally, the course will examine ethical modes of fieldwork within endangered language communities, and the possibilities of successful collaborations and capacity building, focusing especially on Northern California Indian peoples and their languages.
Same as: LINGUIST 163A, LINGUIST 263

NATIVEAM 167. Performing Indigeneity on Global Stage. 4 Units.

Explores how indigeneity is expressed and embodied through performance on the global stage.
Same as: DANCE 167

NATIVEAM 200R. Directed Research. 1-5 Unit.

.

NATIVEAM 200W. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

.

NATIVEAM 240. Psychology and American Indian Mental Health. 3-5 Units.

Western medicine's definition of health as the absence of sickness, disease, or pathology; Native American cultures' definition of health as the beauty of physical, spiritual, emotional, and social things, and sickness as something out of balance. Topics include: historical trauma; spirituality and healing; cultural identity; values and acculturation; and individual, school, and community-based interventions. Prerequisite: experience working with American Indian communities.
Same as: EDUC 340

NATIVEAM 255. Native American Identity in the American Imagination: 19th Century to Present. 5 Units.

Because cultural identity is similar to and overlaps with identity politics, this course will examine Native American identity in current culture through American imagination and perspective as to what it is to be Native American today. Historic perspectives from the 19th century to the present will be covered as well.