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Comparative Literature

Contacts

Office: Building 260, Room 117
Mail Code: 94305-2031
Phone: (650) 723-3566
Email: comparativelit@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://complit.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Comparative Literature are listed under the subject code COMPLIT on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Department of Comparative Literature offers courses in the history and theory of literature through comparative approaches. The department accepts candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy.

The field of Comparative Literature provides students the opportunity to study imaginative literature in all its forms. While other literary disciplines focus on works of literature as parts of specific national or linguistic traditions, Comparative Literature draws on literature from multiple contexts in order to examine the nature of literary phenomena from around the globe and from different historical moments, while exploring how literature interacts with other elements of culture and society. We study literary forms such as fictional narratives, performance and poetry, as well as cinema, music, and emerging aesthetic media.

Along with the traditional model of comparative literature that juxtaposes two or more national literary cultures, the department supports teaching and research that examine literary phenomena with additional tools of inquiry such as literary theory, the relationship between literature and philosophy, and the enrichment of literary study with other disciplinary methodologies. Comparative Literature also encourages the study of aspects of literature that surpass national boundaries, such as transnational literary movements or the creative adaptation of particular genres to local cultures. In each case, students emerge from the program with enhanced verbal and writing skills, a command of literary studies, the ability to read analytically and critically, and a more global knowledge of literature.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Comparative Literature

The mission of the undergraduate program in Comparative Literature is to enhance students’ verbal and written communication skills, their ability to read analytically and critically as well as to develop their global knowledge of literary cultures and the specific properties of literary texts. The program provides students with the opportunity to study imaginative literature in all of its forms, investigating the complex interplay of the literary imagination and historical and social experience.

Along with providing core courses that introduce students to major literary forms in a comparative frame, our program of study is flexible in order to accommodate student interest in areas such as specific geographic regions, historical periods, and interdisciplinary connections between literature and other fields such as philosophy, music, the visual arts, gender and queer theory, studies in race and ethnicity. A Comparative Literature major prepares a student to become a better reader and interpreter of literature, through enhanced examination of texts and the development of a critical vocabulary with which to discuss them. Attention to verbal expression and interpretive argument serves students who plan to proceed into careers requiring strong language and communication skills, as well as deeper cross-cultural knowledge of the world.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. the ability to interpret a literary text in a non-native language or to compare literary texts from different linguistic traditions, which may be read in translation.
  2. a self-reflective understanding of the critical process necessary to read and understand texts.
  3. skills in writing effectively about literature.
  4. skills in oral communication and public speaking about literature.

Graduate Programs in Comparative Literature

The department offers a Doctor of Philosophy and a Ph.D. minor in Comparative Literature.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to

  1. make original contributions to the knowledge of Comparative Literature and to interpret and present the results of such research,
  2. teach literary analysis and interpretation at all levels with broad historical, cultural and linguistic understanding, and
  3. apply such analysis, interpretation and understanding to a range of fields and vocations.

Bachelor of Arts in Comparative Literature

The major in Comparative Literature requires students to enroll in a set of core courses offered by the department, to complete electives in the department, and to enroll in additional literature courses, or other courses approved by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies, offered by other departments. This flexibility to combine literature courses from several departments and to address literature from multiple traditions is the hallmark of the Comparative Literature major. Students may count courses which read literature in translation; however, students, and especially those planning to pursue graduate study in Comparative Literature, are encouraged to develop a command of non-native languages.

Declaring the Major

Students declare the major in Comparative Literature through Axess. Students should meet with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies to discuss appropriate courses and options within the major, and to plan the course of study. Majors are also urged to attend department events such as public talks and conferences.

Advising

Students majoring in Comparative Literature should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies at least once a quarter. The chair monitors progress to completion of the degree. Students are also encouraged to develop relationships with other faculty members who may act as mentors.

Overseas Campuses and Abroad Programs

The Department of Comparative Literature encourages time abroad, both for increased proficiency in language and the opportunity for advanced course work. Course work done at campuses other than Stanford is counted toward the major at the discretion of the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and is contingent upon the Office of the University Registrar's approval of transfer credit. To that end, students abroad are advised to save syllabi, notes, papers, and correspondence.

Degree Requirements

All majors in Comparative Literature (including honors) are required to complete the following requirements. All courses applied to the major must be taken for a letter grade, and a grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 or better must be achieved in each core course.

  1. COMPLIT 101 What is Comparative Literature?. This gateway to the major is normally taken by the end of sophomore year. It provides an introduction to literature and its distinctions from other modes of linguistic expression, and a fundamental set of interpretive skills. This course fulfills the Writing in the Major requirement.
  2. Core Courses (5 units each)
    Students should complete these courses as soon as possible. Each course draws on examples from multiple traditions to ask questions about the logic of the individual genres.
    Units
    COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
    COMPLIT 122Literature as Performance5
    COMPLIT 123The Novel, The World5
  3. COMPLIT 199 Senior Seminar: J.R.R. Tolkien and Junot Diaz's Speculative Narratives. This senior seminar is designed as a culmination to the course of study while providing reflection on the nature of the discipline. Topics vary.
  4. Electives: Majors must complete at least 40 units of electives. The remaining courses should form a coherent intellectual focus requiring approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies and may be drawn from Comparative Literature offerings, from other literature departments, or from other fields of interdisciplinary relevance.  Up to 10 units of Thinking Matters or SLE courses may be counted towards the elective requirement.  Electives are subject to adviser consultation and approval.
  5. Total unit load: Students must complete course work for a total of at least 65 units.

Philosophical and Literary Thought

Undergraduates may major in Comparative Literature and Philosophy. The Philosophy specification is not declared in Axess and does not appear on either the transcript or the diploma. Students in this option take courses alongside students from other departments that also have specialized options associated with the program for the study of Philosophical and Literary Thought. Each student in this option is assigned an adviser in Comparative Literature, and student schedules and courses of study must be approved in writing by the advisor, the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of Comparative Literature, and the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of the program. See the Philosophy + Literature @ Stanford web site.

A total of 65 units must be completed for this option, including the following requirements:

  1. Seven courses taught by Comparative Literature faculty. Of the seven, the following five (5 units each) are required courses:
    Units
    COMPLIT 101What is Comparative Literature?5
    COMPLIT 121Poems, Poetry, Worlds5
    COMPLIT 122Literature as Performance5
    COMPLIT 123The Novel, The World5
    COMPLIT 199Senior Seminar: J.R.R. Tolkien and Junot Diaz's Speculative Narratives5
    The remaining two courses must be instructed by Comparative Literature faculty and approved by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies.
  2. Philosophy and Literature Gateway Course (4 units): COMPLIT 181 Philosophy and Literature. This course should be taken as early as possible in the student's career, normally in the sophomore year.
  3. Philosophy Writing in the Major (5 units): PHIL 80 Mind, Matter, and Meaning. Prerequisite: introductory philosophy class.
  4. Aesthetics, Ethics, Political Philosophy (ca. 4 units): One course from the PHIL 170 series.
  5. Language, Mind, Metaphysics, and Epistemology (ca. 4 units): One course from the PHIL 180 series.
  6. History of Philosophy (ca. 8 units): Two courses in the history of philosophy, numbered above PHIL 100.
  7. Related Courses (ca. 8 units): Two upper division courses relevant to the study of philosophy and literature as identified by the committee in charge of the program. A list of approved courses is available from the undergraduate advisor of the program in philosophical and literary thought.
  8. One course, typically in translation, in a literature distant from that of the student's concentration and offering an outside perspective on that literary tradition.
  9. Capstone Seminar (ca. 4 units): In addition to COMPLIT 199 Senior Seminar: J.R.R. Tolkien and Junot Diaz's Speculative Narratives, students take a capstone seminar of relevance to philosophy and literature approved by the undergraduate adviser of the program in philosophical and literary thought. The student's choice of a capstone seminar must be approved in writing by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of Comparative Literature and by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of the program. Offered this year are FRENCH 265 The Problem of Evil in Literature, Film, and Philosophy and ILAC 240E Borges and Philosophy.
  10. Seminar Paper Requirement: Students must write at least one seminar paper that is interdisciplinary in nature. This paper brings together material from courses taken in philosophy and literature, and may be an honors paper (see below), an individual research paper (developed through independent work with a faculty member), or a paper integrating materials developed for two separate courses (by arrangement with the two instructors). Though it may draw on previous course work, the paper must be an original composition, 18-20 pages in length. It must be submitted to the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and receive approval no later than the end of Winter Quarter in the fourth year of study.

At least two of the courses counted toward requirements 1, 2, 7, 8, and 9 must be taught by Comparative Literature faculty. Transfer units may not normally be used to satisfy requirements 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 9. Units devoted to acquiring language proficiency are not counted toward the 65-unit requirement.

Honors Program

Comparative Literature majors with an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.3 or above, and who maintain a 3.5 (GPA) in major courses, are eligible to participate in the DLCL's honors program. Prospective honors students must choose a senior thesis adviser from among their home department's regular faculty, in their junior year, preferably by March 1, but no later than May 1. During Spring Quarter of the junior year, a student interested in the honors program should consult with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies of their home department to submit a thesis proposal (2-5 pages), DLCL Honors application and an outline of planned course work for their senior year.

Honors papers vary considerably in length as a function of their topic, historical scope, and methodology. They may make use of previous work developed in seminars and courses, but display an enhanced comparative or theoretical scope. Quality rather than quantity is the key criterion. Honors theses range from 40-90 pages not including bibliography and notes. Please consult the DLCL Honors Handbook for more details on declaring and completing the honors thesis.

Honors students are encouraged to participate in the honors college hosted by Bing Honors College and coordinated by the Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages. The honors college is offered at the end of the summer, during the weeks directly preceding the start of the academic year, and is designed to help students develop their honors thesis projects. Applications must be submitted through the Bing program. For more information, view the Bing Honors website.

Enrollment: A minimum of 10 units total, described below, and a completed thesis is required. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year. If an essay is found deserving of a grade of 'A-' of better by the thesis adviser, honors are granted at the time of graduation.

  1. Spring Quarter of the junior year (optional): DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units S/NC, under the primary thesis adviser. Drafting or revision of the thesis proposal. The proposal is reviewed by the Chair of Undergraduate Studies and the Director of the department and will be approved or returned for submission.
  2. Autumn Quarter of the senior year (required): DLCL 189A Honors Thesis Seminar, 4 units S/NC, taught by a DLCL appointed faculty member. Course focuses on researching and writing the honors thesis.
  3. Winter Quarter of the senior year (required): DLCL 189B Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units letter grade, under the primary thesis adviser. Focus is on writing writing under guidance of primary adviser.  The letter grade will determine if honors is granted or not.
  4. Spring quarter of the senior year (option; mandatory if not taken during junior year): DLCL 189C Honors Thesis Seminar, 2-4 units S/NC, under the primary thesis adviser. Honors essays are due to the thesis adviser and Student Service Officer no later than 5:00 p.m. on May 15th of the terminal year.
  5. Spring Quarter of the senior year (required) DLCL 199 Honors Thesis Oral Presentation, 1 unit S/NC.  Enroll with primary thesis adviser.

Minor in Comparative Literature

The undergraduate minor in Comparative Literature represents an abbreviated version of the major. It is designed for students who are unable to pursue the major but who nonetheless seek an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of literature. Plans for the minor should be discussed with the Chair of Undergraduate Studies. The minimum number of units required for a minor at Stanford is 20, and all courses must be taken for a letter grade. Requirements for the minor in Comparative Literature include:

Units
COMPLIT 101What is Comparative Literature?5
Select one of the following:5
Poems, Poetry, Worlds
Literature as Performance
The Novel, The World
At least two other Comparative Literature courses.10

Minor in Modern Languages

The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages offers an undergraduate minor in Modern Languages. This minor draws on literature and language courses offered in this and other literature departments. See the "Literatures, Cultures, and Languages" section of this bulletin for requirements.

Doctor of Philosophy in Comparative Literature

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The Ph.D. program is designed for students whose linguistic background, breadth of interest in literature, and curiosity about the problems of literary scholarship and theory (including the relation of literature to other disciplines) make this program more appropriate to their needs than the Ph.D. in one of the individual literatures. Students take courses in at least three literatures (one may be that of the native language), to be studied in the original. The program is designed to encourage familiarity with the major approaches to literary study prevailing today.

Before starting graduate work at Stanford, students should have completed an undergraduate program with a strong background in one literature and some work in a second literature studied in the original language. Since the program demands an advanced knowledge of two non-native languages and a reading knowledge of a third non-native language, students should at the time of application have an advanced enough knowledge of one of the three to take graduate-level courses in that language when they enter the program. They should be making enough progress in the study of a second language to enable them to take graduate courses in that language not later than the beginning of the second year, and earlier if possible. Language courses at the 100- or 200- level may be taken with approval from the Chair of the department or the Chair of Graduate Studies. Applicants are expected to take an intensive course in the third language before entrance.

Students are admitted under a financial plan which attempts to integrate financial support and completion of residence requirements with their training as prospective university teachers. Tenure as a Ph.D. student, assuming satisfactory academic progress, is for a maximum of five years.

Application Procedures

Competition for entrance into the program is extremely keen. The program is kept small so that students have as much opportunity as possible to work closely with faculty throughout the period of study. Applicants should review all course and exam requirements, advancement requirements, and teaching obligations carefully before applying to the program. Because of the special nature of comparative literary studies, the statement of purpose included in the application for admission must contain the following information:

  1. A detailed description of the applicant's present degree of proficiency in each of the languages studied, indicating the languages in which the applicant is prepared to do graduate work at present and outlining plans to meet additional language requirements of the program.
  2. A description of the applicant's area of interest (for instance, theoretical problems, genres, periods) within literary study and the reasons for finding comparative literature more suitable to his or her needs than the study of a single literature. Applicants should also indicate their most likely prospective primary field, including the literatures on which they intend to concentrate.
  3. An explanation of how the applicant’s undergraduate education has prepared them for work in our program. If there are any gaps in the applicant’s preparation, they should explain how they plan to address those gaps.
  4. The applicant’s specific reasons for wishing to study in our department of Comparative Literature.
  5. All applicants should arrange to have the results of the general section of the Graduate Record Examination sent to Stanford University, ETS code 4704.
  6. A letter of recommendation that focuses on the applicant's language skills, or a current ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) certificate, or a critical paper written in a non-native language.
  7. Recommendations should, if possible, come from faculty in at least two of the literatures in which the student proposes to work.
  8. Applicants must submit a copy of an undergraduate term paper which they consider representative of their best work, preferably containing a comparative analysis.

For further information see the Graduate Admissions web site.

Degree Requirements

Residence

A candidate for the Ph.D. degree must complete three years (nine quarters) of full-time work, or the equivalent, in graduate study beyond the B.A. degree. The student must take 135 units of graduate work, in addition to the doctoral dissertation. At least three consecutive quarters of course work must be taken at Stanford.

Languages

Students must know three non-native languages, two of them sufficiently to qualify for graduate courses in these languages and the third sufficiently to demonstrate the ability to read a major author in this language. Only the third language may be certified by examination. The other two are certified by graduate-level course work specified below. Language preparation must be sufficient to support graduate-level course work in at least one language during the first year and in the second language during the second year. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of the third non-native language no later than the beginning of the third year.

Literatures made up of works written in the same language (such as Spanish and Latin American) are counted as one. One of the student's three literatures usually is designated as the primary field, the other two as secondary fields, although some students may offer two literatures at the primary level (six or more graduate courses).

Teaching

Students, whatever their sources of financial support, are ordinarily required to undertake a total of five quarters of supervised apprenticeships and teaching at half time. Students must complete whatever pedagogy courses are required by the departments in which they teach. The department's minimum teaching requirement is a total of three quarters.

Minimum Course Requirements

Students are advised that the range and depth of preparation necessary to support quality work on the dissertation, as well as demands in the present professional marketplace for coverage of both traditional and interdisciplinary areas of knowledge, render these requirements as bare minimums. The following are required: 

  1. Required Courses:
    Units
    COMPLIT 369Introduction to Graduate Studies: Criticism as Profession5
    COMPLIT 396LPedagogy Seminar I2
    DLCL 301The Learning and Teaching of Second Languages3
  2. A sufficient number of courses (six or more) in the student's primary field to assure knowledge of the basic works in one national literature from its beginnings until the present.
  3. At least two additional complementary courses, with most of the reading in the original, in each of two different national literatures. Students whose primary field is a non-native language are required to take two courses in one additional literature not their own.

Minimum course requirements must be completed before the student is scheduled to take the University oral examination. These requirements are kept to a minimum so that students have sufficient opportunity to seek out new areas of interest. A course is an offering of 3-5 units. Independent study may take the place of up to two of the required courses, but no more; classroom work with faculty and other students is central to the program. The principal conditions for continued registration of a graduate student are the timely and satisfactory completion of the university, department, and program requirements for the degree, and fulfillment of minimum progress requirements. Failure to meet these requirements results in corrective measures which may include a written warning, academic probation, and/or the possible release from the program.

Dissertation Reading Committee

The chair of the dissertation committee must be an Academic Council member and a member of the Comparative Literature faculty. Under highly unusual circumstances a student may petition to have a Stanford faculty member from outside Comparative Literature serve, but it would at the discretion of the department as to whether or not to honor that request.

Examinations

Three examinations are required.  The first two are one-hour exams. The first of these two is taken at the end of the student’s first year of study; the second is taken at the start of the second year. Students should meet with the members of the exam committee to discuss their plans for the exams. The first of these is on literary genre, designed to demonstrate the student's knowledge of a substantial number of literary works in a single genre, ranged over several centuries and over at least three national literatures. This exam is also designed to demonstrate the student's grasp of the theoretical problems involved in his or her choice of genre and in the matter of genre in general. The second of these examinations is on literary theory and criticism, designed to demonstrate the student's knowledge of a particular problem in the history of literary theory and criticism, or the student's ability to develop a particular theoretical position. In either case, this exam should demonstrate wide reading in theoretical and critical texts from a variety of periods. The third and last is the University oral examination, which covers a literary period, to consist of in-depth knowledge of a period of approximately a century in three or more literatures with primary emphasis on a single national literature or, in occasional cases, two national literatures.

  1. First One-Hour Examination: The genre exam is generally administered the second week of April of the student's first year. All first-year students take the exam during the same period, with an examination committee established by the department. Exam lists should be approved by the Chair of Graduate Studies well in advance of the exam. Students are urged to focus on poetry, drama, or the novel or narrative, combining core recommendations from the department with selections from their individual areas of concentration. Any student who does not pass the exam has the opportunity to retake the exam the second week of May of the same quarter. Students who do not pass this exam a second time may be dismissed from the program.
  2. Second One-Hour Examination: The theory exam is administered the Autumn Quarter of the student's second year. All second-year students take the exam during the same period, with an examination committee established by the department. Exam lists should be approved by the Chair of Graduate Studies well in advance of the exam. Any student who does not pass the exam has the opportunity to retake the exam the second week of the Winter Quarter. Students who do not pass this exam a second time may be dismissed from the program.
  3. University Oral Examination: Students are required to take this exam during the Autumn Quarter of their third year. The oral exam is individually scheduled, with a committee established by the student in consultation with the Chair of Graduate Studies. The reading list covers chiefly the major literary texts of a period of approximately one hundred years but may also include some studies of intellectual backgrounds and modern critical discussions of the period. Students must demonstrate a grasp of how to discuss and define this period as well as the concept of periods in general. This examination is not to be on the dissertation topic, on a single genre, or on current criticism, but rather on a multiplicity of texts from the period. Students whose course work combines an ancient with a modern literature have the option of dividing the period sections into two wholly separate periods.

Qualifying Procedures

The department meets at the end of each year to review all graduate student progress. Students may be admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. upon successful completion of the first year examination and a thorough review of the student's academic record, after which the faculty will vote on whether or not to admit the student to candidacy. A student will only be admitted to candidacy if, in addition to the student's fulfilling departmental prerequisites, the faculty makes the judgment that the student has the potential to successfully complete the requirements of the degree program. Should a student not be admitted to candidacy, s/he will be dismissed from the doctoral program. In unusual cases, the faculty may decide to extend the pre-candidacy period and require the student to complete specific steps in a predetermined time period prior to evaluating the student for admittance to candidacy.

Prospectus Colloquium

The prospectus colloquium normally takes place during the spring of the third year. The student should furnish the committee with a five-page prospectus, 20-page draft of a chapter, and working bibliography well before the colloquium. The colloquium lasts one hour, begins with a brief introduction to the dissertation prospectus by the student lasting no more than five minutes, and consists of a discussion of the prospectus by the student and the three readers of the dissertation. At the end of the hour, the faculty readers vote on the outcome of the colloquium. If the outcome is favorable (by majority vote), the student is free to proceed with work on the dissertation. If the proposal is found to be unsatisfactory (by majority vote), the dissertation readers may ask the student to revise and resubmit the dissertation prospectus and to schedule a second colloquium.

The prospectus must be prepared in close consultation with the dissertation adviser during the months preceding the colloquium. It must be submitted in its final form to the readers no later than one week before the colloquium. A prospectus should not exceed ten double spaced pages, in addition to which it should include a working bibliography of primary and secondary sources. It should offer a synthetic overview of the dissertation, describe its methodology and the project's relation to prior scholarship on the topic, and lay out a complete chapter by chapter plan.

It is the student's responsibility to schedule the colloquium no later than the first half of the quarter after that quarter in which the student passed the University Oral Examination. The student should arrange the date and time in consultation with the department administrator and with the three examiners. The department administrator schedules an appropriate room for the colloquium.

Members of the dissertation reading committee are ordinarily drawn from the University oral examination committee.

Ph.D. Minor in Comparative Literature

This minor is designed for students working toward the Ph.D. in the various foreign language departments. Students working toward the Ph.D. in English are directed to the program in English and Comparative Literature described among the Department of English offerings. Students must have:

  1. A knowledge of at least two foreign languages, one of them sufficient to qualify for graduate-level courses in that language, the second sufficient to read a major author in the original language.
  2. A minimum of six graduate courses, of which three must be in the department of the second literature and three in the Department of Comparative Literature, the latter to include a seminar in literary theory or criticism. At least two of the three courses in comparative literature should originate in a department other than the one in which the student is completing the degree. Except for students in the Asian languages, students must choose a second literature outside the department of their major literature.

Emeriti: (Professors) John Freccero, René Girard, Herbert Lindenberger, Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi (French and Italian), Mary Pratt; (Courtesy Professors) W. B. Carnochan, Gerald Gillespie, David G. Halliburton, Marjorie G. Perloff

Director: Monika Greenleaf

Chair of Graduate Admissions: David Palumbo-Liu

Chair of Graduate Studies: Hans U. Gumbrecht

Chair of Undergraduate Studies: Margaret Cohen

Professors: John Bender (English, Comparative Literature) (on leave), Russell Berman (German Studies, Comparative Literature), Margaret Cohen (Comparative Literature), Amir Eshel (German Studies, Comparative Literature), Roland Greene (English, Comparative Literature) (on leave), Hans U. Gumbrecht (French and Italian, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Comparative Literature), Franco Moretti (English, Comparative Literature), David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature), Patricia Parker (English, Comparative Literature) (on leave, Winter), Joan Ramón Resina (Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Comparative Literature)(on leave, Spring), José David Saldívar (Comparative Literature), Ramón Saldívar (English, Comparative Literature), Ban Wang (East Asian Languages and Cultures, Comparative Literature)

Associate Professors: Monika Greenleaf (Slavic Languages and Literatures, Comparative Literature), Haiyan Lee (East Asian Languages and Cultures, Comparative Literature), Indra Levy (East Asian Languages and Cultures, Comparative Literature)

Assistant Professor: Alexander Key (Arabic and Comparative Literature)

Courtesy Professor: Nancy Ruttenburg

Lecturers: Petra Dierkes-Thrun, Burcu Karahan (Turkish), Vered K. Shemtov (Hebrew)

Mellon Fellow: Alvan Ikoku

Courses

COMPLIT 10N. Shakespeare and Performance in a Global Context. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The problem of performance including the performance of gender through the plays of Shakespeare. In-class performances by students of scenes from plays. The history of theatrical performance. Sources include filmed versions of plays, and readings on the history of gender, gender performance, and transvestite theater.

COMPLIT 11Q. Shakespeare, Playing, Gender. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on several of the best and lesser known plays of Shakespeare, on theatrical and other kinds of playing, and on ambiguities of both gender and playing gender.

COMPLIT 11SC. Worlds (No Longer) Apart. 2 Units.

What (if anything) do supermall shoppers in the Philippines, a Filipino taxi driver in Paris, and television viewers in Nepal have to do with a legal case in Canada, two young Japanese on a pilgrimage to Graceland, and a South Asian lawyer/liquor store owner trying to reclaim his property in Uganda from where he lives, in Mississippi?nn This course uses literary narratives, films, and historical research to examine new textures of contemporary life, where "borders" seem hard-pressed to contain culture. Texts include Pico Iyer, Video Night in Kathmandu, Mira Nair's film Mississippi Masala, and M.G. Vassanji, No New Land. New forms of identity have emerged that reflect the cultural changes that have accompanied such movements. Nevertheless, we will not idealize such phenomena either; we will want also to carefully observe the binding power of nations. The result will be a finer-tuned sense of "globalization" and the "local" and the "global." nn The course emphasizes creative thinking and discussion. Students are expected to do the reading and be well prepared for every session with not only questions, but tentative answers. Each student will participate in one group presentation as their final project.

COMPLIT 12SC. Ghost Stories: Why the Dead Return and What They Want From Us. 2 Units.

Ghost stories haunt our imagination. When the dead return they may scare us or warn us, they may pursue us with violence or burden us with sorrow. They shock us with the "boo" of surprise, just as they frustrate us by their elusiveness. Bloodchilling stories terrify us, but they also provide entertainment. The ghost story is one of the most enduring genres, from classical literature to popular film. Yet behind the door of the story lurk both anxiety and wisdom: anxiety about our own mortality and wisdom about the cultural place of the past, between memory and regret, mourning and forgetting. The undead point to what we have not accomplished, just as they direct us--since the ghost of Hamlet's father--toward deeds. In this seminar, we will explore some of these ghostly ambitions.nDuring the summer, in preparation for the seminar, students will read selected stories and novels and post comments to the course website. When we convene in September, we will discuss the summer findings and proceed to examine a selection of novels that explore ghosts and hauntings. Texts will include Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House, Peter Straub's Ghost Story, and others. We will also spend some dark and stormy nights with ghost films and even follow the trail to some hauntings at Stanford and in the Bay Area. Students are expected to participate regularly in the CourseWork discussion forum and work in small groups with other course members to discuss and present readings.

COMPLIT 31SI. What is Neoconservatism? The Movement's History and Ideas. 2 Units.

Its thinking from its communist roots, through the changes of the 60s, the rise of conservatism in the 80s, and the invasion of Iraq. Readings include Irving Kristol, Jeane Kirkpatrick, Daniel P. Moynihan, and David Brooks. Guest lecturers from supporters and critics.

COMPLIT 40Q. Aesthetics of Dissent: the Case of Islamic Iran. 2 Units.

Censorship, Borges tells us, is the mother of metaphors. The Islamic regime in Iran censors all aethetic production in the country. But Iranian dissident artists, from film-makers and fiction writers to composers in a thriving under-ground musical scene, have cleverly found ways to fight these draconian measures. They have developed an impressive body of work that is as sophisticated in style as it is rich in its discourse of democracy and dissent. The purpose of the seminar is to understand the aesthetic tropes of dissent in Iran, and the social and theological roots of rules of censorship. Masterpieces of post-revolutionary film, fiction, and music will be discussed in the context of tumultuous history of dissent in Islamic Iran.
Same as: INTNLREL 71Q.

COMPLIT 41N. Borderlands of Literature and Culture. 3-4 Units.

Rather than try to examine the whole of such an extensive body of work by artists of Mexican descent living in Mexico and the United States, the focus will be on the transnational themes of border thinking, memory, and identity (both personal and collective). Looking at the foundational poetry, auto-ethnographies, and narratives by Américo Paredes and Gloria Anzaldúa and how their literary and ethnographic work laid the groundwork for subsequent imaginings in the narratives, poetry, and theory of border thinking and writing. We will explore the trans-frontier cultural conditions under which imaginative literary texts are produced, disseminated, and received. We will consider not only the historical transnational experiences that inform these borderlands texts but the potential futures of Mexico and the United States they imagine.

COMPLIT 49. "Global Literature": Reading New Worlds. 5 Units.

It is a given that today's world is increasingly "networked": we are connected to a wider spectrum of people and places than ever before, in multiple ways. Our economic, political, technological, financial, cultural, ecological worlds seem blended into one. And yet amidst all that we seem to have in common, we also have sometimes very different ways of understanding those connections, both as individuals and as members of different national communities. In this course, we will learn how great works of literature help us not only imagine those connections between people and between nations as they have been produced historically and as they exist today, but also to see how literature helps us imagine the future. We will read novels from various locales, explore the cultures and histories from which they emerged, and link them together in a conversation. Works include: Gabriel Garcia Marquez, One Hundred Years of Solitude; Amitav Ghosh, The Hungry Tide; Chinua Achebe, Anthills of the Savannah; Ondatjee, The English Patient; Ibrahim Al-Koni, The Bleeding of the Stone.

COMPLIT 51Q. Comparative Fictions of Ethnicity. 4 Units.

We may "know" "who" we "are," but we are, after all, social creatures. How does our sense of self interact with those around us? How does literature provide a particular medium for not only self expression, but also for meditations on what goes into the construction of "the Self"? After all, don't we tell stories in response to the question, "who are you"? Besides a list of nouns and names and attributes, we give our lives flesh and blood in telling how we process the world. Our course focuses in particular on this question--Does this universal issue ("who am I") become skewed differently when we add a qualifier before it, like "ethnic"?
Same as: AMSTUD 51Q, CSRE 51Q.

COMPLIT 101. What is Comparative Literature?. 5 Units.

Introduction to theories about reading and theories about thinking. How should we best read novels, plays, short stories, poetry, and a variety of other forms of literary expression? Which ideas get taken across borders by literature, and which ideas do not? What role has literature played in human societies in different times and places? Fulfills the Writing-in-the-Major requirement. Gateway to the Comparative Literature Major.

COMPLIT 110. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1890s to today: Wilde, Gide, Lucie Delarue-Mardrus, Radclyffe Hall, E.M. Forster, Thomas Mann, Georges Bataille, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Jeanette Winterson, Sarah Waters, Audre Lorde, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality (Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Julia Serano, and others).
Same as: COMPLIT 310, FEMST 110.

COMPLIT 112. Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of Oscar Wilde's work together with major texts and authors of 19th-century French Decadence, including Symbolism, l'art pour l'art, and early Modernism. Points of contact between Wilde and avant-garde Paris salons; provocative, creative intersections between (homo)erotic and aesthetic styles, transgression; literary and cultural developments from Baudelaire to Mallarmé, Huysmans, Flaubert, Rachilde, Lorrain, and Proust compared with Wilde¿s Salomé, Picture of Dorian Gray, and critical writings; relevant historical and philosophical contexts. All readings in English; all student levels welcome.
Same as: COMPLIT 312, FRENCH 112, FRENCH 312.

COMPLIT 115. Nabokov in the Transnational Context. 3-5 Units.

Nabokov's techniques of migration and camouflage as he inhabits the literary and historical contexts of St. Petersburg, Berlin, Paris, America, and Switzerland. His early and late stories, last Russian novel "The Gift," "Lolita" (the novel and screenplay), and "Pale Fire." Readings in English. Russian speakers will be encouraged to read Russian texts in original.
Same as: COMPLIT 315, SLAVIC 156, SLAVIC 356.

COMPLIT 121. Poems, Poetry, Worlds. 3-5 Units.

What is poetry? How does it speak in many voices to questions of history, society, and personal experience? Why does it matter? The reading and interpretation of poetry in crosscultural comparison as experience, invention, form, sound, knowledge, and part of the world. Readings include: classical Chinese poetry, English Romantic poetry, and modern Arabic, American, Brazilian, Japanese, German, Spanish poetry, with specific attention to landscape, terrain, the environment, and the role of the poet.

COMPLIT 122. Literature as Performance. 5 Units.

Theater as performance and as literature. Historical tension between text and spectacle, thought and embodiment in western and other traditions since Greek antiquity. Dramas read in tandem with theory, live performances, and audiovisuals.

COMPLIT 123. The Novel, The World. 5 Units.

Literary inventiveness and social significance of novelistic forms from the Hellenistic age to the present.
Same as: ENGLISH 184.

COMPLIT 125. Past Desire Made Present: The Traditions of Erotic Poetry in Medieval Iran and Europe. 3-5 Units.

Aims to make present and accessible, to our early 21st-century experience, convergences and differences between medieval Persian and medieval European love poetry. Poetry will be dealt with as a discursive and institutional means through which it is possible to make present and tangible that which is absent -- both in space and time. If we accept that medieval Persian and European love poetry conjured up moods of homo- and heteroerotic desire for contemporary audiences, then this desire can also become present for us today through a close reading of those same texts.

COMPLIT 125A. The Gothic Novel. 5 Units.

The Gothic novel and its relatives from its invention by Walpole in The Castle of Otranto of 1764. Readings include: Northanger Abbey, The Italian, The Monk, Frankenstein, Jane Eyre, Great Expectations, and Dracula. What defines the Gothic as it evolves from one specific novel to a mode that makes its way into a range of fictional types?.

COMPLIT 129A. Contemporary Persian Poetry: Encounter of a Thousand-Year-Old Classical Tradition with Modernity. 5 Units.

The primacy of poetic expression in Persian culture in the transition from tradition to modernity. Major 20th-century poets in relation to historical events and social change. Authors include: Nima Yushij, Ahmad Shamloo, Sohrab Sepehri, Mehdi Akhavan Sales, Forough Farrokhzad, Nader Naderpour, Fereydoun Moshiri, Esma'il Kho'i, and Afghan and Tajik poets.

COMPLIT 132A. Dynasties, Dictators and Democrats: History and Politics in Germany. 3-5 Units.

Key moments in German history through documents: personal accounts, political speeches and texts, and literary works. The course begins with the Prussian monarchy and proceeds to the crisis years of the French Revolution. Documents from the 1848 revolution and the age of Bismarck and German unification follow. World War I and its impact on Germany, including the rise of Hitler, as well as the aftermath, divided Germany in the Cold War through the fall of the Berlin Wall. Taught in German.
Same as: GERMAN 132.

COMPLIT 133. Gender and Modernism. 3-5 Units.

Gender and sexuality in trans-Atlantic modernist literature and culture from the 1880s-1930s. Topics include the 19th-century culture wars and the figures of the dandy and the New Woman; modernist critiques of Enlightenment rationality; impact of World War I on gender roles; gender and the rise of modern consumer culture, fashion, design; the modernist metropolis and gender/sexuality; the avant-garde and gender; literary first-wave feminism; homoerotic modernism; modernism in the context of current theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 333.

COMPLIT 135. Chinese Cultural Revolution: Performance, Politics, and Aesthetics. 4 Units.

Events, arts, films, and operas of the Chinese Cultural Revolution. Analysis of political passion, aesthetics, and psychology of mass movements. Places the Cultural Revolution in the long-range context of art, social movements, and politics. Chinese language is not required.
Same as: CHINLIT 190, CHINLIT 290.

COMPLIT 141A. The Meaning of Arabic Literature: a seminar investigation into the nebulous concept of adab. 3-5 Units.

An investigation into the concept of literature in mediaeval Arabic. Was there a mediaeval Arabic way of thinking? We look to develop a translation for the word "adab," a concept that dominated mediaeval Arabic intellectual culture, and is related in some ways to what we mean today when we use the word literature. Our core text is a literary anthology from the 900s in Iraq and we try, together, to work out what literature meant for the author and his contemporaries. Readings, assignments and, class discussion all in English.

COMPLIT 142. The Literature of the Americas. 5 Units.

A wide-ranging overview of the literatures of the Americas inncomparative perspective, emphasizing continuities and crises that are common to North American, Central American, and South American literatures as well as the distinctive national and cultural elements of a diverse array of primary works. Topics include the definitions of such concepts as empire and colonialism, the encounters between worldviews of European and indigenous peoples, the emergence of creole and racially mixed populations, slavery, the New World voice, myths of America as paradise or utopia, the coming of modernism, twentieth-century avant-gardes, and distinctive modern episodes--the Harlem Renaissance, the Beats, magic realism, Noigandres--in unaccustomed conversation with each other.
Same as: AMSTUD 142, CSRE 142, ENGLISH 172E.

COMPLIT 143A. Alla Turca Love: Tales of Romance in Turkish Literature. 3-5 Units.

An introduction to the theme of romantic love in Turkish literature, with particular attention to key classical and contemporary works that influenced the development of the Turkish literary tradition. Topics include close reading and discussion of folk tales, poems, short stories, and plays with particular attention to the characters of lover/beloved, the theme of romantic love, and the cultural and historical background of these elements. We will begin with essential examples of ghazels from Ottoman court poetry to explore the notion of "courtly love" and move to the most influential texts of 19th and 20th centuries. All readings and discussions will be in English; all student levels welcome.
Same as: COMPLIT 342.

COMPLIT 144A. Istanbul the Muse: The City in Literature and Film. 3-5 Units.

The multiple layers of culture and history in Istanbul, a city on two continents between East and West, have inspired great art and literature. The class focuses on the idea of "inbetweenness" through art, literature, music, and popular culture seen chronologically. In addition to discussing literary, historical, and academic texts we will explore visual genres such as advertising, architecture, caricature, documentary, film, and miniature painting. Readings and discussion in English.

COMPLIT 145. Reflection on the Other: The Jew in Arabic Literature, the Arab in Hebrew Literature. 4 Units.

How literary works outside the realm of western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature and how the Jew is viewed in Arabic literature. Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of the writer's views. Arab and Jewish (Israeli) culture.
Same as: AMELANG 126, JEWISHST 106.

COMPLIT 145B. Ideas of Africa in Atlantic Writing. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the ways Anglophone and Francophone writers from the African, Caribbean and North Atlantic have represented Africa as a geographic, aesthetic and political space where one may think through problems of history, community and identity formation, art, language and the author's function. The course begins with Equiano and may include DuBois, Césaire, Senghor, Maryse Condé, Bessie Head, Phillip Gourevitch, Antjie Krog, and Barack Obama. Graduate students read in original French.
Same as: COMPLIT 345B, FRENCH 145B, FRENCH 345B.

COMPLIT 146. Asian American Culture and Community. 3-5 Units.

An examination of the history, art and culture of Vietnamese Americans, and their contemporary experiences in the South Bay. The course will combine in-class learning with a major conference featuring prominent artists and scholars on the Vietnamese Diasporic community. A service learning component requires community work at a service organization in San Jose. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Course can be repeated once.
Same as: AMSTUD 146, ASNAMST 146S, CSRE 146S.

COMPLIT 146A. The Arab Spring in Arabic Literature. 3-5 Units.

An examination of the events of 2011 in the Middle East through literature. We will read short stories, poetry, graphic novels, and blogs in order to try and work out whether the revolution could have been predicted, and how it took place. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.
Same as: COMPLIT 347.

COMPLIT 148B. Indian Epics: Past and Present. 4 Units.

The Mahabharata and the Ramayana, the two great epics of India, have been crucial texts in South Asian literature and culture for millennia. In this course, we will explore the diverse forms and impacts of both epics from their Sanskrit versions, first composed more than 2,000 years ago, into retellings through newer media forms well into the twenty-first century. We begin with abridged translations of both the Mahabharata (including the Bhagavadgita) and the Ramayana. We will discuss the major literary, religious, and social themes of each text as well as subsequent retellings in Sanskrit and vernacular languages. Throughout the course we will also investigate the modern lives of the Indian epics, including their transformations into Indian television serials, film versions of both narratives (from India and America), and invocations of the epic stories in contemporary political disputes. In addition to gaining exposure to some of the foundational texts for the study of South Asia, students will cultivate the ability to fruitfully analyze texts and stories from different cultures.
Same as: RELIGST 108.

COMPLIT 149A. Classical Arabic Poetry: An Introduction. 3-5 Units.

The primary litmus test of proficiency in the Arabic language is, and has always been, a command of classical Arabic poetry. Study and memorize the great lines of Arabic poetry with a manual that has stood the pedagogical test of time from the eleventh century until today. Questions of literary merit, poetic technique, metaphor, and divine and human linguistic innovation are all raised by the text that we will read together. Readings in Arabic, assignments and discussion in English. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.
Same as: COMPLIT 346.

COMPLIT 151A. Philosophies, Literatures, and Alternatives. 3-5 Units.

Aristotelian poetics and mediaeval Arabic literary theory. Nietzsche's irony and Philosophies and literatures, together and apart, dominate the last two millennia of human thought. How might they best be read? Are philosophy and literature two different ways of thinking, or are they just two separate institutional histories? This course starts with familiar Greeks, moves onto unfamiliar Arabs, confronts old Europe, and ends with contemporary Americans arguing.
Same as: COMPLIT 351A.

COMPLIT 154A. Film & Philosophy. 4 Units.

Issues of freedom, morality, faith, knowledge, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Twelve Monkeys (Gilliam), Ordet (Dreyer), The Dark Knight (Nolan), Vicky Cristina Barcelona (Allen), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C.

COMPLIT 154B. Poetic Thinking Across Media. 4 Units.

Even before Novalis claimed that the world must be romanticized, thinkers, writers, and artists wanted to perceive the human and natural world poetically. The pre- and post-romantic poetic modes of thinking they created are the subject of this course. Readings include Ecclestias, Zhaozhou Congshen, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Kafka, Benjamin, Arendt, and Sontag. This course will also present poetic thinking in the visual arts--from the expressionism of Ingmar Bergman to the neo-romanticism of Gerhard Richter.
Same as: GERMAN 154, JEWISHST 144B.

COMPLIT 157. Contemporary Turkish Cinema and Society. 3-5 Units.

An examination of contemporary Turkish cinema in a social and political context. The course will focus on films and directors that revived Turkish cinema in the mid-1990s with a focus on key issues pertaining to belonging, denied identities, masculinity, nationalism, silencing of women, urbanization. There will be approximately two hours of film screening and two hours of classroom discussion/seminar each week. All films have English subtitles.
Same as: COMPLIT 357.

COMPLIT 160. The Literature of Dehumanization. 3-5 Units.

An examination of a constellation in Western literature that specifically deals with a borderline state between humanity and animality, showing different approaches to the problem of humanity and non-humanity through some of the major works in the modern Western literary canon. The class explores the different ways in which dehumanization takes place in these texts, and how these texts also suggest a regaining of one's lost humanity. Readings include: Ovid, Marie de France, Shakespeare, Hobbes, Heine, Baudelaire, Tolstoy, Nietszche, Lautreamont, Kafka, Rilke, Celan, and more.

COMPLIT 161. Co-Existence in Hebrew Literature. 4-5 Units.

Is co-existence possible? Does pluralism require co-existence? Can texts serve as forms of co-existence? The class will focus on these and other questions related to coexistence and literature. Through reading works mostly by Jewish authors writing in Europe, Israel and the US we will explore attempts for complete equality, for a variety of hierarchical systems and for different kinds of co-dependence. Guest speaker: professor Anat Weisman, Ben Gurion University of the Negev.
Same as: AMELANG 175, JEWISHST 146.

COMPLIT 162. American Poetry and Secular Prayer. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore the practice of "secular prayer" in early- and mid-20th Century North American poetry. We will look at diverse poetic examples of meditation, contemplation, exegesis and revelation in order to consider how and why poetry has maintained a particular relation to the sacred, even amidst a secular cultural and intellectual context. We'll also consider how this question has played out in several key strands of 20th century literary theory, with particular emphasis on New Criticism and Eco-Criticism. Primary readings will include the poetry of T.S. Eliot, Wallace Stevens, Audre Lorde, George Oppen, Robert Bly, Mary Oliver, Charles Wright and Jan Zwicky.

COMPLIT 168. Imagining the Oceans. 5 Units.

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Readings might include voyage accounts by Cook and Darwin, sailors' narratives by Equiano and Dana, poetry by Coleridge, Bishop and Walcott, novels by Melville, Verne, Conrad and Woolf. Visual culture might include paintings by Turner and Redon, and films by Jean Painlevé, Kathryn Bigelow, Jerry Bruckheimer and James Cameron. Critical texts will be drawn from interdisciplinary theorists of modernity and mobility, such as Schmitt, Wallerstein, Corbin, Latour, Deleuze + Guattari, and Cresswell.
Same as: COMPLIT 368, FRENCH 168, FRENCH 368.

COMPLIT 171. Ethics of Jihad. 5 Units.

Why choose jihad? An introduction to Islamic ethics. Focus on ways in which people have chosen, rejected, or redefined jihad. Evaluation of the norms in moments of ethical and political choice. Topics include jihad in the age of 1001 Nights, jihad in the Arab Renaissance, jihad in Bin Laden's sermons, and the hashtag #MyJihad. All readings and discussion in English.

COMPLIT 181. Philosophy and Literature. 5 Units.

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track: majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. Issues may include authorship, selfhood, truth and fiction, the importance of literary form to philosophical works, and the ethical significance of literary works. Texts include philosophical analyses of literature, works of imaginative literature, and works of both philosophical and literary significance. Authors may include Plato, Montaigne, Nietzsche, Borges, Beckett, Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas, Pavel, and Pippin. Taught in English.
Same as: CLASSGEN 81, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181.

COMPLIT 190. Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought. 3-5 Units.

Anna Karenina, the novel as a case study in the contest between "modernity" and "tradition," their ethical order, ideology, cultural codes, and philosophies. Images of society, women and men in Tolstoy v. those of his contemporaries: Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Durkheim, Freud. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Requirements: three interpretive essays (500-1000 words each). Analysis of a passage from the novel; AK refracted through a "philosophical" prism and vice versa (30% each); class discussion and Forum (10%).
Same as: COMPLIT 390, SLAVIC 190, SLAVIC 390.

COMPLIT 194. Independent Research. 1-5 Unit.

(Staff).

COMPLIT 199. Senior Seminar: J.R.R. Tolkien and Junot Diaz's Speculative Narratives. 5 Units.

Major terms of speculative narratology; how different literary, cinematic, and popular culture narratives by (and about) Tolkien and Diaz raise issues of coloniality, power and race, stir public debates and contribute to understanding planetary literature. Readings include texts by Tolkien and Diaz, Frye, Fanon, Quijano, Mignolo, Jameson, Badiou, Butler, Moya, and Perez. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. CL Senior majors only and minors with permission.

COMPLIT 213A. Martin Heidegger. 3-5 Units.

Working through the most systematically important texts by Martin Heidegger and their historical moments and challenges, starting with Being and Time (1927), but emphasizing his philosophical production after World War II. The philological and historical understanding of the texts function as a condition for the laying open of their systematic provocations within our own (early 21st-century) situations. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. Taught in English.
Same as: COMPLIT 313A, GERMAN 282, GERMAN 382.

COMPLIT 218. The work of Luis Martín Santos in Mid-Twentieth Century Spain. 3-5 Units.

First published in 1962, "Tiempo de Silencio" is the only book that the young psychiatrist Luis Martin Santos finished during his lifetime, and, although largely overlooked (even in Spain) until the present day, one of the great European novels of the 20th century. It brings to a complex convergence the evocation of Spain's decadent and run-down post-Civil War society with high-modernist literary procedures and (an implicit parody of) phenomenological analysis.

COMPLIT 219. Dostoevsky: Narrative Performance and Literary Theory. 3-5 Units.

This course is an in-depth engagement with a range of Dostoevsky's genres: early works (epistolary novella Poor Folk and experimental Double), major novels (Crime and Punishment, The Idiot), less-read shorter works ("A Faint Heart," "Bobok," and "The Meek One"), and genre-bending House of the Dead<i/> and Diary of a Writer. We will apply recent theory of autobiography, performance, repetition and narrative gaps, to Dostoevsky's transformations of genre, philosophical and dramatic discourse, and narrative performance. For graduate students. Slavic students will read primary texts in Russian, other participants in translation. Course conducted in English. Undergraduates with advanced linguistic and critical competence may enroll with consent of instructor.
Same as: SLAVIC 251.

COMPLIT 221A. Courtly Love: Deceit and Desire in the Middle Ages. 3-5 Units.

A comparative seminar on medieval love books and their reception. We will examine and question the notion of "amour courtois," which arose in the lyrics and romances of medieval France and was codified in Romantic-era criticism. Primary readings will be enriched by thinking about this notion through the lens of modern theories of desire, such as those of Girard, Lacan, and Zizek. Conducted in English with readings in translation.
Same as: FRENCH 234, ITALIAN 234.

COMPLIT 222A. Wrestling with Modernity: German Literature and Thought from 1900 to the Present. 5-8 Units.

Masters of German 20th- and 21st-Century literature and philosophy as they present aesthetic innovation and confront the challenges of modern technology, social alienation, manmade catastrophes, and imagine the future. Readings include Nietzsche, Freud, Rilke, Musil, Brecht, Kafka, Doeblin, Benjamin, Juenger, Arendt, Musil, Mann, Adorno, Celan, Grass, Bachmann, Bernhardt, Wolf, and Kluge. Taught in English. Undergraduates enroll in 222 for 5 units, graduate students enroll in 322 for 8 units.
Same as: GERMAN 222, GERMAN 322.

COMPLIT 224A. Genocide and The Humanities. 3-5 Units.

We will study the history and current instances of genocide and waysnnin which the humanities deal with these. Mass slaughter would seemnnto be opposed by the supposedly humane nature of the humanities. Yetnneach realm of the humanities has its own constraints. We will studynnhistoriography, memoires, novels, and films in order to recognizennideologies of representation and signifying implications ofnnstructure. By discerning implicit values, students will gain toolsnnthey can use in working to eliminate genocide.

COMPLIT 226A. Queer Literature and Film. 3-5 Units.

Close analysis of major works of LGBTQ literature, film, and visual art from the 1890s to today. Students will gain deeper knowledge and appreciation of historical and contemporary forms of queer representation in various national literatures, film, and visual art; understand relevant social and political debates; and gain a basic knowledge of feminist and queer theory. Course will include an optional online component to reach out to the public (class website queerlitfilm.wordpress.com, social media).
Same as: FEMGEN 226A.

COMPLIT 228D. Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools. 1-3 Unit.

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.
Same as: COMPLIT 338D.

COMPLIT 229. Literature of Global Health. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the ways literary and medical writers have used the narrative form to explore the ethics of care in what has been called the developing world. We will begin with a call made by the editor-in-chief of The Lancet for a literature of global health -- modeled on the social reform novels of the nineteenth century, which are meant to have helped readers develop a modern public health conscience. We will study global health ethics as a field initially rooted in philosophy and policy that address questions raised by practice in resource-constrained communities abroad. And we will spend the quarter understanding how colonial and world literatures may deepen and even alter these questions. Readings will be selected from Albert Schweitzer, Aime Cesaire, Albert Camus, Frantz Fanon, Antonio Olinto, Ben Okri, Amitav Ghosh, Anne Fadiman, and Paul Farmer.
Same as: FRENCH 229, HUMBIO 175L, MED 234.

COMPLIT 230A. The Novel in Europe: The Age of Compromise, 1800-1848. 5 Units.

The novel after the French revolution and the industrial take-off. Novelistic form and historical processes ¿ nation-building and the marriage market, political conservatism and the advent of fashion, aristocracy and bourgeoisie and proletariat... ¿ focusing on how stylistic choices and plot structures offer imaginary resolutions to social and ideological conflicts. Authors will include Austen, Scott, Shelley, Stendhal, Puskin, Balzac, Bronte.

COMPLIT 233. Baroque and Neobaroque. 5 Units.

The literary, cultural, and political implications of the 17th-century phenomenon formed in response to the conditions of the 16th century including humanism, absolutism, and early capitalism, and dispersed through Europe, the Americas, and Asia. If the Baroque is a universal code of this period, how do its vehicles, such as tragic drama, Ciceronian prose, and metaphysical poetry, converse with one another? The neobaroque as a complex reaction to the remains of the baroque in Latin American cultures, with attention to the mode in recent Brazilian literary theory and Mexican poetry.
Same as: SPANLIT 293E.

COMPLIT 236. Literature and Transgression. 3-5 Units.

Close reading and analysis of erotic-sexual and aesthetic-stylistic transgression in selected works by Wilde, Schnitzler, Joyce, Barnes, Bataille, Burroughs, Thomas Mann, Guenter Grass, Kathy Acker, Junot Diaz and others. Along with understanding the changing cultural, social, and political contexts of what constitutes "transgression" or censorship, students will gain knowledge of influential theories of transgression by Foucault, Blanchot, and contemporary queer and feminist writers.
Same as: FEMGEN 236.

COMPLIT 240A. Introduction to Hebrew Literature. 3-5 Units.

The influence of biblical poetry, piyut, and medieval Hebrew poetry on the development of Modern Hebrew poetry. With focus on voice, space, lyrical Subjectivity, Intertextuality, and Poetic Forms. Guest Speakers include Tamar Zwei, Susan Einbinder, Berry Saharoff, and Raymond Scheindlin.

COMPLIT 242A. Short Stories from South Asia. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore how cultural identities of the nations in South Asia were re-defined after the Partition of India in 1947, the independence of Sri Lanka in 1948 and the formation of Bangladesh in 1971. Comparative/cross-cultural study of stories will be taken up for indepth analysis based on certain themes like partition and violence, myth and narrative, gender and narrative, music and narratology, familial patterns, etc.

COMPLIT 243B. Readings in Avicenna and al-Jurjani. 4 Units.

Classical Arabic reading course. Instructor approval required. Pre-requisite: minimum two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent.

COMPLIT 245. Introductory Ottoman Turkish. 1-3 Unit.

Course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Aims to familiarize students with Ottoman Turkish script and develop competence in reading Ottoman Turkish texts in print. Selected readings will range from poetry to prose, from newspaper and journal articles to reference works.

COMPLIT 246B. Ottoman Translation Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

This course aims to provide students with training in reading printed Ottoman Turkish texts and translating them into English. Through translation we will explore not only syntactical and lexical problems, but also cultural history and politics as they relate to the texts. Open to undergraduate and graduate students. High intermediate or advanced level of modern Turkish and introductory level of Ottoman Turkish is required. Contact Burcu Karahan Richardson (bkarahan@stanford.edu) for more information.

COMPLIT 247. Bollywood and Beyond: An Introduction to Indian Film. 3-5 Units.

A broad engagement with Indian cinema: its relationship with Indian politics, history, and economics; its key thematic concerns and forms; and its adaptation of and response to global cinematic themes, genres, and audiences. Locating the films within key critical and theoretical debates and scholarship on Indian and world cinemas. Goal is to open up what is often seen as a dauntingly complex region, especially for those who are interested in but unfamiliar with its histories and cultural forms.
Same as: FILMSTUD 250B, ICA 250.

COMPLIT 248A. Reading Turkish I. 3-5 Units.

Designed to develop reading competence in Turkish for graduate students (undergraduates should consult the instructor). An introduction to the structures of Turkish language necessary for reading. Essential grammar, syntax points, vocabulary, and reading skills will be emphasized. The goal is to enable you to read Turkish at an advanced level in a relatively short period of time. It is not a traditional language course that takes an integrated four-skill approach; it focuses only on reading, and as a result we will be able to cover advanced material in a short amount of time.

COMPLIT 248B. Reading Turkish II. 2-4 Units.

Continuation of language and reading development from Reading Turkish I. Open with consent of the instructor to undergraduates who have already taken Reading Turkish I.

COMPLIT 248C. Advanced Turkish for Research. 2-4 Units.

Refining advanced reading skills in modern Turkish through intensive reading and translation. Emphasis on Turkish cultural, historical, literary, and political texts depending on students¿ academic interests. Prior knowledge of Turkish and/or consultation with the instructor is necessary.

COMPLIT 249A. The Iranian Cinema: Image and Meaning. 1-3 Unit.

This course will focus on the analysis of ten Iranian films with the view of conducting a discourse on the semiotics of Iranian art and culture.nnEach session will be designated to the viewing of a film by a prominent Iranian film-maker. Students are expected to prepare for class by having previously examined other available films by the film-maker under consideration.
Same as: ICA 249A.

COMPLIT 249B. Iranian Cinema in Diaspora. 1-3 Unit.

Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian Filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them.nnThese films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran.nnIn this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week:nnWhat changes in aesthetics and point of view of the filmmaker are caused by the change in his or her work environment?nnThough unwantedly these films are made outside Iran, how related are they to the known (recognized) cinema within Iran?nnAnd in fact, to what extent do these films express things that are left unsaid by the cinema within Iran?
Same as: ICA 249B.

COMPLIT 249C. Contemporary Iranian Theater. 1-3 Unit.

Today Iranian plays¿both in traditional and contemporary styles¿are staged in theater festivals throughout the world play their role in forming a universal language of theater which combine the heritages from countries in all five continents. Despite many obstacles, some Iranian plays have been translated into English and some prominent Iranian figures are successful stage directors outside Iran.nnForty six years ago when ¿Theater in Iran¿ (a monograph on the history of Iranian plays) by Bahram Beyzaie was first published, it put the then contemporary Iranian theater movement--which was altogether westernizing itself blindly --face to face with a new kind of self-awareness. Hence in today¿s generation of playwrights and stage directors in Iran, all know something of their theatrical heritage. nnIn this course we will spend some class sessions on the history of theater in Iran and some class meetings will be concentrating on contemporary movements and present day playwrights. Given the dearth of visual documents, an attempt will be made to present a picture of Iranian theater to the student.nnStudents are expected to read the recommended available translated plays of the contemporary Iranian playwrights and participate in classroom discussions.

COMPLIT 250. Literature, History and Memory. 3-5 Units.

Analysis of literary works as historical narratives. Focus on the relationship history, fiction, and memory as reflected in Francophone literary texts that envision new ways of reconstructing or representing ancient or immediate past. Among questions to be raised: individual memory and collective history, master narratives and alternatives histories, the role of reconstructing history in the shaping or consolidating national or gender identities. Readings include fiction by Glissant, Kane, Condé, Schwarz-Bart, Djebar, Perec, as well as theoretical texts by Ricoeur, de Certeau, Nora, Halbwachs, White, Echevarrîa. Taught in French.
Same as: FRENCH 248.

COMPLIT 252A. An Introduction to Classical Arabic Poetry: the Shakespeare of the Arabs. 2-5 Units.

Study, memorize, and criticize the work of al-Mutanabbi, a poet who in his twenties led a failed desert revolution. The mature and cynical poet he became was embarrassed by the claims he made in his youth to be a prophet who received new Quran from God. How did he get away with this? Engage with a literary and political society wholly unlike our own. Readings in Arabic, discussion in English. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent.
Same as: al-Mutanabbi.

COMPLIT 252B. An Introduction to Classical Arabic Prose: the Shakespeare of the Arabs. 2-5 Units.

Learn how to read the Arabic of Iraq in the 800s. Discover how close it is to Modern Standard Arabic. Engage with the politician, philosopher, theologian, and satirist who is still acknowledged today as the master of Arabic prose writing. Readings in Arabic, discussion in English. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford or equivalent.
Same as: al-Jahiz.

COMPLIT 253. Honoré de Balzac. 3-5 Units.

Working through a selection of novels by the author widely considered as a founder of western (19th-century) "Literary Realism." Balzac's will be contextualized within his life and the French culture and literature of his time. We will also approach, from a philosophical point of view, the emergence and functions of "Literary Realism." Another focus will be Balzac's work as exemplary of certain traditions within Literary Criticism (particularly Marxist Literary Criticism). Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 253.

COMPLIT 254. Modern Chinese Novel: Theory, Aesthetics, History. 4 Units.

From the May Fourth movement to the 40s. Themes include enlightenment, democracy, women's liberation, revolution, war, urban culture, and love. Prerequisite: advanced Chinese.
Same as: CHINLIT 174, CHINLIT 274.

COMPLIT 262A. Explosions of Enlightenment. 3-5 Units.

Eighteenth-century culture seen as permeated by intellectual and artistic practices and plays pushing principles of reason and rationality to an extreme that becomes self-undercutting. Such obsessions and practices are becoming more visible and prominent now, as the traditional concept of "Enlightenment" (synonymous with the 18th century) is undergoing a profound transformation. Among the protagonists of this seminar will be: Diderot as a philosopher and novelist; Lichtenberg as a scientist and writer of everyday notes; Goya, accusing violence and obsessed with nightmarish visions; Mozart as the excessive master of repetition and variation.
Same as: GERMAN 262A.

COMPLIT 264. Walter Benjamin. 3-5 Units.

Walter Benjamin's work as cultural historian, critic, literary author and philosopher, seen from the trajectory of a German-Jewish intellectual life in the context of the first half of the 20th century. Providing such a historical perspective will be the condition for an actively critical reading of Benjamin's works; a reading that -- counter to the predominant Benjamin-reception -- will try to distinguish between works of purely biographical and historical interest and those Benjamin texts that prove to be of great and lasting intellectual value. Taught in English.
Same as: GERMAN 264A.

COMPLIT 265. Histories and Futures of Humanistic Education: Culture and Crisis, Books and MOOCs. 5 Units.

Features of online education as they relate to the humanities and notions of engaged critical learning. Collaborative course, working in tandem with Professor Cathy Davidson's Duke course, The History and Future of High Education, using live chats, Google documents, and other forums to interact with students at Duke and other universities nationally. Each campus uses a syllabus linked to each instructor's angle into this general subject, but many readings and exercises in common. Seeing this as a critical moment in education, to connect this topic to its historical, cultural, political, and ethical implications. The Stanford course looks at early discussions about education and culture (Arnold's Culture and Anarchy) and then works through a key moment in the mid-20th century whose premises still have influence: the Two Cultures (humanities, sciences) debate. Radical responses to educational reform in France and the US in the late 60s, and the changing state of funding, value, and cultural critique in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The idea of education as a personal, collective, and intellectual endeavor which is shaped by and shapes societies. Focus on the idea of the public good and the relation between education and a democratic society.
Same as: DLCL 265, EDUC 217X.

COMPLIT 271A. Futurity: Why the Past Matters. 3-5 Units.

Drawing on literature, the arts, political discourse, museums, and new media, this course asks why and how we take interest in the watershed events of the modern era; how does contemporary culture engages with modern, made-made disasters such as the World Wars or 9/11? Readings and viewings include the literature of G. Grass, W. G. Sebald, Ian McEwan, Toni Morrison and Cormac McCarthy; the cinema of Kathryn Bigelow and Steven Spielberg; speeches by Barak Obama; and the theoretical writing of Walter Benjamin, Hayden White, Fredric Jameson, among others. Taught in English.
Same as: GERMAN 271.

COMPLIT 275. Humanities Education in the Changing University. 3 Units.

Advanced study in the humanities faces changes within fields, the university and the wider culture. Considers the debate over the status of the humanities with regard to historical genealogies and current innovations. Particular attention on changes in doctoral education. Topics include: origins of the research university; disciplines and specialization; liberal education in conflict with professionalization; literature and literacy education; interdisciplinarity as a challenge to departments; education policy; digital humanities; accountability in education, assessment and student-centered pedagogies.
Same as: DLCL 320, GERMAN 250.

COMPLIT 281. Visions of the Future in Literature. 4 Units.

Emphasis on personal and collective future as perceived and described in works translated from Hebrew or written originally in English. Focus on novels, short stories, poems and movies that deal both with the future of Israel and the Middle East and the future of individuals in the area. Guest speaker on Science Fiction and the Graphic Novel. The course is part of "The Future of Storytelling" activities organized by Taube Center for Jewish Studies.

COMPLIT 283. Masterpieces of Hebrew Literature from the Bible to the Present. 4-5 Units.

This course presents and reflects on some of the canonical works of Hebrew literature, from biblical era to the present. Discussing works such as the Wisdom Books and selections from the Midrash; and reflecting on important periods such as the Golden Age of Jewish Culture in Spain, the Renaissance, and contemporary Israeli literature, we will highlight linguistic innovation, as well as crucial thematic and philosophical concerns. Readings include the Book of Job, Psalm, Ibn Gabirol, Mapu, Rachel, Goldbegr, Agnon, S. Yizhar, Amichai, Oz and more.
Same as: JEWISHST 243.

COMPLIT 303D. Thinking in Fiction. 5 Units.

Narrative and cognition in 18th-century fictional, philosophical, scientific, and cultural texts. Probable readings: Hobbes, Locke, Newton, Swift, Defoe, Hume, Lennox, Sterne, Adam Smith, Wollstonecraft, and Bentham.

COMPLIT 310. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1890s to today: Wilde, Gide, Lucie Delarue-Mardrus, Radclyffe Hall, E.M. Forster, Thomas Mann, Georges Bataille, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Jeanette Winterson, Sarah Waters, Audre Lorde, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality (Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Julia Serano, and others).
Same as: COMPLIT 110, FEMST 110.

COMPLIT 311. Shakespeare, Islam, and Others. 5 Units.

Shakespeare and other early modern writers in relation to new work on Islam and the Ottoman Turk in early modern studies. Othello, Twelfth Night, Titus Andronicus, The Merchant of Venice, and other Shakespeare plays. Kyd's Solyman and Perseda, Daborne's A Christian Turned Turk, Massinger's The Renegado, Marlowe's The Jew of Malta, and literary and historical materials.

COMPLIT 312. Oscar Wilde and the French Decadents. 3-5 Units.

Close reading of Oscar Wilde's work together with major texts and authors of 19th-century French Decadence, including Symbolism, l'art pour l'art, and early Modernism. Points of contact between Wilde and avant-garde Paris salons; provocative, creative intersections between (homo)erotic and aesthetic styles, transgression; literary and cultural developments from Baudelaire to Mallarmé, Huysmans, Flaubert, Rachilde, Lorrain, and Proust compared with Wilde¿s Salomé, Picture of Dorian Gray, and critical writings; relevant historical and philosophical contexts. All readings in English; all student levels welcome.
Same as: COMPLIT 112, FRENCH 112, FRENCH 312.

COMPLIT 313A. Martin Heidegger. 3-5 Units.

Working through the most systematically important texts by Martin Heidegger and their historical moments and challenges, starting with Being and Time (1927), but emphasizing his philosophical production after World War II. The philological and historical understanding of the texts function as a condition for the laying open of their systematic provocations within our own (early 21st-century) situations. Satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for the major tracks in Philosophy and Literature. Taught in English.
Same as: COMPLIT 213A, GERMAN 282, GERMAN 382.

COMPLIT 315. Nabokov in the Transnational Context. 3-5 Units.

Nabokov's techniques of migration and camouflage as he inhabits the literary and historical contexts of St. Petersburg, Berlin, Paris, America, and Switzerland. His early and late stories, last Russian novel "The Gift," "Lolita" (the novel and screenplay), and "Pale Fire." Readings in English. Russian speakers will be encouraged to read Russian texts in original.
Same as: COMPLIT 115, SLAVIC 156, SLAVIC 356.

COMPLIT 320A. Epic and Empire. 5 Units.

Focus is on Virgil's Aeneid and its influence, tracing the European epic tradition (Ariosto, Tasso, Camoes, Spenser, and Milton) to New World discovery and mercantile expansion in the early modern period.
Same as: ENGLISH 314.

COMPLIT 321A. From Enlightenment to Realism: German Literature 1750-1900. 5-8 Units.

How German writers respond to the rise of historical awareness in the long nineteenth century. The role of historical precedents and models, especially Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman legacies, the Middle Ages, the Reformation, the French Revolution and its aftermath. The vexed relation between cultural production, material circumstances and political agency. The belatedness of German modernity and the anomalous character of Germany's development. France as a screen for the projection of nationalist and utopian fantasies. Authors include Herder, Goethe, Fichte, Heine, Büchner, Marx, Nietzsche, Fontane. Taught in German. Undergraduates enroll in 220 for 5 units, German graduate students enroll in 320 for 8 units.
Same as: GERMAN 221, GERMAN 321.

COMPLIT 321B. Anthropology and Literature: Problems of Representation, Power, and Textuality. 5 Units.

How are literary and social scientific forms of cultural description, evocation, and interpretation related? The seminar reads classic texts as well as recent experiments, addressing issues of genre, rhetoric, epistemology, translation, authority, and collaboration. The emphasis is on writing as a situated practice¿embodied, relational, and historically circumscribed. Authors may include Malinowski, Mead, Benedict, Lévi-Strauss, Geertz, Taussig, Leiris, Conrad, Achebe, Said, Barthes, Kroeber, Le Guin, and selected contemporary ethnographies. Examples from film, visual culture, and performance art may also be included.
Same as: ANTHRO 321A.

COMPLIT 324. Landscapes of the Sublime. 5 Units.

The modern notion of the sublime in philosophy, literature, and art, emphasizing its connection to space and landscape. Topics include: how global exploration contributed to the sublime in the late 17th and 18th centuries; the romantic interiorization of the sublime; and the sublime's connection to mimesis, power, work, and technology. Writers may include Milton, Burke, Kant, Deleuze and Guattari, Freud, the Shelleys, Coleridge, Hugo, Baudelaire, and Rimbaud; artists may include Gericault, Turner, Delacroix, and Friedrich.

COMPLIT 325. Rethinking Comparative Literary Study Outside of Academia. 2 Units.

This graduate seminar will serve three primary purposes: 1) we will create and inspire a dialogue to help us think through the application of comparative literary study in non-academic contexts, 2) we will refine our ideas by applying them in various exercises and settings, and, as a result, 3) we will need to investigate what is meant by the phrase `critical thinking¿. nnBroadly speaking, this seminar represents a forum for thinking creatively about the unique skills of a doctoral student as well as the specific challenges that await when pursuing career opportunities outside of academia. The goal is to come out of the seminar with a heightened appreciation of the humanities skill set in applications that may present new opportunities for the student. Texts will be highly cross-disciplinary, drawing from legal, financial, and technological traditions and mediums. No pre-requisites required.

COMPLIT 327. Genres of the Novel. 5 Units.

Provides students with an overview of major genres in the history of the modern novel. Novels might include works by Cervantes, Defoe, Lafayette, Radcliffe, Goethe, Balzac, Woolf, and Marquez, coupled with theory by Lukacs, Bahktin, Jameson and Barthes.
Same as: FRENCH 327.

COMPLIT 328. Literature, Narrative, and the Self. 3-5 Units.

The role of narrative in the well-lived life. Are narratives necessary? Can they, and should they, be literary? When might non-narrative approaches, whether literary or otherwise, be more relevant? Is unity of self something given, something to be achieved, or something to be overcome? Readings from Aristotle, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Camus, Sartre, MacIntyre, G. Strawson, Velleman; Ricoeur, Brooks; Shakespeare, Stendhal, Musil, Levi, Beckett, Morrison; film. Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 328, ITALIAN 328.

COMPLIT 330. The Bourgeois. 5 Units.

Goal is to define the ruling class of modern times. Social history (Weber, Hirschmann, Marx); literary texts (Defoe, Goethe, Gaskell); and Henrik Ibsen who produced an intransigent criticism of the bourgeois ethos.

COMPLIT 333. Gender and Modernism. 3-5 Units.

Gender and sexuality in trans-Atlantic modernist literature and culture from the 1880s-1930s. Topics include the 19th-century culture wars and the figures of the dandy and the New Woman; modernist critiques of Enlightenment rationality; impact of World War I on gender roles; gender and the rise of modern consumer culture, fashion, design; the modernist metropolis and gender/sexuality; the avant-garde and gender; literary first-wave feminism; homoerotic modernism; modernism in the context of current theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 133.

COMPLIT 334B. Concepts of Modernity II: The Study of Culture in the Age of Globalization. 5 Units.

A survey of 20th-century theory with focus on the concept of culture and methods of studying it from diverse disciplines including, anthropology, historical sociology, literary and cultural studies. Discussions will emphasize modernization, transmodernization and globalization processes in their relations to culture broadly understood, cultures in their regional, national and diasporic manifestations, and cultures as internally differentiated (high and low culture, subcultures, media cultures).
Same as: ENGLISH 334B, MTL 334B.

COMPLIT 335A. Materialism and Literature. 3-5 Units.

Exploration of vibrant materialism (Bennet, Latour) and historical materialism (critical theory) as a basis to approach Latin American commodity novels, i.e., those that revolve around bananas, coffee, etc. Literary works by J.E. Rivera, García Márquez, Asturias, Neruda, Magnus, and others. Taught in Spanish.
Same as: ILAC 335.

COMPLIT 338. The Gothic in Literature and Culture. 5 Units.

This course examines the Gothic as a both a narrative subgenre and an aesthetic mode, since its 18th century invention. Starting with different narrative genres of Gothic expression such as the Gothic novel, the ghost tale, and the fantastic tale by writers such as Walpole, Radcliffe, Sade, Poe, and E.T.A. Hoffmann, the course goes on to ask how the Gothic sensibility permeates a wide range of 19th century cultural phenomena that explore the dark side of Enlightenment, from Romantic poetry and art to melodrama, feuilleton novels, popular spectacles like the wax museum and the morgue. If time permits, we will also ask how the Gothic is updated into our present in popular novels and cinema. Critical readings will examine both the psychology of the Gothic sensibility and its social context, and might be drawn from theorists such as Benjamin, Freud, Lacan, Kristeva, and Zizek.
Same as: ENGLISH 338, FRENCH 338.

COMPLIT 338D. Introduction to Digital Humanities: Concepts, Technologies, Tools. 1-3 Unit.

In this course, we will explore the perspectives of scholars who have thought about what "digital humanities" means and the technologies and tools that are shaping new kinds of research, scholarship, and publishing. Topics will include history of the digital humanities, textual studies, electronic literature, computational and new media, and emerging work around text, image, and new media curation and visualization. This seminar is ideal for anyone interested in digital methods and digital in the humanities, teaching with new digital methods, or to learn about all the digital humanities projects at Stanford.nnThis course is organized as a mix of seminar and workshop and will be featuring a new platform called "Lacuna Stories," designed for Stanford students, that presents multiple platforms, media, and texts to digitally engage with narratives surrounding 9/11; active engagement by all participants is expected. Students may contribute to the field with a creative final project that they develop over the course of the quarter if they select the 3-unit option.
Same as: COMPLIT 228D.

COMPLIT 342. Alla Turca Love: Tales of Romance in Turkish Literature. 3-5 Units.

An introduction to the theme of romantic love in Turkish literature, with particular attention to key classical and contemporary works that influenced the development of the Turkish literary tradition. Topics include close reading and discussion of folk tales, poems, short stories, and plays with particular attention to the characters of lover/beloved, the theme of romantic love, and the cultural and historical background of these elements. We will begin with essential examples of ghazels from Ottoman court poetry to explore the notion of "courtly love" and move to the most influential texts of 19th and 20th centuries. All readings and discussions will be in English; all student levels welcome.
Same as: COMPLIT 143A.

COMPLIT 345B. Ideas of Africa in Atlantic Writing. 3-5 Units.

This course examines the ways Anglophone and Francophone writers from the African, Caribbean and North Atlantic have represented Africa as a geographic, aesthetic and political space where one may think through problems of history, community and identity formation, art, language and the author's function. The course begins with Equiano and may include DuBois, Césaire, Senghor, Maryse Condé, Bessie Head, Phillip Gourevitch, Antjie Krog, and Barack Obama. Graduate students read in original French.
Same as: COMPLIT 145B, FRENCH 145B, FRENCH 345B.

COMPLIT 346. Classical Arabic Poetry: An Introduction. 3-5 Units.

The primary litmus test of proficiency in the Arabic language is, and has always been, a command of classical Arabic poetry. Study and memorize the great lines of Arabic poetry with a manual that has stood the pedagogical test of time from the eleventh century until today. Questions of literary merit, poetic technique, metaphor, and divine and human linguistic innovation are all raised by the text that we will read together. Readings in Arabic, assignments and discussion in English. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.
Same as: COMPLIT 149A.

COMPLIT 347. The Arab Spring in Arabic Literature. 3-5 Units.

An examination of the events of 2011 in the Middle East through literature. We will read short stories, poetry, graphic novels, and blogs in order to try and work out whether the revolution could have been predicted, and how it took place. Prerequisite: two years of Arabic at Stanford, or equivalent.
Same as: COMPLIT 146A.

COMPLIT 351A. Philosophies, Literatures, and Alternatives. 3-5 Units.

Aristotelian poetics and mediaeval Arabic literary theory. Nietzsche's irony and Philosophies and literatures, together and apart, dominate the last two millennia of human thought. How might they best be read? Are philosophy and literature two different ways of thinking, or are they just two separate institutional histories? This course starts with familiar Greeks, moves onto unfamiliar Arabs, confronts old Europe, and ends with contemporary Americans arguing.
Same as: COMPLIT 151A.

COMPLIT 353A. Experiment and the Novel. 5 Units.

A double exploration of experiment in the novel from 1750 into the 19th century. Taking off from Zola's "The Experimental Novel," consideration of the novel's aspect as scientific instrument. Taking the idea of experimental fiction in the usual sense of departures from standard practice, consideration of works that seem to break away from techniques of "realism" devised prior to 1750. Possible texts by: Lennox, Sterne, Walpole, Goldsmith, Godwin, Lewis, Shelley, Hogg, Emily Bronte, and Diderot.

COMPLIT 357. Contemporary Turkish Cinema and Society. 3-5 Units.

An examination of contemporary Turkish cinema in a social and political context. The course will focus on films and directors that revived Turkish cinema in the mid-1990s with a focus on key issues pertaining to belonging, denied identities, masculinity, nationalism, silencing of women, urbanization. There will be approximately two hours of film screening and two hours of classroom discussion/seminar each week. All films have English subtitles.
Same as: COMPLIT 157.

COMPLIT 359A. Philosophical Reading Group. 1 Unit.

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with H. U. Gumbrecht is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 395, ITALIAN 395.

COMPLIT 360B. The Theory of the Novel. 5 Units.

Topics will include: theories of the novel's origin; novelistic subjectivity; voice and text; body and text; the problem of the quotidian; democracy, revolution and novelistic form; and the peculiar dynamic of the novelistic trinity (author, character, reader).
Same as: ENGLISH 360B.

COMPLIT 363. Ecology, History, Exchange. 4-5 Units.

Readings of novels, ecocriticism. Ghosh, Gordimer, Coetzee, Al-Koni, Ondatjee, Silko.

COMPLIT 364. Style. 5 Units.

The return of a term that was central in 20th-century criticism, and has all but disappeared in recent decades. Focus ison looking at concepts of style from various branches of linguistic and literary theory, and examination of some revealing examples in novels and films. Team taught with D.A. Miller from U.C. Berkeley.

COMPLIT 368. Imagining the Oceans. 5 Units.

How has Western culture constructed the world's oceans since the beginning of global ocean exploration? How have imaginative visions of the ocean been shaped by marine science, technology, exploration, commerce and leisure? Readings might include voyage accounts by Cook and Darwin, sailors' narratives by Equiano and Dana, poetry by Coleridge, Bishop and Walcott, novels by Melville, Verne, Conrad and Woolf. Visual culture might include paintings by Turner and Redon, and films by Jean Painlevé, Kathryn Bigelow, Jerry Bruckheimer and James Cameron. Critical texts will be drawn from interdisciplinary theorists of modernity and mobility, such as Schmitt, Wallerstein, Corbin, Latour, Deleuze + Guattari, and Cresswell.
Same as: COMPLIT 168, FRENCH 168, FRENCH 368.

COMPLIT 369. Introduction to Graduate Studies: Criticism as Profession. 5 Units.

A number of faculty will present published work and discuss their research and composition process. We will read critical, theoretical, and literary texts that address, in different ways, "What is a World?" Taught in English.
Same as: DLCL 369, FRENCH 369, GERMAN 369, ITALIAN 369.

COMPLIT 371. China in the World. 2-5 Units.

How aesthetics and politics intertwine and break apart in Western and Eastern traditions. Aesthetics for understanding culture, morality, and power in crosscultural contexts. Readings include Hegel, Kant, Marcuse, Lukacs, and Adorno; and Chinese thinkers Wang Guowei, Lu Xun, Li Zehou, and Mao. Prerequisite: CHINLIT 127/207 or consent of instructor.
Same as: CHINLIT 371.

COMPLIT 390. Tolstoy's Anna Karenina in Dialogue with Contemporary Philosophical, Social, and Ethical Thought. 3-5 Units.

Anna Karenina, the novel as a case study in the contest between "modernity" and "tradition," their ethical order, ideology, cultural codes, and philosophies. Images of society, women and men in Tolstoy v. those of his contemporaries: Marx, Mill, Nietzsche, Weber, Durkheim, Freud. Open to juniors, seniors and graduate students. Requirements: three interpretive essays (500-1000 words each). Analysis of a passage from the novel; AK refracted through a "philosophical" prism and vice versa (30% each); class discussion and Forum (10%).
Same as: COMPLIT 190, SLAVIC 190, SLAVIC 390.

COMPLIT 396L. Pedagogy Seminar I. 2 Units.

Required for first-year Ph.D students in English, Modern Thought and Literature, and Comparative Literature. Preparation for surviving as teaching assistants in undergraduate literature courses. Focus is on leading discussions and grading papers.
Same as: ENGLISH 396L.

COMPLIT 399. Individual Work. 1-15 Unit.

COMPLIT 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.