Catalog Navigation
Contacts
Office: Arrillaga Family Sports Center
Mail Code: 94305-6150
Phone: (650) 723-4591
Web Site: http://recreation.stanford.edu
Web Site: http://gostanford.com

Courses offered through the Department of Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation are listed under the subject code ATHLETIC, OUTDOOR, PE, and WELLNESS on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site. Most courses are activity classes and carry 1 unit of credit for satisfactory completion of work. Although there is no limitation on the number of activity classes in which a student may enroll, no more than 8 units of these activity classes (and/or other University activity classes) may be applied toward undergraduate graduation requirements. See the "Credit" tab of the "Undergraduate Degrees" section of this bulletin for complete information. Course fees, as applicable, are posted to the student's University account. 

Department of Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation Mission

From its founding in 1891, Stanford University's leaders have believed that physical activity is valuable for its own sake and that vigorous exercise is complementary to the educational purposes of the University. Within this context for human development, it is the mission of Stanford's Department of Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation to offer a wide range of high quality programs which encourage and facilitate all participants to realize opportunities for championship athletic participation, physical fitness, health, and well being.

The mission of Stanford Recreation is to provide a balanced and holistic approach to the growth and wellness of our students, faculty, and staff by delivering best-in-class co-curricular programs and resources.

The department's classes and programs aim to promote understanding of the value and role of physical activity as an important dimension of the human condition, to develop performance skills in sport, to develop the habit of participation, and to provide leadership opportunities in aquatics, sports, and other physical activities. To this end, the program encompasses a diversity of learning and participating opportunities from informal recreation through organized intramural competition, basic instructional classes, and theoretical study to, and including, intercollegiate athletic competition.

There are no degree programs currently offered in Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation.

Facilities

Athletic facilities are located throughout campus. They include, but are not limited to Arrillaga Center for Sport and Recreation (Squash, Fencing, fitness & physical education facility for students, faculty, & staff), Arrillaga Family Sports Center (Home to DAPER), Arrillaga Outdoor Education & Recreation Center (Outdoor Education, Avery Recreation Pool, fitness & Physical Education facility for students, faculty & staff), Avery Acquatic Center (Swimming & Diving, Water Polo, Synchronized Swimming), Bill & Joyd Smith Family Stadium (Softball), Burnham Pavillion & Ford Center (Gymnastics, Volleyball), Cobb Track and Angell Field (Track & Field), Klein Field at Sunken Diamond (Baseball), Laird Q. Cagan Stadium at Maloney Field (Soccer, Lacrosse), Maples Pavillion (Basketball, Volleyball), Red Barn (Equestrian), Siebel Varsity Golf Training Complex (Golf), Stanford Campus Recreation Association (Stanford’s community center for faculty, senior staff and their families), Stanford Golf Course (Golf, Cross Country), Stanford Rowing & Sailing Center (Rowing, Sailing, Lightweight Rowing), Stanford Stadium (Football), Steuber Rugby Stadium & Doyle Family Clubhouse (Rugby), Taube Family Tennis Center (Tennis), West Campus Tennis Courts, Varsity Field Hockey Turf (Field Hockey), Sand Hill Intramural Fields, Roble Field, Tresidder Fitness Center, Manzanita Basketball Court and Field.  

Lockers

Lockers are available for rent to faculty/staff and students at the Arrillaga Outdoor Education Recreation Center, Arrillaga Family Sports Center, and the Ford Center. 

Contacts

Office: Arrillaga Family Sports Center
Mail Code: 94305-6150
Phone: (650) 723-4591
Web Site: http://gostanford.com
Web Site: http://clubsports.stanford.edu
Web Site: http://smap.stanford.edu

Courses offered by Athletics are listed under the subject code  ATHLETIC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Athletics Programs

Intercollegiate Athletics

In keeping with American university tradition, Stanford offers a broad intercollegiate athletic program. The objectives are to provide the opportunity to compete at the highest possible level without jeopardizing the integrity of the individual or the institution; to adhere strictly to all University, association, and conference rules governing athletic participation; and to encourage effectively the achievement of academic goals by student athletes at the same rate as other University students.  

As a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), Stanford fields both men's and women's varsity teams. Those for men are baseball, basketball, crew, cross country, fencing, football, golf, gymnastics, sailing, soccer, swimming and diving, tennis, track and field, volleyball, water polo, and wrestling. Those for women are basketball, crew, cross country, fencing, field hockey, golf, gymnastics, lacrosse, sailing, soccer, softball, squash, swimming and diving, synchronized swimming, tennis, track and field, volleyball, sand volleyball and water polo. Both men's and women's teams are affiliated with the Pacific Twelve Conference. Additional or alternative intercollegiate athletic competition is available for all teams.

Club Sports Program

Stanford Club Sports supports intercollegiate competition for non-varsity Club Sports teams at the highest level by providing opportunities for student leadership development as well as appropriate resources to support team and individual success in development, training, and competition. The program is actively supervised by the Associate Director for Recreation Sports and Physical Education, along with the Coordinator for Club Sports and Intramural Sports but the emphasis is for team operations to be student-driven. Students who are returning and committed members of teams that meet the criteria for inclusion in the formal curriculum may register for units of credit, subject to the University's Activity unit policy, for Athletics, Physical Education & Recreation.

Martial Arts Program

The Stanford Martial Arts Program (SMAP) is an umbrella organization that supports the various member martial arts groups on campus. Its main goals are to educate the Stanford community through outreach programming about the variety of martial arts instruction on campus, serve as a centralized communications network among the different groups, and preserve the martial arts as a vital and distinctive component of Stanford life. Academic credit, subject to the University's Activity unit policy, is offered for participation in SMAP classes in accordance with the department's Physical Education guidelines. 

Directors

Director, Academic Services Student Athletes: Austin D. Lee

Associate Director for Recreation Sports and Physical Education:  Pam Mahlow

Stanford Martial Arts Program: Tim Ghormley

Contacts

Office: Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation
Mail Code: 94305-6150
Phone: (650) 723-7686
Web Site: http://cardinalrec.stanford.edu/pe-classes
Email: tlillie@stanford.edu

Courses offered by Physical Education are listed under the subject code PE on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Physical Education

Being active, relieving stress, creating socially interactive environments and having fun are a few of the objectives we have for our Physical Education program.

Physical Education Mission

The goal of the program is to provide undergraduates and graduate students with opportunities to learn new skills and concepts through a variety of non-competitive lifelong physical activity courses such as: fitness, weight training, aquatics, racquet sports, dance, golf, sailing, horsemanship, indoor rock climbing, etc. These courses are tailored to help students learn and develop their physical fitness and motor skills, as well as create a positive attitude toward well-being and physical activity which enable students to live a healthy, active lifestyle.

Learning Outcomes

Physical Education offers courses applicable to a variety of environments and experiences across campus and in life and pair well with academic and group work. Learning outcomes include:

  • Understanding of appropriate warm-up and cool-down routines
  • Identify health related components of fitness (cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility)
  • Understanding of basic anatomical terminology and proper stretching technique
  • Make intelligent choices that contribute to a healthy, active lifestyle

Directors

Associate Director of Health and Human Performance: Chris Pelchat, Ph.D.

Assistant Director of Physical Education: Tia Lillie, Ph.D. 

Teaching Specialists (Activity Class Instructors)    

Tia Lillie (Fitness/Swim),  Stacie Lonaker (Swimming),  Phil Marrone (Golf),  Ying Mitchell (Yoga/Pilates), Olivia Palmer (Lifeguarding),  Tamar Petrosian (Fitness),  Tom Sarsfield (Tennis/Table Tennis),  Bernardo Tapia (Fitness),  Matt Thornton (Tennis/Golf)  

Contacts

Office: Arrillaga Outdoor Education & Recreation Center
Mail Code: 94305-6151
Phone: (650) 498-0766
Web Site: http://hhp.stanford.edu/oe
Email:  outdoored@stanford.edu

Courses offered by Outdoor Education are listed under the subject codes OUTDOOR and SURG on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Outdoor Education Mission

Outdoor Education’s purpose is to develop visionary outdoor educational leaders who are prepared to be agents of change in the world, whether in a wilderness context or a context where these transferable skills are implemented. Courses completed in OUTDOOR and SURG could lead to a national certificate in Outdoor Education.

Facilities

Courses and experiential education take place in the Arrillaga Outdoor Education and Recreation Center, the Outdoor House community space, and the outdoors. The Outdoor Center (AOERC) hosts access to equipment, class and lecture area, a resource library, climbing center and indoor climbing facility, meeting and trip-planning space. Field experiences facilitate a variety of outdoor and adventure disciplines, and vary in locale both near and far from campus.   

Learning Outcomes

Outdoor Education offers co-curricular courses applicable to a variety of environments and experiences across campus and in life.  Outdoor Education expects student exposure to the following learning outcomes:

  • Introduction to the environment through outdoor recreation activities
  • Empowerment to move beyond self-imposed limitations
  • Development of effective team building and leadership skills
  • Education about the environment and sustainability
  • Training for critical thinking, and the ability to identify risks and make sound decisions
  • Exploration and attainment of new skills which merge outside of the classroom

Directors

Associate Director of Health and Human Performance: Chris Pelchat

Coordinator of Outdoor Education: Antja Thompson

Teaching Specialists

Teaching Specialists:  Peter Wright, Phil Sandlin, Chris Pelchat, Kelsey McCabe, Kevin Hopper, Antja Thompson, Andrew De Torres, Patrick Noble, Joel Reid

Contacts

Office: Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation
Mail Code: 94305-6150
Phone: (650) 723-7686
Web Site: http://cardinalrec.stanford.edu/pe-classes
Email: tlillie@stanford.edu

Courses offered by Wellness Education are listed under the subject code WELLNESS on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Wellness Education Mission

Stanford WellnessEd is the student wellness education program at Stanford. The WellnessEd curriculum is designed to inspire students to be the healthiest versions of themselves possible in the cognitive, emotional, social, and physical realms of wellness. The hallmark of the WellnessEd methodology for individual and community change is embodied in its motto: "Learn, Apply, Transform.” Program instructors teach students the latest research-based wellness ideas and strategies. Resourced with this learning, students are supported in applying these practical wellness strategies to their own lives, thereby transforming their quality of living and impacting their social spheres in positive ways. In short, WellnessEd trains wellness change agents who change themselves in order to impact the world around them in meaningful ways.

Learning Outcomes

WellnessEd offers a range of research-based theory and practice classes in the areas of wellness and flourishing. These courses teach ideas and skills that enhance cognitive, emotional, and social wellness across the full variety of environments that students experience. Though we do not offer a degree program, for students who want to deepen their wellness education, we also offer a Wellness Certificate with a 5 course curriculum.

  • Understand the core components of an integrated emotional-social-physical perspective of human wellness.
  • Investigate and apply research based strategies for enhancing flourishing and resilience.
  • Conceptualize optimal performance as a balance between achievement and wellness.
  • Learn the latest findings in the mind-brain-body system and its impact of human achievement and health.

Directors

Associate Director for Health and Human Performance: Chris Pelchat

Coordinator of Wellness Education: TBA

Teaching Specialists

Aneel Chima, Marlene Bjornsrud, Monica Hanson, Carley Hauck, Fred Luskin, Carole Pertofsky, Shani Robins, Rev. Joanne Sanders, Sonya Soohoo, Clyde Wilson

Directors

Athletic Director: Bernard Muir

Senior Associate Athletic Director /Senior Woman Administrator: Beth Goode

Senior Associate Athletic Director, External Relations: Kevin Blue

Senior Associate Athletic Director, Intercollegiate Sports: Earl Koberlein

Senior Associate Athletic Director, Physical Education, Recreation, and Wellness: Eric Stein

Senior Associate Athletic Director, CFO: Brian Talbott

Athletics, Phys Ed, Recreation Courses

ATHLETIC 1. Varsity Sport Experience. 1-2 Unit.

Course is designed for the Varsity Athlete in terms of conditioning, practice, game preparation and weight training. Limit 2 credits per quarter with a maximum of 8 credits able to be applied towards graduation. Prerequisite: Must be a Varsity Athlete; Permission of appropriate sport administrator. May repeat for credit.

ATHLETIC 2C. Club Sport Experience. 1 Unit.

This course is offered to club sport athletes who participate on credit approved Club Sports teams. Teams who are eligible to receive credit, are required to have a coach and/or administrator to supervise their class. All teams and athletes on the team must complete 30 hours of participation during the quarter. To be eligible for credit, teams must practice 2x a week for a maximum total of 4 hours and participate in 1-3 competitions in the quarter.

ATHLETIC 3M. Aikido. 1 Unit.

Aikido originated in the centuries-old tradition of the Japanese martial arts and is a form of budo¿ a way of life that seeks to polish the self through a blend of rigorous physical training and spiritual discipline. There is no attack in Aikido. Its uniqueness as a martial art lies in its awareness of a deep sense of harmony with all of creation with training to defend not only the self but to bring the attacker under control without the necessity of inflicting injury. Because of Aikido¿s noncompetitive, harmonious philosophy, men and women of all ages can train together in a mutually supportive atmosphere, at an energy level appropriate for each individual. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://aikido.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 4C. Archery Club Team. 1 Unit.

Restricted to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. Not a PE class or for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. Students new to a team should register for the course in future quarters once committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 5C. Climbing Club Team. 1 Unit.

This class is for members of the Climbing Club Sports team. All students must complete 30 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. While many teams are open to beginners, this class is for returning athletes committed to the team for the year and are at an intermediate or advanced level. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. May be repeat for credit.

ATHLETIC 10. Band, Sports Activity. 1 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 12V. Baseball, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 14V. Basketball, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 15V. Basketball, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 20M. Capoeira Club. 1 Unit.

Capoeira is a breathtaking Afro-Brazilian art which combines practical martial arts, dance, acrobatics, music, history and philosophy. The origin of Capoeira is obscure since the evolution of Capoeira during the Brazilian slave trade was not well documented. Most theories point toward adapted movements from traditional Angola dance which evolved into techniques of self-defense. When Capoeira was outlawed by slave owners the fighting art became disguised as a dance through the addition of music and acrobatic movements. In the 1930¿s Capoeira was legalized in Brazil and is now spreading throughout the world. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements.

ATHLETIC 21C. Soccer Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the Soccer Club Sports team. All students must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).
Same as: Men

ATHLETIC 22C. Competitive Cheer Club. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member.

ATHLETIC 25V. Crew, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 26V. Crew, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 28V. Cross Country, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 29V. Cross Country, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 31C. Cycling Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 34V. Diving, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 35V. Diving, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 37C. Equestrian Club Team. 1 Unit.

This course is offered to club sport athletes who participate on credit approved Club Sports teams. Teams who are eligible to receive credit, are required to have a coach and/or administrator to supervise their class.  All teams and athletes on the team must complete 30 hours of participation during the quarter. To be eligible for credit, teams must practice 2x a week for a maximum total of 4 hours and participate in 1-3 competitions in the quarter.

ATHLETIC 38M. Eskrima. 1 Unit.

Eskrima is the study of the Filipino martial art. It focuses on practical self-defense from a unique weapons-oriented perspective. Unlike most martial arts, Eskrima teaches students empty hand and weapon techniques concurrently. Here at Stanford, we study the Inayan System of Eskrima under the instruction of Suro Jason Inay. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://eskrima.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 41V. Fencing, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 42V. Fencing, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU) (Milgram).

ATHLETIC 47V. Field Hockey, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 48V. Football, Varsity. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 55V. Golf, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 56V. Golf, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

AU.

ATHLETIC 60V. Gymnastics, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 61V. Gymnastics, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 70C. Horse Polo Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 72C. Ice Hockey Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. Men (AU).

ATHLETIC 73M. JKA Shotokan Karate. 1 Unit.

Shotokan Karate is a weaponless martial art developed in Okinawa and Japan, emphasizing power and efficiency in combat. Skilled karateka defeat their opponents with minimal number of techniques and effort, which is particularly useful when facing multiple opponents. Shotokan is distinguished from other martial arts by the linearity and strength of its punches, blocks, and kicks. Precise techniques, accompanied by mastery and focus of energy flows and a deep knowledge of the body¿s vital points, make this karate style a comprehensive system for self-defense and combat. However, Shotokan Karate is much more than just a way to defend and fight ¿ it is an holistic system in which the training itself has far reaching effects on the trainee. It is an ideal way to become and stay fit, as it combines intense aerobic and anaerobic exercises. It is a way to gain self-discipline and the confidence to surmount everyday obstacles, whether tangible or not. Shotokan Karate encourages and helps in the exploration and understanding of both the physical and mental self. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://karate.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 74C. Judo Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 75M. Jujitsu Self Defense. 1 Unit.

The Stanford Self-Defense Class teaches practical methods of self-defense drawn from all the martial arts. This coed course is available to beginners every quarter. Advanced training also is available year-round through senior black belt level, and is offered to improve and widen each student¿s skills. All Stanford students, faculty and staff members are invited to join our relaxed atmosphere, as we work on conditioning and coordination. Students who have completed the beginners¿ course can further refine their basic skills, as well as learn more complicated techniques. Advanced students may continue as long as they wish, with the possibility of receiving formal belt ranks in Aiki Jujitsu. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://jujitsu.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 76M. Kendo. 1 Unit.

Kendo is a Japanese form of fencing with two-handed bamboo swords, originally developed as a safe form of sword training for samurai. This is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program.

ATHLETIC 77C. Lacrosse Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).
Same as: Men

ATHLETIC 78M. Kenpo Karate. 1 Unit.

The Stanford Kenpo Karate Association teaches vital self-defense techniques, designed to maximize effectiveness regardless of size or strength. Beginning students will learn tools for responding to a modern street-fight situation, including single- or multiple-attackers, with or without weapons, under a variety of circumstances. Kenpo students learn multiple-strike defenses, hand strikes, kicks, joint locks, evasions, pressure points, sweeps, throws and even falls and rolls. In addition to self-defense, SKKA also teaches sparring and kata, encouraging balance, flexibility, strength and personal growth in the martial arts. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://www.stanfordkenpo.com.

ATHLETIC 78V. Lacrosse, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 81M. Muay Thai. 1 Unit.

Muay Thai or Thai Kickboxing is a martial art developed in Thailand about 500 years ago to defend the country against invaders. Muay Thai combines Western-style boxing with kicking, and includes the use of elbows and knees. Though traditionally Muay Thai is designed to be fatal to the opponent, in our class we focus on self-defense and counter attack. Usually light sparring is practiced with minimal use of elbows. During class, students will wear boxing gloves, shin guards, and mouth protectors. Head protection is required for sparring. In order to excel in Muay Thai, one will need to develop flexibility, strength, endurance, concentration, and reflexes. One will learn to adapt the techniques according to their strengths and weaknesses on their own pace. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://kickboxing.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 82. Manager: Athletic Team. 1 Unit.

For student managers of intercollegiate teams. Prerequisite: consent of respective varsity team head coach. (AU).

ATHLETIC 91C. Rugby Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).
Same as: Men

ATHLETIC 92C. Rugby Club Team. 1 Unit.

(AU).
Same as: Women

ATHLETIC 104V. Sailing, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 105V. Sailing, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 107C. Ski Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 118V. Soccer, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 119V. Soccer, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 121V. Softball, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 125C. Squash Club Team. 1 Unit.

(AU).
Same as: Men

ATHLETIC 126V. Squash, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 135V. Swimming, Synchronized: Varsity. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 136V. Swimming, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 137V. Swimming, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 141C. Tae Kwon Do Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 143C. Tennis Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 148V. Tennis, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 149V. Tennis, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 153V. Track and Field, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 154V. Track and Field, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 156C. Triathlon Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 158C. Ultimate Frisbee Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).
Same as: Men

ATHLETIC 159C. Ultimate Frisbee Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU) (Staff).
Same as: Women

ATHLETIC 166V. Volleyball, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 167V. Volleyball, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 168C. Volleyball Club Team. 1 Unit.

This credit is offered to returning members of the specified Club Sports team. All enrollees must complete 21 hours of participation with the team and meet any other team requirements during the quarter. This is NOT a PE class or credit for beginners. While many teams are open to beginners joining, the credit is offered to returning athletes committed to the team for the year. If you are new to the team, please look to register for the credit in future quarters once you are committed as a team member. (AU).

ATHLETIC 171V. Water Polo, Varsity Men. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 172V. Water Polo, Varsity Women. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 178M. Wing Chun Kung Fu. 1 Unit.

Wing Chun Kung Fu¿s roots can be traced from the Southern Shaolin Temple in China to the late Grand Master Yip Man. It is one of the few martial arts that attributes its origins to a woman. Although popularized as Bruce Lee¿s ¿mother art¿, the practice of Wing Chun remains substantially different from his Jeet Kune Do. Taught as a predominantly internally-oriented style stressing technique, sensitivity, and subtle awareness instead of brute force, Wing Chun provides practical self-defense for men and women and a means for developing the mind and spirit. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://wingchun.stanford.edu.

ATHLETIC 180V. Wrestling, Varsity. 1-2 Unit.

(AU).

ATHLETIC 181M. Wushu. 1 Unit.

Modern Wushu is a martial art which combines a foundation in the traditional Chinese fighting arts with a modern disposition towards aesthetics, grace, and performance. It emphasizes a combination of strength, speed, and flexibility rarely seen in other martial arts or sports. Both a martial art and a performance art, Wushu is the national sport of China, and is practiced throughout the world. Along with open hand training, Wushu athletes do extensive training with weapons such as broadsword, staff, spear, and straight sword. This class is part of the Stanford Martial Arts program, in order to receive credit you must be meet program requirements. For more information visit: http://wushu.stanford.edu.

Courses

OUTDOOR 100. Sociocultural Dynamics of Adventure. 3 Units.

An examination of the historical, psychological, social, and philosophical foundations of adventure experiences in American culture, folklore, and landscape. Experience adventure in a variety of contexts.

OUTDOOR 101. Introduction to Outdoor Education. 1 Unit.

This course explores the historical and philosophical foundations of Outdoor Education and how these concepts have influenced the development of programs at Stanford. Students will be introduced to the varied avenues of outdoor education application across campus.

OUTDOOR 105. Outdoor Living Skills. 1-2 Unit.

Introduction to essential skills for individual and group sustainability in a backcountry setting including shelter in outdoor environments, equipment selection and use, travel techniques, water and nutrition needs, planning and preparation, and risk management. Course includes the participation in a weekend backcountry experience.

OUTDOOR 106. Outdoor Leadership Practicum. 1-2 Unit.

Outdoor education and leadership theory integration through intensive field-based experiences. During these field-based experiences, students will engage with critical self-assessment process to better understand their own levels of competence leading others. Co-requisite: OUTDOOR 101, OUTDOOR 105.

OUTDOOR 107. Working with Youth in Recreational Settings. 1 Unit.

Experience youth engagement techniques designed for specific outcomes and useful in outdoor environments. Discuss trends in youth culture through an examination of the social, legal, and political systems of working with youth in recreational programs. Course includes planned and facilitated youth engagement activities. Pre or Co-Requisite: OUTDOOR 101.

OUTDOOR 410. ART OF FACILITATION. 1 Unit.

This experiential education style course allows participants to develop and test their group facilitation skills. Students will experience and deliver group initiatives surrounding popular leadership topics and learn how to help their group take away valuable learning from an educational experience. Topics include: evaluating risk, assessing the physical, human and social environment to improve group effectiveness, and case studies in team effectiveness Prerequisites: None.

OUTDOOR 415. Adventure Experience Management. 1 Unit.

This course covers the effective design and delivery of courses and multi-day outdoor experiences. Students will learn the fundamentals of: emergency action plans; how to manage local operating procedures (LOP); standard operating procedures; Instructional design and delivery. Prerequisite: OUTDOOR 406A, OUTDOOR 406B, OUTDOOR 406C, OUTDOOR 406D or Instructor Permission.

OUTDOOR 416. Outdoor Educator Apprenticeship. 1-2 Unit.

This course provides the student an opportunity to lead a multi-day outdoor experiences in an official capacity. Experience includes: outdoor living skills, planning and logistics, leadership, risk management, environmental integration, and education. Students will plan and co-lead field outings. Prerequisites: OUTDOOR 106 or OUTDOOR 406; OUTDOOR 415.

OUTDOOR 495. Outdoor Education: Assistant Instructor. 1-2 Unit.

Assist Instructor Outdoor Leadership Courses. Instructor Approval and Defined Student Goals/Benchmarks Required Prior to instructing.

Courses

PE 1. Student Designed Fitness Programming. 1 Unit.

Students will learn how to design safe, effective, exercise programs based on their individual needs and interest. Through class discussions, assignments and participation, students will learn all the health-related and skill-related components of fitness such as cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, balance, agility, speed, power, and coordination. nnPrerequisite: All levels and abilities welcome.

PE 3. Jogging. 1 Unit.

This course will teach students how to properly prepare, condition and pace themselves throughout a variety of workouts such as tempo runs, easy runs, interval training (speed and hills) and other training methods. At the end of the quarter, students will have the tools to develop their own training programs. Students will also gain knowledge on how to make intelligent choices that contribute to a healthy active lifestyle.nPrerequisite: Students should be able to run continuously for at least 1 mile. If students can not run for 1mile continuously, we recommend taking the following conditioning classes: PE 151 Total Body Training, PE 177: Circuit Training, or PE 30: Indoor Cycling.

PE 4. Walking for Fitness. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on understanding the basic components of cardiovascular fitness, and flexibility. This will be achieved by teaching students how to monitor heart rate, record steps, prepare, train and pace themselves throughout a variety of walking workouts. Students will gain knowledge to make intelligent choices that contribute to a healthy active lifestyle.

PE 5. Fundamentals of TRX. 1 Unit.

Students will learn a variety of exercises that focuses on total body resistance exercise. This class allows you to move, stretch and strengthen the entire body. Exercising on the TRX utilizes gravity and movement to generate neuromuscular responses to changes in body position and mechanical advantage. Movements using the TRX integrate strength and balance into a single dynamic format. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 8. Badminton: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the basic skills necessary to play the game of badminton. Fitness and training principles will be discussed as well as singles and doubles strategy. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 9. Badminton: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

TThis course will introduce the student to more advanced skills and strategies of the game of badminton. Emphasis will be placed on conditioning, shot selection, court positioning, and singles and doubles play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 14. Basketball Skills. 1 Unit.

Although this course is designed for players of intermediate to advance skill level, it is open to anyone hoping to improve as a player. Focus will be placed on individual skills such as passing, dribbling, shooting, rebounding, defending, and post play. Team offensive and defensive principles will be taught through intra-class competition.

PE 16. Bellydance Fusion. 1 Unit.

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of belly dance with a focus on fusion and tribal fusion styles.  No dance experience is required for this class; however, it is also suitable for students with previous belly dance training.  Over the course of the quarter students will build their technique and learn a full choreography.

PE 17. Cardio Dance. 1 Unit.

Cardio Dance combines traditional aerobic routines with dance-based choreography. This course will focus on understanding the basic components of cardiovascular fitness, and flexibility. This course will teach students how to properly warm-up, cool-down, stretch and monitor heart rate as you engage in various styles of dance week to week: swing, salsa, hip-hop, modern, African and Jazz. No experience necessary; just a love of both movement and upbeat music.

PE 20. Barre Fusion. 1 Unit.

This course is a mix of Barre exercises, Pilates exercises, Yoga poses and stretching specifically designed to increase strength and muscle tone in the entire body and overall flexibility. We focus on proper alignment and improving posture. The exercises are intense and effective yet extremely accessible. This course will also utilize class instruction, assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 23. Core Training. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to help students improve their ability to stabilize the torso. A strong core is an essential component for performance in any sport, hobby and for life. Your posture will improve enabling you to breathe more deeply. You will move with the ease and grace that comes from finding balance the fulcrum of your body. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as muscle strength and endurance (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 27. Cross Training Fitness. 1 Unit.

Cross training fitness class will focus on combining different types of exercises to work the body as a whole to develop cardiovascular fitness, strength and power. All fitness levels are welcome. Class sessions will include exercises such as: indoor cycling, plyometrics, rowing, jump rope, circuit training, and various other exercises.

PE 30. Indoor Cycling. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach students basic concepts associated with indoor cycling as well as build cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength, and flexibility through structured individually paced indoor cycling workouts. Instructors motivate participants through intervals, hill climbs and coasts for the ultimate workout. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 32. Boot Camp. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on understanding the basic components of health-related physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility). Students will have the opportunity to engage in a variety of physical activities, which will enhance all aspects of health-related fitness. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. May be repeated for credit.

PE 33. Diving. 1 Unit.

Basic techniques and mechanics of springboard and platform diving. Five basic categories of dives will be introduced: front, back, inward, reverse and twist. Competitive aspects of diving. Fee.

PE 39. Fencing: Beginning. 1 Unit.

The sport of swordmanship develops quick hands, strong legs, and a strategic mind. Footwork, handwork, and bouting. Emphasis is on foil technique. All equipment provided. Fee. (AU).

PE 40. Fencing, Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Continuation of 39; learn advanced footwork and handwork. Strategy and bouting. Introduction to epee and saber. All equipment provided. Prerequisite: 39. Fee. (AU).

PE 51. Golf: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of the golf swing; putting, chipping, and sand play. We will also cover golf etiquette and rules. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 52. Golf: Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to further development their golf swing and short game. This course will also review golf concepts, rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nnPrerequisite: PE 51 or golf experience.

PE 53. Golf: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to further development their golf game by engaging in various golf drills and the opportunity to practice on all facets of golf. Students will learn how to lower scores and manage the game on the course. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisite: 52 or equivalent. Fee. (AU).

PE 54. Golf: Advanced. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to refine the golf swing and increase power, distance, and accuracy. This course will also cover topics such as: course management, mental preparation and visualization techniques. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of skill-related and health-related physical fitness, (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisite: PE 53 or experience playing and practicing, and the ability to hit shots with relative accuracy and distance.Fee. (AU).

PE 58. Gymnastics: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach students the fundamental movements of gymnastics including flexibility and strength exercises taught on the Olympic apparatus including floor, balance beam, bars, and rings. The utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Fee. (AU).

PE 59. Gymnastics: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course is for students who have completed 58 or have a background in gymnastics. This class will focus on tumbling and somersaulting. The utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Fee. (AU).

PE 63. Hip Hop. 1 Unit.

Funky, jazzy, hip hop dance for fun and cardiovascular fitness. Fee. (AU).

PE 65. Horsemanship: Beginning Riding. 1 Unit.

This course explores beginning riding. Topics include, but are not limited to, basic horse care, equitation at the walk/trot and negotiation of simple obstacles. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation.nNo experience needed.

PE 66. Horsemanship: Advanced Beginning Riding. 1 Unit.

This course will review the basics of horsemanship and provides the necessary foundation for riding. Topics that will be covered include: horsemanship and horse care; the canter and basic jumping. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation.nPrerequisite: 65 or equivalent. Fee. (AU).

PE 67. Horsemanship: Intermediate Riding. 1 Unit.

Basic veterinary skills and barn management. Riding at all gaits and completing horsemanship patterns (Western) or jumping basic courses (English). Fee. Prerequisite: 66 or equivalent. (AU).

PE 68. Horsemanship: Student Assistant. 1 Unit.

(Bartsch).

PE 69. Leadership: Assertiveness and Creativity. 1 Unit.

This class will teach leadership techniques for maximizing creativity in a group setting through facilitated interaction with horses. Students will practice increasing personal and situational mind/body awareness, develop an authentic, assertive leadership style, and access creativity in challenging circumstances. No experience needed. Fee.

PE 70. Horsemanship. 1 Unit.

This course explores the basics of horsemanship and provides the necessary foundation for beginning riding. Topics include, but are not limited to, general horse care, handling techniques, horse health and disease, and stable management. This is an un-mounted course. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation.nNo experience needed.

PE 76. Kickboxing. 1 Unit.

This high energy class focuses on upper and lower body kickboxing combinations for the ultimate cardio and muscular endurance workout. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 80. Lifeguard Training. 1 Unit.

This course allows students to learn lifeguard characteristics and responsibilities, recognize hazards and emergencies, patron and facility surveillance, interaction with the public, and rescue skills. Students will also learn first aid and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation, both in and out of water, to prepare students to become lifeguards.nnPrereq: 300 yard continuous swim with rhythmic breathing (100 yards of freestyle, 100 yards of breaststroke, and 100 yards of combination of the two); Swim 20 yards, surface dive 7ft, retrieve a 10lb diving brick, and return in one minute and forty seconds.

PE 81. Beginning Stand Up Paddleboarding. 1 Unit.

This course teaches students the basic skills, strokes, maneuvers and water safety skills of Stand Up Paddleboarding in a calm, flat-water setting. nnPrerequisites: None.

PE 82. Intermediate Stand Up Paddleboarding. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on the development and refinement of the skills needed to paddle effectively in conditions where wind, waves, and current are present. Students will learn more advanced skills, strokes and maneuvers of SUP. This course is also designed to increase knowledge of SUP equipment.nnnPrerequisite: Successful completion of Introduction to SUP or successful demonstration of equivalent skills.

PE 83. Introduction to Martial Arts. 1 Unit.

This course will focus on techniques, training methods, history, and culture of Asian martial arts. Throughout the quarter, students will learn proper warm-ups, fundamental techniques, basic application, and conditioning. This course will focus on the development of (1) motor Martial Art skills for physical fitness and positive exercise experience, (2) knowledge of Martial Arts and basic components of health-related physical fitness, and (3) understanding of benefits of Martial Arts toward a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate an active and healthy lifestyle.

PE 87. Learn to Row for Men. 1 Unit.

This class is an introduction to the sport of rowing for men. The fundamentals of proper form, technique and workouts to develop cardiovascular fitness will be taught. The class will progress from rowing ergometer machines into rowing shells on the water. The utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 88. Learn To Row For Women. 1 Unit.

This class is an introduction to the sport of rowing for women. The fundamentals of proper form, technique and workouts to develop cardiovascular fitness will be taught. The class will progress from rowing ergometer machines into rowing shells on the water. No prior rowing experience necessary. This class is recommended if you are interested in trying out for the women's rowing team. Read notes section for additional information. Fee (AU).

PE 89. Rowing Ergometer. 1 Unit.

Introduction to aerobic based training utilizing rowing machines. The utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Fee.

PE 90. Essentials of Pilates. 1 Unit.

Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle. May be repeat for credit.

PE 91. Pilates Mat: Intermediate / Advanced. 1 Unit.

Students will focus on developing core strength, flexibility, and awareness by engaging in a variety of exercises that integrate the principles of Pilates. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 92. Rock Climbing I: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is an introductory course. Students will learn skills necessary to get started exploring the world of indoor climbing. These skills include technical safety skills for bouldering and top-roped climbing, essential physical and mental skills, and strategies for training. Students will be taught with industry standard best practices in regards to safety, and provided with a multi-disciplinary approach to overall health and wellness. No experience necessary.

PE 93. Rock Climbing II: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

In this course students will have the opportunity to build upon basic principles associated with rock climbing. Student will further explore variations in climbing efficiency techniques, crack climbing techniques, and training methodologies to enhance their climbing experience and help prevent injuries. Students will be taught with industry standard best practices in regards to safety, and provided with a multi-disciplinary approach to overall health and wellness.nPrerequisites: Rock Climbing 1 or at least 3 months previous climbing experience, current top-rope belay certification at the Stanford Climbing Wall.

PE 94. Rock Climbing III: Lead Climbing. 1-2 Unit.

This course is for the more advanced climber looking to learn to lead climb and increase their climbing fitness. Students will be exposed to technical and safety skills pertaining to sport lead climbing. Additional climbing specific training principles will be introduced to assist in improving climbing fitness and preventing common overuse injuries. Students will be taught with industry standard best practices in regards to safety, and provided with a multi-disciplinary approach to overall health and wellness. Once students demonstrate proficiency, they will have the opportunity to become lead certified at the Stanford Climbing Wall.

PE 95. Rock Climbing: Strength and Conditioning. 1-2 Unit.

The course will provide students with a framework to develop a balanced strength and conditioning program specific to training for bouldering and sport climbing. Topics addressed will include mobility training, sport specific strength and conditioning, and injury prevention.nnPrerequisites: Rock Climbing 1 or at least 3 months previous climbing experience, current top-rope belay certification at the Stanford Climbing Wall.

PE 96. Rock Climbing: Functional Movement for Climbing. 1 Unit.

Students will explore multiple modalities of fitness to learn about functional movements associated with climbing and be able to apply them to other aspects of life. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of basic structures of the human anatomy and assess faulty movement patterns (2) Develop an understanding of exercises, stretches, and soft tissue work to allow for better movement, and (3) Understand and practice behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 98. Sailing, Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn skills, theories, and techniques to enable beginners to sail with confidence in small centerboard boats. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 99. Sailing, Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to further development their sailing skills and techniques. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 100. Sailing, Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to refine their sailing skills Students will also be introduced to racing. This class utilization of class discussions, assignments and student participation will enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 102. Coaching Corps. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to build practical and educational foundations to prepare students to be instructional leaders (coaches) in sports activities. Students will have the opportunity to make a valuable contribution to youth while developing practical coaching skills. The course will explore topics including practice planning and designing curriculum, how to effectively engage youth in sports, youth development through sports, social issues facing urban youth in sports, the plight of sports programs in urban centers, and how to create a college-going culture among youth in low-income communities. Students will coach off campus at local schools/community-based organizations that offer after school sports programs.

PE 103. Route Setting: Designing the Indoor Climbing Experience. 1 Unit.

The Route Setting course is intended for those with extensive climbing experience who are interested in learning to design climbing routes for indoor climbing walls. The course will introduce students to route setting philosophies centered around the user experience, route setting operations, route evaluation, and setting guidelines and techniques for designing specific grades, specific movements and achieving equitability for various climber heights.

PE 104. PCIA: Climbing Wall Instructor. 1 Unit.

The Professional Climbing Instructors Association (PCIA) Climbing Wall Instructor Course provides instructors and potential instructors with an in depth and standardized understanding of the skills essential to teaching climbing in an indoor setting. The course reinforces the importance of teaching technically accurate information and debunks many common climbing myths. The course emphasizes the presentation of sound fundamental skills to climbing gym participants, the formation of risk assessment and risk management skills and basic problem solving skills such as belay transitions and on wall coaching and assist techniques. Participants will be assessed on both their core knowledge and their ability to effectively teach and coach related skills. Students will have the option to certify with the Professional Climbing Instructors Association.nnnPrerequisites: Rock Climbing 2 (Intermediate) or equivalent, The candidate must show an adequate experience level to the course provider illustrating that he/she is ready for the course. Examples include periodic climbing for 2 ¿ 3 years, a high intensity of climbing in the past few months, etc.; Able to easily put on harness and tie in appropriately; Able to belay with an aperture belay device and an assisted locking device in competent, comfortable and confident manner; Possess the personal equipment necessary for the course; Capable of comfortably top roping 5.8 on an artificial climbing wall.

PE 108. Social Dance: Introduction to Swing dancing: Lindy Hop. 1 Unit.

Students will learn the collection of dances known as Swing, generally considered to include Lindy Hop, East Coast Swing, and Charleston. All of these sometimes fall under the single heading of Lindy Hop and can be danced together in one dance. In addition, students will: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.
Same as: includes East Coast Swing and Charleston

PE 109. Social Dance, Beginning. 1 Unit.

Introduction to modern social partner dancing, comprised of three sections: Latin, Ballroom, and Club. You may take one or more sections in any order; no section requires any prior experience nor partner. Steps, styling, and technique are covered. n¿ Autumn: Introduction to Latin dancing: Salsa, Cha-Cha, Rumba, Samba n¿ Winter: Introduction to Ballroom dancing: Waltz, Foxtrot, Tango, Quickstepn¿ Spring: Introduction to Club dancing: Swing (Lindy Hop), Night-Club Two Step, Hustle.

PE 110. Introduction to Ballroom Dancing: Waltz, Foxtrot and Tango. 1 Unit.

Students will learn the three primary Ballroom Dances: Waltz, Foxtrot and Tango. In addition, students will: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 111. SCUBA Diving Open Water - Beginner. 1 Unit.

Knowledge and skills to safely enjoy and gain limited experience in the diving environment under normal open water diving conditions. This course prepares students for Open Water SCUBA Diving PADI Certification. Topics include diving equipment, diving physics, medical aspects of diving, diving emergencies, the diving environment, diving practices, diving activities, and SCUBA diving skills.

PE 112. SCUBA Diving Open Water - Advanced. 1 Unit.

Develop a diver who is confident, safe, relaxed, aware, and more able to enjoy the underwater world. Skills include: confidence to dive to deeper depths; night diving experience; boat diving techniques; river diving; ocean diving, currents, and marine environment; underwater navigation; and search and recovery techniques. This class is an excellent choice for certified divers who have not been diving for a while, and need to regain confidence.

PE 117. SCUBA Diving Open Water - Rescue. 1 Unit.

Knowledge and skills for individuals to effectively perform diver rescues and assists, manage diving accident situations, and render proper first aid. nPrerequisites: PE111; PE112; and EMED110; or Instructor Permission.

PE 118. SCUBA Diving Open Water - Refresher. 1 Unit.

Certification refresher; Topics include: knowledge and skills to safely enjoy, and gain limited experience in the diving environment under normal open water diving conditions. The major categories of subject material and skills include diving equipment, diving physics, medical aspects of diving, diving emergencies, the diving environment, diving practices, diving activities, and SCUBA diving skills. nPrerequisites: PE111; or Instructor permission.

PE 123. Squash, Beginning/Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Techniques, rules and practice matches. Racquets, balls, and eye guards provided. Limited enrollment. Fee.

PE 128. Swimming: Beginning I. 1 Unit.

This class is for first time swimmers and for individuals who have fear, anxiety or discomfort in water. This class is also designed for individuals who have previously taken beginning swim courses and have had little/no success or who struggle to move through water. A foundation of basic balance and movement skills will be developed through a series of fundamental water exercises. When safety or balance in the water is in question, so is the ability to move, and to some extent, the ability to breathe comfortably. As comfort and balance improves, the easier it is to accept breathing and movement skills. The goal is for a swimmer to become comfortable and in control in both shallow and deep water. The fundamental skills learned in this course will provide a foundation for learning stroke technique, such as freestyle, in an effortless manner. nPrerequisites: None.

PE 129. Swimming: Beginning II. 1 Unit.

In this class you will learn how to relax in the water, breath effectively, float and tread, swim 4-5 strokes (freestyle, backstroke, sidestroke, elementary backstroke, and breaststroke, time permitting), jump in the water from the deck, use swimming equipment (kickboards, pull buoys, fins) and swim across a 25- yard pool. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Swim each stroke with proper form and technique (2) Develop an understanding of how to stay healthy and conditioned to further enhance swim strokes and decrease the risk of injuries. (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. nIf you have fear or anxiety in the water, consider taking the PE 128 Confidence in Water class. If you can swim across a 25 yard pool, you should take the PE 131 Intermediate Swim class.nPrereq: non-swimmer, unable to swim across a 25 yard pool.nFEE. (AU).

PE 131. Swimming: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This class is for those who can swim across a 50-yard pool. In this class you will learn how to: breathe effectively, tread water, dive in from the edge and use swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins). You will be introduced to and gain further development of the 4 competitive swimming strokes (Freestyle, Backstroke, Breaststroke & Butterfly). An introduction to flipturns and intervals (50 yard repeats) will be taught. Underwater videotaping and stroke review and analysis will occur. nPrereq: Ability to swim across a 50-yard pool continuously. You MUST be comfortable in deep water, if you are uncomfortable in deep water please take PE 129 Swimming Beginning.

PE 132. Swimming: Advanced. 1 Unit.

This class is for those who can swim 100 yards freestyle continuously and have had an introduction to backstroke and breaststroke. In this class you will learn: refinement of the 4 competitive swimming strokes: freestyle, breaststroke, backstroke, butterfly (review/intro) and efficient breathing techniques. You will gain additional development of flipturns using intervals (100 yard repeats), competitive starts and turns, use of swimming equipment (kick boards, pull buoys, hand paddles, fins) for fitness, and videotaping with review. nPrereq: Swim 100 yards continuous of freestyle. If you have not had an introduction to Breaststroke or backstroke, we recommend you take PE 131 Swimming Intermediate.

PE 133. Swim Conditioning. 1 Unit.

Improve cardio-respiratory endurance through directed swimming workouts. Technique corrections as needed. Prerequisite: advanced swimmer. Fee. (AU).

PE 134. Synchronized Swimming, Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn basic skills and techniques associated with synchronized swimming. Students will learn how synchronized swimming is judged alongside some of the basic moves. Sculling with the arms and an 'egg beater' motion with the legs keeps the swimmer stable and allows the more advanced techniques to be performed. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscle endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisite: intermediate to advanced swimming skills. Fee. (AU).

PE 135. Aqua Boot Camp. 1 Unit.

A unique combination of swim conditioning, swim power training and dry land training offered by the staff of the Women's Swimming program.  Increase your strength and cardiovascular endurance, in and out of the water.  Prerequisites: Ability to tread deep water for 5 minutes and swim at least 50 meters continuously of backstroke, front crawl, & breaststroke.  This is not a learn-to-swim class. Fee.

PE 136. Swimming: Stroke Refinement. 1 Unit.

Review and fine tune the 4 competitive strokes (freestyle, backstroke, butterfly, and breaststroke), with a primary emphasis on improving freestyle stroke efficiency. Flipturn refinement. Drill and technique work will be heavily emphasized. On average, 1000 meters will be swum per class. nPrereq: Ability to tread deep water for 5 minutes, swim 100 meter intervals of freestyle, backstroke, and breaststroke with rhythmic breathing, and swim 200 meters continuously under 5 minutes.

PE 138. Table Tennis: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This class is intended for players who have experience playing table-tennis including those who have taken the beginning table-tennis class. Students should have prior experience in countering, looping, chopping, and serving.

PE 139. TABLE TENNIS: BEGINNING. 1 Unit.

Basic counters, topspins, and chops with both the forehand and backhand. Serve and return, emphasizing game situations and match play. All equipment provided. Fee.

PE 140. Taiji Quan. 1 Unit.

Tai Chi (Taiji Quan) is a slow meditative Chinese physical exercise usually used for relaxation, balance, and health. This course will focus on the development of (1) motor Tai chi skills for physical fitness and positive exercise experience, (2) knowledge of Tai Chi and basic components of health-related physical fitness, and (3) understanding of benefits of Tai chi toward a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate an active and healthy lifestyle.nAll levels are welcome.
Same as: Tai Chi

PE 141. Tai Chi: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

At the Intermediate level, students will develop a deeper and more internal understanding of Tai Chi. This course will introduce new concepts and movements that are more challenging. This course will also utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.n nPrerequisite: ATHLETIC 140 or prior practice and courses in Tai Chi.

PE 142. Pickleball: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on posture and control. This course will also cover the biomechanics associated with pickleball, as well as the rules and etiquette. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of basic structures of the human anatomy to optimally perform the skills (2) Develop an understanding of exercises, stretches, and conditioning exercises to allow for more efficient movements, and (3) Understand and practice behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 144. Tennis: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will learn and develop the essential stroke techniques with emphasis on control. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic play. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 145. Tennis: Advanced Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with emphasis on control, depth, and direction. This course will also incorporate rules, etiquette, and basic strategy and tactics. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle. Prerequisites: 144, or knowledge of rules and scoring and average ability in fundamental strokes but limited playing experience. Fee. (AU).

PE 146. Tennis: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

Students will review and strengthen stroke techniques with more emphasis on depth, direction, and spin. This course will also incorporate basic to advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing cooperative and competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisites:145 or average ability in fundamental strokes, and regular playing experience; NTRP rating of 3.0 -3.5 . (AU).

PE 147. Tennis: Advanced. 1 Unit.

Students will refine stroke techniques with more emphasis on spin, power, and variety. This course will also incorporate advance strategies and tactics with performance enhancing competitive drills. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.nPrerequisite: NTRP rating above 4.0 or equivalent. (AU).

PE 151. Total Body Training. 1 Unit.

Students will learn a variety of exercises that focuses on the body as a whole. This class allows you to move, stretch and strengthen the entire body. A variety of equipment will be used to target all major muscle groups. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 173. Weight Training: Intermediate. 1 Unit.

This course will allow students to expand upon skills learned in Beginning Weight Training. Students will learn to design and develop a balanced weight training program to meet their goals. This course also provides an opportunity to develop skills in specific areas of strength training, endurance, and power. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness such as: muscular strength and endurance, power, and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 174. Weight Training: Beginning. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of weight training, including equipment use, exercise technique and safety procedures. By the end of the course, students should be able to safely demonstrate a variety of exercise techniques, as well as have a general appreciation for the benefits of strength training. Fee. (AU).

PE 175. Multi-Modality Training. 1 Unit.

This course will teach students how to correctly utilize a variety of modalities to improve their fitness level, optimally move their bodies, and prevent injuries. Class sessions incorporate a variety of exercises that work on flexibility, core strength, balance, endurance, strength and power, while focusing on multiple movement planes. Through class discussions, assignments, assessments,, and student participation, students will leave with an (1) Understanding of basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Ability to perform activities of daily life effortlessly and without injuries, and improve their overall health, fitness and well-being and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.May be repeat for credit.

PE 176. Weight Training for Women. 1 Unit.

This course is designed to teach the fundamentals of weight training, including equipment use, exercise technique, proper stretching, safety procedures and injury prevention. The basics of the physiology of strength training and planning individual programs. Fee. (AU).

PE 177. Circuit Training. 1 Unit.

This class will focus on full-body conditioning workouts, combining resistance training and high-intensity aerobics. This challenging class provides a great workout as you move through a series of stations designed to elevate your heart rate and challenge your muscles. Stations may include body weight exercises, weights, resistant bands, stability balls, treadmills, etc. Class may be modified for all levels of fitness. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness (2) Develop physical fitness skills and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 179. Wrestling and Introduction to Mixed Martial Arts. 1 Unit.

While primarily focusing on the basic techniques of collegiate wrestling, some non-striking forms of MMA, such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu and submission grappling, will be covered throughout the quarter.
Same as: MMA

PE 180. Yoga for Stress Management. 1 Unit.

Students will have the opportunity to learn ancient yoga/health practices for managing daily stressors. Students will learn to identify signs and symptoms of stress, how anxiety manifests in the body and mind, and yoga techniques for relief. The focus will be on breathing techniques to calm the nervous system and practicing mindfulness. Hatha, or physical yoga, will also be introduced as preliminary practices to balance the body, relax the breath, stretch and tone muscles, and massage internal organ systems. All practices are meant to provide students new options for gaining inner strength and self-control. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 181. YOGA: Beginning. 1 Unit.

Students will be introduced to the values and skills of Hatha Yoga (Yoga of exercise). Students will learn how to reduce tension, increase energy levels, move efficiently, reconnect to self-awareness, and learn about the body. The poses and flows are adaptable and can be personalized for any level of fitness. The emphasis of the class will be on asanas (poses) and vinyasa (flow) for increased flexibility, improved health, relaxation, and reduced stress in daily living. Students will also be exposed to the language, philosophy, history, and concepts of Yoga. A typical class will include breathing techniques, meditation and asana practice, including standing, balancing, stretching and some inverted poses. At the end of the quarter students will have: (1) Acquired knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Developed physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) A positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 182. Yoga: Asana Practice. 1 Unit.

Yoga offers continual opportunities for growth and balance both physical and nemotional. Challenging yourself with different approaches will help you stay nfocused and keep your practice creative. In Asana Yoga Practice students will learn solid yoga practices that they can enjoy on their own as well as yoga foundations that they can apply in all types of yoga classes around the world.

PE 183. Yoga: Advanced. 1 Unit.

Advanced Yoga is for students who already possess a solid and ongoing yoga practice. This course will move deeper into all aspects of yoga by exploring more advanced postures, pranayama and meditation techniques. This course is designed for students who wish to challenge themselves both physically and mentally.

PE 184. Yoga/Pilates Fusion. 1 Unit.

This class will focus on practicing yoga poses and Pilates exercises to enhance one¿s sense of proprioception, mind-body awareness, and muscular strength and endurance. This course will utilize class instruction, assignments, and student participation to enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic health-related components of physical fitness and the different dimensions of wellness. (2) Develop the skill-related components of fitness, and (3) Understand and practice the behaviors that contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

PE 185. Yoga: Intermediate Asana. 1 Unit.

This course is designed for students who already possess an ongoing yoga practice. This course will move deeper into all aspects of yoga by exploring more postures, pranayama and meditation techniques. This course is designed for students who wish to improve themselves both physically and mentally. Intermediate yoga will provide students with information and experience which will enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 187. Power Yoga. 1 Unit.

Power yoga combines dynamic breathing and flowing sequences of asanas that focus on strengthening the entire body. Core muscle activation and stabilization is emphasized to ensure safe body mechanics. Power yoga will provide students with information and practical experience that will enable students to: (1) Acquire knowledge of the basic components of health and wellness. (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity, which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 189. Business Practices in Sport. 2 Units.

Planning and management of intercollegiate sports and recreation. Elements of business contracts, finance, facility development, legal issues, risk management, human resources, security, and operations and event management. How an athletic and recreation department is organized. Career opportunities in sports and recreation administration.

PE 193. Fitness for Life. 1 Unit.

This course teaches students how to stay active by engaging in a variety of workouts (indoor cycling, interval training, weight training, walking/jogging, etc.). This course utilizes a variety of workout equipment to target all major muscle groups. This course will utilize class discussions, class assignments and student participation to enable students to: (1) Understand basic components of health-related physical fitness, cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance and flexibility (2) Develop physical fitness and motor skills, and (3) Develop a positive attitude toward wellness and physical activity which will facilitate a healthy lifestyle.

PE 201. Social Aspects of Sport. 1 Unit.

Of all the social institutions that social scientists study - family, religion, government, medicine, race - sport is arguably the least studied in proportion to its societal impact. Sport plays a pervasive role in almost of of our lives as fans, players, and consumers. Despite this omnipresence, sports remain an understudied topic. This course will attempt to analyze the ubiquity and impact of sports. We will explore the topic of sport from a critical perspective focusing especially on inequalities in gender, race, class, and power. The course will jointly examine sports as a social mirror that reflects status inequalities as well as the role of sports in perpetuating social inequalities.

PE 299. Selected Topics: PE. 1 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles, please refer to the notes of each course section.

Courses

WELLNESS 18. Compassion Meditation: Strengthening the Heart. 1 Unit.

Investigate evidence-based models of compassion meditation and cultivation based on Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) program and following the Stanford Compassion Training protocol. Examine strategies to develop self-compassion, experience genuine happiness, reduce stress and negative thoughts, resolve differences with difficult others, and take compassionate action that makes a difference in the world. Courses mixes direct instruction, meditation, and group discussion on current research and its real world application.

WELLNESS 188. The Athlete and Personal Identity Development. 1 Unit.

Overview of identity development theory related to religious/spiritual identity development, gender, and sexuality identity development, racial and cultural identity development, ethical and moral development, and the development of meaning and purpose. The ways in which athletic participation affects and contributes to each of these developmental areas. This course also examines each of these topics in a larger context by discussing relevant current issues and events in sport.

WELLNESS 192. Mindful Nourishment: Training for Healthy Nutrition and Wellbeing. 1 Unit.

Intuitive Eating entails the scientific study and the application of mindfulness applied to nutrition, health, and eating through contemplative and applied practices. ¿Mindfulness¿ is a way of being engaged in our lives with greater emotional and mental balance. This course involves: 1) Participating in dialogue that cultivates shared mindfulness 2) Develop inner and outer wisdom applied to your health and eating. 3) Apply mindfulness skills to your emotional and physical health and greater well-being. These practices aim to develop greater insight, self-awareness, emotional regulation, and skillful responding. 4) Use mindfulness as way to create collaborative learning. Collaborative learning at its best is when we can listen deeply, suspend judgment, and speak authentically. When we do these, we create the conditions for meaningful dialogue and learning.

WELLNESS 194. Healthy Cooking: Food as Medicine. 1 Unit.

The class will explore the basics in healthy nutrition and the essentials for a healthy balanced plate. Classes will focus on recipes in East Asia &India, the benefits of foods for certain ailments, super-foods, plant based diets and phyto-nutrients, cleansing foods, the use of foods for skin care and aromatherapy, understanding the link between the foods we eat and the soil they grow in, and lastly healthy comfort foods. This interactive and experiential class will help one to develop a healthy relationship with food and develop some practical cooking skills.

WELLNESS 198. Stress Less, Sleep Better. 2 Units.

This course helps students better manage their stress and sleep more soundly. It does so by presenting the latest findings in the science of stress and sleep. Functional definitions of stress and perceived stress are given, student stress levels are assessed, and tools are given to manage stress more effectively. Students learn about the sleep cycle and its effect on the brain, understand the causes of insomnia, track their sleep behaviors, and practice getting a better night¿s sleep by using cognitive-behavioral interventions rooted in the latest findings of sleep research. By the end of the course students will be more empowered to work effectively with stress and sleep so they have more clarity, focus, and energy in their day-to-day lives.

WELLNESS 202. Wellness: Mind, Body, Spirit. 1 Unit.

An introduction to wellness focusing on emotional health and the cultivation of happiness. Managing stress and enhancing productivity while remaining centered are the primary learning objectives. Class will be lecture and discussion with time for guided practice in skill development.

WELLNESS 204. Resilience: How to Bounce Back. 1 Unit.

Resilience is the ability to bounce back in the face of life¿s challenges, whether these challenges are getting a poor test grade, breaking-up with a significant other, battling illness, or taking on any number of other tough events. In this course students study insights from the emerging field of resilience to learn about and practice the skills that allow them to bounce back more quickly and effectively from life¿s setbacks. Models of resilience will be presented and students will learn about the cognitive, emotional, and social aspects that allow them to enhance their capacity to rise above life adversity and thrive, even in the midst of tough times.

WELLNESS 207. Meaningful Work: Creating a Career You Love. 1 Unit.

Finding work that is meaningful and a career that actualizes one's potential while maximizing success and well-being deepens insights present in research on motivation, meaning, and purpose creation. Philosophical traditions and psychological science converge on the conclusion that meaningful work leads to professional success, positive relationships, and improved health. Develop the theoretical understanding and skills that lead to both reframing current endeavors for enhanced purpose and choose new endeavors with higher meaning, optimizes both future achievement and lasting happiness.

WELLNESS 210. The Science of Motivation. 1 Unit.

Examines factors that give rise to and sustain motivation. Cultivates the psycho-physiological factors that increase motivation, while reducing those aspects that depress it. Presents the meaning, mastery, and autonomy model of motivation in tasks engagement, plus research from the fields of psychology, behavioral economics, and neuroscience, then discusses tools to enhance motivation and achievement while maintaining balance and health.

WELLNESS 211. Exploring Happiness. 1 Unit.

Explores how research-based happiness theory and principles are applied to enhance daily and life satisfaction. Positions happiness as a cornerstone construct of personal wellness, purpose, and fulfillment. Investigates the science of happiness through lecture, guided practice, dialogue, and course material in order to enhance understanding and implementation.

WELLNESS 212. Psych of Optimal Performance. 2 Units.

How the psychological skills that athletes and other performers apply in training, preparation, and competition influence optimal performance in multiple life domains. Surveys concepts of motivation, arousal regulation, self-confidence, team dynamics, mental skills training. Applies psychological techniques to enhance balanced performance, enjoyment, and self-satisfaction in sports and life.

WELLNESS 214. Using Emotional Intelligence to Increase Effectiveness. 2 Units.

Examine, understand, and develop emotional and social intelligence (ESI). Presents leading models (Bar-on, Mayer, Salovey, Caruso) of and skills (Goleman) for enhancing emotional and social intelligence. Blends course lecture, discussion, peer coaching, and guided practice to develop theoretical and practical knowledge of ESI. Assess, understand and utilize ESI strengths and mitigate weaknesses in order to enhance stress management and resilience, increase self-other awareness, and increase balanced productivity.

WELLNESS 215. Wise Decision Making. 1 Unit.

Being wise makes us happier and more successful. Our relationships, bodies, health, school, and work can be either stressful or fulfilling. Wisdom skills are practical and effective in these areas, and you can learn how to apply them sooner rather than later. This course will help you develop wisdom through guided practice in skills such as mindfulness, emotional intelligence, cognitive reframing, humility, empathy, gratitude, and courage. Entertaining video clips, quotes, and jokes will supplement our discussions.

WELLNESS 217. Behavior Change: Building A Better You. 2 Units.

Change behaviors using evidence-based techniques. Addresses habit cycles, procrastination mitigation, productivity enhancement, motivational factors, and addiction and addictive processes (both substances and non-substance related) in changing behavior from maladaptive to adaptive patterns. Draws from neuroscience (Davidson, Siegel) and psychology (Beck, Miller, Rollnick) and employs motivational interviewing, cognitive reframing, peer coaching, and mindfulness meditation models and intervention strategies.

WELLNESS 219. Cultivating Healthy Romantic Relationships. 1 Unit.

Explore the factors that support healthy romantic relationships from psychological, sociological, historical, and cultural perspectives. Investigates the questions What is a healthy romantic relationship? and How do I know if my relationship is healthy?Through learning about attraction, attachment, attunement, individuation, cultural scripts, gender roles, and considerations for non-monogamous and non-heteronormative relationships, the structures of healthy romantic relationships will be studied.

WELLNESS 230. Meditation. 1 Unit.

Introduces diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, mindfulness, and mantra meditation will be offered to enhance well-being. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

WELLNESS 233. Meditation Retreat: Weekend Campus Intensive. 1 Unit.

Introduces Diverse forms of meditation practice in both theory (contemplative neuroscience, phenomenological traditions) and practice. Practices in focused attention, mindfulness, guided imagery, compassion, loving kindness, positive emotion, and/or mantra meditation will be offered to enhance stress management and well-being. Takes place in a weekend immersion format (on campus), which allows more focused exploration of the topic space. While meditation practices emerge from religious traditions, all practice and instruction will be secular.

WELLNESS 234. Forgive for Good: Practice, Meditation, and Contemplation. 1-2 Unit.

Examines forgiveness from a variety of perspectives with an emphasis on its value for physical and mental wellbeing. Presents forgiveness both as a useful response to interpersonal hurt and a teachable skill, backed by scientific research from preventative medicine and psychology. Explores the idea that forgiveness and grievance are both narrative responses to painful experience, but differing in their adaptability and utility. Spiritual and contemplative approaches are considered, but the methods are secular and research-tested.

WELLNESS 235. Mindful Self-Compassion, Strength, and Courage. 1 Unit.

Investigate how harsh self-criticism adversely impacts well-being, strength, and performance. In contrast, explore how mindful self-comapssion (MSC) enhances emotional wellbeing, resilience in coping with life challenges, lower levels of anxiety and depression, healthy habits such as diet and exercise, and more satisfying personal relationships. Using the scientifically validated MSC method (Neff & Germer), learn how to better pursue goals and commitments (academic, personal/social development, community service, and/or activism) with greater inner peace, confidence, and courage.

WELLNESS 250. Introduction to Nutrition. 1 Unit.

Optimize nutrition for health and performance based on established research. Topics include evidence-based analysis of macronutrients, fad diets, sugar addiction, low-calorie sweeteners, caloric restriction, disease prevention, and general nutrition. Discern between popular trends and scientific understanding in nutrition and nutritional habits.

WELLNESS 254. Analysis of Human Movement. 2 Units.

Covers the basic principles governing human movement with an emphasis on sports and performance applications. Examines anatomy and biology (large- and small-scale structure and function); applied anatomy, both anatomy (body structure) and mechanics (force, torque), which together describe macroscopic movement; applied biology, specifically the molecular and cellular basis of movement mechanics (force, torque, etc) together describe macroscopic movement; applied biology, specifically the molecular and cellular basis of movement including muscles contraction, nerves signals, and related topics such as exercise damage, cramping, muscle memory, DOMS and fatigue.

WELLNESS 255. Intro to Human Movement: Mind-Body Performance. 1 Unit.

Investigate the basic principles governing human movement with an emphasis on sports applications and lifelong wellness. Conceptually and experientially examine the latest research and theories on basic anatomy and biology as pertaining to injury prevention, principles of optimal human performance, and the mind-body connection. Topics include periodization, modes of exercises, types of injuries, the healing process, and physiological and psychological factors influencing body movement.

WELLNESS 260. Wired for Wellness: Exploring the Technology of Flourishing. 1-2 Unit.

Explore the present and future relationship between technology, humanity, and the search for happiness & flourishing. Investigate and develop the core questions, concerns, ethical considerations, and broad implications of technologies that shape human culture and consciousness. Course draws from science and technology studies, contemplative science, neurophenomenology, positive psychology, biomedical engineering, and brain stimulation & neurofeedback. Explore and evaluate the latest tech, interact with luminaries in the field, and rapid-design a consumer tech concept.

WELLNESS 261. Wired for Wellness: Intro to the Technology of Flourishing. 1 Unit.

Explore the present and future relationship between technology, humanity, and the search for happiness & flourishing. Investigate and develop the core questions, concerns, ethical considerations, and broad implications of technologies that shape human culture and consciousness. Course draws from science and technology studies, contemplative science, neurophenomenology, positive psychology, biomedical engineering, and brain stimulation & neurofeedback. Explore and evaluate the latest tech, interact with luminaries in the field, and rapid-design a consumer tech concept.
Same as: Weekend Intensive

WELLNESS 263. Technology Augmented Meditation. 1 Unit.

Challenges the traditional definition of meditation by incorporating the latest technologies for psychological, emotional, and contemplative wellbeing into meditation theory and practice. Learn how to integrate technology into a beginning or existing practice. Explore the range of technology based meditation tools, including brain, heart, and breath sensing/feedback, and experiment with new ways that wearables, apps, and other tech can support awareness and presence in contemplative practice and in daily life.

WELLNESS 264. Consciousness Hacking: Designing Technology for Wellbeing. 2-3 Units.

Design new technologies that support wellbeing and human connection. Learn about and apply scientifically validated models of human flourishing, explore existing technologies, and interact with innovators and thought leaders. Highly collaborative, interdisciplinary course emphasizes personal and interpersonal development as critical to the design process. Topics include design methodologies, science and technology studies, contemplative science, applied positive psychology, and recent technological innovations. Class culminates in presentations to relevant experts in academia and industry, including investors, entrepreneurs, and scientists.

WELLNESS 280. The Flourishing Activist: Mindful Compassion and Being the Revolution. 1-2 Unit.

Explore the variety of ways social activism is expressed in the world and how flourishing enhances mastery, acceptance of all parts of ourselves, a sense of growing, and personal agency. Investigate the topic of flourishing while engaging in activism within the context of challenges inherent to activism, namely, the confrontation with violence, trauma, and related mental struggles. Use self-reflection, embodied practice, and creative expression for contemplating how personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the self, how self healing can lead to community healing, and how the personal is the political.

WELLNESS 281. Flourishing Leaders and Teams. 1-2 Unit.

Connect leadership and team performance models to models of human flourishing in order to broaden definitions of success. Develop and practice leadership skill-sets that enhance human performance and flourishing of individuals and small groups. Integrate theory and practice through facilitated leadership simulations.

WELLNESS 282. Mindfulness & Yoga in Organizations: Tools for Future Educators and Leaders. 1-2 Unit.

Explore the foundations of contemplation, mindfulness, and yoga as they are taught and experienced in educational and leadership settings. As a future educator or leader, learn to instruct basic contemplative, mindfulness, and yoga practices as resources that increase self-awareness, emotional regulation, and self-care, as well as practices that promote personal, professional, and contemplative development. Topics include the physiological, neurobiological, psychological, social, and philosophical bases of contemplation, mindfulness, and yoga in educational and leadership contexts.

WELLNESS 290. Wellness Foundations: Mind, Body, Spirit. 1-2 Unit.

Investigate how psychological, physical, social, emotional, and spiritual factors promote optimal wellness and flourishing. Presents models of integrated wellbeing (PERMA, Seligman), meditation, deep meaning making, and social dynamics of integration from interpersonal neurobiology (Siegel, Schore), contemplative neuroscience (Davidson), and secular meditation practices. Lecture and practice format surveys the theory and skills promoting wellness throughout the lifetime, including deep meaning cultivation, emotional regulation, social connection, and mind-brain-body integration.

WELLNESS 291. Intro to Wellness: Nutrition, Stress, Movement, and the Body. 2 Units.

Explores how physical factors (proper nutrition, adequate exercise, stress management, and effective sleep practices) serve as the foundation for wellness. Examines current controversies and research in the field of mind-body wellness and holistic health, with specific emphasis on the relationship between physical factors and psychological states. Provides guided-practices on using established wellness principles to live a healthy and happy life.

WELLNESS 293. Applying Wellness Individual Studies. 1-3 Unit.

Translating theoretical knowledge and acquired skills into actionable wellness projects that enhances an aspect of wellness within the Stanford community. Students work in collaborative groups, or individually under the mentorship of the course instructor(s), to design, deliver, and evaluate a wellness initiative at Stanford.

WELLNESS 299. Selected Topics: Wellness. 1-2 Unit.

Exploration of a topic (to be determined) not covered by the standard curriculum but of interest to faculty and students in a particular quarter. May be repeated with change of content. For more information regarding specific course titles, please refer to the notes of each course section.

WELLNESS 301. Mindfulness and Stress Management for Graduate Students. 1 Unit.

Effectively manage stress through mindfulness strategies that positively impact the brain-body system to enhance clarity, focus, and energy. Presents tools for assessing perceived stress (Shelden Cohen, Perceived Stress Scale), findings in the science of stress management, and cognitive-behavioral theories and interventions demonstrated to reduce stress and enhance wellbeing.