Catalog Navigation
Contacts
Office: Building 500, 488 Escondido Mall
Mail Code: 94305-2170
Phone: (650) 723-5731
Email: archaeology@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://archaeology.stanford.edu/

Courses offered by the Archaeology Program are listed under the subject code ARCHLGY on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Archaeology is the study of the past through its material remains that survive into the present. Archaeology is a discipline that offers direct access to the experiences of a wide range of people in numerous cultures across the globe. Increasingly, archaeology bridges past and present societies through the study of the human heritage and its role in contemporary societies. Stanford's Archaeology Program provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the material remains of past societies, drawing in equal parts on the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

The Archaeology curriculum draws on faculty from a wide range of University departments and schools. To complete the requirements for the major, students must take courses from the offerings of the program and from the listings of other University departments. The program culminates in a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Archaeology.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Archaeology

The mission of the undergraduate program in Archaeology is to provide students with a broad and rigorous introduction to the analysis of the material culture of past societies, drawing on the questions and methods of the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. Students in the major learn to relate these analyses to the practice of archaeology in the contemporary world. The program seeks to help each student achieve a high level of understanding through concentrated study of a particular research area. Courses in the major complete a comprehensive curriculum that draws on faculty from a wide range of University departments and programs. Archaeology majors are well prepared for advanced training in professional schools such as education, law, and journalism and, depending upon their choice of upper-division course, graduate programs in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to:

  1. demonstrate an understanding of core knowledge of the history of thought and basic theoretical foundations in archaeology.

  2. write clearly and persuasively, communicating ideas about archaeology to multiple audiences and different communities, from the scholarly and to the general public in a variety of formats.

  3. learn about the development of archaeology as a discipline and the major trends that have influenced thinking and writing about archaeology today.
  4. demonstrate their mastery of the broad historical and theoretical trends in the field through critique of research within archaeology.

Bachelor of Arts in Archaeology

To declare a major in Archaeology, students should apply for the B.A. in Archaeology on Axess and contact the student services specialist, who provides an application form, answers initial questions, and helps the student choose a faculty adviser. Students should declare by the beginning of their junior year.

All majors must complete 65 units with an overall minimum grade of 'C', which must form a coherent program of study and be approved by the student's faculty adviser and the program director.

Students who plan to pursue graduate work in Archaeology should be aware of the admission requirements of the particular departments to which they intend to apply. These vary greatly. Early planning is advisable to guarantee completion of major and graduate school requirements.

Degree Requirements

The B.A. in Archaeology requires a minimum of 65 units in the major, with an overall minimum grade of 'C', and no more than 10 units may be taken for pass/nopass credit. The major requirements are divided among five components. A course may only be used once to fulfill a component.

1. Core Courses

Units
20 units must be taken for a letter grade (minimum passing grade of 'B')
ARCHLGY 1Introduction to Archaeology (Gateway)5
ARCHLGY 102Archaeological Methods (Intermediate)5
ARCHLGY 103History of Archaeological Thought (Intermediate)5
ARCHLGY 107AArchaeology as a Profession (Capstone)5
Total Units20

ARCHLGY 1 Introduction to Archaeology is recommended as a first course. Many upper-level courses in Archaeology require this course as a prerequisite. Students should normally take the capstone course in their final year of course work in the major.

2. Analytical Methods and Computing (5 units)

Quantitative skills and computing ability are indispensable to archaeologists. It is recommended that students take one of the following:

Units
Select one of the following:5
Digital Methods in Archaeology (recommended)
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Introduction to Statistical Methods (Postcalculus) for Social Scientists

3. Archaeological Skills (10 units)

Archaeological skills include archaeological formation processes, botanical analysis, cartography, ceramic analysis, dating methods, faunal analysis, geographic information systems, geology, geophysics, genetics, osteology, remote sensing, soil chemistry, and statistics. With the approval of the instructor and Archaeology director, undergraduates may fulfill part of this requirement from graduate-level courses (typically courses with catalog numbers of 200 or higher).

Units
ARCHLGY 119Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains5
ARCHLGY 124Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual3-5
ANTHRO 103AHuman Osteoarchaeology5
ANTHRO 175Human Skeletal Anatomy5

4. Theory (at least 10 units)

Topics include archaeological, art-historical, sociocultural, historical, and material culture theory. With the approval of the instructor, undergraduates may fulfill part of this requirement from graduate-level courses (typically courses with catalog numbers of 200 or higher).

Units
ARCHLGY 151Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design3
ANTHRO 90BTheory of Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 117Thinking Through Animals5
ANTHRO 125Language and the Environment4-5
ANTHRO 134Object Lessons5
ANTHRO 147Nature, Culture, Heritage5

5. Electives (20 units)

Select from any of the courses listed below. Courses are arranged around a regional or thematic focus, and therefore, may appear more than once. Students have the option of taking courses around a theme or concentration, and are encouraged to do so by consulting with their faculty adviser(s) to design a course plan. Courses other than those on this list can be used to fulfill this requirement with prior approval of the student's faculty adviser and program director. With the approval of instructor, undergraduates may fulfill part of this requirement from graduate-level courses, typically courses numbered 200 or higher.

  • World Archaeology: Mediterranean
Units
ARCHLGY 118Engineering the Roman Empire4-5
ARCHLGY 145Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean3
CLASSICS 51Introduction to Greek Archaeology3-5
CLASSICS 52Introduction to Roman Archaeology3-5
CLASSICS 169Archaeology of Britannia3-4
  • World Archaeology: Americas
Units
ARCHLGY 103-5
ARCHLGY 102BIncas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology3-5
ANTHRO 30QThe Big Shift4
  • World Archaeology: Asia
Units
ARCHLGY 111Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces3-4
ARCHLGY 135Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology3-5
  • Heritage
Units
ARCHLGY 13Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies3-5
ARCHLGY 135Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology3-5
ARCHLGY 143Classical Archaeology Today: Ethical Issues of Excavation, Ownership, and Display3
ANTHRO 112Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project4-5
ANTHRO 112BAdvanced Study in Public Archaeology2-5
ANTHRO 147Nature, Culture, Heritage5
THINK 22Who Owns the Past? Archaeology, Heritage and Global Conflicts4
  • Urbanism and Cities
Units
ANTHRO 112Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project5
ANTHRO 112BAdvanced Study in Public Archaeology2-5

6. Archaeological Fieldwork

Students must take part in a month-long Stanford Archaeology Center field project directed by a Stanford faculty member, and enroll in any coursework that is required for participation in the field project. Projects are typically offered during summer months and funding may be provided. In summer 2013, field schools were located in: Turkey, Peru, China, Mauritius and Italy. 

7. Collateral Language Requirement

All Archaeology majors must demonstrate competence in a foreign language beyond the first-year level. Students can meet this requirement by completing a course beyond the first-year level with a grade of 'B' or better, and are encouraged to choose a language that has relevance to their archaeological region or topic of interest. Students may petition to take an introductory-level course in a second language to fulfill this requirement by demonstrating the connection between the language(s) and their research interest(s).

8. Research and Independent Study

Students may count up to 5 units of research and independent study toward the Archaeology major:

Units
including but not limited to:
ARCHLGY 190Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study1-5
ARCHLGY 195Independent Study/Research1-5
ARCHLGY 199Honors Independent Study5

Honors Program

The honors program in Archaeology gives qualified majors the chance to work closely with faculty on an individual research project culminating in an honors thesis. Students may begin honors research from a number of starting points, including topics introduced in the core or upper-division courses, independent interests, research on artifacts in Stanford's collections, or fieldwork experiences.

Interested Archaeology majors of junior standing may apply for admission by submitting an honors application form, including a 4-5 page statement of the project, a transcript, and a letter of recommendation from the faculty member supervising the honors thesis to the student services specialist, no later than the end of the fourth week of the Spring Quarter. Archaeology majors are eligible to apply for honors candidacy. The thesis is due in early May of the senior year and is read by the candidate's adviser and a second reader appointed by the undergraduate committee.

Overseas Studies Courses in Archaeology

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site or the Bing Overseas Studies web site. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

Minor in Archaeology

A minor in Archaeology provides an introduction to the study of the material cultures of past societies. It can complement many majors, including but not limited to Anthropology, Applied Physics, Art and Art History, Classics, Earth Systems, Geological and Environmental Sciences, History, and Religious Studies.

Students must complete the declaration process, including the planning form submission and Axess registration, by the last day of the quarter, two quarters prior to degree conferral; for example, by the last day of Autumn Quarter if Spring graduation is the intended quarter of graduation.

Requirements

To minor in Archaeology, students must complete at least 27 units of relevant course work, including:

  1. Core Program (10 units)

    Units
    ARCHLGY 1Introduction to Archaeology (Gateway Course, Required)3-5
    ARCHLGY 103History of Archaeological Thought5
    ARCHLGY 107AArchaeology as a Profession5

    is recommended as a first course, and many of the upper-level courses in Archaeology require this course as a prerequisite. Students have the option to take ARCHLGY 103 History of Archaeological Thought or ARCHLGY 107A Archaeology as a Profession to fulfill the rest of the 10 unit core requirement for the minor.

  2. Archaeological Skills (2-5 units)

    Archaeological skills include dating methods, faunal analysis, botanical analysis, ceramic analysis, geology, geophysics, soil chemistry, remote sensing, osteology, genetics, statistics, cartography, and geographic information systems. The course(s) must be chosen from the list of courses under Archaeological Skills (requirement 3) in the Bachelor's tab of this section.

  3. Theory (5 units)

    Topics include archaeological, art historical, sociocultural, historical, and material culture theory. The course(s) must be chosen from the list of courses under Theory (requirement 4) in the Bachelor's tab of this section.

  4. Electives (10 units)

    Select courses from the list of courses under Electives (requirement 5) in the Bachelor's tab of this section. Students have the option of taking courses around a theme or concentration, and are encouraged to do so by consulting their faculty advisers to design a course plan.

Archaeology is an interdisciplinary program. Students should meet with their adviser about degree requirements and the applicability of courses from other University departments to the Archaeology major or minor. Applicable courses are commonly found in Anthropology (ANTHRO) and Classics (CLASSICS), but are not limited to these departments. Please check with your adviser and the program director for course approvals. 

Interim Director: Li Liu (East Asian Languages and Cultures)

Department Faculty:

Professors: Ian Hodder (Anthropology, on leave), Li Liu (East Asian Languages and Cultures), Gail Mahood (Geological Sciences), Lynn Meskell (Anthropology, on leave), Ian Morris (Classics, on leave), Michael Shanks (Classics, on leave A)

Associate Professors: Giovanna Ceserani (Classics), Jody Maxmin (Art and Art History, Classics, on leave W), John Rick (Anthropology), Jennifer Trimble (Classics), Barbara Voss (Anthropology)

Associate Professor (Teaching): Michael V. Wilcox (Anthropology)

Assistant Professors: Andrew Bauer (Anthropology), Justin Leidwanger (Classics), Krish Seetah (Anthropology, on leave A)

Associated Faculty: Christina Hodge (Academic Curator & Collections Manager), Laura Jones (Campus Archaeologist)

Postdoctoral Fellows: Maureece Levin (Archaeology Science)

Affiliated Faculty:

Professors: Rob Dunbar (Earth Sciences), Mark Lewis (Chinese Culture, Religious Studies), J. Moldowan (Geological and Environmental Sciences), Amos Nur (Earth Sciences), Peter Vitousek (Earth System Science)

Associate Professors: Paulla Ebron (Anthropology), James A. Fox (Anthropology, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, Linguistics, on leave A), Grant Parker (Classics)

Staff: Apurva Mehta (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory), Connie Wolf (Cantor Arts), Xiaoneng Yang (Cantor Center for Visual Arts)

Overseas Studies Courses in Archaeology

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

Units
OSPCPTWN 16Sites of Memory2
OSPCPTWN 364
OSPAUSTL 40Australian Studies3

Courses

ARCHLGY 1. Introduction to Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Same as: ANTHRO 3

ARCHLGY 12. Peopling of the Globe: Changing Patterns of Land Use and Consumption Over the Last 50,000 Years. 3-5 Units.

Fossil, genetic and archaeological evidence suggest that modern humans began to disperse out of Africa about 50,000 years ago. Subsequently, humans have colonized every major landmass on earth. This class introduces students to the data and issues regarding human dispersal, migration and colonization of continents and islands around the world. We explore problems related to the timing and cause of colonizing events, and investigate questions about changing patterns of land use, demography and consumption. Students are introduced to critical relationships between prehistoric population changes and our contemporary environmental crisis.
Same as: ANTHRO 18, EARTHSYS 21, HUMBIO 182

ARCHLGY 13. Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies. 3-5 Units.

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Same as: ANTHRO 13A, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E

ARCHLGY 16. Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America. 5 Units.

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.
Same as: ANTHRO 16, ANTHRO 116C, NATIVEAM 16

ARCHLGY 21Q. Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 21Q.) Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Same as: CLASSICS 21Q

ARCHLGY 34. Animals and Us. 5 Units.

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts.n This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognized as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 34

ARCHLGY 42. Pompeii. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 42 and CLASSGEN 60.) The Roman town of Pompeii, buried by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 C.E., provides information about the art and archaeology of ancient social life, urban technology and production, and ancient spatial patterns and experience. Its fame illustrates modern relationships to the ancient past, from Pompeii's importance on the Grand Tour, to plaster casts of vaporized bodies, to debates about reconstruction, preservation, and archaeological methods.
Same as: CLASSICS 53

ARCHLGY 51. Introduction to Greek Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

An introduction to the archaeology of ancient Greece, from the first city states through the cultural achievements of classical Athens to the conquest by Rome.
Same as: CLASSICS 51

ARCHLGY 64. Cultural Heritage and Human Rights. 1 Unit.

This interdisciplinary research workshop will critically engage the issue of the growing currency of human rights discourse within cultural heritage. Epistemological and practical areas of tension between rights discourse and cultural discourse will be surveyed within the context of current global challenges facing heritage practice, conservation and archaeology. Topics will include the inequities of cultural recognition between North-South globalizations, questions of cultural property and rights, the role of tourism, and the impact of environmental conservation discourse on cultural rights.
Same as: ARCHLGY 164

ARCHLGY 81. Introduction to Roman Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 81.) This course will introduce you to the material culture of the ancient Roman world, from spectacular imperial monuments in the city of Rome to cities and roads around the Mediterranean, from overarching environmental concerns to individual human burials, from elite houses and army forts to the the lives of slaves, freedmen and gladiators. Key themes will be change and continuity over time; the material, spatial and visual workings of power; how Roman society was materially changed by its conquests and how conquered peoples responded materially to Roman rule.
Same as: CLASSICS 52

ARCHLGY 97. Archaeology Internship. 1-10 Unit.

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, museums or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Prior instructor consent needed.

ARCHLGY 98B. Digital Methods in Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Same as: ANTHRO 98B, ANTHRO 298B

ARCHLGY 99A. Historical Archaeology in the Archive, Lab, and Underground: Methods. 5 Units.

The practice of historical archaeology through methodologies including archival research, oral history, material culture analysis, and archaeological excavation. Students use these methods to analyze the history and archaeology of a local park, the Thornewood Open Space Preserve.

ARCHLGY 100. Archaeology of Technology. 5 Units.

The course is an introduction to the social organization of material production and to the theoretical, ethnographic, and historical frameworks used by archaeologists to link the technologies of the past to salient sociocultural information about the people who employed them. Comparison of metallurgical, ceramic, lithic, and textile industries in different cultural and historical settings will inform critical discussions of how and to what extent analyses of artifacts, workshops, and industrial installations can provide insight into past societies.
Same as: ANTHRO 101B, ANTHRO 201B, ARCHLGY 200

ARCHLGY 100D. Chavin de Huantar Research |Seminar. 3-5 Units.

Archaeological analytical techniques appropriate for data recovered during archaeological fieldwork in Chavin de Huantar, Peru. Open to all interested students; fieldwork participants are expected to take the course. Students work on data from the previous field season to produce synthetic written reports, focusing on specific methodological issues.
Same as: ANTHRO 100D

ARCHLGY 102. Archaeological Methods. 5 Units.

Methodological issues related to the investigation of archaeological sites and objects. Aims and techniques of archaeologists including: location and excavation of sites; dating of places and objects; analysis of artifacts and technology and the study of ancient people, plants, and animals. How these methods are employed to answer the discipline's larger research questions.
Same as: ANTHRO 91A

ARCHLGY 102B. Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Same as: ANTHRO 106, ANTHRO 206A

ARCHLGY 103. History of Archaeological Thought. 5 Units.

Introduction to the history of archaeology and the forms that the discipline takes today, emphasizing developments and debates over the past five decades. Historical overview of culture, historical, processual and post-processual archaeology, and topics that illustrate the differences and similarities in these theoretical approaches.

ARCHLGY 104C. The Archaeology of Ancient China. 5 Units.

Early China from the perspective of material remains unearthed from archaeological sites; the development of Chinese culture from early hominid occupation nearly 2 million years ago through the development of agriculture in the Neolithic period and complex society in the Bronze Age to the political unification of China under the Qin Dynasty. Continuity of Chinese culture from past to present, history of Chinese archaeology, relationships between archaeology and politics, and food in early China.
Same as: ARCHLGY 304C

ARCHLGY 106A. Museums and Collections. 5 Units.

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Same as: ARCHLGY 306A

ARCHLGY 107A. Archaeology as a Profession. 5 Units.

Academic, contract, government, field, laboratory, museum, and heritage aspects of the profession.
Same as: ANTHRO 101A

ARCHLGY 108E. Catalhoyuk and Neolithic Archaeology. 3 Units.

Catalhoyuk as a case study to understand prehistoric social life during the Neolithic in Anatolia and the Near East. Developments in agriculture, animal domestication, material technology, trade, art, religion, skull cults, architecture, and burial practices. Literature specific to Catalhoyuk and other excavations throughout the Anatolian and Levantine regions to gain a perspective on diversity and variability throughout the Neolithic. The reflexive methodology used to excavate Catalhoyuk, and responsibilities of excavators to engage with larger global audiences of interested persons and stakeholders.
Same as: ANTHRO 108E

ARCHLGY 109A. Archaeology of the Modern World. 3-5 Units.

Historical archaeology, also called the archaeology of the modern world, investigates the material culture and spatial history of the past five centures. As a discipline, historical archaeology has been characterized by (1) a methodological conjunction between history and archaeology; (2) a topical focus on the ¿three Cs¿: colonization, captivity, and capitalism ¿ forces which arguably are constitutive of the modern world; and (3) an epistemological priority to recovering the perspectives of ¿people without history.¿ Each of these three trends is widely debated yet they continue to profoundly shape the field. This seminar provides an in-depth examination of the emergence and development of this historical archaeology, with a focus on current issues in theory and method. For undergraduates, the prerequisite is ANTHRO 3 or consent of instructor.
Same as: ANTHRO 109A, ANTHRO 209A

ARCHLGY 110. Environmental Archaeology. 5 Units.

This course investigates the field of environmental archaeology. Its goals are twofold: 1) to critically consider the intellectual histories of environmental archaeology, and, 2) to survey the various techniques and methods by which archaeologists assess historical environmental conditions through material proxies. The course will include lab activities.
Same as: ANTHRO 110, ANTHRO 210

ARCHLGY 111. Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces. 3-4 Units.

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Same as: CHINA 176, CHINA 276

ARCHLGY 111B. Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Same as: ANTHRO 111B, NATIVEAM 111B

ARCHLGY 113B. Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures. 5 Units.

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Same as: ANTHRO 113B, ANTHRO 213B

ARCHLGY 114. Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis. 5 Units.

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Same as: ANTHRO 114, ANTHRO 214

ARCHLGY 114A. Introduction to South Asian Archaeolgy. 5 Units.

This seminar will survey the archaeology of South Asia, beginning with animal and plant domestication in the early Holocene and ending with the late Medieval Period. Given its chronological breadth and spatial scope, the class will interrogate a variety of social and historical contexts that contribute to a broad range of anthropological research concerns¿including the intersections of authority, ritual, alterity and landscape¿and at the same time critically consider the epistemological bases for their analyses through archaeological remains.
Same as: ANTHRO 114A, ANTHRO 214A

ARCHLGY 115. The Social life of Human Bones. 3-5 Units.

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Same as: ANTHRO 115, ANTHRO 215

ARCHLGY 117A. Stuff. 5 Units.

Never before have humans been engulfed by so much stuff. Stuff is needed to survive giving us the basics of food, clothing, and shelter. But stuff does so much more. Smart phones rule our social interactions. Louis Vuitton handbags display status. Air conditioning masters nature. Picassos inspire beauty. Wedding bands promise eternal love. Crosses connect believers to God. Is stuff really who we are? This seminar explores the science of stuff, past, present and future, investigating deeply-held beliefs about the meaning, value, and purpose of objects. Because our stuff has become such a popular obsession, this course embraces the eclectic intersection of popular and academic knowledge. Students will seek to answer the complex whys of our relationship with objects and understand our future human condition made by the material world.
Same as: ANTHRO 117A, ANTHRO 217A

ARCHLGY 117B. Monuments and Landscapes: An Archaeological Perspective. 3-5 Units.

The landscape is a result of the action and interaction of human and natural factors. Communities have altered their landscapes for a variety of reasons, including the subsistence practices; as a consequence of economic growth; to express a social ideology, and as a consequence of political and religious drivers. Accordingly, landscapes enable physical and provide psychological sustenance to people, and the human need to relate to our surroundings is part of the way in which identities are created and disputed. Within the humanities, landscape is being conceptualized as a process, a practice and as performance, and monuments within a given landscape have an equally important role, not to mention history. They are often the most durable and well-known evidence of the ancient civilizations, and should be observed jointly with the landscape. How did the landscape predefine the monument and how did the monument complement, emphasize or devalue the landscape? What philosophy channeled the construction of the monuments within the landscapes? Whether ephemeral or permanent, the human agency left traces in the landscape; thus, both monuments and landscapes are the key indicators for understanding the ideology of a particular culture. Archaeology, through its interdisciplinary nature, provides a unique perspective, as well as tools, for examining the formation processes of all man-made elements, within both natural and cultural landscapes. nnThe course will address the multifaceted issues of the ways that people have consciously and unconsciously shaped the land around them through time. It will look into diverse, geographically and periodically influenced concepts of a monument and landscape. The course will be divided into two parts, with the first one covering the theory and methodological approaches and the second part the conceptual characteristics, modifications and changeability in various archaeological and historical periods and cultural frameworks.
Same as: ANTHRO 117B, ANTHRO 217B

ARCHLGY 118. Engineering the Roman Empire. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 117.) Enter the mind, the drafting room, and the building site of the Roman architects and engineers whose monumental projects impressed ancient and modern spectators alike. This class explores the interrelated aesthetics and mechanics of construction that led to one of the most extensive building programs undertaken by a pre-modern state. Through case studies ranging from columns, domes and obelisks to road networks, machines and landscape modification, we investigate the materials, methods, and knowledge behind Roman innovation, and the role of designed space in communicating imperial identity.
Same as: CLASSICS 168

ARCHLGY 119. Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains. 5 Units.

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Same as: ANTHRO 119, ANTHRO 219

ARCHLGY 123A. Debating Repatriation. 5 Units.

The debates over the return of cultural property have raged for centuries. At stake are key questions about the rights of Indigenous peoples, intellectual freedom, nationalism, globalization, heritage management, the meaning of history, and the purpose of museums in the world. This seminar examines these vital discussions that intersect law and morality, science and religion, culture and politics. Discussions will be informed by cross-cultural, legal, ethical perspectives, exploring both the philosophical and practical implications of the repatriation debates. This course will provide students with a nuanced historical viewpoint of museum collections, heritage policies, and legal dimensions that underpin contests over cultural property.
Same as: ANTHRO 123A, ANTHRO 223A

ARCHLGY 124. Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual. 3-5 Units.

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Same as: ARCHLGY 224

ARCHLGY 125. ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SURVEY METHODS. 3 Units.

Practicum applying a variety of survey techniques to discover, map, and record archaeological sites. Basic cartographic skills for archaeologists and an introduction to GIS tools, GPS instruments, and geophysical techniques. Participants should be able to walk 3 - 4 miles over uneven terrain or make special arrangements with the instructor for transportation.

ARCHLGY 126. Archaeobotany. 5 Units.

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Same as: ARCHLGY 226

ARCHLGY 126A. Politics of the Past. 5 Units.

The past is never dead, William Faulkner once wrote. It's not even past. This seminar explores the contested meanings of history in the political present. It particularly focuses on how archaeological work and heritage becomes entangled in larger questions of identity, belonging, belief, economics, and the stories we tell about ourselves. Students will gain an expansive and in-depth perspective on why humans so value what has come before us, and why making meaning from the past is a process suffused with power.
Same as: ANTHRO 126A, ANTHRO 226A

ARCHLGY 127. Introduction to bioarchaeological Method and Theory. 3-5 Units.

This course deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and methods used in the study of skeletal and dental remains. Issues surrounding the reconstruction of the individual and population, which include age, sex and other paleodemographic factors, will be explored. The health and disease of teeth and bones, and the biomechanical and chemical analyses of bone will also be explored to illustrate how the variety of methods available to bioarchaeologists can be used to reconstruct past lifeways. While this course will be of primary interest to students interested in skeletal biology and archaeology, it is not exclusive to those pursuing careers in biological anthropology. The emphasis is on critical analysis, research skills, and communication skills that can be useful to students pursuing careers in other sub-disciplines of anthropology, laboratory research, or other lateral health-related fields. Required readings will be selected from current literature, and in some classes there will be practical material/exercises so that students can learn some of these techniques. The class is intended to be an interactive learning process in discussion format, and students are required to take an active part in class along with lectures.
Same as: ARCHLGY 227

ARCHLGY 130E. GIS, Archaeological Evaluation, Impact Assessment, and Site Management. 5 Units.

The course explores archaeological GIS and the techniques adopted to acquire, evaluate and manage spatial data. The students will be provided both with theoretical and practical principles of GIS for archaeological use and site management.nnStudents will learn a complete GIS workflow, from data acquisition to decision making. They will use Venice, a multilayered site, as a test case. The course will examine practical evaluation processes in consideration of current and future development projects in the Venetian lagoon, listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Same as: ANTHRO 130E, ANTHRO 230E

ARCHLGY 132. The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Same as: ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 232, ARCHLGY 332

ARCHLGY 134. Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present. 3-5 Units.

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 234, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134

ARCHLGY 135. Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Same as: ARCHLGY 235, CHINA 175, CHINA 275

ARCHLGY 136. Artifacts in the Atomic Age: Isotopes in Archaeology. 5 Units.

Advances in material science over the 20th and 21st centuries have greatly expanded archaeologists' tool-kit for studying the material remains of the past. In particular, isotopic chemistry has come to play an important role in answering questions of prime importance to archaeological research: How old is this artifact? Where did it come from? What did people and animals eat in the past? How did humans and animals move in the landscape? In this course, we will explore a variety of methods that use isotopic chemistry to answer anthropological questions about human lives in the past. The course will provide a background in the science of isotopic abundance and fractionation in natural and technological systems. It will also investigate wide variety of archaeological case studies that use chemistry to explore topics of anthropological interest, including: migration, technology, social inequality, food & nutrition, human-animal interactions, and human-environment interactions.

ARCHLGY 142. Lost and found: Roman Coinage. 4-5 Units.

New trends in Roman numismatics (from the late Republic to the early Empire, 3rd-c. BCE-1st-c. CE). Archaeology from coins. Barter, money, and coinage. The introduction of coinage in Rome and the provinces. Making money (coin production), using money (monetary, non-monetary and ritual uses), losing money (coin circulation, hoards, single finds): contextual interpretations. Monetary systems: coins from Rome and coins from the provinces. Coinage and identity. False coinage.
Same as: ARCHLGY 242, CLASSART 232

ARCHLGY 143. Classical Archaeology Today: Ethical Issues of Excavation, Ownership, and Display. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 143.) While Classical archaeology engages with material remains from the Greco-Roman past, it is embedded within and inseparable from contemporary practice. Through an examination of case studies, legal statutes, professional codes, and disciplinary practices, this seminar discusses ethical dilemmas raised by Classical archaeology in the 21st century. We will focus on broad issues ranging from ownership, looting, reconstruction, and collecting to nationalism, religion, tourism, and media, with an eye toward defining ethical ¿best practices¿ for Classical archaeology.

ARCHLGY 145. Sailing the Wine-Dark Sea: Maritime Archaeology of the Ancient Mediterranean. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 145.) Why do we care about shipwrecks? What can sunken sites and abandoned ports tell us about our past? Focusing primarily on the archaeological record of shipwrecks and harbors, along with literary evidence and contemporary theory, this course examines how and why ancient mariners ventured across the "wine-dark seas" of the Mediterranean for travel, warfare, pilgrimage, and especially commerce. We will explore interdisciplinary approaches to the development of maritime contacts and communication from the Bronze Age through the end of Roman era. At the same time, we will engage with practical techniques of maritime archaeology, which allows us to explore the material record first hand.
Same as: CLASSICS 154

ARCHLGY 146B. Global Heritage, World Heritage: History and Intersections in Contemporary Society. 5 Units.

This Course will provide an overview of global heritage by focusing on the UNESCO World Heritage Program, which is based on an international treaty, the 1972 Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. The first part of the course will provide an historical overview on the development of the international preservation movements, the second part of the course will concentrate on how anthropology can contribute to the study of intergovernmental organizations and cultural bureaucracies, the third part and will discuss specific issues related to heritage by providing case studies from the World Heritage. This course will provide theoretical and empirical interpretations of contemporary issues in heritage and will give students a critical understanding of the complexities related to various uses of past in the present.
Same as: ANTHRO 146B

ARCHLGY 147B. World Heritage in Global Conflict. 5 Units.

Heritage is always political, it is typically said. Such a statement might refer to the everyday politics of local stakeholder interests on one end of the spectrum, or the volatile politics of destruction and erasure of heritage during conflict, on the other. If heritage is always political then one might expect that the workings of World Heritage might be especially fraught given the international dimension. In particular, the intergovernmental system of UNESCO World Heritage must navigate the inherent tension between state sovereignty and nationalist interests and the wider concerns of a universal regime. The World Heritage List has over 1000 properties has many such contentious examples, including sites in Iraq, Mali, Syria, Crimea, Palestine and Cambodia. As an organization UNESCO was born of war with an explicit mission to end global conflict and help the world rebuild materially and morally, but has found it¿s own history increasingly entwined with that of international politics and violence.
Same as: ANTHRO 147B, ANTHRO 247B

ARCHLGY 148. Ceramic Analysis for Archaeologists. 3-5 Units.

The analysis and interpretation of ceramic remains allow archaeologists to accomplish varied ends: establish a time scale, document interconnections between different areas, and suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites. The techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramics and their interpretation within archaeological contexts is the focus of this seminar.
Same as: ARCHLGY 248

ARCHLGY 151. Ten Things: An Archaeology of Design. 3 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 113/213.) Connections among science, technology, society and culture by examining the design of a prehistoric hand axe, Egyptian pyramid, ancient Greek perfume jar, medieval castle, Wedgewood teapot, Edison's electric light bulb, computer mouse, Sony Walkman, supersonic aircraft, and BMW Mini. Interdisciplinary perspectives include archaeology, cultural anthropology, science studies, history and sociology of technology, cognitive science, and evolutionary psychology.
Same as: CLASSICS 151

ARCHLGY 153. Ancient Urbanism. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 112/212.) Archaeology of Greek, Roman and early Islamic cities and urbanism in the Mediterranean and western Asia. Comparison and contrast of the shaping role of religion and politics; definitions of public and private space, monumental buildings, houses, streets, infrastructure. Special themes are city and country connections; the problems of giant cities; cities in the longue durée. Case studies include Athens, Olynthos, Rome, Pompeii, Constantinople, Damascus and Cairo.
Same as: CLASSICS 153, URBANST 119

ARCHLGY 156. Design of Cities. 3-5 Units.

Long-term, comparative and archaeological view of urban planning and design. Cities are the fastest changing components of the human landscape and are challenging our relationships with nature. They are the historical loci of innovation and change, are cultural hotspots, and present a tremendous challenge through growth, industrial development, the consumption of goods and materials. We will unpack such topics by tracking the genealogy of qualities of life in the ancient Near Eastern city states and those of Graeco-Roman antiquity, with reference also to prehistoric built environments and cities in the Indus Valley and through the Americas. The class takes an explicitly human-centered view of urban design and one that emphasizes long term processes.
Same as: CLASSICS 156

ARCHLGY 164. Cultural Heritage and Human Rights. 1 Unit.

This interdisciplinary research workshop will critically engage the issue of the growing currency of human rights discourse within cultural heritage. Epistemological and practical areas of tension between rights discourse and cultural discourse will be surveyed within the context of current global challenges facing heritage practice, conservation and archaeology. Topics will include the inequities of cultural recognition between North-South globalizations, questions of cultural property and rights, the role of tourism, and the impact of environmental conservation discourse on cultural rights.
Same as: ARCHLGY 64

ARCHLGY 165. Roman Gladiators. 3-5 Units.

In modern America, gladiators are powerful representatives of ancient Rome (Spartacus, Gladiator). In the Roman world, gladiators were mostly slaves and reviled, barred from certain positions in society and doomed to short and dangerous lives. A first goal of this course is to analyze Roman society not from the top down, from the perspective of politicians, generals and the literary elite, but from the bottom up, from the perspective of gladiators and the ordinary people in the stands. A second goal is to learn how work with very different kinds of evidence: bone injuries, ancient weapons, gladiator burials, laws, graffiti written by gladiators or their fans, visual images of gladiatorial combats, and the intricate architecture and social control of the amphitheater. A final goal is to think critically about modern ideas of Roman ¿bloodthirst.¿ Are these ideas justified, given the ancient evidence?.
Same as: CLASSICS 164

ARCHLGY 166. The Body in Roman Art. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 105.) Ancient and modern ideas about the body as ideal and site of lived experience. Themes include representation, portrayal, power, metamorphosis, and replication. Works that exemplify Roman ideas of heroism and power versus works portraying nude women, erotic youth, preserved corpses, and suffering enemies. Recommended: background in ancient Mediterranean art, archaeology, history, or literature. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: CLASSICS 166

ARCHLGY 169. Archaeology of Britannia. 3-4 Units.

Life in the Roman Empire: this course is a broad introduction to the archaeology of one of the best known provinces of the empire.
Same as: CLASSICS 169

ARCHLGY 173. Heritage Institutions Inside Out: The Power of Bureaucracies. 5 Units.

Anyone interested in how objects, places and customs become heritage should be interested in bureaucracies. Given that dealing with bureaucratic procedures often cause something of an allergic reaction among people, heritage researchers included, it is perhaps no wonder that they have long been neglected as acts of heritage-making; considered less attractive research subjects than archaeological field ventures, World Heritage sites and grass root heritage communities. Yet it is precisely in the everyday practices of regional, national and international bureaucracies in the administrative tasks, paper shuffling and decisions taken across shiny tables that much of the power to define, select and configure the values of heritage lie. nThe main task of this course is to introduce bureaucracies as agents in sustaining and producing heritage regimes, and to discuss how to go about the study of such institutions. Drawing on the research of an emergent group of scholars dealing with UNESCO, the European Union, international corporations and national governments, the first set of seminars will explore the logics of Western bureaucracy and discuss specific examples relating to heritage. The second set of seminars will discuss some methods and analytical approaches to studying heritage bureaucracies, particularly ethnography and Actor Network Theory. Leaning on contemporary research in political anthropology, the points and pitfalls of document analysis, participant observation and interviewing will be covered, as will the challenges of analyzing such knowledge and turning it into academic text.

ARCHLGY 190. Archaeology Directed Reading/Independent Study. 1-5 Unit.

.

ARCHLGY 195. Independent Study/Research. 1-5 Unit.

Students conducting independent study and or research with archaeology faculty members.

ARCHLGY 199. Honors Independent Study. 5-6 Units.

Independent study with honors faculty adviser.

ARCHLGY 200. Archaeology of Technology. 5 Units.

The course is an introduction to the social organization of material production and to the theoretical, ethnographic, and historical frameworks used by archaeologists to link the technologies of the past to salient sociocultural information about the people who employed them. Comparison of metallurgical, ceramic, lithic, and textile industries in different cultural and historical settings will inform critical discussions of how and to what extent analyses of artifacts, workshops, and industrial installations can provide insight into past societies.
Same as: ANTHRO 101B, ANTHRO 201B, ARCHLGY 100

ARCHLGY 222. Pottery Analysis for Archaeologists: The Social and Material Dimensions of Ceramic Containers. 5 Units.

Due to the dominance of pottery in the archaeological record for the past 10,000 years, its analysis has attracted a great deal of research attention, making it imperative that all archaeologists have at least a working knowledge of ceramics. This course provides classroom and laboratory perspectives for understanding the information about ancient society, economy, and culture that can be plausibly derived from pottery and the visual, structural, and compositional methods that best help obtain that information.

ARCHLGY 224. Archaeology of Food: production, consumption and ritual. 3-5 Units.

This course explores many aspects of food in human history from an archaeological perspective. We will discuss how the origins of agriculture helped to transform human society; how food and feasting played a prominent role in the emergence of social hierarchies and the development of civilization; and how various foodways influenced particular cultures. We will also conduct experimental studies to understand how certain methods of food procurement, preparation, and consumption can be recovered archaeologically.
Same as: ARCHLGY 124

ARCHLGY 226. Archaeobotany. 5 Units.

Archaeobotany, also known as paleoethnobotany, is the study of the interrelationships of plants and humans through the archaeological record. Knowledge and understanding of Archaeobotany sufficient to interpret, evaluate, and understand archaeobotanical data. Dominant approaches in the study of archaeobotanical remains: plant macro-remains, pollen, phytoliths, and starch grains in the identification of diet and environmental reconstruction.
Same as: ARCHLGY 126

ARCHLGY 227. Introduction to bioarchaeological Method and Theory. 3-5 Units.

This course deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and methods used in the study of skeletal and dental remains. Issues surrounding the reconstruction of the individual and population, which include age, sex and other paleodemographic factors, will be explored. The health and disease of teeth and bones, and the biomechanical and chemical analyses of bone will also be explored to illustrate how the variety of methods available to bioarchaeologists can be used to reconstruct past lifeways. While this course will be of primary interest to students interested in skeletal biology and archaeology, it is not exclusive to those pursuing careers in biological anthropology. The emphasis is on critical analysis, research skills, and communication skills that can be useful to students pursuing careers in other sub-disciplines of anthropology, laboratory research, or other lateral health-related fields. Required readings will be selected from current literature, and in some classes there will be practical material/exercises so that students can learn some of these techniques. The class is intended to be an interactive learning process in discussion format, and students are required to take an active part in class along with lectures.
Same as: ARCHLGY 127

ARCHLGY 232. The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Same as: ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 132, ARCHLGY 332

ARCHLGY 234. Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present. 3-5 Units.

Students will open the "black box" of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores "museum cultures": representations of self and other within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.n3 credits (no final project) or 5 credits (final project). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: AMSTUD 134, ARCHLGY 134, ARTHIST 284B, CSRE 134, EDUC 214, NATIVEAM 134

ARCHLGY 235. Constructing National History in East Asian Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

Archaeological studies in contemporary East Asia share a common concern, to contribute to building a national narrative and cultural identity. This course focuses on case studies from China, Korea, and Japan, examining the influence of particular social-political contexts, such as nationalism, on the practice of archaeology in modern times.
Same as: ARCHLGY 135, CHINA 175, CHINA 275

ARCHLGY 236. Artifacts in the Atomic Age: Isotopes in Archaeology. 5 Units.

Advances in material science over the 20th and 21st centuries have greatly expanded archaeologists' tool-kit for studying the material remains of the past. In particular, isotopic chemistry has come to play an important role in answering questions of prime importance to archaeological research: How old is this artifact? Where did it come from? What did people and animals eat in the past? How did humans and animals move in the landscape? In this course, we will explore a variety of methods that use isotopic chemistry to answer anthropological questions about human lives in the past. The course will provide a background in the science of isotopic abundance and fractionation in natural and technological systems. It will also investigate wide variety of archaeological case studies that use chemistry to explore topics of anthropological interest, including: migration, technology, social inequality, food & nutrition, human-animal interactions, and human-environment interactions.

ARCHLGY 242. Lost and found: Roman Coinage. 4-5 Units.

New trends in Roman numismatics (from the late Republic to the early Empire, 3rd-c. BCE-1st-c. CE). Archaeology from coins. Barter, money, and coinage. The introduction of coinage in Rome and the provinces. Making money (coin production), using money (monetary, non-monetary and ritual uses), losing money (coin circulation, hoards, single finds): contextual interpretations. Monetary systems: coins from Rome and coins from the provinces. Coinage and identity. False coinage.
Same as: ARCHLGY 142, CLASSART 232

ARCHLGY 248. Ceramic Analysis for Archaeologists. 3-5 Units.

The analysis and interpretation of ceramic remains allow archaeologists to accomplish varied ends: establish a time scale, document interconnections between different areas, and suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites. The techniques and theories used to bridge the gap between the recovery of ceramics and their interpretation within archaeological contexts is the focus of this seminar.
Same as: ARCHLGY 148

ARCHLGY 299. INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEARCH. 1-5 Unit.

nnINDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEARCH.

ARCHLGY 304C. The Archaeology of Ancient China. 5 Units.

Early China from the perspective of material remains unearthed from archaeological sites; the development of Chinese culture from early hominid occupation nearly 2 million years ago through the development of agriculture in the Neolithic period and complex society in the Bronze Age to the political unification of China under the Qin Dynasty. Continuity of Chinese culture from past to present, history of Chinese archaeology, relationships between archaeology and politics, and food in early China.
Same as: ARCHLGY 104C

ARCHLGY 306A. Museums and Collections. 5 Units.

Practical, theoretical, and ethical issues which face museums and collections. Practical collections-based work, museum visits, and display research. The roles of the museum in contemporary society. Students develop their own exhibition and engage with the issues surrounding the preservation of material culture.
Same as: ARCHLGY 106A

ARCHLGY 319. Archaeological Theory: Graeco-Roman Antiquity. 3-5 Units.

The ways that archaeology is a medium of understanding Classical antiquity. We will selectively and deeply review themes in archaeological theory as they inform the academic study of Graeco-Roman antiquity. The aim is not to acquire comprehensive coverage of contemporary archaeological theory, but to focus on concepts, methodologies and practices that have a strong connection with agendas in contemporary Classics, and to explore interdisciplinary links through social and cultural theory and critique, performance studies, science studies (including the history and sociology of technology), design studies and approaches to material culture.

ARCHLGY 327. Doing Business in Classical Antiquity: Mediterranean Exchange. 3-5 Units.

Exchange was everywhere in the Mediterranean, from the individual household to the state. Yet the specific models by which goods changed hands were as varied as the ideas and values that moved alongside them. This seminar will explore theoretical approaches to commercial and non-commercial exchange, drawing primarily on the crucial but uneven bodies of archaeological evidence and historical sources in an effort to investigate the simple but hardly straightforward question of how business was undertaken in the Greco-Roman world.
Same as: CLASSICS 352

ARCHLGY 332. The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Same as: ANTHRO 332A, ARCHLGY 132, ARCHLGY 232

ARCHLGY 335. Models in Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 335.) This seminar explores how we can use archaeological sources to build models of Graeco-Roman antiquity. A model is defined as a systematic and schematic representation of the way the ancient world worked, and particularly by using social and cultural theory. We will take in classic works of Marx and Weber, as well as contemporary approaches. A key objective is for class members to connect this most important aspect of social science to their own research project.

ARCHLGY 342. Archaeology of Roman Slavery. 4-5 Units.

(Formerly CLASSART 342.) The archaeological study of Roman slavery has been severely limited by a focus on identifying the traces of slaves in the material record. This seminar explores a range of newer and more broadly conceived approaches to understanding slavery and slaves' experiences, including spatial analysis, bioarchaeology, epigraphy, visual imagery, and comparative archaeologies of slavery. Students will learn about the current state of research, work with different kinds of evidence and a range of methodologies, and develop original research projects of their own.
Same as: CLASSICS 372

ARCHLGY 353. Archaeology: Post-Humanist Agendas. 3-5 Units.

How do people and their artifacts connect? Just what is the subject of archaeological history? A seminar reviewing the latest materialist approaches in archaeology and heritage studies.
Same as: CLASSICS 353

ARCHLGY 355. Landscape & Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

TBD.
Same as: CLASSICS 355

ARCHLGY 356. Mediterranean Regionalism. 3-5 Units.

The ancient world enjoys scholarly traditions of both grand pan-Mediterranean narratives and focused studies of the individual landscapes and peoples who comprise them. Within archaeology, these latter explorations generally rely on expedient geographical designations, modern political boundaries, or survey areas as focused ¿regions¿ for discussion. Defining and interrogating the regions created and experienced by ancient peoples and assembling these into a coherent larger ancient picture proves far more difficult. This seminar explores the varied forms of ancient regionalisms¿from archaeological (architecture, ceramics, coinage, sculpture, etc.) to social (language, religion, etc.)¿and tools for investigating such patterns of human interaction.
Same as: CLASSICS 356

ARCHLGY 367. Mediterranean Networks. 3-5 Units.

The the ancient Mediterranean was highly interconnected is common knowledge, and the idea of integration has become a defining factory in current approaches to Greco-Roman cultural identities. Yet how connectivity functiond, and how we should effectively analyze it, are less well understood. This seminar highlights emerging network approaches--both broad theoretical network paradigms and specific network science methodologies--as conceptual tools for archaeological and historical investigations of cultural interaction (economic, religious, artistic, colonial, etc.) across the Mediterranean world.
Same as: CLASSICS 367