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Anthropology

Contacts

Office: Building 50, Main Quadrangle, 450 Serra Mall
Mail Code: 94305-2034
Phone: (650) 723-3421
Email: anthropology@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://anthropology.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Department of Anthropology are listed under the subject code ANTHRO on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Mission of the Department of Anthropology

The courses offered by the Department of Anthropology are designed to: provide undergraduates with instruction in anthropology; provide undergraduate majors in Anthropology with a program of work leading to the bachelor's degree; and prepare graduate candidates for advanced degrees in Anthropology. Anthropology is devoted to the study of human beings and human societies as they exist across time and space. It is distinct from other social sciences in that it gives central attention to the full time span of human history, and to the full range of human societies and cultures, including those located in historically marginalized parts of the world. It is therefore especially attuned to questions of social, cultural, and biological diversity, to issues of power, identity, and inequality, and to understanding the dynamic processes of social, historical, ecological, and biological change over time. Education in Anthropology provides excellent preparation for living in a multicultural and globally-interconnected world, and helps to equip students for careers in fields including law, medicine, business, public service, research, ecological sustainability, and resource management. Students may pursue degrees in Anthropology at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels.

The Department of Anthropology offers a wide range of approaches to the topics and area studies within the field, including archaeology, ecology, environmental anthropology, evolution, linguistics, medical anthropology, political economy, science and technology studies, and sociocultural anthropology. Methodologies for the study of micro- and macro-social processes are taught through the use of qualitative and quantitative approaches. The department provides students with excellent training in theory and methods to enable them to pursue graduate study in any of the above mentioned subfields of Anthropology.

Undergraduate Programs in Anthropology

  • Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)
  • Anthropology Minor

In addition to gaining an excellent foundation for graduate research and study, students majoring in Anthropology can pursue careers in government, international business, international development agencies, international education, law, mass media, nonprofit organizations, and public policy.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the degree program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an understanding of core knowledge within the Anthropology discipline.
  2. the ability to communicate ideas clearly and persuasively in writing.
  3. identify analytical problems and make appropriate inferences and analytical arguments.
  4. critically evaluate anthropological theory and ethnographic research.

Graduate Programs in Anthropology

Graduate training in Anthropology at Stanford is designed for students who seek the Doctoral (Ph.D.) degree, and for students who seek the Masters of Arts (M.A.) degree only.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The purpose of the master's program is to further develop knowledge and skills in Anthropology and to prepare students for a professional career or doctoral studies. This is achieved through completion of courses in the primary field, as well as related areas, and through experience with independent work,  area specialization and field research.

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research and analysis in Anthropology. Through completion of advanced course work and rigorous skills training, the doctoral program prepares students to make original contributions to the knowledge of Anthropology and to interpret and present the results of such research.

Field School and Research Opportunities in Anthropology

Students majoring in Anthropology are encouraged to develop field research projects under the supervision of a department faculty member. The department offers research grants to support individually-designed and other summer field research in Anthropology. The department research grants may be used to support field research as a supplement to other field research grants such as the UAR research grants. The department also offers opportunities to participate in faculty-led research projects.

Please refer to http://anthropology.stanford.edu for information about the department's summer research opportunities, including the following: Beagle II Award, Tambopata, and Franz Boas summer scholars programs, and Michelle Z. Rosaldo Summer Field Research Grant program. Other field school opportunities include the following: Catalhoyuk and Chavin Huantar. Note: Required courses for the Franz Boas summer scholars program and the Michelle Z. Rosaldo grant program include:

ANTHRO 93Prefield Research Seminar5
or ANTHRO 93B Prefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors
ANTHRO 94Postfield Research Seminar5

For more information about research opportunities and deadlines, see the department's web site.

Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology

Undergraduate training in the Department of Anthropology is designed for students who seek the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree, only. Students may declare a major in Anthropology and earn the B.A. degree by completing the requirements below. The Department also offers a minor in Anthropology. The Anthropology B.A. degree program usually requires at least five quarters of enrollment. Students interested in majoring in Anthropology are encouraged to declare by the beginning of their junior year and to work closely with a faculty adviser to develop a coherent plan of study.

To declare a major in Anthropology, apply in Axess for the B.A. in Anthropology,  contact the department's student peer adviser(s) or the undergraduate student services specialist to prepare the department major checklist and planning form; submit the required forms to the undergraduate student services specialist; request a faculty adviser assignment and meet with the assigned faculty adviser for approval of the department major checklist and planning form. Students must apply in Axess for the major in Anthropology by the time junior status is achieved at 85 units.

Degree Requirements

The B.A. degree in Anthropology may be earned by fulfilling the following requirements:

  1. A faculty adviser appointed in the Department of Anthropology. A faculty adviser will be assigned based on the students chosen emphasis. Undergraduate Anthropology (ANTHRO) majors should plan to meet with their faculty adviser at least once each quarter.
  2. A program of 65 units, passed with an overall minimum grade point average of 'C':
    • of the 65 units, 50 units must be in courses with the ANTHRO subject code. 15 may be approved from related areas of study, overseas studies, and/or transfer units.
      • any related, overseas studies, or transfer units must be approved by the faculty adviser and by petition to the undergraduate committee.
    • of the 65 units, at least 20 units with a minimum grade of ‘C’ must be in courses with the ANTHRO subject code numbered 100 or above and taught by Anthropology faculty.
    • no more than 10 units of directed reading-style course work may be counted towards the 50 units required for the major in the ANTHRO subject code.
    • no more than 10 units may be taken for a satisfactory/no credit grade: 5 units in ANTHRO courses, and 5 in related or transfer units.
  3. A minimum grade of 'B' in the ANTHRO Writing in the Major (WIM) course from the chosen emphasis. This can be fullfilled by completing the ANTHRO Theory course, ANTHRO 90C or ANTHRO 90B, and should be taken within a year of declaring the Major or before the end of the junior year.
  4. A minimum grade of 'B' in the ANTHRO Theory course from the chosen emphasis. This should be taken within a year of declaring the major or before the end of the junior year.
  5. A minimum grade of 'B' in the ANTHRO Methods course (ANTHRO 91 Method and Evidence in Anthropology). This should be taken within a year of declaring the major or before the end of the junior year.
  6. Students must enroll in the senior Capstone course, (ANTHRO 193 Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology) during their senior year.
  7. An approved plan of study which includes an emphasis chosen from the list below. Students must complete a minimum of 20 units in their chosen emphasis of which 10 units must be numbered 100 or above.
    • Culture and Society
    • Ecology, Environment, and Evolution
    • Medical Anthropology
    • Self-Designed Emphasis (with faculty adviser and undergraduate committee approval, only)
  8. Competence in a foreign language beyond the first-year level. Such competence is usually demonstrated by completing a 5 unit course at the second-year level with a minimum grade of 'B-'. The requirement may be met by special examination administered through the Language Center, or demonstration of superior placement scores.
    • Up to 5 units from a second-year language course can count towards the "Related to Anthro" category of the major requirements.
  9. At least five quarters of enrollment in the major. Each candidate for the B.A. in Anthropology should declare a major by the first day of the first quarter of the third year of study.

Advising is an important component of the Anthropology major. Students are encouraged to work closely with their major adviser throughout their pursuit of the B.A. degree. Advising milestones for the major include the following:

  1. In the quarter in which the major is declared, students meet with their assigned faculty adviser, create a rigorous plan of study based on topical breadth, obtain adviser approval of an Anthropology emphasis as part of the plan of study, and obtain the major adviser's signature on the Major Checklist form.
  2. Undergraduate Anthropology majors should plan to meet with their major faculty adviser at least once each quarter before the final study list deadline. Any revisions to the initial checklist must be approved by the faculty adviser.
  3. Undergraduate Anthropology majors must submit an updated major checklist and planning form to the Undergraduate Student Services Specialist in the quarter before graduating.

Required Courses

1. Writing in the Major courses

Undergraduate majors can fulfill the Writing in the major course requirement for the B.A. in Anthropology by taking the ANTHRO theory course designated from a chosen emphasis.

2. Theory courses

Enroll in one of the following theory courses according to the student's chosen emphasis:

Culture and Society/Medical Anthropology:
ANTHRO 90BTheory of Cultural and Social Anthropology5
Ecology, Environment, and Evolution:
ANTHRO 90CTheory of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology5
3. Methods courses

The following course fulfills the ANTHRO undergraduate major methods course requirement for all emphases:

ANTHRO 91Method and Evidence in Anthropology5
4. Capstone Course

The following course fulfills the ANTHRO undergraduate major capstone course requirement for all emphases:

ANTHRO 193Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology5

Department Courses

Students should complete a minimum of 20 units from the courses listed below within their chosen emphases; 10 of these units must be numbered 100, or above. Departmental courses may fulfill the requirements for more than one emphasis. For example: with approval, an Archaeology course may fulfill a course needed to meet a course requirement in the Medical Anthropology emphasis. Undergraduates may also petition to the undergraduate committee for a self-designed emphasis in the Anthropology major.

Cultural & Society Anthropology Courses
ANTHRO 1Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 4Language and Culture4-5
ANTHRO 30QThe Big Shift4
ANTHRO 34Animals and Us5
ANTHRO 42Megacities5
ANTHRO 49Violence and Belonging in the Middle East3-5
ANTHRO 90BTheory of Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 91Method and Evidence in Anthropology5
ANTHRO 122ARace and Culture in Mexico and Central America3-5
ANTHRO 124NMaya Mythology and the Popol Vuh3
ANTHRO 126Urban Culture in Global Perspective5
ANTHRO 136The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains5
ANTHRO 140Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 141BThe Anthropology of Bits and Bytes: Digital Media in the Developing World5
ANTHRO 146GPaperwork5
ANTHRO 149South Asia: History, People, Politics5
ANTHRO 152Ritual, Politics, Power5
ANTHRO 187Nuclear Cultures5
Medical Anthropology Courses
ANTHRO 82Medical Anthropology3-5
ANTHRO 138Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise5
ANTHRO 154Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity5
ANTHRO 175Human Skeletal Anatomy5
ANTHRO 176Cultures, Minds, and Medicine1
ANTHRO 182NSmoke and Mirrors in Global Health3
ANTHRO 186Culture and Madness5
Ecology, Environment & Evolution Anthropology Courses
ANTHRO 10SCDarwin, Evolution, and Galapagos2
ANTHRO 90CTheory of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology5
ANTHRO 160Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case3-5
ANTHRO 162Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems3-5
ANTHRO 163Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology5
ANTHRO 166Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness3-5
ANTHRO 169The Ecology of Cuisine: Food, Nutrition, and the Evolution of the Human Diet3-5
Senior Courses
ANTHRO 95BDirected Study in Honors and Senior Papers1-10
ANTHRO 193Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology5
Senior Paper/Honors & Research Courses
ANTHRO 92AUndergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop2-3
ANTHRO 92BUndergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop2-3
ANTHRO 93Prefield Research Seminar5
ANTHRO 93BPrefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors5
ANTHRO 94Postfield Research Seminar5
ANTHRO 95Research in Anthropology1-10
ANTHRO 96Directed Individual Study1-10
ANTHRO 97Internship in Anthropology1-10

Emphasis Courses

The following course listing includes courses taught by the Anthropology faculty in Archaeology. These courses may be considered towards the published emphasis requirements in the Anthropology bachelors degree with the culture and society, ecology, environment and evolution, medical, and self-designed emphases in the Anthropology undergraduate major.

 Archaeology Courses

ANTHRO 3Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology3-5
ANTHRO 34Animals and Us5
ANTHRO 91AArchaeological Methods5
ANTHRO 98BDigital Methods in Archaeology3-5
ANTHRO 100C2-5
ANTHRO 106Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology3-5
ANTHRO 108ECatalhoyuk and Neolithic Archaeology3
ANTHRO 113BReligious Practices in Archaeological Cultures5
ANTHRO 115The Social life of Human Bones3-5
ANTHRO 118Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii4
ANTHRO 119Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains5
ANTHRO 134Object Lessons5

Plan of Study (example)

Please see the example Plan of Study grid below designed for an ANTHRO major beginning junior year (from 85 units).  This sample course schedule details the courses needed to satisfy the requirements for the Culture & Society emphasis

JuniorUnits
AutumnWinterSpring
Method and Evidence in Anthropology (ANTHRO 91)5    
Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 92A)2-3    
Culture, Narrative, and Medicine (ANTHRO 178A)5    
Language and Culture (ANTHRO 4)4-5    
Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 92B)  2-3  
Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 1)  5  
Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology (ANTHRO 90B)  5  
Sex and Gender (ANTHRO 15)  3  
Prefield Research Seminar (ANTHRO 93)    5
Field School Training Workshop (ANTHRO 98F)    1-3
The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains (ANTHRO 136)    5
Medical Anthropology (ANTHRO 82)    3-5
Year Total: 16-18 15-16 14-18
 
SeniorUnits
AutumnWinterSpring
Urban Culture in Global Perspective (ANTHRO 126)5    
Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)1-2    
Postfield Research Seminar (ANTHRO 94)5    
Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology (ANTHRO 193)5    
Ritual, Politics, Power (ANTHRO 152)  5  
Ethnography of Africa (ANTHRO 139)  5  
Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop (ANTHRO 199)  1-2  
Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers (ANTHRO 95B)    1-10
South Asia: History, People, Politics (ANTHRO 149)    5
Year Total: 16-17 11-12 6-15
 
Total Units in Sequence: 78-96

Course selections may vary depending on the students chosen emphasis. The number of units needed to satisfy the ANTHRO major requirements may also vary depending on the student's current undergraduate status and units accomplished previously before declaration of the ANTHRO major.

Research Courses

Courses listed are recommended for students writing a research paper in the major:

ANTHRO 92AUndergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop2-3
ANTHRO 93BPrefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors5
ANTHRO 93Prefield Research Seminar5
ANTHRO 94Postfield Research Seminar5
ANTHRO 95Research in Anthropology1-10
ANTHRO 199Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop1-2
Total Units19-30

Senior Courses

ANTHRO 95BDirected Study in Honors and Senior Papers1-10
ANTHRO 193Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology5

Senior Paper

The senior paper program in Anthropology provides majors with the opportunity to conduct original research under the guidance of an Anthropology faculty member. All Anthropology majors are encouraged to write a senior paper. Interested Anthropology majors of junior standing may apply to the senior paper program by submitting a senior paper application form, including a research topic/title of the proposed senior paper project, a two page abstract/proposal, and a letter of reference from their faculty adviser to the undergraduate student services specialist on or by February 15 in the junior year. Enrollment in ANTHRO 95 Research in Anthropology is recommended during Autumn and Winter quarters of the senior year. Students must enroll in ANTHRO 95B Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers in the final quarter of the undergraduate degree program before graduating. The senior paper is submitted in the final quarter before graduation. For more information, see the undergraduate student services specialist.

Honors Program

The honors program in Anthropology provides eligible Anthropology majors with an opportunity to conduct original ethnographic, field, laboratory, or library-based research under the guidance of an Anthropology faculty member. All Anthropology majors are urged to consider applying to the Departmental Honors Program in Anthropology. Interested Anthropology majors of junior standing may apply for admission to the honors program by applying first in Axess, submitting an honors program application form, including a research topic/title of the proposed honors project, a two page abstract/proposal, a transcript, and a letter of reference from the faculty or honors adviser, to the Undergraduate Student Services Specialist on or by February 15 in the junior year.

Department majors are eligible to apply for honors candidacy with a 3.4 GPA in the major, a 3.0 GPA in overall course work, and with no more than one incomplete listed on the transcript at the time of application. Students interested in the honors program are encouraged to apply for Summer Quarter research funding through the Department of Anthropology, Undergraduate Advising and Research, and area studies centers. In most cases, honors students apply for such funding early in the junior year. This process requires advanced planning as the Spring Quarter research deadline falls before the honors application due date.

Students must enroll in ANTHRO 95B Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers in the final quarter of the undergraduate degree program before graduating. The honors thesis is submitted in the final quarter before graduation. Students must submit the final draft of their Honors Thesis to their honors adviser (first reader), second reader, and the undergraduate student services specialist electronically, or printed, no later than May 13, 2015. Honors advisers must complete a Certificate of Honors Eligibility Form, provided by the student services specialist, to confirm a student’s honors status no later than May 20, 2015.  If ineligible, students must withdraw their request to graduate with honors via Axess. For more information, see the undergraduate student services specialist.

Minor in Anthropology

To declare a minor in Anthropology, apply in Axess; contact the department's student peer adviser(s) or the undergraduate student services specialist to prepare the minor checklist and the minor planning form; submit the required forms to the undergraduate student services specialist; request a faculty adviser assignment; and meet with the assigned faculty adviser for approval of the minor checklist and planning form. These forms are available at http://anthropology.stanford.edu. Students must apply in Axess for the undergraduate minor in Anthropology by the last day of the quarter at least two quarters before degree conferral.

Requirements for the minor in Anthropology include the following:

  1. A faculty adviser appointed in the Department of Anthropology.
  2. A program of 30 units, with a minimum grade of 'C':
    • Of the 30 units, 10 units may be approved from related areas of study, overseas studies, and transfer units.
      • Note: Any related, overseas studies, or transfer units must be approved by the faculty adviser and by petition to the Undergraduate Committee.
    • Of the 30 units, a minimum of 15 units must be ANTHRO courses numbered 100 or above.
    • No more than 5 units of directed reading-style course work may be counted towards the minor and may only be included among the 10 related units permitted for the minor.
    • No more than 5 units may be taken for a satisfactory/no credit grade.
  3. A self-designed course of study chosen from an Anthropology emphasis listed below and approved by the faculty adviser:
    • Culture and Society
    • Ecology, Environment and Evolution
    • Medical Anthropology
  4. A minimum grade of 'C' in two ANTHRO courses listed at the 100 level or higher and taught by Anthropology faculty.
  5. At least two quarters of enrollment in the minor. Each candidate for the minor in Anthropology should declare by the last day of the quarter at least two quarters before the quarter of degree conferral.

Advising milestones for the minor include the following:

  1. In the quarter in which the minor is declared, the student must meet with his or her assigned adviser, create a rigorous course of study based on topical breadth, and obtain adviser approval for the checklist.
  2. Any revisions to the initial checklist must be approved by the faculty adviser.
  3. Undergraduate Anthropology minors must submit an updated minor checklist and planning form to the undergraduate student services specialist in the quarter before graduating.

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Anthropology

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the Stanford Undergrad Coterm Guide.

Graduate enrollment at Stanford University for three consecutive quarters of full tuition for at least 45 units is usually required of all candidates for the coterminal M.A. degree. M.A. students in Anthropology must take a minimum of 45 units of Anthropology course work beyond the Undergraduate degree with an overall minimum grade point average of 3.0.  For the Masters degree, all courses must be at or above the 100 level, and, at least 23 of the required 45 units must be taken at either the ANTHRO 200 or 300-level.

The M.A. program usually requires more than one year of study. However, full-time students entering the program with appropriate background should complete the M.A. degree program within three consecutive calendar quarters after the student's first quarter of master's-level enrollment. The University allows no transfer units into the master's program. To provide a meaningful Master's program within one year, advance planning of course work with a faculty adviser is required. Requirements for the coterminal M.A. program must be completed within three years.

It is highly suggested by this department that a student who accepts an offer of admission to the Anthropology Coterminal Master's program, defers their Undergraduate B.A. conferral until the Graduate M.A degree requirements have been completed.  The student can then request to graduate in both the B.A. and  M.A. simultaneously.  Please see the Undergraduate Student Services Specialist for details.

For further information about the Department's coterminal M.A. degree program requirements, please consult the Department webpages .

Admission to the Coterminal Master's Degree Program 

The deadline for graduate applications to the coterminal M.A. degree program in Anthropology is December 9, 2014. Stanford University Undergraduate Majors are eligible to apply for the coterminal M.A. degree program if they have a 3.4 GPA in their Department Major, a 3.0 GPA in overall course work, and have no more than one incomplete listed on the transcript at the time of application. Successful applicants to the M.A. program may enter only in the following Autumn Quarter. However, the department may consider a request for early deferral of admission in the Spring Quarter by petition. Coterminal M.A. degree applicants are not required to submit their Graduate Record Examination scores.  Additional coterminal M.A. degree program application procedures are required by the Department. Please consult the Department webpages.

For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/registrar/publications#Coterm.

Degree Options

Students may pursue one of three possible department tracks in the Anthropology M.A. degree program. The tracks are:

  • Archaeology
  • Culture and Society
  • Ecology and Environment

The tracks are not declarable in Axess.

Master of Arts in Anthropology

University requirements for the terminal M.A. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The Department of Anthropology offers the terminal M.A. degree to the following:

  1. Graduate applicants who apply from outside the University for admission to the terminal M.A. program in Anthropology.
  2. Stanford graduate students, taking advanced degrees in other departments or schools at Stanford, who are admitted to the terminal M.A. program in Anthropology.
  3. Anthropology Ph.D. students at Stanford University who fulfill the M.A. degree requirements on the way to the Ph.D. degree.

Graduate applicants who apply from outside the University and whose ultimate goal is the Ph.D. degree should apply directly to the Ph.D. degree program. Applicants who are offered admission to the terminal Masters degree program may not transfer to the Ph.D. degree program; they must reapply on the same basis as other Ph.D. applicants and in competition with the Ph.D. applicants.

Graduate applicants, taking an advanced degree in other departments or schools at Stanford, applying for admission to the M.A. in Anthropology should apply via the Department terminal M.A. degree application for current Stanford University graduate students form and via the Registrar electronic graduate authorization petition by December 9, 2014 in consideration of beginning degree matriculation in either the following Spring Quarter or the following Autumn Quarter.

Anthropology Ph.D. students choosing to take the M.A. in Anthropology on the way to the Ph.D. are governed by separate requirements described in the Anthropology Ph.D. Degree Program and Ph.D. Handbook.

Graduate enrollment at Stanford University for three consecutive quarters of full tuition for at least 45 units is required of all candidates for the terminal master's degree. M.A. students in Anthropology must take a minimum of 45 units of course work with an overall minimum grade point average of 3.0. For the Masters degree, all courses must be at or above the 100 level, and, at least 23 of the required 45 units must be taken at either the ANTHRO 200 or 300-level.

The M.A. program may require more than one year of study. However, full-time students entering the program with appropriate background should complete the M.A. degree program within three consecutive calendar quarters after the student's first quarter of master's-level enrollment. The University allows no transfer units into the master's program. To provide a meaningful master's program within one year, advance planning of course work with an adviser is required. Requirements for the terminal master's program must be completed within three years.

For further information about the Department's M.A. degree program requirements, please consult the Department webpages.

Admission to the Master's Degree Program 

The deadline for graduate applications to the M.A. degree program in Anthropology is December 9, 2014. Successful applicants to the M.A. program may enter only in the following Autumn Quarter. M.A. degree applicants must file a report of their Graduate Record Examination score electronically. Additional terminal M.A. degree program application procedures are required by the Department. Please consult the Department webpages.

No financial support is available to students enrolled for the M.A. degree.

Degree Options

Students may pursue one of three possible department tracks in the Anthropology M.A. degree program. The tracks are:

  • Archaeology
  • Culture and Society
  • Ecology and Environment

The tracks are not declarable in Axess.

Degree Requirements

Requirements for the coterminal and terminal master's degree program include the following:

  1. A faculty adviser appointed in the Department of Anthropology.
  2. A program of 45 units, taken at the 100 level or higher with a minimum grade of 'B'. Note: At least 23 of the 45 units must be taken at the 200/300 level.
    • of the 45 units, no more than 15 units may be approved from related areas of study or overseas studies.
    • of the 45 units, no more than 10 units of directed reading-style course work may be counted towards the degree.
    • of the 45 units, no more than 5 units may be taken for a satisfactory/no credit grade.
  3. A minimum grade of 'B' in one graduate-level ANTHRO Theory course from the chosen track. Please note that ANTHRO theory courses are usually considered as department review courses.
  4. A minimum grade of 'B' in one graduate-level ANTHRO Methods course from the chosen track. Please note that ANTHRO methods courses are not considered as department review course.
  5. A minimum grade of 'B' in four ANTHRO Review courses from the chosen track, listed at the 200-level or higher, taught by Anthropology faculty, and taken as a five unit course.
  6. A self-designed plan of study chosen from the Anthropology tracks listed below:
    • Archaeology
    • Culture and Society
    • Ecology and Environment
  7. Submission of an approved plan of study form and an approved department graduate report of degree progress form, inclusive of a field research, laboratory research or library-based paper proposal, by the last day of the first quarter of the Master's degree program.
  8. Submission of an approved Master's degree program proposal form by the last day of the first quarter of the Master's degree program.
  9. Presentation of the Master's research project at the Department's Master's (Honors) paper presentation event in Spring Quarter - optional.
  10. Submission of the Master's paper reviewed by two faculty members (advisor and reader). For the Culture and Society track, the paper can be a field research or library-based research paper. For the Archaeology and the Ecology and Environment tracks, the paper can also be a laboratory research paper.

Required Courses

Archaeology Track, Required Theory (Review) Course
ANTHRO 303Introduction to Archaeological Theory5
Culture and Society Track, Required Theory (Review) Courses
ANTHRO 301History of Anthropological Theory, Culture and Society5
-or-
ANTHRO 301AFoundations of Social Theory5
-or-
ANTHRO 300Reading Theory Through Ethnography5
Ecology and Environment Track, Required Theory (Review) Course
ANTHRO 302History of Anthropological Theory, Ecology and Environment (or comparable, approved course at the 200 level)5
Archaeology Track, Required Methods Course
ANTHRO 307Archaeological Methods5
Culture and Society Track, Required Methods Course
ANTHRO 306Anthropological Research Methods5
Ecology and Environment Track, Required Methods Course
ANTHRO 305Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (or comparable, approved course at the 200 level)5
-or-
ANTHRO 255Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (or comparable, approved course at the 200 level)5

Recommended Courses

For all tracks, attendance at the Departmental colloquium each quarter is recommended for all Master's students. Students may enroll in the following course for additional units.

ANTHRO 444Anthropology Colloquium1
ANTHRO 445Anthropology Brown Bag Series1

Doctor of Philosophy in Anthropology

University requirements for the Ph.D. are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Admission

The deadline for graduate application to the Ph.D. degree program is December 9, 2014. Successful applicants for the Ph.D. program may enter only in Autumn Quarter. It is the Department of Anthropology's policy not to defer graduate admission. Additional Ph.D. application procedures are required by the department. Please consult the department website.

Financial Support

The department endeavors to provide needed financial support (through fellowships, teaching and research assistantships, and tuition grants) to all students admitted to the program who maintain satisfactory degree progress in years one through five of the Ph.D. program.  San Francisco Bay Area residency during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters in academic cohort years one through five is required for eligibility to receive department funding.

First year students who have not obtained a graduate degree previous to entering the Ph.D. program, and who have not obtained extramural funding previously before entering the Ph.D. program, are required to submit one extramural funding application in support of graduate doctoral training (for example, funding support for training during the first three years of the Ph.D. program) by the first day of finals week in the Autumn Quarter of the first year. In order to be eligible to apply for the departments exceptional (pre)dissertation research-related funding support, first-year students must submit at least two intramural or extramural summer research funding proposals (deadlines are usually early Winter Quarter and advanced planning is required) as well as the department graduate report of degree progress form inclusive of a research proposal on or by May 15 in the Spring Quarter of the first year of the Ph.D. program.

Note that two summers of predissertation field research funding support are given to qualified Ph.D. students in Anthropology. The first of two summers of predissertation field research funding support, is given in the Summer Quarter of the second year in the Ph.D. program and provided by way of a predoctoral research affiliateship. The second of two summers of predissertation field research funding support may be taken in either the first or third year Summer Quarter in the Ph.D. and is provided by way of a department fellowship. Careful consideration should be given when choosing to take Summer Quarter funding support, either in the first year for a pilot study, survey work, or approved predissertation research, or, in the third year as a bridge to the field to conduct approved dissertation research.

Second-year students are required to complete one or more full time quarterly teaching assistant assignments and be advanced to candidacy. In order to qualify for a predoctoral research affiliateship given in the Summer Quarter of the second year,  Ph.D. students are required to submit at least two predissertation research funding proposals for second year Summer Quarter funding support.

Third-year students must pass the department qualifying examinations, inclusive of the oral component, and receive department approval by the dissertation reading committee for the dissertation proposal. Third-year students who have not secured fourth-year field research funding are required to make at least three extramural funding applications to support dissertation research usually by the end of Autumn Quarter of the third year. Advanced planning is required in order to meet approved dissertation research funding application deadlines. If receiving department funding for fourth year field research, third-year students must submit the department Ph.D. funding agreement form before leaving to conduct field research. Finally, the second of two summers of (pre)dissertation field research funding support may be taken as a bridge to the field in the third year Summer Quarter if this support was not taken previously in the first year Summer Quarter. If this support is taken in the third year Summer Quarter, Ph.D. students may qualify to receive these funds by way of successful completion of the department qualifying examinations, inclusive of the oral component, and receive approval for the dissertation proposal by the dissertation reading committee by the Summer Quarter final study list deadline.

While in the field, fourth-year students make quarterly reports of their dissertation research progress to the dissertation reading committee via email. Fourth-year students returning from the field must submit the department's graduate report of degree progress form to establish eligibility for fifth year funding for degree progress and dissertation writing support, on or by May 15th in the Spring Quarter of the fourth year.

Fifth-year students are required to complete one or more full time quarterly teaching assistantship assignments. Fifth-year students who have not secured extramural funding for the sixth year are required to make at least two dissertation write-up funding applications to secure extramural or intramural funding for dissertation write-up in order to be eligible for consideration of a department teaching affiliateship in the sixth year. A department offer of teaching affiliateship is always dependent on the availability of funds and is given at the discretion of the department curriculum committee. During the fifth year and after returning from field research, students confirm Bay Area residency to be eligible for department fifth-year dissertation writing funds. Eligibility for department support is based on seminar attendance and dissertation chapter production, as well as on Bay Area residency (the Bay Area is defined as Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, or Sonoma counties)

Program

The Ph.D. in Anthropology allows the student to develop a flexible program reflecting special research interests, under the supervision of a faculty committee, chosen by the student. Students are encouraged to plan for completion of all work for the Ph.D. in five years. Matriculation in the Ph.D. is full-time only. In order to be eligible for department and intramural support, students must reside locally through the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters of academic years one through five. The University oral examination may be scheduled in the fifth year or beyond depending upon a student's dissertation completion progress. Ph.D. students in Anthropology must complete a minimum of 135 quarter units with a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B). The maximum allowable number of transfer units is 45.

Degree Options

Students may pursue three different tracks in the Anthropology Ph.D. program. The tracks are not declarable in Axess and do not appear on the transcript or the diploma. The three tracks are:

  • Archaeology
  • Culture and Society
  • Ecology and Environment.

Degree Requirements

For students who matriculate beginning 2014-15, the requirements for the doctoral degree program include the following:

  1. Students must submit a department (first year) plan of study form detailing intended courses enrollment and milestone accomplishment to be completed in the first year of the Ph.D. program. The plan of study form should be submitted by the first day of Autumn Quarter. In addition, the plan of study form also confirms the department track: Archaeology, Culture and Society, or Ecology and Environment.
  2. Students must pass six graduate level ANTHRO subject code department review courses, with a minimum grade of 'B+', appropriate to the student's chosen track, within the first two years of the degree program. Department review courses are usually those seminar-style courses, taught by tenure-line ANTHRO faculty appointed in the department, at the 300-level.
  3. In the first year of the program:
    1. pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' the theory course(s) as required for the chosen track in Archaeology , Culture and Society, and Ecology And Environment:
      Archaeology Track, Required Theory (Review) Course
      ANTHRO 303Introduction to Archaeological Theory5
      Culture and Society Track, Required Theory (Review) Courses
      ANTHRO 300Reading Theory Through Ethnography5
      ANTHRO 301History of Anthropological Theory, Culture and Society5
      ANTHRO 301AFoundations of Social Theory5
      Ecology and Environment Track, Required Theory (Review) Course
      ANTHRO 302History of Anthropological Theory, Ecology and Environment (or comparable, approved course at the ANTHRO 200 level)5
    2. pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' one or more methods courses as required for the chosen track in Archaeology and Ecology and Environment:
      Archaelogy Track, Required Methods Course
      ANTHRO 307Archaeological Methods5
      (may be taken in either the first or second year of the PhD program)
      Ecology and Environment Track, Required Methods Course
      In the first year, pass at least one of two required methods courses, or a comparable, approved ANTHRO course at the 200-level:
      ANTHRO 304Data Analysis for Quantitative Research5
      ANTHRO 305Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology5
      or ANTHRO 255 Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology
    3. complete at least 45 units by the end of Spring Quarter in the first year.
    4. as scheduled by the department, attend the department ethics workshop for review of ethics in Anthropology. Submit the department review of ethics in anthropology form on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter.
    5. enroll in ANTHRO 310G Introduction to Graduate Studies during Autumn Quarter (all tracks).
    6. Culture and Society track students only enroll in ANTHRO 311G Introduction to Culture and Society Graduate Studies in Anthropology during Winter and Spring quarters for 1-2 units (no more than 5 units total over two quarters).
    7. attend the department colloquial series each quarter. Enrollment in ANTHRO 444 Anthropology Colloquium is optional.
    8. attend the department brown bag series each quarter. Enrollment in ANTHRO 445 Anthropology Brown Bag Series is optional.
    9. submit the department graduate report of degree progress form inclusive of the research proposal to the faculty adviser and the graduate committee on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter of the first year. Receive final approval for the predissertation research proposal from the adviser and the graduate committee by the first day of finals week in Spring Quarter.
    10. submit at least one extramural funding application within the first year (deadlines are usually early Autumn Quarter and advanced planning is required), or, confirm a waiver of the requirement by graduate committee petition.
    11. to be eligible for exceptional Summer Quarter funding support, submit at least two intramural or extramural summer research funding proposals (deadlines are usually early Winter Quarter and advanced planning is required). If exceptional funding support is needed, submit a request for predissertation first-year Summer Quarter funding support using a department graduate program petition form on or by May 15th in the Spring Quarter. The second of two summers of predissertation field research funding support may be taken in either the first or third year Summer Quarter in the Ph.D. program and is provided by way of a department fellowship. Careful consideration should be given when choosing to use the Summer Quarter funding support in either the first year for a pilot study, survey work, or approved field research or, in the third year as a 'bridge to the field' to conduct approved dissertation field research.
    12. complete the appropriate CITI tutorial for non-medical human subjects, and, either submit a non-medical human subjects protocol, based on the predissertation research proposal, to the Institutional Review Board before departing for Summer Quarter field research in the first year, or confirm approval for exempt status. Alternately, a notice of determination may be confirmed with the Institutional Review Board for a pilot study proposal that does not require protocol submission.
    13. complete the appropriate CITI tutorial for Responsible Conduct of Research on or by May 15 in Spring Quarter.
    14. upon completion of the above requirements, and with recommendation from the faculty adviser and department chair, request the master's degree 'on the way to the Ph.D.' by the first day of finals week in Spring Quarter, if desired.
  4. In the second year:
    1. pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' the methods course(s) appropriate for the chosen track in Archaeology, Culture and Society, and Ecology And Environment:
      Archaeology Track, Required Methods Course
      ANTHRO 307Archaeological Methods5
      ANTHRO 370Advanced Theory and Method in Historical Archaeology5
      Culture and Society Track, Required Methods Course
      ANTHRO 306Anthropological Research Methods5
      Ecology and Environment Track, Required Methods Course(s)
      ANTHRO 305Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology5
      or ANTHRO 255 Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology
    2. pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' the proposal writing course appropriate for the chosen track in Archaeology and in Culture and Society:
      Archaeology Track, Required Proposal Writing Course
      ANTHRO 308AProposal Writing Seminar in Archaeological Anthropology5
      Culture and Society Track, Required Proposal Writing Course
      ANTHRO 308Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology5
    3. for all tracks, submit the pre-dissertation proposal to the assigned faculty adviser and the graduate committee by the first day of finals week in Spring Quarter. Receive approval for the draft proposal of the second year summer pre-dissertation research before departing for field research.
    4. complete at least 40 units of course work in the second year and a total of at least 50 units overall including the Summer Quarter enrollment in ANTHRO 450 Research Apprenticeship (10 units). Students must have completed a total of 95 units overall by the end of the second year.
    5. pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' any remaining ANTHRO subject code review courses to complete the six review course requirement.
    6. for the Ecology and Environment track, pass the second of two required methods courses by the end of the second year:
      Ecology and Environment Track, Required Methods Courses
      ANTHRO 304Data Analysis for Quantitative Research (or, comparable approved ANTHRO course at the 200-level)5
      ANTHRO 305Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology (or, comparable approved ANTHRO course at the 200-level)5
      or ANTHRO 255 Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology
    7. as scheduled by the department, attend the teaching assistant training workshop (to be scheduled in the week before the first day of Autumn Quarter).
    8. complete one or more full time quarterly teaching assistant assignments in the second year.
    9. submit a second year graduate report of degree progress form inclusive of the research proposal on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter. Receive approvals from the assigned faculty adviser and the graduate committee by the first day of finals week in Spring Quarter.
    10. by the first day of finals week in Winter Quarter, confirm the qualifying examination committee adviser for each examination committee (i.e. one committee for AREA and one committee for TOPIC) by submitting the department report of qualifying examination form to the department graduate committee.
    11. by the first day of finals week in Winter Quarter (for those whose native language is English), either pass a foreign research or field language exam, or petition the department's language committee for exemption from a foreign research or field language examination (based on a description of previous field or research language training). For those whose native language is not English, demonstrate satisfactory command of the English language, as evidenced by completion of the first two years of graduate study and a petition to the language committee.
    12. upon completion of the above requirements and at the recommendation of the Anthropology faculty, petition the University for candidacy by submitting the University application for candidacy for doctoral degree form by the first day of finals week in Winter Quarter. Advancement to candidacy is based on faculty review and approval of the predissertation research proposal demonstrating a capacity for original research submitted on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter of the second year. Failure to advance to candidacy results in the dismissal of the student from the program.
    13. In order to qualify for a predoctoral research affiliateship given in the Summer Quarter of the second year,  Ph.D. students are required to submit at least two predissertation research funding proposals for second year Summer Quarter funding support.
  5. In the third year, complete the following:
    1. by the last day of the third week of Autumn Quarter, confirm the committee reader for each of the qualifying examination committees (i.e. one committee for AREA and one committee for TOPIC) by submitting the report of qualifying examination form to the department graduate committee.
    2. by the first day of finals week in Autumn Quarter, submit three dissertation research grant proposals to the faculty adviser for approval. In order to be eligible for fourth year field research funding support, submit approved extramural funding proposals to three funding agencies by the end of the Summer Quarter.
    3. by the first day of finals week in Autumn Quarter, confirm the dissertation reading committee by submitting the University dissertation reading committee form to the graduate committee.
    4. by the last day of third week in Winter Quarter, submit the third year department report of qualifying examination status form to the graduate program committee reaffirming committee formulation, and confirming the exam dates, preliminary qualifying bibliographies, and the proposed question set for each examination.
    5. by the last day of finals week in Winter Quarter, complete the qualifying examinations for area and for topic (two separate examinations to be scheduled one week apart), inclusive of the final bibliographies.
    6. by the last day of the second week in Spring Quarter, submit a draft of the dissertation proposal to the dissertation reading committee.
    7. by the last day of the second week in Spring Quarter, confirm a scheduled meeting with the qualifying examination committee/dissertation reading committee members for the oral component of the qualifying examinations and for approval review of the dissertation proposal.
    8. meet with the qualifying examination/dissertation reading committee to review the dissertation proposal, inclusive of the oral component of the qualifying examinations, on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter.
    9. the second of two summers of (pre)dissertation field research funding support provided by way of a fellowship stipend may be taken in either the first or third year Summer Quarters in the Ph.D. program. If not taken in Summer Quarter of the first year, submit the third-year Summer Quarter dissertation bridge to the field funding request via a graduate program petition form on or by May 15th in Spring Quarter.
    10. by the first day of finals week in Spring Quarter, submit the approved dissertation proposal to the graduate committee.
    11. before departing for field research, receive approval for the non-medical human subjects protocol from the Institutional Review Board.
    12. meet with Graduate Program Committee chair to review comments for proposal, all tracks.
  6. In the fourth year, complete the following requirements:
    1. by the first day of finals week in the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters, submit a quarterly report of dissertation field research via email to the dissertation reading committee.
    2. to establish eligibility for funding and to confirm Bay Area residency, submit a fourth-year department graduate report of degree progress form to the department graduate committee on or by May 15th in the Spring Quarter.
    3. submit one or more funding proposals supporting of Summer Quarter in the fourth year.
  7. In the fifth year, complete the following requirements:
    1. during the fifth year and after returning from field research, confirm Bay Area residency to be eligible for department fifth year dissertation writing funds. Eligibility for department support is based on seminar attendance as well as on Bay Area residency (the Bay Area is defined as Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Solano, or Sonoma counties).
    2. during the fifth year and after returning from field research, complete one or more full time quarterly teaching assistant assignments in the department.
    3. during Autumn, Winter, Spring Quarters in the fifth year, students attend a minimum of four out of five class meetings of ANTHRO 400 Dissertation Writers Seminar (required of Culture and Society track, only; and, recommended for the Archaeology and the Ecology and Environment tracks). In each quarter and for all tracks, chapter drafts of the dissertation must be handed in to the dissertation reading committee for review.
    4. submit the fifth year dissertation writers report of degree progress and time to degree completion form by the last day of finals week in the Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.
    5. fifth year students who have not secured funding support from the beginning of the Summer Quarter of the fifth year through the end of Summer Quarter in the sixth year, should submit one or more funding proposals for dissertation writing funding support.
  8. In either the fifth year or in the sixth plus year and beyond, complete the following requirements:
    1. submit a penultimate draft of the dissertation by the last day of the first week of the quarter preceding the quarter in which the oral examination (dissertation defense) has been scheduled, and in which the dissertation is to be submitted in partial fulfillment of degree requirements.
    2. at least four weeks prior to a proposed date for the oral examination, submit the University oral examination schedule form and a final draft of the dissertation, to the department graduate program committee.
    3. pass the University oral examination, inclusive of an oral presentation held at the beginning of the oral examination period (approximately 30 minutes for the public presentation with a 15 minute public discussion period preceding a closed session with the oral examination committee), prior to the final submission of the dissertation to the University Registrar and the conferral of the doctoral degree in Anthropology.
  9. Complete 30 units of ANTHRO subject code courses at the 300 level. The courses dedicated to the Ph.D. minor must be successfully completed with a minimum (GPA) of 3.0 (B). Directed Individual Study units are not approved for the Ph.D. minor in Anthropology.
  10. Request a faculty member within the Department of Anthropology who provides written consent to serve as the adviser for the Ph.D. minor and serve on the student's oral examination and dissertation reading committees.
  11. With the faculty adviser, determine a coherent plan and submit the department plan of study form for the Ph.D. minor.
  12. Pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' three ANTHRO theory courses, and one ANTHRO course in a geographical or theoretical area, for a total of four department Review courses.

Required Courses

Archaeology Track

ANTHRO 303Introduction to Archaeological Theory5
ANTHRO 307Archaeological Methods5
ANTHRO 310GIntroduction to Graduate Studies2
ANTHRO 308AProposal Writing Seminar in Archaeological Anthropology5
Total Units17

Culture and Society Track

ANTHRO 300Reading Theory Through Ethnography5
ANTHRO 301History of Anthropological Theory, Culture and Society5
ANTHRO 301AFoundations of Social Theory5
ANTHRO 306Anthropological Research Methods5
ANTHRO 308Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 310GIntroduction to Graduate Studies2
ANTHRO 311GIntroduction to Culture and Society Graduate Studies in Anthropology2
Total Units29

Ecology and Environment Track

ANTHRO 302History of Anthropological Theory, Ecology and Environment5
ANTHRO 304Data Analysis for Quantitative Research5
ANTHRO 305Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology5
ANTHRO 310GIntroduction to Graduate Studies2
Total Units17

Recommended Courses

For all tracks, quarterly attendance (during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters) in the departmental colloquium is recommended for all doctoral students and required for all current first-year, second-year, and fifth-year cohort Ph.D. students. Students may enroll in the following course for additional units.

ANTHRO 444Anthropology Colloquium1
ANTHRO 445Anthropology Brown Bag Series1

Ph.D. Minor in Anthropology

University requirements for the Ph.D. Minor are described in the Graduate Degrees section of this Bulletin.

To request the Ph.D. Minor in Anthropology, apply to the department graduate program committee at least three quarters before terminal graduate registration status is confirmed with the following materials: the University application for Ph.D. minor form, the department request for Ph.D. minor adviser form, an approved pre-dissertation proposal, confirmation of qualifying status in the Ph.D. (home) department, confirmation of Ph.D. candidacy in the Ph.D. (home) department, proposed dates for the University oral examination and the dissertation defense, and a recommendation for consideration of the Ph.D. minor made by the Ph.D. (Minor) department adviser. Once approved, a HelpSU request to the University Registrar requesting the addition of the Ph.D. minor to the student's academic career will be submitted by the Anthropology student services officer on behalf of the Ph.D. minor applicant.

The requirements for a Ph.D. Minor in Anthropology include the following:

  1. Complete 30 units of ANTHRO subject code courses at the 300 level. The courses dedicated to the Ph.D. minor must be successfully completed with a minimum (GPA) of 3.0 (B). Directed Individual Study units are not approved for the Ph.D. minor in Anthropology.
  2. Request a faculty member within the Department of Anthropology who provides written consent to serve as the adviser for the Ph.D. minor and serve on the student's oral examination and dissertation reading committees.
  3. With the faculty adviser, determine a coherent plan and submit the plan of study form for the Ph.D. minor.
  4. Pass with a minimum grade of 'B+' three ANTHRO theory courses, and one ANTHRO course in geographical or theoretical area, for a total of four department Review courses.

For additional information regarding the Ph.D. Minor in Anthropology, consult the department website.

Faculty

Emeriti: (Professors) Clifford R. Barnett, Harumi Befu, George A. Collier, Jane F. Collier, Carol Delaney, Charles O. Frake, James L. Gibbs, Jr., Renato I. Rosaldo

Chair: Sylvia Yanagisako

Professors: Lisa Curran, William H. Durham, James Ferguson, Thomas Blom Hansen, Ian Hodder, Richard G. Klein, Tanya Luhrmann, Lynn Meskell, Sylvia J. Yanagisako

Associate Professors: Rebecca Bliege Bird, Paulla Ebron, James A. Fox, Duana Fullwiley (on leave), Miyako Inoue, S. Lochlann Jain, James Holland Jones, Matthew Kohrman, Liisa Malkki, John W. Rick, Barbara Voss (on leave)

Assistant Professors: Angela Garcia, Krish Seetah, Kabir Tambar, Sharika Thiranagama

Associate Professors (Teaching): Michael V. Wilcox

Senior Research Scientist/Lecturers: Douglas W. Bird

Courtesy Professors: H. Samy Alim, Penelope Eckert, Raymond McDermott

Visiting Professors: James Clifford, Jorge Ramos Gonzalez

Visiting Associate Professors: Ewa Domanska

Visiting Assistant Professors:

Lecturers: Ayca Alemdaroglu, Sasa Caval, Claudia Engel, Alma Kunanbaeva

Affiliated Faculty: Li Liu, Richard White

Postdoctoral Fellows:Mary-Ashley Hazel, Philip Labo, Nev Jones, Alan Greene

Teaching Affiliates: Stephanie Bautista, Lisa Poggiali, Eleanor Power, Ian Simpson, Anna West

Overseas Studies Courses in Anthropology

 

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.

 

OSPBER 25Architecture, Memory, Commemoration5
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPISTAN 68Istanbul: Space, Memory, and Protest5
OSPMADRD 25Politics of "Culture/s" in the Iberian's World: the Multicultural Debate4
OSPOXFRD 87The Archaeology of Britain5
OSPSANTG 37Cultures of Disease and Medicine5

Courses

ANTHRO 1. Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology. 5 Units.

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Same as: ANTHRO 201

ANTHRO 1S. Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology. 3-5 Units.

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Same as: ANTHRO 101S

ANTHRO 3. Introduction to Prehistoric Archeology. 3-5 Units.

Aims, methods, and data in the study of human society's development from early hunters through late prehistoric civilizations. Archaeological sites and remains characteristic of the stages of cultural development for selected geographic areas, emphasizing methods of data collection and analysis appropriate to each.
Same as: ARCHLGY 1

ANTHRO 4. Language and Culture. 4-5 Units.

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Same as: ANTHRO 204

ANTHRO 6. Human Origins. 5 Units.

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Same as: ANTHRO 206, HUMBIO 6

ANTHRO 10A. The Archaeology of Home. 3-5 Units.

Homes evoke powerful emotions about place and also highlight the dynamic and complex nature of people, their relationships, and the broader society they live in. Focus on the ways that material traces from the past shed light on the diversity of domestic life, which includes household organization, economic strategies, diet and status, rituals, and identity. Archaeological case studies to see how archaeologists identify reoccurring patterns in material culture found in homes or domestic dwellings to reconstruct household patterns and social relations.
Same as: ARCHLGY 10

ANTHRO 10SC. Darwin, Evolution, and Galapagos. 2 Units.

The tiny remote islands of Galápagos have played a large and central role in the study of evolution. Not surprisingly, they have also been central to the study of conservation. The fascinating adaptations of organisms to the unique ecosystems of the archipelago have left them particularly vulnerable to outside introductions. Drawing on lessons learned in Galapagos from Darwin's time to the present, this seminar explores evolution, conservation, and their connection in the Galapagos. Using case-study material on finches, iguanas, tortoises, cacti, Scalesia plants, and more, we will explore current theory and debate about adaptation, sexual selection, speciation, adaptive radiation, and other topics in evolution. Similarly, we will explore the special challenges Galápagos poses today for conservation, owing to both its unusual biota and the increasing human impact on the archipelago. This course includes an intensive eleven-day expedition to Galápagos to observe firsthand the evolutionary phenomena and conservation issues discussed in class. A chartered ship will serve as our floating classroom, dormitory, and dining hall as we work our way around the archipelago to visit as many as ten islands. For this portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a group of Stanford alumni and friends in a format called a Stanford "Field Seminar." Because our class time on campus is limited to one week before travel, students will be required to complete all course readings over the summer. Both on campus and in South America, the course emphasizes student contributions and presentations. Students will be asked to lead discussions and carry out literature research on the evolutionary and conservation biology of particular Galápagos species. The final assignment for the seminar is to complete a seven- to ten-page paper on the evolutionary biology and conservation challenges of a particular organism or adaptation and to present the main findings of that paper in a joint seminar of undergrads and alumni as we travel in Galápagos. Note: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for Galápagos. Travel to Galápagos will be provided and paid by Sophomore College (except incidentals) and is made possible by the support of the Stanford Alumni Association Travel/Study Program and generous donors. Students will return to campus late afternoon or evening on Sunday, September 23, the day before the fall term begins.
Same as: HUMBIO 17SC

ANTHRO 11SC. Conservation and Development Dilemmas in the Amazon. 2 Units.

This course explores the human dimensions of conservation efforts under way in the Amazon Basin of South America. It has two specific goals: (1) to introduce the human ecology of Amazonia; and (2) to assess the prospects for joint efforts at biodiversity conservation and community development. We will draw on case studies to investigate such topics as the causes and consequences of deforestation, the social impact of parks and protected areas, and the potential for "Integrated Conservation and Development Projects" (ICDPs) such as extractive reserves, natural forest management, biodiversity prospecting, and community-based ecotourism. The course views Amazonia as a microcosm of the challenges facing conservation and development efforts today in the Third World. nPart of the course is an intensive 11-day expedition to the Peruvian Amazon, at no extra cost, to observe firsthand the conservation and development dilemmas discussed in class. We will visit ecolodges in the rainforest, walking miles of trails to learn about local flora, fauna, and conservation efforts. We will also visit Machu Picchu in the upper reaches of the rainforest. For the travel portion of the class, undergraduates will be joined by a group of Stanford alumni and friends. nStudent contributions and presentations are emphasized throughout the course. Students are expected to come well-prepared to each session, to lead discussions, and to carry out literature research. The final assignment is a 6 to 8 page paper on a case study of your own choosing¿or an equivalent piece of a longer collaborative paper¿that offers a critical assessment of one particular conservation and/or development project in or near the region we will visit. Students will present the main findings of their papers in a joint seminar of undergraduates and alumni as we travel in the Peruvian Amazon. n nNote: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for the Amazon. Travel to and from Peru¿organized by the Travel/Study Program of the Stanford Alumni Association¿is included; costs are defrayed by the Stanford Field Seminar Fund and generous donors.
Same as: HUMBIO 18SC

ANTHRO 12. Anthropology and Art. 5 Units.

Modernity. How the concept of art appears timeless and commonsensical in the West, and with what social consequences. Historicizing the emergence of art. Modernist uses of primitive, child art, asylum, and outsider art.

ANTHRO 12SC. Parks and Peoples: Dilemmas of Protected Area Conservation in East Africa. 2 Units.

The world-famous landscapes of East Africa, including Serengeti National Park, Ngorongoro Conservation Area, and the Rift Valley lakes of Tanzania, form the backdrop for this special course on protected area conservation. The course is designed to explore the pros and cons of parks and protected areas as they impact flora, fauna, and human inhabitants, and to address the dilemma of how to achieve conservation in a manner that creates local community benefits and is socially just. We will use a case study approach to ask: (1) What approach to protected area (PA) conservation has been taken in each case? Who are the key proponents and what are their main objectives? (2) How successful has the protected area been at achieving its conservation goals? (3) What are the benefits of the PA to people and who receives them? (4) What are the costs of the PA to people and who pays them? (5) Where benefits are not commensurate to costs, what, if anything, is being done to address the imbalance? How well is it working? (6) Are there alternatives or variations on the theme of protected area conservation that would be more realistic and beneficial? How could the interests of parks and people be made more compatible in each case? Is there any chance for an "integrated conservation-development project" (ICDP), or is that just "wishful thinking," as some critics insist?nnThis course includes an intensive 12-day expedition to Tanzania to observe firsthand the dilemmas of parks and peoples we have discussed in class. We are scheduled to visit Tarangire, Lake Manyara, Mt. Meru, and Serengeti National Parks, as well as the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Both on campus and in Tanzania, the course emphasizes student contributions and presentations. Students are expected to come well-prepared to each and every session, and will be asked to lead discussions plus carry out literature research on particular protected areas or conservation issues of interest to them, or on alternative conservation strategies. The final assignment for the seminar is to complete a 5- to 7-page paper on some aspect of conservation dilemmas in East Africa, preferably Tanzania, and to present the main findings of that paper in a joint seminar of undergrads and alumni as we travel in East Africa.nNote: Students will arrive on campus and will be housed at Stanford until we leave for the travel portion. Travel to Tanzania will be provided and paid by Sophomore College (except incidentals) and is made possible by the support of the Stanford Alumni Association Travel/Study Program and generous Stanford donors.
Same as: HUMBIO 19SC

ANTHRO 13A. Islamic Routes: Archaeology and Heritage of Muslim Societies. 3-5 Units.

How has archaeology changed our knowledge of the spread of Islam and past Muslim societies? How does archaeology shape heritage debates, conflicts and ideas about Islam today? Topics include the city and urban change, secular and religious life, gender, economy, and globalization. These topics are explored using archaeological and critical heritage approaches. Focus is on examples drawn from Syria-Palestine, Egypt, Iraq, Arabian Peninsula, India, and Africa. Sources include archaeological data and material culture, historical texts in translation, and photography.
Same as: ARCHLGY 13, HISTORY 7E, HISTORY 107E

ANTHRO 13SI. Zombies: Anthropology of the American Undead. 1-2 Unit.

The zombie apocalypse, affectionately known as the ¿Zombiepocalypse.¿ In this combination class on zombie history, ethnography, biology, and culture, we will explore the origins of zombie legends (or truths?) and how the undead have been represented in American culture for the past 200 years. Classes will include lectures, film clip viewings, literary analysis, medical anthropology components, and disaster survival planning.

ANTHRO 14. Introduction to Anthropological Genetics. 3 Units.

For upper division undergraduates. The extent and pattern of variation among human genomes, the origin of these patterns in human evolution, and the social and medical impact of recent discoveries. Topics include: the Human Genome Project; human origins; ancient DNA; genetic, behavioral, linguistic, cultural, and racial diversity; the role of disease in shaping genetic diversity; DNA forensics; genes and reproductive technology.

ANTHRO 15. Sex and Gender. 3 Units.

Commonality and diversity of gender roles in crosscultural perspective. Cultural, ecological, and evolutionary explanations for such diversity. Theory of the evolution of sex and gender, changing views about men's and women's roles in human evolution, conditions under which gender roles vary in contemporary societies, and issues surrounding gender equality, power, and politics.

ANTHRO 16. Native Americans in the 21st Century: Encounters, Identity, and Sovereignty in Contemporary America. 5 Units.

What does it mean to be a Native American in the 21st century? Beyond traditional portrayals of military conquests, cultural collapse, and assimilation, the relationships between Native Americans and American society. Focus is on three themes leading to in-class moot court trials: colonial encounters and colonizing discourses; frontiers and boundaries; and sovereignty of self and nation. Topics include gender in native communities, American Indian law, readings by native authors, and Indians in film and popular culture.

ANTHRO 19Q. Hauntings, Visions, and Prophecy. 1-3 Unit.

Preference to sophomores. Why do people see ghosts? Why do people believe that stars foretell the future? When do people see demons and angels? Focus is on the conditions under which people experience themselves as having sensory evidence of supernatural phenomena and the role of training and expectation in the process. Intellectual exploration of what is known from the ethnographic, historical, and psychological record. Practical experimental projects involve attempting to induce positive supernatural experience. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 21N. The Anthropology of Globalization. 4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Anthropological approach to how cultural change, economic restructuring, and political mobilization are bound up together in the process of globalization.

ANTHRO 22. Archaeology of North America. 3-5 Units.

Why and how people of N. America developed. Issues and processes that dominate or shape developments during particular periods considering the effects of history and interactions with physical and social environment. Topics include the peopling of the New World, explaining subsequent diversity in substance and settlement adaptations, the development of social complexity, and the impact of European contact.

ANTHRO 22N. Ethnographies of North America: An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology. 3-4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Ethnographic look at human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, and related topics in N. America. Films.

ANTHRO 23N. Glimpses of Divinity. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. How human beings search for and identify the presence of the divine in everyday human life. Sources include spiritual classics in the Christian, Jewish, and Hindu traditions including works by Augustine, Teresa of Avila, Jonathan Edwards, the Bhagavad Gita, the Zohar, and some ethnographies of non-literate traditions.

ANTHRO 24N. Maya Hieroglyphic Writing. 4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Decipherment of classic Maya writing. Principles of archaeological decipherment. Maya calendrical, astronomical, historical, mythological, and political texts on stone, wood, bone, shell, murals, ceramics, and books (screenfold codices). Archaeology and ethnohistory of Maya scribal practice and literacy. Related Mesoamerican writing systems. The evolution of writing and the relevance of writing to theories of culture and civilization.

ANTHRO 25N. Contemporary Japanese Popular Culture. 3 Units.

This is a seminar focusing on the intersection between politics and popular culture in contemporary Japan. It will survey a range of social and political implications of practices of popular culture. Topics include representations of gender in J-pop, manga, and anime, the otaku culture and its pathologization. Students will be introduced to theories of popular culture in general, and a variety of contemporary anthropological studies on Japanese popular culture in particular as well.

ANTHRO 26N. God and the Supernatural. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the conditions under which people have experiences that they identify as "supernatural": experiences of something that is not physically present. We will explore the cultural and psychological dimensions of this very real phenomenon. We will not, however, make ontological judgments about whether something which is experienced as externally present is in fact externally present: in other words, this is a class about culture and psychology, not about metaphysics. We will do experimental work, using our selves and fellow classmates, as subjects, to understand who, when and how people have experiences that they deem "supernatural.".

ANTHRO 27N. Ethnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives. 3-5 Units.

Ethnicity is one of the most compelling and most modern ways in which people - in the midst of considerable global and local uncertainty - all across the world imagine and narrate themselves. This seminar will take an anthropological look at both the modernity and the compulsions of ethnic allegiance, and, why struggles over ethnic identity are so frequently violent. Our questions will be both historical ¿ how, why and when did people come to think of themselves as possessing different ethnic identities - and contemporary ¿ how are these identities lived, understood, narrated, and transformed and what is the consequence of such ethnicisation. We follow this through anthropological perspectives which ask persistently how people themselves locally narrate and act upon their experiences and histories. Through this we will approach some of the really big and yet everyday questions that many of us around the world face: how do we relate to ourselves and to those we define as others; and how do we live through and after profound violence? The seminar will take these larger questions through a global perspective focusing on cases from Rwanda and Burundi, India, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Guatemala, and the countries of Former Yugoslavia among others. These cases cover a broad canvas of issues from questions of historicity, racial purity, cultural holism, and relations to the state, to contests over religious community, indigeneity, minority identities, globalization, gender, and generation.

ANTHRO 28N. Secularism and its Critics. 3-5 Units.

Secularism is often taken to be a necessary prerequisite for democracy in the modern world. The separation of religion and politics is often written into constitutions as a fundamental priority. Yet around the world, growing numbers of religious movements have sought to dispute the legitimacy of secularism. Social scientists, including anthropologists, are beginning to research the forms of domination and political violence that have been justified in the name of secularism. This course seeks to make sense of this global debate about secularism. It does so by taking up an anthropological perspective: much as anthropologists might study culture, religion, or kinship, we will interrogate secularism as a comparative social artifact, constituted by historically specific repertoires of signs, identities, everyday practices, and institutional powers. The course focuses on case studies in the United States, Western Europe, the Middle East, and South Asia.

ANTHRO 30Q. The Big Shift. 4 Units.

Is the middle class shrinking? How do people who live at the extremes of American society- the super rich, the working poor and those who live on the margins, imagine and experience "the good life"? How do we understand phenomena such as gang cultures, addiction and the realignment of white consciousness? This class uses the methods and modes of ethnographic study in an examination of American culture. Ethnographic materials range from an examination of the new American wealth boom of the last 20 years (Richistan by Robert Frank) to the extreme and deadlynworld of the invisible underclass of homeless addicts on the streets of San Francisco (Righteous Dopefiend by Phillipe Bourgois and Jeff Schonberg). The experiences of Hispanic immigrants and the struggle to escape gang life in Los Angeles are highlighted in the story of Homeboy Industries a job creation program initiated by a priest working in LA's most deadly neighborhoods (G-Dog and the Homeboys by Celeste Fremon). Finally in Searching for Whitopia: an improbable journeyninto the heart of White America, Rich Benjamin explores the creation on ethnic enclaves (whitopias) as fear over immigration and the shrinking white majority redefine race consciousnessnin the 21st century. Each of these narratives provides a window into the various ways in which Americans approach the subjects of wealth and the good life, poverty and the underclass, and thenconstruction of class, race, and gender in American society. Students will not be required to have any previous knowledge, just curiosity and an open mind.

ANTHRO 31. Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health. 3-5 Units.

Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health Human ecology, environments, adaptation and plasticity, and their relationship to health and well-being considered in the broad comparative context. Topics include human population history, subsistence ecology, demography, reproductive decision making, urbanization, migration, infectious disease, the physiology of stress and the inflammatory response, social capital and social networks, nutrition, nutritional deficiencies, growth, and social inequalities. No prior course work in ecological or medical anthropology required.

ANTHRO 32. Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective. 5 Units.

This undergraduate course employs an anthropological and historical perspective to introduce students to ideas and concepts of race and ethnicity that emerged primarily in Europe and the United States in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and that continue to shape contemporary racial attitudes, interactions, and inequalities. Ideas about race and ethnicity forged outside the U.S. and case studies from other nations are presented to broaden students' understanding and to overcome the limitations of an exclusive focus on the U.S. This course is geared to sophomores and juniors who have already taken at least one course on race and ethnicity, anthropology, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Jewish Studies or Native American Studies.
Same as: CSRE 32

ANTHRO 34. Animals and Us. 5 Units.

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts.n This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognized as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Same as: ARCHLGY 34

ANTHRO 42. Megacities. 5 Units.

In this course we will examine the meaning, processes, and challenges of urbanization. Through a series of targeted readings across history and geography and through the study of varied means of representation (anthropology, literature, cartography, film, etc), the class will analyze the ways in which urban forms have come into being and created, met, and/or ignored challenges such as disease, water, transport, religious and class conflict, colonialism, labor, and trade. Students will read anthropology in conjunction with other disciplines (literature, urban planning, public health, architecture, and economics) to learn the ways in which ethnographies of immigration, urban poverty, class disparity, economic development and indicators, noise, and transportation substantively augment our understandings of how people live within globalization.

ANTHRO 49. Violence and Belonging in the Middle East. 5 Units.

This course examines politics in the Middle East from an anthropological perspective. We will explore the symbolic expression of political identities, the effects of religious revival on political institutions, and the tumultuous culture of protest in the region. Readings discuss the historical development of rights and citizenship, Islamic politics, sectarian tensions, and imaginings of revolution. Course materials are drawn from ethnographic studies and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.

ANTHRO 54A. Central Asia Through Films: A Weekly 3-Hour Seminar. 3-5 Units.

Through films this course explores major issues of contemporary peoples of Central Asia while learning fundamental concepts in cultural anthropology. In this seminar we will consider a wide range of examples, including first of all the new feature films, which will be used as a window into the modern reality and therefore could be served in a certain sense as anthropological fieldwork data. Films are prearranged by the instructor according to certain thematic subjects for in-class discussions.
Same as: REES 54A

ANTHRO 77. Japanese Society and Culture. 5 Units.

Focus is on power, identity, and the politics of knowledge production. How transnational interactions influence Japanese identity. How anthropological knowledge has contributed to understanding Japanese culture and society. Gender, race and class; contemporary ethnographies. Modernity and globalization. Cultural politics, domestic work, labor management, city planning, ad images, anime, martial art, fashion, theater, leisure, and tourism.
Same as: ANTHRO 277

ANTHRO 82. Medical Anthropology. 3-5 Units.

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Same as: ANTHRO 282, HUMBIO 176A

ANTHRO 90B. Theory of Cultural and Social Anthropology. 5 Units.

Preference to Anthropology majors. Anthropological interpretations of other societies contain assumptions about Western societies. How underlying assumptions and implicit categories have influenced the presentation of data in major anthropological monographs. Emphasis is on Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, and anthropological analyses of non-Western societies.

ANTHRO 90C. Theory of Ecological and Environmental Anthropology. 5 Units.

Dynamics of culturally inherited human behavior and its relationship to social and physical environments. Topics include a history of ecological approaches in anthropology, subsistence ecology, sharing, risk management, territoriality, warfare, and resource conservation and management. Case studies from Australia, Melanesia, Africa, and S. America.
Same as: HUMBIO 118

ANTHRO 90D. Social Theory in the Anthropological Sciences. 5 Units.

Required of majors. Foundational course in the history of social theory in anthropology from the late 19th century to the present. Major approaches to human culture and society: symbolic, social, material, and psychological. Questions about the role of theory in anthropology and how it can be applied to human issues. (HEF IV).

ANTHRO 91. Method and Evidence in Anthropology. 5 Units.

This course provides a broad introduction to various ways of designing anthropological questions and associated methods for collecting evidence and supporting arguments. We review the inherent links between how a question is framed, the types of evidence that can address the question, and way that data are collected. Research activities such as interviewing, participant observation, quantitative observation, archival investigation, ecological survey, linguistic methodology, tracking extended cases, and demographic methods are reviewed. Various faculty and specialists will be brought in to discuss how they use different types of evidence and methods for supporting arguments in anthropology.

ANTHRO 91A. Archaeological Methods. 5 Units.

Methodological issues related to the investigation of archaeological sites and objects. Aims and techniques of archaeologists including: location and excavation of sites; dating of places and objects; analysis of artifacts and technology and the study of ancient people, plants, and animals. How these methods are employed to answer the discipline's larger research questions.
Same as: ARCHLGY 102

ANTHRO 92A. Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Practicum. Students develop independent research projects and write research proposals. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and field site; and step-by-step proposal writing.

ANTHRO 92B. Undergraduate Research Proposal Writing Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Practicum. Students develop independent research projects and write research proposals. How to formulate a research question; how to integrate theory and field site; and step-by-step proposal writing.

ANTHRO 93. Prefield Research Seminar. 5 Units.

For Anthropology majors only; non-majors register for 93B. Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies of successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Prerequisites: two ANTHRO courses or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 93B. Prefield Research Seminar: Non-Majors. 5 Units.

Preparation for anthropological field research in other societies and the U.S. Data collection techniques include participant observation, interviewing, surveys, sampling procedures, life histories, ethnohistory, and the use of documentary materials. Strategies for successful entry into the community, research ethics, interpersonal dynamics, and the reflexive aspects of fieldwork. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

ANTHRO 94. Postfield Research Seminar. 5 Units.

Goal is to produce an ethnographic report based on original field research gathered during summer fieldwork, emphasizing writing and revising as steps in analysis and composition. Students critique classmates' work and revise their own writing in light of others' comments. Ethical issues in fieldwork and ethnographic writing, setting research write-up concerns within broader contexts.

ANTHRO 95. Research in Anthropology. 1-10 Unit.

Independent research conducted under faculty supervision, normally taken junior or senior year in pursuit of a senior paper or an honors project. May be repeated for credit.

ANTHRO 95B. Directed Study in Honors and Senior Papers. 1-10 Unit.

Taken in the final quarter before graduation. Independent study and work on senior paper for students admitted to the program. Prerequisite: consent of program adviser and instructor.

ANTHRO 96. Directed Individual Study. 1-10 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 97. Internship in Anthropology. 1-10 Unit.

Opportunity for students to pursue their specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

ANTHRO 98B. Digital Methods in Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Same as: ANTHRO 298B

ANTHRO 98E. Catalhoyuk and Neolithic Archaeology. 1-3 Unit.

Catalhoyuk as a case study to understand prehistoric social life during the Neolithic in Anatolia and the Near East. Developments in agriculture, animal domestication, material technology, trade, art, religion, skull cults, architecture, and burial practices. Literature specific to Catalhoyuk and other excavations throughout the Anatolian and Levantine regions to gain a perspective on diversity and variability throughout the Neolithic. The reflexive methodology used to excavate Catalhoyuk, and responsibilities of excavators to engage with larger global audiences of interested persons and stakeholders.

ANTHRO 98F. Field School Training Workshop. 1-3 Unit.

Provides students important preparatory orientation to anthropology as well as the methods, ethics, and logistics of the specific field school each student will be attending in the summer.

ANTHRO 100A. India's Forgotten Empire: The Rise and Fall of Indus Civilization. 3 Units.

How and why cities with public baths, long-distance trade, sophisticated technologies, and writing emerged, maintained themselves, and collapsed in the deserts of present-day Pakistan and India from 2500 to 1900 B.C.

ANTHRO 100B. Lifeways of the Ancient Maya. 5 Units.

This course engages with the world of the pre- and post-contact Maya people through scholarship that explores the material culture of daily life. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, and how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Maya world are formulated. We consider how perceptions of the ancient Maya are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of sites and materials in the Maya area, focusing on the dynamic interplay between the material and the social. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 200B

ANTHRO 100D. Chavin de Huantar Research |Seminar. 3-5 Units.

Archaeological analytical techniques appropriate for data recovered during archaeological fieldwork in Chavin de Huantar, Peru. Open to all interested students; fieldwork participants are expected to take the course. Students work on data from the previous field season to produce synthetic written reports, focusing on specific methodological issues.

ANTHRO 101. The Aztecs and Their Ancestors: Introduction to Mesoamerican Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

The prehispanic cultures of Mesoamerica through archaeology and ethnohistory, from the archaic period to the Spanish conquest in the 16th century.

ANTHRO 101A. Archaeology as a Profession. 5 Units.

Academic, contract, government, field, laboratory, museum, and heritage aspects of the profession.
Same as: ARCHLGY 107A

ANTHRO 101B. ARCHAEOLOGY OF TECHNOLOGY. 5 Units.

The course is an introduction to the social organization of material production and to the theoretical, ethnographic, and historical frameworks used by archaeologists to link the technologies of the past to salient sociocultural information about the people who employed them. Comparison of metallurgical, ceramic, lithic, and textile industries in different cultural and historical settings will inform critical discussions of how and to what extent analyses of artifacts, workshops, and industrial installations can provide insight into past societies.
Same as: ANTHRO 201B, ARCHLGY 100, ARCHLGY 200

ANTHRO 101S. Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology. 3-5 Units.

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Same as: ANTHRO 1S

ANTHRO 102. Urban Ethnography. 5 Units.

Ethnographic research and writing focuses on the ways our lives are shaped by interacting forces such as history, political economy, and creative cultural practices. In the last fifty years, more and more cultural anthropology has been carried out in urban contexts, due to both urbanization around the world and changes in anthropology as a field. This seminar focuses on careful reading and analysis of book-length ethnographies about urban cultures, people and dynamics to consider what the theory and methodological tools of anthropology have to offer us as we seek to better understand ¿the city.¿ Readings include a variety of approaches to ethnographic research in and/or about cities, with a mix from different eras and about different cities around the world.
Same as: URBANST 140

ANTHRO 102A. Ancient Civilizations: Complexity and Collapse. 3-5 Units.

How archaeology contributes to understanding prehistoric civilizations. How and why complex social institutions arose, and the conditions and processes behind their collapse. The development of monumental architecture, craft specialization, trade and exchange, and social stratification using examples from the archaeological record. (HEF II, III; DA-B).
Same as: ANTHRO 202A

ANTHRO 102B. Aztec Language and Culture. 3 Units.

Introduction to Nahuatl, the language of the Aztecs. Also known as Mexicano, Nahuatl was once used as a lingua franca throughout Mesoamerica, and is today spoken by about 1.5 million people. Emphasis on vocabulary. colonial documents, including Central Mexican codices, and archaeology. Attention also given to modern dialects, the place of Nahuatl in the Uto-Aztecan language phylum, and the relationship between Nahuatl and Aztec culture. Appropriate for students interested in linguistics, anthropology, archaeology, and history, and those desiring to better understand the native linguistic heritage of Mesoamerica and its impact on Spanish.

ANTHRO 102C. Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation. 3-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary blended seminar course (online content/on-campus seminar) explores challenges and avenues for furthering protection of the cultural heritage rights enumerated in the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP). Using an innovative combination of online lectures by Stanford faculty and recorded interviews with Indigenous leaders, artists, performers, scholars and museum professionals, the seminar will explore and problematize: historic and contemporary understandings of "Indigenous cultural heritage" and the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political/economic/social forces on Indigenous identity and cultural heritage; current and potential domestic and international legal and non-legal frameworks for Indigenous cultural heritage protection and repatriation; past and present museum approaches to Indigenous peoples and their cultural material; and optimal methods of resolving repatriation disputes. While the seminar will cover primarily the situation of Indigenous peoples in North America, comparisons will be drawn with other regions of the globe. The on-campus seminar will involve directed discussions of the online content, the online forum, assigned readings and students' weekly writing assignments.
Same as: ARCHLGY 101, ARCHLGY 202, CSRE 102, NATIVEAM 102

ANTHRO 103. The Archaeology of Modern Urbanism. 5 Units.

Seminar. Urbanism as a defining feature of modern life. The perspective of archaeology on the history and development of urban cultures. Case studies are from around the globe; emphasis is on the San Francisco Bay Area megalopolis. Cities as cultural sites where economic, ethnic, and sexual differences are produced and transformed; spatial, material, and consumption practices; and the archaeology of communities and neighborhoods.

ANTHRO 103A. Human Osteoarchaeology. 5 Units.

The course will cover the methodological and theoretical backgrounds to human osteoarchaeology, introduce the student to the chemical and physical characteristics of bone, and to the functional morphology of the human skeleton. Classes will consist of a taught component that outlines how osteoarchaeologists reconstruct individual life-histories based on age, sex etc.; this is combined with hands-on identification of different skeletal elements and the markers used to inform the analytical methods. Additional scientific methodologies are also introduced that increasingly form a major component of human osteoarchaeology.
Same as: ANTHRO 203A

ANTHRO 105. Ancient Cities in the New World. 3-5 Units.

Preindustrial urbanism as exemplified by prehispanic New World societies. Case studies: the central and southern highlands of Mesoamerica, and the Maya region. Comparative material from highland S. America.
Same as: ANTHRO 205

ANTHRO 105A. Archaeological Fieldwork: Critical Analysis and Practical Application. 2-3 Units.

This introduction to archaeological fieldwork involves both field and seminarncomponents, each component meeting once per week. During the field sessions,nwe will investigate an archaeological site on campus using methods of survey,nmapping, testing, and excavation (digging, recording units/features, profilenillustration). In seminar, we will critically examine archaeological fieldworknthrough reading, writing, and discussion, exploring topics such as history ofnarchaeological excavation, production of archaeological knowledge, disjuncturenbetween theory and practice, reflexive methodologies, ethics, collaboration, andnspecialization. No experience necessary, but students with fieldwork experiencenare welcome.
Same as: ANTHRO 205A

ANTHRO 105B. Heritage & Neoliberalism: Theorizations of the Past. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the emergence of heritage from within the broader field of modern historical thought. Readings explore how transformations in economic theory and changes in traditional philosophies of history have shaped how the historical event and historical figures are cast and recast within heritage. The distinctive modes by which archaeological sites and heritage sites are spatialized, linked and narrated are explored as these relate to corresponding turns in the modern concepts of freedom, inequality, personhood, sovereignty, community and culture.
Same as: ANTHRO 205B, ARCHLGY 105

ANTHRO 106. Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Same as: ANTHRO 206A, ARCHLGY 102B

ANTHRO 106A. Gang Colors: The Racialization of Violence and the American City. 5 Units.

Street gangs (e.g. Bloods, Crips, Mara Salvatrucha, M-18, etc.) serve as a window onto the experience of racial, ethnic and economic marginalization under late capitalism. This class explores the context that gives rise to gang violence through a combination of anthropological, sociological, and historical approaches. Students will be familiarized with the macro-social factors that shape both gangs and the politics of violence in the Americas, North and South.
Same as: CSRE 106A

ANTHRO 108E. Catalhoyuk and Neolithic Archaeology. 3 Units.

Catalhoyuk as a case study to understand prehistoric social life during the Neolithic in Anatolia and the Near East. Developments in agriculture, animal domestication, material technology, trade, art, religion, skull cults, architecture, and burial practices. Literature specific to Catalhoyuk and other excavations throughout the Anatolian and Levantine regions to gain a perspective on diversity and variability throughout the Neolithic. The reflexive methodology used to excavate Catalhoyuk, and responsibilities of excavators to engage with larger global audiences of interested persons and stakeholders.
Same as: ARCHLGY 108E

ANTHRO 109. Archaeology: World Cultural Heritage. 5 Units.

Focus is on issues dealing with rights to land and the past on a global scale including conflicts and ethnic purges in the Middle East, the Balkans, Afghanistan, India, Australia, and the Americas. How should world cultural heritage be managed? Who defines what past and which sites and monuments should be saved and protected? Are existing international agreements adequate? How can tourism be balanced against indigenous rights and the protection of the past?.
Same as: ANTHRO 209

ANTHRO 110A. Neandertals and Modern Humans: Origin, Evolution, Interactions. 3 Units.

The expansion out of Africa of our species represents the last spectacular step in the course of Human Evolution. It resulted in the colonization of the whole planet and the replacement of archaic forms of humans in Eurasia. One way to investigate why Homo sapiens has been such a successful species is to compare its evolution with that of its closest relative, the Neandertals. Exploring the bio-cultural processes at work in the two lineages leads to examine some of the main issues in Paleoanthropology and the most recent methodological advances in the field.
Same as: ANTHRO 210A

ANTHRO 110B. Examining Ethnographies. 5 Units.

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Same as: ANTHRO 210B

ANTHRO 111. Archaeology of Sex, Sexuality, and Gender. 5 Units.

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Same as: ANTHRO 211

ANTHRO 111A. Archaeology of the Andes of Argentina. 3-5 Units.

The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications and typologies; material archaeological contexts as cultural units; from artefacts to things; past ontologies. Nature and environment; domestication; ecological approaches; agropastoralism; nature/culture. nIt is expected that by the end of the course students will gain a panorama of the major problems of the archaeology of andean Argentina with historically and theoretically informed perspectives.
Same as: ANTHRO 211A

ANTHRO 111B. Muwekma: Landscape Archaeology and the Narratives of California Natives. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the unique history of San Francisco Bay Area tribes with particular attention to Muwekma Ohlone- the descendent community associated with the landscape surrounding and including Stanford University. The story of Muwekma provides a window into the history of California Indians from prehistory to Spanish exploration and colonization, the role of Missionaries and the controversial legacy of Junipero Serra, Indigenous rebellions throughout California, citizenship and land title during the 19th century, the historical role of anthropology and archaeology in shaping policy and recognition of Muwekma, and the fight for acknowledgement of Muwekma as a federally recognized tribe. We will visit local sites associated with this history and participate in field surveys of the landscape of Muwekma.
Same as: ARCHLGY 111B

ANTHRO 112. Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project. 4-5 Units.

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Same as: ANTHRO 212, ASNAMST 112

ANTHRO 112B. Advanced Study in Public Archaeology. 2-5 Units.

This service-learning course is offered only to students who have completed Anthro 112a and wish to deepen their scholarship in public archaeology and heritage practice through continued study. Students enrolled in ANTHRO 112B complete readings, collections management study, public archaeology events, and community-based research oriented towards their specific interests.nPrerequisite: Completion of Anthro 112a AND instructor consent.

ANTHRO 113. Faunal Analysis: Animal Remains for the Archaeologist. 5 Units.

The analysis of fossil animal bones and shells to illuminate the behavior and ecology of prehistoric collectors, especially ancient humans. Theoretical and methodoloigcal issues. The identification, counting, and measuring of fossil bones and shells. Labs. Methods of numerical analysis.
Same as: ANTHRO 213, BIO 166, BIO 266

ANTHRO 113B. Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures. 5 Units.

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Same as: ANTHRO 213B, ARCHLGY 113B

ANTHRO 114. Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis. 5 Units.

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Same as: ANTHRO 214

ANTHRO 114B. Landscape Archaeology and Global Information Systematics. 3-5 Units.

This course is meant to lay groundwork for analysis of archaeological landscapes using the methods of GIS. Throughout, we consider the various understandings of landscape, from the biographical to the biological. The course explores the history of various typologies of landscape, incorporating the cultural, the topographical, the ecological, and the topological; reviews different types of landscape data and analysis, including aerial imagery, stratigraphic excavations, and specialized analyses; addresses how to integrate different sorts of data sets and carry out analytical assessment of interrelated "layers" as dynamic constituents of landscape; considers implications of landscape studies in modern policy and management. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 214B

ANTHRO 115. The Social life of Human Bones. 3-5 Units.

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Same as: ANTHRO 215, ARCHLGY 115

ANTHRO 115A. The Aegean in the Neolithic and Bronze Age. 3-5 Units.

This course provides a survey of Aegean prehistory (7th-2nd millennium BC), focusing on traditions that were picked up or renegotiated, instead of taking a standpoint that evaluates phenomena as steps leading up to a `state-like¿ `palatial¿ society. It will draw on the region¿s wealth of data, and will be set within a theoretically informed, problem-oriented framework, aiming to introduce students to current interpretations and debates, mainly through discussion of specific case-studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 215A, ARCHLGY 139, ARCHLGY 239

ANTHRO 115B. Peoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica. 5 Units.

This course engages with the world of ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the Mixtec, Aztec, Maya, Zapotec, Chichimec, Olmec, and Teotihuacan peoples. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Mesoamerican world are formulated, and how these interpretations are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. We explore different scales of Mesoamerican communities, and compare the diverse material culture and lifeways represented in Mesoamerica at different time periods. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 215B

ANTHRO 116. Data Analysis for Quantitative Research. 5 Units.

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
Same as: ANTHRO 216

ANTHRO 117. Thinking Through Animals. 5 Units.

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts. This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognised as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. The module presents an overview covering a broad timespan from the Pleistocene to the modern day. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 217

ANTHRO 118. Heritage, Environment, and Sovereignty in Hawaii. 4 Units.

This course explores the cultural, political economic, and environmental status of contemporary Hawaiians. What sorts of sustainable economic and environmental systems did Hawaiians use in prehistory? How was colonization of the Hawaiian Islands informed and shaped by American economic interests and the nascent imperialsm of the early 20th centrury? How was sovereignty and Native Hawaiian identity been shaped by these forces? How has tourism and the leisure industry affected the natural environment? This course uses archaeological methods, ethnohistorical sources, and historical analysis in an exploration of contemporary Hawaiian social economic and political life.
Same as: EARTHSYS 118

ANTHRO 118A. Digital Heritage: Bringing the Past Online with the Chinese American Historical Museum. 5 Units.

Interpreting the past is no longer just for people like historians and archaeologists, and it¿s no longer confined to the pages of books. More and more, community-based organizations are gathering stories and perspectives from everyday people, and they¿re putting them out for the world to see online. With these big changes, what will be the future of thinking about the past? In this course, students will work through the dynamics of digital heritage through readings, discussion, and original research. The course centers around artifacts unearthed at the Market Street Chinatown in San Jose. Each student will analyze and gather stories relating to a single artifact in order to contribute to a multimedia exhibit for the Chinese American Historical Museum in San Jose. Class time will be devoted both to discussion and to work on artifact-based projects, and will also include a fieldtrip to the museum and collaboration time with members of the Chinese Historical and Cultural Project.
Same as: ASNAMST 118A, CSRE 118A

ANTHRO 119. Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains. 5 Units.

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Same as: ANTHRO 219, ARCHLGY 119

ANTHRO 119A. Spirits, Selves, and the Social: Histories of Thinking about Religion. 5 Units.

Why do humans worship gods, spirits, and ancestors? What roles do religion, witchcraft, and magic play in everyday life? How does religious action become meaningful in a particular context? In what sense can we know about the religious experiences of others? Focus is on approaches to religion throughout anthropology¿s history. Each student will carry out a mini-ethnography on a religious community of their choice. Students will not be required to have any previous knowledge in anthropology or the study of religion.
Same as: RELIGST 119X

ANTHRO 120B. Indian Popular Culture. 5 Units.

This course will explore key topics in contemporary India through an analysis of its popular culture. Bollywood and Kollywood films, Hindi soap operas and reality shows, vernacular music in Bihar, Tamil pulp fiction, matchboxes from Bangalore, clothing styles of Kerala college students, advertising in Mumbai, and cell phones used in Varanasi will all be brought together to help us shape an image of India as complex, contested, and changing. As an anthropology course, we will focus on the consumption of these media and discuss what they do in the world. Looking at both the source material itself and the way in which it is used, we will explore topics such as: nationalism, gender and sexuality, middle class aspiration, globalization, neoliberal consumerism, and the postcolonial condition.

ANTHRO 121. Language and Prehistory. 4-5 Units.

Language classification and its implications for human prehistory. The role of linguistic data in analyzing prehistoric populations, cultures, contact, and migrations. Comparison of linguistic and biological classifications. Reconstruction, proto-vocabularies, and culture. Archaeological decipherment and the origins and evolution of writing. Archaeological and genetic evidence for human migrations. (DA-A; HEF II,III).
Same as: ANTHRO 221

ANTHRO 121A. Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language. 3-4 Units.

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Same as: AFRICAAM 121X, AMSTUD 121X, CSRE 121X, EDUC 121X, LINGUIST 155

ANTHRO 122A. Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America. 3-5 Units.

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Same as: ANTHRO 222A

ANTHRO 123. Readings in Linguistic Anthropology. 2 Units.

One or two major related works on language in its cultural context. Works for 2007-08 involve attempts to correlate linguistic and non-linguistic data for analysis of prehistoric human contact and migrations. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ANTHRO 223

ANTHRO 124. Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh. 3-5 Units.

The mythology and folklore of the ancient Maya, emphasizing the relationship between the 16th-century Quiché Maya mythological epic Popol Vuh (Book of the Council) and classic lowland Maya art, architecture, religion, and politics. General Mesoamerican mythology. Anthropological and other theories of mythology. Class participates in the creation of a web project on the Popol Vuh.

ANTHRO 124N. Maya Mythology and the Popol Vuh. 3 Units.

Shortly after the Spanish conquest of Highland Guatemala, an anonymous Quiché Mayan noble translated a sacred text of his people, Popol Vuh (¿Council Book¿), and committed the Mayan to Spanish letters. His book, with its account of creations and destructions of the world by the gods, the descent of the Hero Twins into the Underworld and their ball games with its lords, and a history of the ruling clan of the Quiché state, is a grand apology for the values and world of the Quiché Maya, but it is no drab political treatise. It relates the daily life of the Quiché to their natural world (including the skies) and to the underworld journey that they expected in death, and is a compilation crafted to instruct and entertain at several levels of interpretation, from those of sophisticated scholars to children.n In the 1970¿s, we began to realize that many of the ceramic vessels unearthed from the tombs of the Classic Lowland Maya, originally intended to accompany their owners on their perilous journey through the underworld, actually illustrate scenes described in Popol Vuh. More recently, it has been possible to relate the mythology to texts newly deciphered from Mayan inscriptions as well as vases. The Popol Vuh has thus been shown to be a survival of a much older and more widespread culture. Like most survivals, though, it had been re-crafted in the image of the contemporary Quiché culture. When are mythological similarities sufficient to imply relatedness of the stories through common descent? How can mythical similarities imply universals of mind and culture? How have myths been used as state political instruments?n This is an exciting combination of archaeology, linguistics, cultural anthropology, art, and literature. Students will analyze the text critically, examine Mayan art, and help develop a web site. No prerequisites.

ANTHRO 125. Language and the Environment. 4-5 Units.

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Same as: ANTHRO 225

ANTHRO 125A. International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice. 3-5 Units.

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the global extrapolation of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon, Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).nn.

ANTHRO 125S. International Criminal Courts and the Question of Global Justice. 3 Units.

What are the cultural, legal and political implications of the globalization of our understanding of the rule of law, in general, and criminal law, in particular? This course will look at the theory and practice of the new international criminal courts, the criminalization and individualization (or humanization) of international law, and the broader system of cosmopolitan order that it presupposes, with special reference to how it differs from earlier projects for international order (international law, war crimes, human rights, and the UN system). Case studies will follow the historical development of the key institutions, individuals and legal precedents that have been determinative for the new international criminal jurisdiction, including Nuremberg and Tokyo, the ad hoc (Yugoslavia, Rwanda) and hybrid tribunals (Liberia, Sierra Leone, Lebanon Cambodia) and now the International Criminal Court (DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan, Libya and Kenya).

ANTHRO 126. Urban Culture in Global Perspective. 5 Units.

Core course for Urban Studies majors. We will study urban space both historically and cross-culturally. Urban Studies, by definition, is an interdisciplinary field, where the methodological approaches draw upon a diverse set of analytic tools. Disciplines that occupy a prominent place in this class are geography, cultural anthropology, sociology, history, media studies, and literature. In this context, we will discuss the importance of cities around the world to the economic, cultural, and political well-being of modern societies and examine how forces such as industrialization, decentralization, and globalization affect the structure and function of cities.
Same as: URBANST 114

ANTHRO 127. City and Sounds. 5 Units.

How do people experience modern cities and urban public cultures through auditory channels? How does sound mediate and constitute urban space? How to listen to and write about culture through sound. Students carry out narrative interviews and sound fieldwork in the Bay Area. Readings include urban anthropology, semiotics, art history, social studies of science and technology, media studies, and musicology.

ANTHRO 127A. Cities and the Future: Utopias, Dystopias, and Other Urbanisms to Come. 3 Units.

What sort of futures are being imagined for the cities of the twenty-first century? An interdisciplinary seminar, this course will critically analyze how the future of cities, and the cities of the future, are being thought about and acted upon in the present. It is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with experience in the social sciences and humanities and who also have a keen interest in urban studies. Its primary objective is to develop sophisticated ways of thinking about the future of cities, since doing so has real significance for the kind of city we want to, and eventually will, ourselves inhabit.

ANTHRO 128. Visual Studies. 5 Units.

Drawing on anthropology, art history, cultural studies, and other fields, this course explores how and why one might want to think critically about the politics of visuality, social imagination, the politics of making and consuming images and things, iconophonia and iconophilia, the classification of people and things into ¿artists¿ and ¿art¿, and cultural production more generally.

ANTHRO 130A. Interpreting Space and Place: An Introduction to Mapmaking. 5 Units.

How mapmaking, geographical information systems (GIS), and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Qualitative and quantitative approaches in the use of geospatial information. Methodologies and case examples.

ANTHRO 130B. Introduction to GIS in Anthropology. 5 Units.

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Same as: ANTHRO 230B

ANTHRO 130D. Spatial Approaches to Social Science. 5 Units.

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Same as: ANTHRO 230D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124

ANTHRO 131. Genes and Identity. 5 Units.

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Same as: AFRICAAM 131, CSRE 131

ANTHRO 132. Religion and Politics in the Muslim World. 5 Units.

This course provides an ethnographic examination of religion and politics in the Muslim world. What is the role of Islam in the political life of modern Muslim societies? Conversely, how do modern political powers shape and constrain the terms of religious life? This course takes an anthropological perspective on the study of Islam: our investigations will not focus on the origins of scriptures and doctrines but rather on the use of religious texts and signs in social context and on the political significance of ritual and bodily practices. A major aim of the course is provide students with analytical resources for thinking critically about the history and politics of modern Muslim societies, with a particular focus on issues of religious authority, gender and sexuality, and the politics of secularism.

ANTHRO 132B. Islam Law in Muslim and Non-Muslim Societies. 3-5 Units.

In this course, students will engage with scholarly material that demonstrates the multiple and varying ways in which Islam is invoked as a legal discourse in Muslim and Non- Muslim societies. In this course, we look at Islam not merely as being in the domain of legislation and adjudication, but as a cultural object; an important signifier in politics, for the state to enforce itself, as well as a technology for people¿s strategic use. The point of this course is therefore to consider how Islam operates in legal contexts as a 1) discourse of power and of strategy (at personal and political levels) and 2) as a discourse of identity that concerns issues of ethics, rights, gender, kinship, class and nation.

ANTHRO 133A. Anthropology of the Middle East. 3-5 Units.

This course examines social, political, and religious dimensions of various Middle Eastern societies. Key topics include the development of the modern nation-state, the Islamic revival, human rights, and discourses of democracy. Course materials include ethnographic studies, novels, and films, which provide a rich contextualization of social life and cultural politics in the region.
Same as: CSRE 133A

ANTHRO 134. Object Lessons. 5 Units.

Human-object relations in the processes of world making. Objectification and materiality through ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies, and cultural studies. Interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality, and the cultural constitution of objects. Sources include: works by Marx, Hegel, and Mauss; classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability, and fetishism; and material culture studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 234

ANTHRO 135. Cultural Studies. 5 Units.

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Same as: ANTHRO 235

ANTHRO 135A. The Anthropology of Security. 3-5 Units.

This seminar begins by outlining the main theoretical and empirical challenges in the areas of surveillance studies and security studies. The seminar provides a space wherein students will be able to discuss these inter-disciplinary areas and develop their own Anthropology-informed perspectives. The seminar then discusses the work of Anthropologists who through their ethnographic and theoretical work have helped developed and important and emergent area: ¿The Anthropology of Security¿. Areas covered include, inter alia, national security, security and war, biometrics, gated-ness, and environmental and bio-security threats.
Same as: ANTHRO 235A

ANTHRO 135H. Conversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community. 1-2 Unit.

Race, ethnicity, gender, and religion using the tools, analytical skills and concepts developed by anthropologists.
Same as: CSRE 135H

ANTHRO 135I. CSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford. 1-2 Unit.

Race, ethnicity, gender, and religion using the tools, analytical skills and concepts developed by anthropologists.
Same as: CSRE 135I

ANTHRO 136. The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains. 5 Units.

This upper-division undergraduate seminar focuses on recent studies by anthropologists and scholars in related disciplines on global supply chains and consumption practices.The goal of the course is to assess concepts and methods for integrating a cultural analysis of transnational production with a cultural analysis of transnational consumption. We will review ethnographic studies of the production and consumption of commodities linked by transnational and global networks. The class will thennpursue collaborative research on the global production, distribution, and consumption of a selected commodity. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and previous coursework in cultural anthropology or permission of instructor.
Same as: ANTHRO 236

ANTHRO 137. The Politics of Humanitarianism. 5 Units.

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issue generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes ¿ or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the ¿cause of humanity¿. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer.
Same as: ANTHRO 237

ANTHRO 137A. Traditional Medicine in the Modern World. 3 Units.

This class considers "traditional medicine" in contemporary times. We will survey major systems of traditional medicine while considering their broader social, cultural, and political contexts. The class will study the symbolic uses of traditional medicine, the role of traditional medicines in early modern medical knowledge, the place of indigenous knowledge in bioprospecting, health-seeking behavior and medical pluralism, and the WHO's approach to traditional medicine and how it has affected government health policies. The class emphasizes a critical approach to the concepts of tradition and modernity, and an understanding of traditional medicine as a changing, flexible, and globalized category of healing.

ANTHRO 138. Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise. 5 Units.

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Same as: ANTHRO 238, CSRE 138

ANTHRO 138A. Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore recent debates on the causes and structural terms of large-scale violence in Africa in the context of key contemporary models for reconciliation and transitional justice. Discussions will emphasize the broader international legal and political order each presupposes, and specifically whether their underlying reconstitution of rights and subjectivities are compatible with cultural, political or legal diversity. A historical assessment of the predominating Nuremberg paradigm of transitional justice¿structured around international military intervention and criminal trials based on international criminal courts¿will be contrasted with other regional models that engage with the challenges of the political reconciliation of formerly divided political communities. The necessity of understanding the specificities of both global and local historical and structural contexts will be examined with respect to various proposals for how to balance of balance concerns for both justice and peace. Readings will cover case studies from South Africa, Rwanda, DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan (including Darfur and South Sudan), Libya, Mali, and CAR.
Same as: AFRICAST 138, AFRICAST 238, ANTHRO 238A

ANTHRO 138B. Urban Africa. 5 Units.

This course explores the production of urban space and the social, cultural, and political significance of cities in sub-Saharan Africa. Topics include: architecture and the built environment; urban planning and colonial public health; migration and rural-urban dynamics; youth, politics, and popular culture; violence, policing, and the privatization of public space; (in)formality in housing, transportation, and employment; class, gender, and mobility in the public sphere; urban citizenship and `right to the city¿ movements; gentrification, tourism, and the commodification of poverty; and efforts to (re)theorize postcolonial African cities. Readings are drawn from anthropology, history, urban studies, and geography. Discussion will situate struggles over urban forms and the contours of everyday life within broader trends in the political economy of the region from the late colonial period to the present.

ANTHRO 139. Ethnography of Africa. 5 Units.

The politics of producing knowledge in and about Africa through the genre of ethnography, from the colonial era to the present. The politics of writing and the ethics of social imagination. Sources include novels juxtaposed to ethnographies.
Same as: ANTHRO 239

ANTHRO 139A. Forgotten Africa: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Africa. 5 Units.

This course provides an introductory survey of Africa¿s past from prehistoric times through the 19th-century. The course will challenge Western depictions of Africa as a dark continent `without history¿ by highlighting the continent¿s vibrant cultures, sophisticated technologies, complex political systems and participation in far-reaching commercial networks, all predating European colonization. In tandem, the course explores how these histories are mobilized in the production of negative ideas about Africa in contemporary discourse.
Same as: AFRICAST 139A, ARCHLGY 139A

ANTHRO 140. Ethnography of Africa. 3 Units.

This course is an exploration of some central themes and issues in contemporary African society through close readings of a selection of recent ethnographies. It aims to understand Africa as a place where many of the most challenging issues of a modern, globalized world are being thought about in exciting and creative ways, both by ethnographers and by the people about whom they write. Among the key issues that the course seeks to address are: the history and politics of colonial domination; the ways that medicine and government intersect; the increasing use of humanitarian frames of reference in understanding African realities; the changing meanings of HIV/AIDS, sex, and love; and the role of mass media in enabling cultural and imaginative production to take form.

ANTHRO 140A. Ethnographic Archaeologies. 4-5 Units.

How have ethnographic and archaeological methods been combined in anthropological research? What methodological and theoretical implications do these kinds of projects generate? Seminar topics will include ethnoarchaeology, ethnographies of archaeological practice, public archaeology and heritage ethics. Lecture and discussion.
Same as: ANTHRO 240A, ARCHLGY 137

ANTHRO 141A. Science, Technology, and Medicine in Africa. 4 Units.

Africa is often depicted as a place simply in need of science, technology, andnmedicine. This class will introduce students to the culture and politics of science innsub-Saharan Africa: to the diverse and rich traditions, histories and contemporarynpredicaments of knowledge practices on the continent. We will consider the rolenof science in the colonial period, covering the expansion of European empires intonAfrica and the forms of technical knowledge that colonial governments encountered, especially as they relate to health and the environment. We will examine the role of science at African independence and in international development work. Finally, we will discuss the techno-politics of medical training and research, resource extraction, and the internet in contemporary Africa. This course will provide some important background for those with an applied interest in Africa as well as provide an introduction to a growing area of scholarship. Course materials include historical and ethnographic works, as well as primary sources and films emphasizing scientific practice in the context of geopolitical relations of power and inequality.
Same as: AFRICAST 141A

ANTHRO 141B. The Anthropology of Bits and Bytes: Digital Media in the Developing World. 5 Units.

Recent historical developments, including the widespread adoption of the mobile phone across Africa and Southeast Asia, the ¿Arab Spring,¿ and the rise of technology sectors in cities such as Nairobi, Bangalore, and Accra, have turned digital technology in the ¿global South¿ into a topic of growing popular interest and increasing scholarly concern. This course attempts to make sense of these developments by interrogating diverse theoretical approaches to digital technology and assessing what these approaches reveal and obscure in specific cases of technology adoption in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. Students will be introduced to an overview of scholarly approaches to digital technology from anthropology, science and technology studies (STS), critical theory, geography, and communications studies. We will analyze the relative utility of these explanations through case studies of specific instances of technological production and/or use. These case studies will be drawn from both secondary texts and primary materials such as social media, digital maps, videos, blogs, and news reports. At the same time, we will examine how digital discourses and practices both draw upon and inform broader issues of context-specific political and cultural importance. Major topics to be discussed include ¿development¿ and the State, civil society and the ¿public sphere,¿ youth culture, gender politics, mobility, and globalization. Students will come away from the course with a strong understanding of the major issues at stake in the increasing digitalization of the ¿global South,¿ and the socio-cultural, political, and technical debates that frame them.

ANTHRO 143. Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom. 4-5 Units.

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
Same as: ANTHRO 243

ANTHRO 143B. Anthropology and International Development. 3-5 Units.

International development as a set of projects, policies, and controversies has been a major force in shaping the world over the past seventy years. Throughout, the discipline of anthropology has been involved¿both as participant and as critical observer. After a brief overview of development theory and history, this course will discuss (1) the ways in which anthropology has contributed to development projects and ideas and (2) how the discipline has critiqued development practice over the past three decades. What has anthropology offered to those who work towards social and economic development¿and how has development shaped the discipline itself? Readings will include detailed ethnographic and historical case studies from across the developing world.

ANTHRO 144A. Practice of Everyday Life in Kazakhstan: From Nomadism to Modernity. 3-5 Units.

An interdisciplinary introduction to the historically nomadic land of Kazakhstan, its peoples and their lifestyles ¿ the practice of everyday life. Ranked as the ninth largest country in the world, Kazakhstan is also the world's largest landlocked country; its territory is greater than Western Europe: it stretches from the fringes of Europe to the borders of Mongolia and China. The seminar surveys language and society, traditional economics and customary law, rituals and folk customs, local dwelling, craft and art, the cultural panorama, the historical relationship between sedentary and nomadic peoples as well as new approaches to the study of nomads in modernity. Speaking of the present time, we will follow the changing nomads in a changing world. The instructor is going to base, to the extent possible, on the extremely rich fieldwork data recently discovered in Kazakhstan -- the data is yet little known in the West. The seminar will make extensive use of audio-visual materials and films.
Same as: REES 244A

ANTHRO 145. Race and Power. 5 Units.

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.
Same as: ANTHRO 245, CSRE 145F

ANTHRO 145B. Reinventing the Other: Greeks, Romans, Barbarians. 3-5 Units.

Ancient ethnography was a highly conventionalized tradition stretching from "the father of History," Herodotus, to the last historian of the ancient world, Procopius. We will read selections of these two authors' works as well as of Sallust, Tacitus, and lesser known ones. Within various theoretical frameworks'rhetorical, anthropological, structuralist we will reconstruct the shifting images of The Other, explore what they tell us about their producers, and reflect on what ancient ethnography contributed to its modern descendant.

ANTHRO 146. Global Mobilities. 5 Units.

In this STS senior capstone seminar, students will study the local and global impacts of the technologies that have increased personal mobility. STS majors must have Senior status to enroll in this Senior Capstone course.
Same as: STS 200B

ANTHRO 146A. Anthropology of Youth. 5 Units.

This course will be a survey of classical texts and contemporary research on youth and generations. We will explore the historical and cultural construction of `youth¿ and youth practices across regions over time. We will pay special attention to the organization of contemporary capitalism, its effect in producing marginality and exclusion, and issues underlying youth political movements.

ANTHRO 146G. Paperwork. 5 Units.

"Paperwork" is an intensive reading course in a seminar format, concerning the production, circulation and mediation of "paperwork" both as a material and symbolic infrastructure for the operation of modern institutions and governance. We will explore diverse techniques and technologies of paperwork, including note-taking, memos, lists, files, and documents, and forms of paperwork such as medical record, petition, passport, ID card, immigration paper, as well as archives and other mnemonic technologies both as cultural practices and reflexive objects. The goal of the course is to understand "bureaucracy" in the fields of law, business, and public administration, as well as in civil society generally, from the vantage point of concrete inscription, circulation, and storage of papers and documents. Readings will include works by Bruno Latour, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Cornelia Vismann, Friedrich Kittler, and others.
Same as: STS 200G

ANTHRO 147. Nature, Culture, Heritage. 5 Units.

Seminar. Shared histories of natural and cultural heritage and their subsequent trajectories into the present. How thought about archaeological sites and natural landscapes have undergone transformations due to factors including indigenous rights, green politics, and international tourism. The development of key ideas including conservation, wilderness, sustainability, indigenous knowledge, non-renewability and diversity. Case studies draw on cultural and natural sites from Africa, the Americas and Australia.
Same as: ANTHRO 247

ANTHRO 147A. Folklore, Mythology, and Islam in Central Asia. 3-5 Units.

Central Asian cults, myths, and beliefs from ancient time to modernity. Life crisis rites, magic ceremonies, songs, tales, narratives, taboos associated with childbirth, marriage, folk medicine, and calendrical transitions. The nature and the place of the shaman in the region. Sources include music from the fieldwork of the instructor and the Kyrgyz epoch Manas. The cultural universe of Central Asian peoples as a symbol of their modern outlook.
Same as: REES 247A

ANTHRO 148. Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China. 4-5 Units.

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Same as: ANTHRO 248

ANTHRO 149. South Asia: History, People, Politics. 5 Units.

The South Asian subcontinent (comprising of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka) is one of the most diverse and densely populated regions in the world and increasingly prominent in new global political and cultural economies. South Asia has also provided the inspiration for cutting edge theories about the colonial state, postcolonial studies, democracy, popular culture, and religious conflict. The course will provide an overview of major historical events and social trends in contemporary South Asia and focus on themes such as gender, religion, caste, migration and movement, new technologies, the urban and rural, the state, and new forms of consumption among others.Thus, the course will give students historically and theoretically informed perspectives on contemporary South Asia, as well as how to apply insights learned to larger debates within the political and social sciences.
Same as: ANTHRO 249

ANTHRO 149A. Cities and Citizens in the Middle East. 4 Units.

This course will explore historical formation of cities and citizens in the Eastern Mediterranean since the 19th century.We will explore urban development, economy, social classes and local politics with a focus Egypt and Turkey and in particular two world-historical cities, Cairo and Istanbul. Drawing on history, cultural anthropology, geography and sociology disciplines, we will examine how urban space in Egypt and Turkey have reconfigured through histories of colonialism, nationalism, developmentalism and globalization. Rural to urban immigration, informality, gendered places, consumption, urban regeneration, local politics and branding the city will be the themes of our discussion. We will study these themes in relation to two main questions: How do spatial changes engender new social practices and redefine cultural difference?; How do power struggles at the intersection of local and global interests shape urban change? It will be of interest for urban studies majors and other students at all levels who would like to study urban struggles and change in Turkey, Egypt, the Middle East and the Global South.
Same as: URBANST 144

ANTHRO 150A. Minaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to women's culture and art in Muslim countries of Central Asia. Women, bearers of family rites and folklore, are the key figures in transmission of traditional culture and guardians of folk Islam. Women helped to keep the continuity of Islamic education in Central Asia during the harsh times of Communist dominance. The whole wealth of women's oral tradition will be demonstrated and examined to the extent possible. The course will make broad use of audio-visual materials.
Same as: FEMGEN 150A, REES 250A

ANTHRO 151. Women, Fertility, and Work. 5 Units.

How do choices relating to bearing, nursing, and raising children influence women's participation in the labor force? Cultural, demographic, and evolutionary explanations, using crosscultural case studies. Emphasis is on understanding fertility and work in light of the options available to women at particular times and places.
Same as: ANTHRO 251, HUMBIO 148W

ANTHRO 151A. Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film. 3-5 Units.

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.
Same as: ANTHRO 251A

ANTHRO 152. Ritual, Politics, Power. 5 Units.

Our everyday lives are made up of multiple routines, some consciously staged and imagined and others unconscious and insidious. Anthropologists call these rituals. Rituals shape every aspect of our lives, creating our symbolic universes and governing the most minute of our practices. nnFor early anthropologists and for those interested in religious and symbolic life, rituals and rites were seen as both one of the most universal features of human existence, and, as that which enables us to reflect upon our human existence. A prominent example are that of the ¿rites de passage¿ found in every culture, from puberty initiation rites, weddings or funerals, which socially signal the change from one status to another. While initially for anthropologists, rituals marked the difference between the sacred and the profane, soon scholars began to see the ubiquity of ritual and the symbolic in shaping even the most mundane activity such as the structure of a meal and why one is not meant to eat dessert before the main course. The first half of the class examines these different debates surrounding the meaning and effects of rituals and rites. The second half of the class takes these debates to think about the question of power and politics. We return to the question of how our symbolic universes are staged and imagined by us through ritual forms such as the annual Presidential ¿pardoning the turkey¿ at Thanksgiving. The question of power however pushes us even further to ask why it is that we obey particular kinds of authority, consent to particular actions, and find ourselves doing things we haven¿t consciously decided to do. Many have argued that these kinds of political questions about how we respond and are shaped by power have something to do with our symbolic worlds and ritual, from the most obvious (the monarchy) to the most subtle (listening in a classroom). Throughout the course, these abstract questions will be grounded in cross-cultural examples and analysis.
Same as: SOC 156

ANTHRO 152A. Urban Poverty and Inequality in Contemporary China. 5 Units.

Experiences of poverty and inequality and their relationship to gender, space development, post-socialism, and globalization. How processes of class-making in China's cities are bound up with transformations in the country's sociopolitcal landscape.

ANTHRO 153A. Population and social trends in Japan. 3-5 Units.

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.
Same as: ANTHRO 253A

ANTHRO 154. Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity. 5 Units.

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Same as: ANTHRO 254B, CSRE 154

ANTHRO 155. Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology. 5 Units.

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Same as: ANTHRO 255

ANTHRO 160. Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case. 3-5 Units.

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Same as: ANTHRO 260

ANTHRO 160A. Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources. 5 Units.

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.
Same as: ANTHRO 260A

ANTHRO 161. Human Behavioral Ecology. 3-5 Units.

Theory, method, and application in anthropology. How theory in behavioral ecology developed to understand animal behavior is applied to questions about human economic decision making in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Topics include decisions about foraging and subsistence, competition and cooperation, mating, and reproduction and parenting.
Same as: ANTHRO 261, HUMBIO 117H

ANTHRO 161A. Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change. 5 Units.

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
Same as: ANTHRO 261A

ANTHRO 162. Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems. 3-5 Units.

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Same as: ANTHRO 262

ANTHRO 163. Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology. 5 Units.

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
Same as: ANTHRO 263

ANTHRO 164. Natural Resource Extraction: Use and Development: Assessing Policies, Practices and Outcomes. 3-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary course explores natural resource extraction from multiple conceptual perspectives. Logging and non-timber resource harvesting practices are examined through ecological dynamics of species and community life histories, natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes and resilience and recovery to diverse perturbations through alternative stable states. Using a political ecology lens, we then examine historical and current policies and practices aimed to manage terrestrial resource use and extraction: maximum sustained yield, community-based forest management, certification systems, payment for ecosystem services and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD). Through problem sets and lab/field exercises, we employ quantitative ecological measurements and experiments coupled with quantitative and qualitative methods and analyses used to assess socio-economic drivers and ecological impacts. Diverse benefits/costs imparted throughout the supply chain - from extraction to consumer ¿ are explored across temporal and spatial scales with local to global agents. No Prerequisites: course or foundation in Ecology, Community Ecology, and/or Ecosystem Ecology strongly suggested.
Same as: ANTHRO 264

ANTHRO 164A. Anthropology of Ecotourism. 5 Units.

Ecotourism has been touted as a win-win scenario for both biodiversity conservation and the well-being of local residents. In practice, these lofty ideals of ecotourism have proven difficult to implement. The rapid development of ecotourism over the last two decades. Focus is on the scholarly literature relating to ecotourism from both supporting and critical perspectives.

ANTHRO 164B. Anthropology of Tourism. 5 Units.

As ¿the largest scale movement of goods, services, and people that humanity has ever seen,¿ tourism is an immense phenomenon and is currently the world¿s most immense industry, reaching some of the most remote people and places on the planet. Yet scholars have only begun to focus on the topic in recent decades. This seminar-style course will focus on the key anthropological and social science literature relating to tourism from both supporting and critical perspectives; however, tourism is an inherently multi-disciplinary subject and students from all disciplines are encouraged to enroll. After providing an initial overview of this phenomenon and field of study, later sections of the course will focus on emerging sub-types of tourism including sustainable tourism, ecotourism, agritourism, and geotourism to name just a few.

ANTHRO 165. Parks and Peoples: The Benefits and Costs of Protected Area Conservation. 5 Units.

Seminar. Emphasis is on the social impact of parks and reserves. Integrated conservation and development projects (ICDPs) based on protected areas; alternative ways to derive local social benefits from them. Cases include Yellowstone, Manu, Galápagos, Ngorongoro, and Guanacaste.

ANTHRO 165A. People and Parks: Management of Protected Areas. 5 Units.

As resources become scarcer, parks increasingly serve as ideological battlegrounds for contested core human values and often put livelihoods at stake. Their historical development and the complex array of present-day issues associated with the formal protection of biodiversity. The ideas behind parks and the evolution of these ideas.

ANTHRO 166. Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?.
Same as: ANTHRO 266

ANTHRO 167A. A Wilderness Empire: The Political Ecology of California. 5 Units.

This course traverses the historical and geographic space of California to explore the intersection of nature, economy and politics in the making of the contemporary American West. The course links popular historical accounts of the state to related core theoretical literature from anthropology, preparing students to use the analytic tools of anthropology to pursue questions about the people, processes and landscapes that are part of our taken for granted lived experience in California. The class draws theoretically from cultural anthropology, ecological anthropology, cultural and economic geography, and literature to develop a holistic understanding of the historical and social co-production of nature and economy in California and the American West.

ANTHRO 168. Everest: Extreme Anthropology. 3-5 Units.

Using Mt. Everest as a touch point, this class will examine the anthropology of nature, specifically focusing on exploration and adventure travel.

ANTHRO 168A. Risky Environments: The Nature of Disaster. 5 Units.

This seminar explores topics including environmental movements and countercultures, human agency and geoengineering ecotourism, and indigenous perspectives of changing climates to query how humans view `nature¿ in terms of stability, instability, risk and disaster in the 21st century. Case studies draw upon a broad range of geographical regions including the Arctic, Iceland, Australia, and the Americas. Discussions will draw upon film portrayals and interviews with researchers in addition to readings.
Same as: ANTHRO 268A

ANTHRO 169. The Ecology of Cuisine: Food, Nutrition, and the Evolution of the Human Diet. 3-5 Units.

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human food consumption and nutrition, incorporating biological, evolutionary, ecological and social perspectives. Topics include a broad survey of primate diets and their physiological and behavioral correlates; fossil and archaeological evidence for early human diets; adaptations to dietary shifts since the Neolithic; infant and early child feeding practices and their role in shaping human social arrangements, metabolic syndrome, food security, food taboos; the origins of spices; cultural diversity in the social uses and meanings of food and the sharing of food; gathering, hunting and locavorism as high hipster cuisine. Emphasis is on understanding the diversity of human foodways through time and space: how biology, culture, and ecology interact to shape the food we eat, and how the food we eat shapes us.
Same as: ANTHRO 269

ANTHRO 169A. New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.. 5 Units.

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Same as: CHILATST 168, CSRE 168, FEMGEN 140H

ANTHRO 170. Australian Ecosystems: Human Dimensions and Environmental Dynamics. 3 Units.

This cross-disciplinary course surveys the history and prehistory of human ecological dynamics in Australia, drawing on geology, climatology, archaeology, geography, ecology and anthropology to understand the mutual dynamic relationships between the continent and its inhabitants. Topics include anthropogenic fire and fire ecology, animal extinctions, aridity and climate variability, colonization and spread of Homo sapiens, invasive species interactions, changes in human subsistence and mobility throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene as read through the archaeological record, the totemic geography and social organization of Aboriginal people at the time of European contact, the ecological and geographical aspects of the "Dreamtime", and contemporary issues of policy relative to Aboriginal land tenure and management.
Same as: ANTHRO 270, EARTHSYS 172

ANTHRO 171. The Biology and Evolution of Language. 4-5 Units.

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Same as: ANTHRO 271, HUMBIO 145L

ANTHRO 172. Seminar on Cultural Evolution and Coevolution. 3-5 Units.

Upper division/graduate seminar on recent approaches to the study of cultural evolution and coevolution. Critical evaluation of Darwinian and non-Darwinian theories, with special attention to the interplay of culture, genes, environment and society. Students will undertake projects of their own design to review, test, or improve current theoretical formulations. Prerequisite: a university-level course in evolution, ecology, or human behavioral biology.
Same as: ANTHRO 272

ANTHRO 173. Human Dimensions of Global Environmental Change: Resilence, Vulnerability, and Environmental Justice. 3 Units.

The complexity of social and political issues surrounding global environmental change. Emphasis is on synergies precipitated by human-induced climatic change. Case studies and scenarios to explore the vulnerability and resilience in households, communities, regions, and nationmstates most affected by extreme weather conditions. Their concerns, livelihood changes, and diverse responses of rural smallholders, indigenous communities, the state, and local and regional migrants. Central theme is environmental justice.
Same as: HUMBIO 111

ANTHRO 174. Beginnings of Social Complexity. 5 Units.

Models and examples of the social evolution of stratification and political centralization in prehistoric human societies. Inferences from the archaeological record concerning the forces and mechanisms behind the rise and fall of complex societies, particularly in S. America. (HEF II; DA-B).
Same as: ANTHRO 274

ANTHRO 175. Human Skeletal Anatomy. 5 Units.

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Same as: ANTHRO 275, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180

ANTHRO 176. Cultures, Minds, and Medicine. 1 Unit.

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. We will meet every other week on Wednesday evening 5:30-7, starting on January 11, for dinner and conversation.May be repeat for credit. Class will meet on the following dates: Oct 8, 23, Nov 6. Dec 4. during the autumn quarter.
Same as: ANTHRO 276

ANTHRO 177. Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases. 3-5 Units.

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Same as: ANTHRO 277, HUMBIO 114

ANTHRO 178. Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos. 5 Units.

The contribution of research in the Galapagos Islands to our current understanding of evolution and conservation. Writings from Darwin to Dawkins, as they reveal patterns and processes of evolution including selection, adaptation, speciation, and coevolution. Current conservation strategies in the archipelago, and urgent measures needed today before unique species and adaptations are lost.
Same as: ANTHRO 278

ANTHRO 178A. Culture, Narrative, and Medicine. 5 Units.

This course examines the ways in which medicine is practiced in diverse cultural contexts with narrative skills of recognizing, interpreting and being moved by the stories of illness. It is an examination of the human experience of illness and healing through narratives as presented in literature, film, and storytelling. We explore how cultural resources enable and empower healing and how narrative medicine can guide the practice of culturally competent medical care.
Same as: HUMBIO 177C

ANTHRO 179. Cultures of Disease: Cancer and HIV/AIDS. 5 Units.

History, politics, science, and anthropology of cancer; political and economic issues of disease and health care in the U.S., including the ethics and economics of health care provision, the pharmaceutical industry, carcinogen production, and research priorities.

ANTHRO 179A. Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia. 5 Units.

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Same as: ANTHRO 279A

ANTHRO 180. Science, Technology, and Gender. 3-5 Units.

Why is engineering often seen as a masculine profession? What have women's experiences been in entering fields of science and technology? How has gender been defined by scientists? Issues: the struggles of women in science to negotiate misogyny and cultural expectation (marriage, children), reproductive issues (surrogate motherhood, visual representations of the fetus, fetal surgery, breast feeding, childbirth practices), how the household became a site of consumerism and technology, and the cultural issues at stake as women join the ranks of scientists.

ANTHRO 181A. Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt. 4 Units.

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Same as: FEMGEN 181A

ANTHRO 182. An Anthropology of Annihilation: Tobacco at the Turn of the Millennium. 3-5 Units.

The cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction: 100 million dead worldwide from cigarettes during the 20th century, one billion expected to die in the 21st century. How to understand this toll, its production, management, politicization, and depoliticization? What can anthropological and allied perspectives disclose? How does the catastrophe challenge key precepts within anthropology and other branches of the academy?.

ANTHRO 182A. Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies. 5 Units.

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Same as: ANTHRO 282A

ANTHRO 182N. Smoke and Mirrors in Global Health. 3 Units.

A few years ago, health experts began calling out tobacco as engendering a global health crisis, categorizing the cigarette as the world's greatest weapon of mass destruction. A "global health crisis"? What merits that title if not tobacco use? A hundred million people were killed by tobacco in the 20th century, and ten times that number ¿ a billion people ¿ are predicted to die prematurely from exposure to cigarette smoke over the next hundred years. How has tobacconcome to be labeled a global health crisis over the last decade and what has been the political response? From whence does activism and ongoing complacency regarding tobacco arise? How are they created in different cultural contexts?nnThis course aims to provide students conceptual tools to tackle two specific thought projects: (1) to understand how institutional actors compete to define a situation in the world today as a problem of global health, and (2) to understand the sociocultural means by which something highly dangerous to health such as the cigarette is made both politically contentious and inert. On both fronts, special attention will be given to the ways global health activism and complacency unfold in the U.S. and China.

ANTHRO 183B. Human Mobility and Adaptability. 5 Units.

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.
Same as: ANTHRO 283B

ANTHRO 184. Spirituality and Healing. 3-5 Units.

The puzzle of symbolic healing. How have societies without the resources of modern medicine approached healing? Why do these rituals have common features around the world? Shamanism, spirit possession, prayer, and the role of placebos in modern biomedicine. Students do ethnographic work and practical explorations along with more traditional scholarly approaches to learning.
Same as: HUMBIO 179S

ANTHRO 185. Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa. 5 Units.

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Same as: ANTHRO 285

ANTHRO 185A. Race and Biomedicine. 3-5 Units.

Race, identity, culture, biology, and political power in biomedicine. Biological theories of racial ordering, sexuality and the medicalization of group difference. Sources include ethnography, film, and biomedical literature. Topics include colonial history and medicine, the politics of racial categorization in biomedical research, the protection of human subjects and research ethics, immigration health and citizenship, race-based models in health disparities research and policy, and recent developments in human genetic variation research.
Same as: ASNAMST 185A

ANTHRO 186. Culture and Madness. 5 Units.

'Madness' lends insight into the construction of the normal and abnormal; the boundaries of reason and unreason; the epistemological relation of mind and body, and the management of difference and disease. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, this course explores the fundamental questions madness poses to subjectivity, culture and modernity.

ANTHRO 186N. The Most Rational People in the World. 4 Units.

Humans, broadly construed, emerged as bipedal apes in the African mixed savanna-woodlands approximately two million years ago. From humble beginnings, humans have gone on to be become the ecologically dominant species in most biomes and grown to a global population in excess of seven billion. This dominance arises from a combination of features of the human organism including its extreme degree of behavioral flexibility and flexible social organization. The prima facie evidence of human evolutionary and ecological success raises a paradox with respect to recent work in economics and psychology which increasingly argues for pervasive irrationality in human decision-making in a wide array of behavioral contexts. How is it possible for an organism with such seemingly flawed software supporting decision-making to become the globally dominant species? We will use this contradiction as the launching point for understanding what rationality means in a broad ecological and cross-cultural context. What do we mean by `rationality¿? How do different disciplines conceive of rationality in different ways? Is there such a thing as a rationality that transcends cultural differences or is the very idea of rationality a cultural construction that is used to justify imperialism and other modes of paternalism? Are there systematic factors that promote or impede rational decision-making? The seminar will provide a gentle introduction to the formal approaches of decision theory which we will apply to an unusual array of topics centered on the subsistence and reproductive decisions of hunter-gatherers, horticulturalists, pastoralists, and agrarian peasants, in short, people living in face-to-face, subsistence societies. In addition to doing reading from a broad array of social and natural science disciplines around the topic of rationality, students will regularly engage in exercises to assess their own approaches to decision-making.

ANTHRO 187. Nuclear Cultures. 5 Units.

This course examines the new cultural forms that arose out of the use of nuclear technology. Subjects covered will include: The Manhattan Project, nuclear activism, nuclear experimentation in medicine, pre-nuclear history, nuclear energy, and nuclear waste and trade.

ANTHRO 187A. The Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality. 5 Units.

As recently as the 40s, the S, Africa government labeled indigenous San people part of the animal landscape. Using the San example as a starting point, course examines socially, culturally, and politically constructed ideas about race, animality, and nature in the cultural and geographic settings of N. America, Australia, and Africa. How connections between race and nature have served as terrains of power through which people and governments have claimed territories and justified violence. Classic texts by nature writers and philosophers and current social science works that focus on race and ethnicity. Concepts such as gender, sex, and nature; environmental tourism; natural resource development; and indigeneity and animality. How ideas about race and nature have come together around concepts such as the myth of wilderness and the violence of considering certain people to be less-than-human. Issues of environmental politics and activism.
Same as: CSRE 187A

ANTHRO 193. Anthropology Capstone: Contemporary Debates in Anthropology. 5 Units.

Do you know what an anthropological perspective is? Can you describe some of the key assumptions and questions within the discipline? nA major in Anthropology is composed of many specialized courses in different tracks, different emphases and seemingly a never-ending multiplication of perspectives and ethnographies. However, Anthropology is also an ongoing intellectual conversation with foundational questions, some of longstanding and some new. These foundational questions have stimulated different responses and answers and thus have also led to constant renewal of the discipline in the midst of profound disagreement. In this Anthropology Capstone course students across tracks and emphases will address some of the critical debates that have been central to the discipline as it has developed. We will feature three debate questions in the class. Preparation for each debate will be through class discussion of critical readings as well as extra-mural reading and preparation with one¿s debating partners.

ANTHRO 199. Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Same as: ANTHRO 299

ANTHRO 200B. Lifeways of the Ancient Maya. 5 Units.

This course engages with the world of the pre- and post-contact Maya people through scholarship that explores the material culture of daily life. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, and how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Maya world are formulated. We consider how perceptions of the ancient Maya are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. The course is designed to provide a broad overview of sites and materials in the Maya area, focusing on the dynamic interplay between the material and the social. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 100B

ANTHRO 200C. STS Senior Capstone. 5 Units.

Genetics, Ethics and Society. This course will explore three socially transforming components of genetics research that hold simultaneously liberating and constraining possibilities for populations and publics, both locally and globally. Topically the course will be divided into three sections. First, we will examine past and present issues dealing with the study of human subjects, as well as recent proposals to eventually bring full genome scans to every individual (personal genomics). Next we will learn of large-scale projects that aim to map the presence of environmental pathogens by their genetic signatures on a planetary scale and how different global populations may be affected. The last section of the course will focus on still other projects and policies that aim to expand the scope and capacity of state and international law enforcement through DNA-based forensics (the FBI CODIS database and the UK¿s Human Provenance Pilot Project). Projects like the latter also overlap with theories about community, families, and citizens who may or may not be linked through DNA. New concepts, such as the forensic "genetic informant" within a family unit, human DNA and isotope ¿country matches¿ in cases of state asylum, and DNA based kinship rules for family reunification in many Western countries, will be explored. In all three sections we will also examine scientific ethics when subject populations are minorities, or somehow structurally disadvantaged globally.n This capstone course will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas that promise to reorganize critical aspects of human life. Students will be encouraged to explore these dynamics within such important societal domains as health, law, markets of bio-surveillance, and the growing industry of disease and heritage DNA identity testing among others. We will read works from social scientists of science practice, ethicists, medial humanists and scientists. This course will equip students with tools to write about the intersection of science and society and to engage in a research project that relates to the topical foci of the course, broadly conceived.
Same as: STS 200C

ANTHRO 201. Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology. 5 Units.

Crosscultural anthropological perspectives on human behavior, including cultural transmission, social organization, sex and gender, culture change, technology, war, ritual, and related topics. Case studies illustrating the principles of the cultural process. Films.
Same as: ANTHRO 1

ANTHRO 201B. ARCHAEOLOGY OF TECHNOLOGY. 5 Units.

The course is an introduction to the social organization of material production and to the theoretical, ethnographic, and historical frameworks used by archaeologists to link the technologies of the past to salient sociocultural information about the people who employed them. Comparison of metallurgical, ceramic, lithic, and textile industries in different cultural and historical settings will inform critical discussions of how and to what extent analyses of artifacts, workshops, and industrial installations can provide insight into past societies.
Same as: ANTHRO 101B, ARCHLGY 100, ARCHLGY 200

ANTHRO 202A. Ancient Civilizations: Complexity and Collapse. 3-5 Units.

How archaeology contributes to understanding prehistoric civilizations. How and why complex social institutions arose, and the conditions and processes behind their collapse. The development of monumental architecture, craft specialization, trade and exchange, and social stratification using examples from the archaeological record. (HEF II, III; DA-B).
Same as: ANTHRO 102A

ANTHRO 203A. Human Osteoarchaeology. 5 Units.

The course will cover the methodological and theoretical backgrounds to human osteoarchaeology, introduce the student to the chemical and physical characteristics of bone, and to the functional morphology of the human skeleton. Classes will consist of a taught component that outlines how osteoarchaeologists reconstruct individual life-histories based on age, sex etc.; this is combined with hands-on identification of different skeletal elements and the markers used to inform the analytical methods. Additional scientific methodologies are also introduced that increasingly form a major component of human osteoarchaeology.
Same as: ANTHRO 103A

ANTHRO 204. Language and Culture. 4-5 Units.

Comparative approach, using examples from many languages. Emphasis is on generally non-Western speech communities. Topics include: the structure of language; the theory of signs; vocabulary and culture; grammar, cognition, and culture (linguistic relativism and determinism); encodability of cultural information in language; language adaptiveness to social function; the ethnography of speaking; registers; discourse (conversation, narrative, verbal art); language and power; language survival and extinction; and linguistic ideology (beliefs about language).
Same as: ANTHRO 4

ANTHRO 205. Ancient Cities in the New World. 3-5 Units.

Preindustrial urbanism as exemplified by prehispanic New World societies. Case studies: the central and southern highlands of Mesoamerica, and the Maya region. Comparative material from highland S. America.
Same as: ANTHRO 105

ANTHRO 205A. Archaeological Fieldwork: Critical Analysis and Practical Application. 2-3 Units.

This introduction to archaeological fieldwork involves both field and seminarncomponents, each component meeting once per week. During the field sessions,nwe will investigate an archaeological site on campus using methods of survey,nmapping, testing, and excavation (digging, recording units/features, profilenillustration). In seminar, we will critically examine archaeological fieldworknthrough reading, writing, and discussion, exploring topics such as history ofnarchaeological excavation, production of archaeological knowledge, disjuncturenbetween theory and practice, reflexive methodologies, ethics, collaboration, andnspecialization. No experience necessary, but students with fieldwork experiencenare welcome.
Same as: ANTHRO 105A

ANTHRO 205B. Heritage & Neoliberalism: Theorizations of the Past. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the emergence of heritage from within the broader field of modern historical thought. Readings explore how transformations in economic theory and changes in traditional philosophies of history have shaped how the historical event and historical figures are cast and recast within heritage. The distinctive modes by which archaeological sites and heritage sites are spatialized, linked and narrated are explored as these relate to corresponding turns in the modern concepts of freedom, inequality, personhood, sovereignty, community and culture.
Same as: ANTHRO 105B, ARCHLGY 105

ANTHRO 206. Human Origins. 5 Units.

The human fossil record from the first non-human primates in the late Cretaceous or early Paleocene, 80-65 million years ago, to the anatomically modern people in the late Pleistocene, between 100,000 to 50,000 B.C.E. Emphasis is on broad evolutionary trends and the natural selective forces behind them.
Same as: ANTHRO 6, HUMBIO 6

ANTHRO 206A. Incas and their Ancestors: Peruvian Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

The development of high civilizations in Andean S. America from hunter-gatherer origins to the powerful, expansive Inca empire. The contrasting ecologies of coast, sierra, and jungle areas of early Peruvian societies from 12,000 to 2,000 B.C.E. The domestication of indigenous plants which provided the economic foundation for monumental cities, ceramics, and textiles. Cultural evolution, and why and how major transformations occurred.
Same as: ANTHRO 106, ARCHLGY 102B

ANTHRO 209. Archaeology: World Cultural Heritage. 5 Units.

Focus is on issues dealing with rights to land and the past on a global scale including conflicts and ethnic purges in the Middle East, the Balkans, Afghanistan, India, Australia, and the Americas. How should world cultural heritage be managed? Who defines what past and which sites and monuments should be saved and protected? Are existing international agreements adequate? How can tourism be balanced against indigenous rights and the protection of the past?.
Same as: ANTHRO 109

ANTHRO 210A. Neandertals and Modern Humans: Origin, Evolution, Interactions. 3 Units.

The expansion out of Africa of our species represents the last spectacular step in the course of Human Evolution. It resulted in the colonization of the whole planet and the replacement of archaic forms of humans in Eurasia. One way to investigate why Homo sapiens has been such a successful species is to compare its evolution with that of its closest relative, the Neandertals. Exploring the bio-cultural processes at work in the two lineages leads to examine some of the main issues in Paleoanthropology and the most recent methodological advances in the field.
Same as: ANTHRO 110A

ANTHRO 210B. Examining Ethnographies. 5 Units.

Eight or nine important ethnographies, including their construction, their impact, and their faults and virtues.
Same as: ANTHRO 110B

ANTHRO 211. Archaeology of Sex, Sexuality, and Gender. 5 Units.

How archaeologists study sex, sexuality, and gender through the material remains left behind by past cultures and communities. Theoretical and methodological issues; case studies from prehistoric and historic archaeology.
Same as: ANTHRO 111

ANTHRO 211A. Archaeology of the Andes of Argentina. 3-5 Units.

The aim of this course is to provide a panorama of the archaeology of the andean region of Argentina, along some main topics of past and current researches. North andean Argentina has been considered for a long time as subordinated to the major developments in the central Andes and Puna, as if it were in a marginal position that mirrored their history. More than a hundred years of research in the area have produced different insights, which put that affirmation in relative terms. nThe course will give an overview of major historical contributions and contemporary trends in the archaeological thinking in relation to themes such as time, the space, people, things and nature. An overview of the conceptions and construction of time. Space seen as cultural area; natural environment and built landscape; archaeological areas as national territory. Historical conceptions of people; bodies; social inequality; the past and present others in the archaeological research. Artefacts, classifications and typologies; material archaeological contexts as cultural units; from artefacts to things; past ontologies. Nature and environment; domestication; ecological approaches; agropastoralism; nature/culture. nIt is expected that by the end of the course students will gain a panorama of the major problems of the archaeology of andean Argentina with historically and theoretically informed perspectives.
Same as: ANTHRO 111A

ANTHRO 212. Public Archaeology: Market Street Chinatown Archaeology Project. 4-5 Units.

This internship-style course centers on the practice and theory of historical archaeology research and interpretation through a focused study of San Jose's historic Chinese communities. The course includes classroom lectures, seminar discussion, laboratory analysis of historic artifacts, and participation in public archaeology events. Course themes include immigration, urbanization, material culture, landscape, transnational identities, race and ethnicity, gender, cultural resource management, public history, and heritage politics. The course includes required lab sections, field trips, and public service. Transportation will be provided for off-site activities.
Same as: ANTHRO 112, ASNAMST 112

ANTHRO 213. Faunal Analysis: Animal Remains for the Archaeologist. 5 Units.

The analysis of fossil animal bones and shells to illuminate the behavior and ecology of prehistoric collectors, especially ancient humans. Theoretical and methodoloigcal issues. The identification, counting, and measuring of fossil bones and shells. Labs. Methods of numerical analysis.
Same as: ANTHRO 113, BIO 166, BIO 266

ANTHRO 213B. Religious Practices in Archaeological Cultures. 5 Units.

According to Hawkes (1954), religion or ideology is the most difficult part of social life to access archaeologically. Luckily, not all scholars agree; according to Fogelin (2008) 'religion is not something people think about, but something people do¿. Thus, archaeology, an inherently multidisciplinary subject that studies material culture, is well suited to delve into religion and its underpinnings.nThis course will explore religious practices, as they can be defined and interpreted from archaeological contexts spanning the Paleolithic to historic periods. Definitions of religion differ from author to author but they mostly agree that religion is a fully integrated and thus integral part of human social life. Politics, economics, identity and social class influence religion, and religion influences how these forces play out in society. Thus, the course will also examine the significance of ritual and religion in a variety of social contexts.
Same as: ANTHRO 113B, ARCHLGY 113B

ANTHRO 214. Prehistoric Stone Tools: Technology and Analysis. 5 Units.

Archaeologists rely on an understanding of stone tools to trace much of what we know about prehistoric societies. How to make, illustrate, and analyze stone tools, revealing the method and theory intrinsic to these artifacts.
Same as: ANTHRO 114

ANTHRO 214B. Landscape Archaeology and Global Information Systematics. 3-5 Units.

This course is meant to lay groundwork for analysis of archaeological landscapes using the methods of GIS. Throughout, we consider the various understandings of landscape, from the biographical to the biological. The course explores the history of various typologies of landscape, incorporating the cultural, the topographical, the ecological, and the topological; reviews different types of landscape data and analysis, including aerial imagery, stratigraphic excavations, and specialized analyses; addresses how to integrate different sorts of data sets and carry out analytical assessment of interrelated "layers" as dynamic constituents of landscape; considers implications of landscape studies in modern policy and management. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 114B

ANTHRO 215. The Social life of Human Bones. 3-5 Units.

Skeletal remains serve a primary function of support and protection for the human body. However, beyond this, they have played a range of social roles once an individual is deceased. The processes associated with excarnation, interment, exhumation and reburial all speak to the place that the body, and its parts, play in our cultural as well as physical landscape.n This course builds on introductory courses in human skeletal anatomy by adding the social dynamics that govern the way humans treat other humans once they have died. It draws on anthropological, biological and archaeological research, with case studies spanning a broad chronological and spatial framework to provide students with an overview of social practice as it relates to the human body.
Same as: ANTHRO 115, ARCHLGY 115

ANTHRO 215A. The Aegean in the Neolithic and Bronze Age. 3-5 Units.

This course provides a survey of Aegean prehistory (7th-2nd millennium BC), focusing on traditions that were picked up or renegotiated, instead of taking a standpoint that evaluates phenomena as steps leading up to a `state-like¿ `palatial¿ society. It will draw on the region¿s wealth of data, and will be set within a theoretically informed, problem-oriented framework, aiming to introduce students to current interpretations and debates, mainly through discussion of specific case-studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 115A, ARCHLGY 139, ARCHLGY 239

ANTHRO 215B. Peoples and Cultures of Ancient Mesoamerica. 5 Units.

This course engages with the world of ancient Mesoamerica, focusing on the Mixtec, Aztec, Maya, Zapotec, Chichimec, Olmec, and Teotihuacan peoples. We address how questions about the past are framed through ethnographic and ethnohistoric accounts of daily life, how diverse scientific methods and theoretical perspectives are used to address these questions, how interpretations of daily life in the ancient Mesoamerican world are formulated, and how these interpretations are marshaled in contemporary politics and policies. We explore different scales of Mesoamerican communities, and compare the diverse material culture and lifeways represented in Mesoamerica at different time periods. Students will create interpretive frameworks for a public audience as a component of the final project.
Same as: ANTHRO 115B

ANTHRO 216. Data Analysis for Quantitative Research. 5 Units.

This course allows graduate and advanced undergraduate students in archaeology and anthropology to acquire practical skills in quantitative data analysis. Some familiarity with basic statistical methods is useful but not assumed; the structure of the course will be flexible enough to accommodate a range of student expertise and interests. Topics covered include: statistics and graphics in R; database design, resampling methods, diversity measures, contingency table analysis, and introductory methods in spatial analysis.
Same as: ANTHRO 116

ANTHRO 217. Thinking Through Animals. 5 Units.

The human-animal relationship is dynamic, all encompassing and durable. Without exception, all socio-cultural groups have evidenced complex interactions with the animals around them, both domesticated and wild. However, the individual circumstances of these interactions are hugely complicated, and involve much more than direct human-animal contact, going far beyond this to incorporate social, ecological and spiritual contexts. This course delves into this complexity, covering the gamut of social roles played by animals, as well as the methods and approaches to studying these, both traditional and scientific. While the notion of `animals as social actors¿ is well acknowledged, their use as proxies for human autecology (the relationship between a species and its environment) is also increasingly recognised as a viable mechanism for understanding our cultural and economic past. The module presents an overview covering a broad timespan from the Pleistocene to the modern day. It will piece together the breadth of human-animal relationships using a wide geographic range of case studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 117

ANTHRO 219. Zooarchaeology: An Introduction to Faunal Remains. 5 Units.

As regularly noted, whether historic or pre-historic, animal bones are often the most commonly occurring artefacts on archaeological sites. As bioarchaeological samples, they offer the archaeologist an insight into food culture, provisioning, trade and the social aspects of human-animal interactions. The course will be taught through both practical and lecture sessions: the `hands-on¿ component is an essential complement to the lectures. The lectures will offer grounding in the main methodological approaches developed, as well as provide case-studies to illustrate where and how the methods have been applied. The practical session will walk students through the skeletal anatomy of a range of species. It will guide students on the identification of different parts of the animal, how to age / sex individuals, as well as recognize taphonomic indicators and what these mean to reconstructing post-depositional modifications.
Same as: ANTHRO 119, ARCHLGY 119

ANTHRO 221. Language and Prehistory. 4-5 Units.

Language classification and its implications for human prehistory. The role of linguistic data in analyzing prehistoric populations, cultures, contact, and migrations. Comparison of linguistic and biological classifications. Reconstruction, proto-vocabularies, and culture. Archaeological decipherment and the origins and evolution of writing. Archaeological and genetic evidence for human migrations. (DA-A; HEF II,III).
Same as: ANTHRO 121

ANTHRO 222A. Race and Culture in Mexico and Central America. 3-5 Units.

This course addresses the role of racial ideologies in the historical configuration of multiple hierarchies of inequality that determine the place of everyone in society in Mexico and Central America. Based on readings from the humanities and social sciences, we will discuss the cultural and racial politics of authoritarianism and indigenous insurgency, emphasizing narratives of laziness and vagrancy that have been central to the discipline of labor that shapes local processes of regressive modernization and nation building. We will analyze the hegemony of dictatorship as political necessity, the relationship between local racisms and global Whiteness, and the emergence of new local and transnational contestations to the multiple hierarchies that determine the place of everyone in society.
Same as: ANTHRO 122A

ANTHRO 223. Readings in Linguistic Anthropology. 2 Units.

One or two major related works on language in its cultural context. Works for 2007-08 involve attempts to correlate linguistic and non-linguistic data for analysis of prehistoric human contact and migrations. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ANTHRO 123

ANTHRO 225. Language and the Environment. 4-5 Units.

Lecture course on vocabulary and grammar as keys to peoples¿ understanding and use of the environment. Ethnobotany, ethnobiology, and ethnosemantics in the analysis of the language of place, plants and animals, the earth, the body, and disease. Terminological gaps and gluts and what they imply. Language as a strategic resource in environmental management. Language contact and conflict in the modern global environment, with particular attention to the vocabularies of capitalism and property. Language extinction and its environmental implications. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Same as: ANTHRO 125

ANTHRO 230B. Introduction to GIS in Anthropology. 5 Units.

How GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social research. Case studies and student projects address questions of social and cultural relevance using real data sets, including the collection of geospatial data and building of spatial evidence. Analytical approaches and how they can shape a social and cultural interpretation of space and place.
Same as: ANTHRO 130B

ANTHRO 230D. Spatial Approaches to Social Science. 5 Units.

This multidisciplinary course combines different approaches to how GIS and spatial tools can be applied in social science research. We take a collaborative, project oriented approach to bring together technical expertise and substantive applications from several social science disciplines. The course aims to integrate tools, methods, and current debates in social science research and will enable students to engage in critical spatial research and a multidisciplinary dialogue around geographic space.
Same as: ANTHRO 130D, POLISCI 241S, URBANST 124

ANTHRO 234. Object Lessons. 5 Units.

Human-object relations in the processes of world making. Objectification and materiality through ethnography, archaeology, material culture studies, and cultural studies. Interpretive connotations around and beyond the object, the unstable terrain of interrelationships between sociality and materiality, and the cultural constitution of objects. Sources include: works by Marx, Hegel, and Mauss; classic Pacific ethnographies of exchange, circulation, alienability, and fetishism; and material culture studies.
Same as: ANTHRO 134

ANTHRO 235. Cultural Studies. 5 Units.

Identity, community, and culture; their interactions and formation.
Same as: ANTHRO 135

ANTHRO 235A. The Anthropology of Security. 3-5 Units.

This seminar begins by outlining the main theoretical and empirical challenges in the areas of surveillance studies and security studies. The seminar provides a space wherein students will be able to discuss these inter-disciplinary areas and develop their own Anthropology-informed perspectives. The seminar then discusses the work of Anthropologists who through their ethnographic and theoretical work have helped developed and important and emergent area: ¿The Anthropology of Security¿. Areas covered include, inter alia, national security, security and war, biometrics, gated-ness, and environmental and bio-security threats.
Same as: ANTHRO 135A

ANTHRO 236. The Anthropology of Global Supply Chains. 5 Units.

This upper-division undergraduate seminar focuses on recent studies by anthropologists and scholars in related disciplines on global supply chains and consumption practices.The goal of the course is to assess concepts and methods for integrating a cultural analysis of transnational production with a cultural analysis of transnational consumption. We will review ethnographic studies of the production and consumption of commodities linked by transnational and global networks. The class will thennpursue collaborative research on the global production, distribution, and consumption of a selected commodity. Prerequisite: junior or senior standing and previous coursework in cultural anthropology or permission of instructor.
Same as: ANTHRO 136

ANTHRO 237. The Politics of Humanitarianism. 5 Units.

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issue generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical or political stakes ¿ or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the ¿cause of humanity¿. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer.
Same as: ANTHRO 137

ANTHRO 238. Medical Ethics in a Global World: Examining Race, Difference and Power in the Research Enterprise. 5 Units.

This course will explore historical as well as current market transformations of medical ethics in different global contexts. We will examine various aspects of the research enterprise, its knowledge-generating and life-saving goals, as well as the societal, cultural, and political influences that make medical research a site of brokering in need of oversight and emergent ethics.nThis seminar will provide students with tools to explore and critically assess the various technical, social, and ethical positions of researchers, as well as the role of the state, the media, and certain publics in shaping scientific research agendas. We will also examine how structural violence, poverty, global standing, and issues of citizenship also influence issues of consent and just science and medicine.
Same as: ANTHRO 138, CSRE 138

ANTHRO 238A. Conflict and Reconciliation in Africa: International Intervention. 3-5 Units.

This course will explore recent debates on the causes and structural terms of large-scale violence in Africa in the context of key contemporary models for reconciliation and transitional justice. Discussions will emphasize the broader international legal and political order each presupposes, and specifically whether their underlying reconstitution of rights and subjectivities are compatible with cultural, political or legal diversity. A historical assessment of the predominating Nuremberg paradigm of transitional justice¿structured around international military intervention and criminal trials based on international criminal courts¿will be contrasted with other regional models that engage with the challenges of the political reconciliation of formerly divided political communities. The necessity of understanding the specificities of both global and local historical and structural contexts will be examined with respect to various proposals for how to balance of balance concerns for both justice and peace. Readings will cover case studies from South Africa, Rwanda, DRC, northern Uganda, Sudan (including Darfur and South Sudan), Libya, Mali, and CAR.
Same as: AFRICAST 138, AFRICAST 238, ANTHRO 138A

ANTHRO 239. Ethnography of Africa. 5 Units.

The politics of producing knowledge in and about Africa through the genre of ethnography, from the colonial era to the present. The politics of writing and the ethics of social imagination. Sources include novels juxtaposed to ethnographies.
Same as: ANTHRO 139

ANTHRO 240A. Ethnographic Archaeologies. 4-5 Units.

How have ethnographic and archaeological methods been combined in anthropological research? What methodological and theoretical implications do these kinds of projects generate? Seminar topics will include ethnoarchaeology, ethnographies of archaeological practice, public archaeology and heritage ethics. Lecture and discussion.
Same as: ANTHRO 140A, ARCHLGY 137

ANTHRO 241. The State in Africa. 5 Units.

Postcolonial African states in historical and ethnographic context. Focus is on contemporary African states not as failures, but as the products of distinctive regional histories and political rationalities.

ANTHRO 243. Title Social Change in Contemporary China: Modernity and the Middle Kingdom. 4-5 Units.

Over the last twenty years, residents of the People¿s Republic of China have experienced dramatic changes in nearly every facet of life. This undergraduate seminar introduces students to contemporary China through an examination of various types of social transformation. We will analyze how PRC residents of different backgrounds are confronting such processes as economic liberalization, migration, kinship transformation, sexual commodification, media proliferation, industrialization, and transnationalism? Priority is placed on reading, discussing and assessing research that uses qualitative methods and that situates political economy in dialogue with lived experience.
Same as: ANTHRO 143

ANTHRO 245. Race and Power. 5 Units.

This course examines how race is made. We will pay close attention to how people engage with material, economic, scientific, and cultural forces to articulate human group difference as a given, and even natural. In this seminar, we will look at the construction of race as a literally made phenomenon, where historical, colonial, bodily, market, and humanitarian constituent elements both circulate and sediment racial understandings. To focus our readings and discussions we will divide this vast terrain into three units: race and the colonial encounter, race and biopower, and race and capital.
Same as: ANTHRO 145, CSRE 145F

ANTHRO 245A. Evolutionary Theory in Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

The ability of scientific evolutionary theory to explain human behavior as represented in the archaeological record. Past attempts to apply evolutionary theory in archaeology are compared to more recent Darwinian efforts, as are current evolutionary approaches to human behavior in related fields. The ontological underpinnings and methodological requirements of a Darwinian archaeology and its potential contribution to archaeology as an explanatory system. (HEF I).

ANTHRO 247. Nature, Culture, Heritage. 5 Units.

Seminar. Shared histories of natural and cultural heritage and their subsequent trajectories into the present. How thought about archaeological sites and natural landscapes have undergone transformations due to factors including indigenous rights, green politics, and international tourism. The development of key ideas including conservation, wilderness, sustainability, indigenous knowledge, non-renewability and diversity. Case studies draw on cultural and natural sites from Africa, the Americas and Australia.
Same as: ANTHRO 147

ANTHRO 248. Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China. 4-5 Units.

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Same as: ANTHRO 148

ANTHRO 249. South Asia: History, People, Politics. 5 Units.

The South Asian subcontinent (comprising of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka) is one of the most diverse and densely populated regions in the world and increasingly prominent in new global political and cultural economies. South Asia has also provided the inspiration for cutting edge theories about the colonial state, postcolonial studies, democracy, popular culture, and religious conflict. The course will provide an overview of major historical events and social trends in contemporary South Asia and focus on themes such as gender, religion, caste, migration and movement, new technologies, the urban and rural, the state, and new forms of consumption among others.Thus, the course will give students historically and theoretically informed perspectives on contemporary South Asia, as well as how to apply insights learned to larger debates within the political and social sciences.
Same as: ANTHRO 149

ANTHRO 251. Women, Fertility, and Work. 5 Units.

How do choices relating to bearing, nursing, and raising children influence women's participation in the labor force? Cultural, demographic, and evolutionary explanations, using crosscultural case studies. Emphasis is on understanding fertility and work in light of the options available to women at particular times and places.
Same as: ANTHRO 151, HUMBIO 148W

ANTHRO 251A. Contemporary Chinese Society Through Independent Documentary Film. 3-5 Units.

An overview of social issues in contemporary China as seen through its emerging independent documentary film movement. Topics covered include representations of history, political power and accountability in the reform era, human rights, urbanization, the environment, homelessness and inequality, sexualities, addiction, and the role of media in society. Each viewing is accompanied by readings in media theory or the anthropological/sociological study of contemporary China. Can be taken with or without research component. Films include English subtitles.
Same as: ANTHRO 151A

ANTHRO 253A. Population and social trends in Japan. 3-5 Units.

Anthropological theories and concepts as applied to Japan. Postwar demographic trends. Delayed marriage.  Declining nuclear family.  Re-structuring of education and workplace. Problems for the seniors.  Foreign laborers shaking fundamentals of Japan.
Same as: ANTHRO 153A

ANTHRO 254B. Anthropology of Drugs: Experience, Capitalism, Modernity. 5 Units.

This course examines the significant role ¿drugs¿ play in shaping expressions of the self and social life; in the management populations, and in the production of markets and inequality. It engages these themes through cultural representations of drugs and drug use, analyses of scientific discourse, and social theory. Topics include: the social construction of the licit and illicit; the shifting boundaries of deviance, disease and pleasure; and the relationship between local markets and global wars.
Same as: ANTHRO 154, CSRE 154

ANTHRO 255. Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology. 5 Units.

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.
Same as: ANTHRO 155

ANTHRO 260. Social and Environmental Sustainability: The Costa Rican Case. 3-5 Units.

Seminar focused on issues of tropical sustainability with a particular emphasis on the Osa Peninsula of Costa Rica. Offered in conjunction with the Osa Initiative in the Wood¿s Institute for the Environment, the course highlights issues of human development in the tropics, through such means as agricultural development, ecotourism, conservation efforts, private and indigenous reserves, and mining. The course will draw from diverse disciplines including anthropology, rural sociology, conservation biology, geosciences, history, political science, and journalism. In addition to weekly discussions, students will development a research paper throughout the term which will be presented to a panel of selected Wood¿s Faculty during the final week of the term.
Same as: ANTHRO 160

ANTHRO 260A. Tragedy of the Commons: Human Ecology of Communal Resources. 5 Units.

The ¿tragedy of the commons¿ is a classic social dilemma ¿ a situation in which individual interests conflict with collective ones ¿ and key to understanding past, present and future environmental degradation. This course surveys a variety of scientific perspectives on the essence of the tragedy: common property resources will ultimately be destroyed by overexploitation. Major themes include the effects of human population density and social organization on the health and management of commons, self-interest versus collective action, and potential solutions to commons problems. Modern and prehistoric case studies are examined from ecological and evolutionary perspectives.
Same as: ANTHRO 160A

ANTHRO 261. Human Behavioral Ecology. 3-5 Units.

Theory, method, and application in anthropology. How theory in behavioral ecology developed to understand animal behavior is applied to questions about human economic decision making in ecological and evolutionary contexts. Topics include decisions about foraging and subsistence, competition and cooperation, mating, and reproduction and parenting.
Same as: ANTHRO 161, HUMBIO 117H

ANTHRO 261A. Human Ecology: Adaptations to Climate and Climate Change. 5 Units.

Humans face essentially the same adaptive challenges as all organisms but are unique for having successfully adapted to virtually every environment on Earth. The resulting diversity of phenotypes and cultures¿past and present¿is key to understanding how interactions with environments shape the economic, social, and cultural lives of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists and agriculturalists. This course surveys the range of human adaptations from an ecological and evolutionary perspective to understand human adaptive capacity and vulnerability to climate change.
Same as: ANTHRO 161A

ANTHRO 262. Indigenous Peoples and Environmental Problems. 3-5 Units.

The social and cultural consequences of contemporary environmental problems. The impact of market economies, development efforts, and conservation projects on indigenous peoples, emphasizing Latin America. The role of indigenous grass roots organizations in combating environmental destruction and degradation of homeland areas.
Same as: ANTHRO 162

ANTHRO 263. Conservation and Evolutionary Ecology. 5 Units.

Environmental degradation resulting from human behavior, and what can be done about it. Patterns of interaction between people and environments, and why they vary over time and space. Topics include adaptation and behavior, resource acquisition and utilization, conflicts of interest, collective action problems, conspicuous consumption, waste, land management, and public policy.
Same as: ANTHRO 163

ANTHRO 264. Natural Resource Extraction: Use and Development: Assessing Policies, Practices and Outcomes. 3-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary course explores natural resource extraction from multiple conceptual perspectives. Logging and non-timber resource harvesting practices are examined through ecological dynamics of species and community life histories, natural and anthropogenic disturbance regimes and resilience and recovery to diverse perturbations through alternative stable states. Using a political ecology lens, we then examine historical and current policies and practices aimed to manage terrestrial resource use and extraction: maximum sustained yield, community-based forest management, certification systems, payment for ecosystem services and Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD). Through problem sets and lab/field exercises, we employ quantitative ecological measurements and experiments coupled with quantitative and qualitative methods and analyses used to assess socio-economic drivers and ecological impacts. Diverse benefits/costs imparted throughout the supply chain - from extraction to consumer ¿ are explored across temporal and spatial scales with local to global agents. No Prerequisites: course or foundation in Ecology, Community Ecology, and/or Ecosystem Ecology strongly suggested.
Same as: ANTHRO 164

ANTHRO 266. Political Ecology of Tropical Land Use: Conservation, Natural Resource Extraction, and Agribusiness. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. The state, private sector, development agencies, and NGOs in development and conservation of tropical land use. Focus is on the socioeconomic and political drivers of resource extraction and agricultural production. Case studies used to examine the local-to-global context from many disciplines. Are maps and analyses used for gain, visibility, accountability, or contested terrain? How are power dynamics, land use history, state-private sector collusion, and neoliberal policies valued? What are the local and extra-local responses?.
Same as: ANTHRO 166

ANTHRO 268A. Risky Environments: The Nature of Disaster. 5 Units.

This seminar explores topics including environmental movements and countercultures, human agency and geoengineering ecotourism, and indigenous perspectives of changing climates to query how humans view `nature¿ in terms of stability, instability, risk and disaster in the 21st century. Case studies draw upon a broad range of geographical regions including the Arctic, Iceland, Australia, and the Americas. Discussions will draw upon film portrayals and interviews with researchers in addition to readings.
Same as: ANTHRO 168A

ANTHRO 269. The Ecology of Cuisine: Food, Nutrition, and the Evolution of the Human Diet. 3-5 Units.

This course is an interdisciplinary approach to understanding human food consumption and nutrition, incorporating biological, evolutionary, ecological and social perspectives. Topics include a broad survey of primate diets and their physiological and behavioral correlates; fossil and archaeological evidence for early human diets; adaptations to dietary shifts since the Neolithic; infant and early child feeding practices and their role in shaping human social arrangements, metabolic syndrome, food security, food taboos; the origins of spices; cultural diversity in the social uses and meanings of food and the sharing of food; gathering, hunting and locavorism as high hipster cuisine. Emphasis is on understanding the diversity of human foodways through time and space: how biology, culture, and ecology interact to shape the food we eat, and how the food we eat shapes us.
Same as: ANTHRO 169

ANTHRO 270. Australian Ecosystems: Human Dimensions and Environmental Dynamics. 3 Units.

This cross-disciplinary course surveys the history and prehistory of human ecological dynamics in Australia, drawing on geology, climatology, archaeology, geography, ecology and anthropology to understand the mutual dynamic relationships between the continent and its inhabitants. Topics include anthropogenic fire and fire ecology, animal extinctions, aridity and climate variability, colonization and spread of Homo sapiens, invasive species interactions, changes in human subsistence and mobility throughout the Pleistocene and Holocene as read through the archaeological record, the totemic geography and social organization of Aboriginal people at the time of European contact, the ecological and geographical aspects of the "Dreamtime", and contemporary issues of policy relative to Aboriginal land tenure and management.
Same as: ANTHRO 170, EARTHSYS 172

ANTHRO 271. The Biology and Evolution of Language. 4-5 Units.

Lecture course surveying the biology, linguistic functions, and evolution of the organs of speech and speech centers in the brain, language in animals and humans, the evolution of language itself, and the roles of innateness vs. culture in language. Suitable both for general education and as preparation for further studies in anthropology, biology, linguistics, medicine, psychology, and speech & language therapy. Anthropology concentration: CS, EE. No prerequisites.
Same as: ANTHRO 171, HUMBIO 145L

ANTHRO 272. Seminar on Cultural Evolution and Coevolution. 3-5 Units.

Upper division/graduate seminar on recent approaches to the study of cultural evolution and coevolution. Critical evaluation of Darwinian and non-Darwinian theories, with special attention to the interplay of culture, genes, environment and society. Students will undertake projects of their own design to review, test, or improve current theoretical formulations. Prerequisite: a university-level course in evolution, ecology, or human behavioral biology.
Same as: ANTHRO 172

ANTHRO 274. Beginnings of Social Complexity. 5 Units.

Models and examples of the social evolution of stratification and political centralization in prehistoric human societies. Inferences from the archaeological record concerning the forces and mechanisms behind the rise and fall of complex societies, particularly in S. America. (HEF II; DA-B).
Same as: ANTHRO 174

ANTHRO 275. Human Skeletal Anatomy. 5 Units.

Study of the human skeleton (a. k. a. human osteology), as it bears on other disciplines, including medicine, forensics, archaeology, and paleoanthropology (human evolution). Basic bone biology, anatomy, and development, emphasizing hands-on examination and identification of human skeletal parts, their implications for determining an individual¿s age, sex, geographic origin, and health status, and for the evolutionary history of our species. Three hours of lecture and at least three hours of supervised and independent study in the lab each week.
Same as: ANTHRO 175, BIO 174, BIO 274, HUMBIO 180

ANTHRO 276. Cultures, Minds, and Medicine. 1 Unit.

This workshop aims to bring together scholars from the social sciences, humanities, medicine and bio-science and technology to explore the ways that health and illness are made through complex social forces. We aim for informal, interactive sessions, full of debate and good will. We will meet every other week on Wednesday evening 5:30-7, starting on January 11, for dinner and conversation.May be repeat for credit. Class will meet on the following dates: Oct 8, 23, Nov 6. Dec 4. during the autumn quarter.
Same as: ANTHRO 176

ANTHRO 277. Environmental Change and Emerging Infectious Diseases. 3-5 Units.

The changing epidemiological environment. How human-induced environmental changes, such as global warming, deforestation and land-use conversion, urbanization, international commerce, and human migration, are altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, and promoting their re-emergence as a global public health threat. Case studies of malaria, cholera, hantavirus, plague, and HIV.
Same as: ANTHRO 177, HUMBIO 114

ANTHRO 278. Evolution and Conservation in Galapagos. 5 Units.

The contribution of research in the Galapagos Islands to our current understanding of evolution and conservation. Writings from Darwin to Dawkins, as they reveal patterns and processes of evolution including selection, adaptation, speciation, and coevolution. Current conservation strategies in the archipelago, and urgent measures needed today before unique species and adaptations are lost.
Same as: ANTHRO 178

ANTHRO 279A. Health, Illness, and Healing in South Asia. 5 Units.

This course has three related goals pertinent to medicine and healing in South Asia. The first is to understand the experiences of illness, and therapy in ordinary South Asian communities. How do social and economic inequality, religious commitments, available healing traditions, and community and family contexts shape the experience of illness and healing? The second goal is to think about South Asian medical systems using a broad historical perspective. How had biomedicine been used during the colonial period to manage the health of native populations? What is the legacy of this colonial history on current practices? What happens when South Asian medical traditions (such as Ayurveda) become global? Third, we will explore crucial health problems in South Asia from the perspective of medical anthropology. Possible topics for the third portion of the course include: child birth and maternal health, sex-selection technologies, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, the selling of organs, medical tourism, tuberculosis, HIV, suicide, and schizophrenia.
Same as: ANTHRO 179A

ANTHRO 282. Medical Anthropology. 3-5 Units.

Emphasis is on how health, illness, and healing are understood, experienced, and constructed in social, cultural, and historical contexts. Topics: biopower and body politics, gender and reproductive technologies, illness experiences, medical diversity and social suffering, and the interface between medicine and science.
Same as: ANTHRO 82, HUMBIO 176A

ANTHRO 282A. Down and Out: Marginal Lives and Institutional Technologies. 5 Units.

This course examines the neglect and management of socially marginalized persons including the mentally ill, youth runaways, child wards of the state, drug addicts and prisoners. In this course, we will approach the concept of marginality by investigating the spaces and institutions of decay, neglect and rehabilitation to which unwanted and indigent individuals are relegated. Readings are focused on qualitative research conducted within institutions of health, welfare, and reform. There will be two comparative public mental health sections in this course: one focused on South Asia and the second on Africa. This course is relevant for students interested in medical anthropology, applied anthropology, public health policy, or clinical careers in medicine, psychology, or social work.
Same as: ANTHRO 182A

ANTHRO 283. Ecology, Evolution, and Human Health. 3-5 Units.

Human ecology, human environments, adaptation and plasticity, and their relationship to health and well-being. Comparative context. Topics include human population history, subsistence ecology, demography, reproductive decision making, migration, infectious disease, risk management, and social inequalities. Particular attention will be paid to small-scale subsistence populations. Small-scale societies demonstrate an enormous range of variation in both environmental challenges faced and adaptations thereto. The process of human adaptation cannot be understood in the absence of a grounding in this range of challenge and adaptation.

ANTHRO 283B. Human Mobility and Adaptability. 5 Units.

Mobility, whether in the form of seasonal or permanent migration, is an ancient practice necessary for many subsistence strategies, including hunting-and-gathering and pastoralism. Many new forms of mobility have emerged and now it is nearly impossible to consider a patch of human society that is not engaged in or directly impacted by habitual, patterned geographic mobility. Today, almost everywhere in the world, people can get farther, faster; urbanization, environmental degradation, and civil unrest are driving groups of people who do not have a cultural tradition of nomadic migration to adopt a mobile lifestyle¿sometimes permanently, sometimes temporarily¿in search of new economic or resource opportunities. In this seminar course, we will explore modern patterns of human mobility and migration as adaptive strategies for predictably and unpredictably changing environments. Using a framework of biological and cultural adaptation, we will discuss the major types of current human mobility (e.g. nomadism, immigration, migrant labor, displacement) and how they influence and are influenced by social systems, resource access, and health.
Same as: ANTHRO 183B

ANTHRO 285. Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa. 5 Units.

In this course we will examine the place of Africa in global health discourses while reading in-depth histories and ethnographies of the varied causes and consequences of some of the most difficult problems facing African countries today. We will study the effects of colonialism and conflict on health, explore the military and humanitarian connections in the fight against HIV/AIDS, weigh the risks and benefits of population genetic studies on African populations, examine biomedical interventions on, and erasures of, local health problems, and query the role of violence, memory, insecurity, and power in daily life on the continent.
Same as: ANTHRO 185

ANTHRO 293B. Master's Thesis Writing Seminar. 2-4 Units.

May be repeated for credit.

ANTHRO 298B. Digital Methods in Archaeology. 3-5 Units.

This is a course on digital technologies in archaeology used for documentation, visualization, and analysis of archaeological spaces and objects. Emphasizes hands-on approaches to image manipulation, virtual reality, GIS, CAD, and photogrammetry modeling methods.
Same as: ANTHRO 98B

ANTHRO 299. Senior and Master's Paper Writing Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

Techniques of interpreting data, organizing bibliographic materials, writing, editing and revising. Preparation of papers for conferences and publications in anthropology. Seniors register for 199; master's students register for 299.
Same as: ANTHRO 199

ANTHRO 300. Reading Theory Through Ethnography. 5 Units.

Required of and restricted to first-year ANTHRO Ph.D. students. Focus is on contemporary ethnography and related cultural and social theories generated by texts. Topics include agency, resistance, and identity formation, and discourse analysis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 301. History of Anthropological Theory, Culture and Society. 5 Units.

Required of Anthropology Ph.D. students. The history of cultural and social anthropology in relation to historical and national contexts and key theoretical and methodological issues as these inform contemporary theory and practices of the discipline. Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 301A. Foundations of Social Theory. 5 Units.

The purpose of this course is to introduce key themes in social theory - the social, the modern subject, reason, autonomy, civility, interests, exchange, morality, life, the senses - through a reading of classic texts from Descartes up to psychoanalysis and phenomenology. nnEach section has original texts, commentaries, and background readings that place these texts in their deeper historical setting. Many of these commentaries trace how practical theories of 'lower' or minor selves - the subject people of the colonies, slaves, and other - were integral to the very development of ideas of the modern, autonomous and reasonable self in the western world. Prerequisite, by instructor consent.

ANTHRO 302. History of Anthropological Theory, Ecology and Environment. 5 Units.

Evolutionary and ecological theory from the 19th century to present. Theory and concepts from evolution and ecology, emphasizing an-thropological applications. Evolutionary theories of human behavior, culture, and societies. Ecological theory behind carrying capacity, sustainable yield, and population growth. Emphasis is on tools of analysis and formulating research questions in anthropology today. Upper division undergrads require consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 303. Introduction to Archaeological Theory. 5 Units.

The history of archaeological thought emphasizing recent debates. Evolutionary theories, behavioral archaeology, processual and cognitive archaeology, and approaches termed feminist and post-processual archaeology in the context of wider debate in adjacent disciplines. The application and integration of theory on archaeological problems and issues. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 304. Data Analysis for Quantitative Research. 5 Units.

Univariate, multivariate, and graphical methods used for analyzing quantitative data in anthropological research. Archaeological and paleobiological examples. Recommended: algebra. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 305. Research Methods in Ecological Anthropology. 5 Units.

The course prepare students for the methodological and practical aspects of doing ecologically oriented, quantitative anthropological field research. The primary goal is to explore what it means to ask anthropological questions in a systematic way. We will focus on understanding what can constitute an interesting question, how to frame a question in way that facilitates investigation, and how to design methods to begin investigating a question. In turn, the course will provide a format to refine research projects in preparation for doing more extensive fieldwork.

ANTHRO 306. Anthropological Research Methods. 5 Units.

Required of ANTHRO Ph.D. students; open to all graduate students. Research methods and modes of evidence building in ethnographic research. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 307. Archaeological Methods. 5 Units.

Methodological aspects of field and laboratory practice from traditional archaeological methods to the latest interdisciplinary analytical techniques. The nature of archaeological data and inference; interpretive potential of these techniques. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 308. Proposal Writing Seminar in Cultural and Social Anthropology. 5 Units.

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the culture and society track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 308A. Proposal Writing Seminar in Archaeological Anthropology. 5 Units.

Required of second-year Ph.D. students in the archaeology track. The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 309. Advanced Evolutionary Theory in Anthropological Sciences. 5 Units.

History of evolutionary theory from the 19th century to present, emphasizing anthropological applications. Theory and concept in evolutionary biology; evolutionary theories of culture; and interactions of genetic, social, and cultural evolution and their implications. Emphasis is on tools of analysis and the value of evolutionary thinking for formulating research questions in anthropology today. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor. (HEF II, III).

ANTHRO 310C. Intersections. 5 Units.

Themes of materiality and visuality, aesthetic and other forms of cultural production, and the meanings of creativity and convention. Ethnographic and archaeological material and case studies from worldwide cultural contexts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 310G. Introduction to Graduate Studies. 2 Units.

Required graduate seminar. The history of anthropological theory and key theoretical and methodological issues of the discipline. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 311. Ethnographic Writing. 3-5 Units.

For graduate students writing or planning to write a dissertation using ethnographic methods. The choices made by the authors of ethnographies in constructing an argument, using data and speaking to an audience of readers. Readings include chapters written by class members currently writing dissertations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 311G. Introduction to Culture and Society Graduate Studies in Anthropology. 2 Units.

Required graduate seminar for CS track. The history of anthropological theory and key theoretical and methodological issues in cultural anthropology. Prerequistes: this course is open only to Ph.D. students in anthropology or by permission of the instructor.

ANTHRO 312. Writing Across Audiences: Styles and Methods. 5 Units.

This course examines the way anthropologists and others write to different audiences. What do you need to do communicate to a mainstream anthropology audience? How does that change when you write an editorial or place something in a popular venue? When you try to capture a non-anthropological medical audience? What methods might you consider adding to enable that cross-talk? We will examine a series of examples of people who have written across. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 313. Anthropology of Neoliberalism. 5 Units.

How is the recent worldwide restructuring under the name neoliberalism understood as a social, cultural, and economic phenomenon? Focus is on interrogation of analytic categories, and ethnographic explorations of social and political processes. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 316. Politics of the Mass Subject. 5 Units.

Harbinger of democracy or arbiter of tyrannous rule? Source of collective agency or threat to political order? Over the past century, notions of the masses, the multitudes, and the people have served as volatile focal points for political theory and for institutions of governance. Drawing on historical, ethnographic, and theoretical readings, this course explores how tensions haunting these concepts continue to animate, as much as beleaguer, contemporary discussions of democratic citizenship and political modernity.

ANTHRO 317. Colonial Archives and Archaeology: Models and Methods of Analysis. 5 Units.

This course details the methodological challenges associated with using primary historical documents, ethnographic methods and sources and archaeological data. How do archaeologists deal with multiple sources of data, primary texts (translated and original) and ethnographic materials? This course examines archaeological monographs as models for individual student projects leading to dissertation research and publishing beyond the dissertation. Students will be required to present materials, research questions and primary source materials to the class in order to expand our understanding of the challenges and insights provided by archival and archaeological studies.

ANTHRO 318. Democracy and Political Authority. 5 Units.

Democracy is commonly defined in formalist terms as a form of government (involving the consent of the governed) and a procedure of governance (involving the rule of law). In place of a formalist definition, this course examines democracy as a historical and discursive form. In what ways have the rights of citizenship for some been premised on the domination of others (workers, women, the colonized, etc.)? What forms of violence are not only tolerated as practical necessity in the contemporary order of democratic states but sanctioned as morally just? What mechanisms of political authority operate by defining the boundaries between the tolerable and the intolerable, between citizenly belonging and terrorism ¿ in short, between democracy and its others (e.g., an arbitrary despot, a feudal economy, a religious fundamentalism)? These questions require urgent interrogation in the present day: the past thirty years have witnessed a virtual explosion of new constitutions proclaiming democratic sovereignty across the world. What forms of global power and institutional domination are constitutive of the contemporary era of liberty, freedom, and equality? Readings are drawn from a variety of disciplines, including anthropology, political theory, and political philosophy. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 319. South Asia: History, People, Politics. 5 Units.

The South Asian subcontinent (comprising of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan and Sri Lanka) is one of the most diverse and densely populated regions in the world and increasingly prominent in new global political and cultural economies. South Asia has also provided the inspiration for cutting edge theories about the colonial state, postcolonial studies, democracy, popular culture, and religious conflict. The course will provide an overview of major historical events and social trends in contemporary South Asia and focus on themes such as gender, religion, caste, migration and movement, new technologies, the urban and rural, the state, and new forms of consumption among others.Thus, the course will give students historically and theoretically informed perspectives on contemporary South Asia, as well as how to apply insights learned to larger debates within the political and social sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 320A. Race, Ethnicity, and Language. 3-4 Units.

This seminar explores the linguistic construction of race and ethnicity across a wide variety of contexts and communities. Throughout the course, we will take a comparative perspective and highlight how different racial/ethnic formations participate in similar, yet different, ways of "doing race" though language, interaction and culture. Readings draw heavily from perspectives in (linguistic) anthropology and sociolinguistics. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: EDUC 389X, LINGUIST 253

ANTHRO 321. Reading Marx, Reading Weber. 5 Units.

This advanced graduate seminar is devoted to a critical reading of selected writings by two nineteenth century social theorists who continue to shape anthropology and social analysis more broadly. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural or social anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Maximum enrollment 12.

ANTHRO 321A. Anthropology and Literature: Problems of Representation, Power, and Textuality. 5 Units.

How are literary and social scientific forms of cultural description, evocation, and interpretation related? The seminar reads classic texts as well as recent experiments, addressing issues of genre, rhetoric, epistemology, translation, authority, and collaboration. The emphasis is on writing as a situated practice¿embodied, relational, and historically circumscribed. Authors may include Malinowski, Mead, Benedict, Lévi-Strauss, Geertz, Taussig, Leiris, Conrad, Achebe, Said, Barthes, Kroeber, Le Guin, and selected contemporary ethnographies. Examples from film, visual culture, and performance art may also be included.
Same as: COMPLIT 321B

ANTHRO 322. From Biopolitics to Necropolitics and Beyond. 5 Units.

Scholarship produced and informed by Michel Foucault. Focus is on the final period of Foucault¿s life; how his discussions of biopolitics, subjectification, governmentality, and death have served as touchstones for recent empirical research. Key interventions initially made under these rubrics; how anthropologists and others have applied, challenged, and extended them. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 324. Political Anthropology. 5 Units.

An anthropological approach to politics through bringing anthropological ways of thinking and modes of analysis to bear on key presuppositions of modern Western political thought. Ideas of rights, the individual, society, liberty, democracy, equality, and solidarity; ethnographic accounts used to identify the limits of conventional analytical approaches and to document the forms of politics that such approaches either ignore or misunderstand. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 326. Postcolonial and Indigenous Archaeologies. 5 Units.

The role of postcolonial and Indigenous archaeologies as emergeant disciplinary activities within contemporary society. Community based archaeologies; the roles of oral history, landscape, and memory; archaeology as political action; and history in archaeological projects. The emergence of Indigenous archaeology within N. America in relation to limitations imposed by processual or new archaeology; and NAGPRA, Kennewick, essentialism, and terminal narratives within this context. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 327. Language and Political Economy. 5 Units.

Theories of language: Saussure, Jakobson, Hymes, Marx, Foucault, Butler, and Derrida. The theorization of language in its linkages to power, social relations, and history. Prerequisites: Linguistics or Anthropology course work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 331. The Anthropology of Technology. 5 Units.

Iconic discipline-building works of the last three decades; readings that lay out and intervene in contemporary debates. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 332. Transformative Design. 3-5 Units.

Project-based. How interactive technologies can be designed to encourage behavioral transformation. Topics such as self-efficacy, social support, and mechanism of cultural change in domains such as weight-loss, energy conservation, or safe driving. Lab familiarizes students with hardware and software tools for interaction prototyping. Students teams create functional prototypes for self-selected problem domains. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Same as: ENGR 231

ANTHRO 332A. The Anthropology of Heritage: Concepts, Contexts and Critique. 3-5 Units.

This seminar will explore foundational concepts currently employed within heritage practice and debates. Readings will examine the historically formative context of colonial-era and nationalist discourses on stewardship and culture, as well as postcolonial reformulations of such concepts as cultural property, cultural recognition and public history. The seminar will engage the question of the relationship between foundational concepts and the current cosmopolitan and internationalist vision for heritage, probing the enduring dynamics of North-South divides in heritage development and archaeological practice.
Same as: ARCHLGY 132, ARCHLGY 232, ARCHLGY 332

ANTHRO 333. Anthropologies of Evidence. 5 Units.

Drawing on literature in Anthropology and Science and Technology Studies, this course will examine what kinds of artifacts and arguments count as evidence in intellectual and scientific debate.

ANTHRO 333A. The Cultural Politics of Ambiguity. 5 Units.

Contemporary conceptual approaches to understanding the politics and production of certainty, ambiguity, and doubt. The seemingly ambiguous nature of the science of industrial pollution and contamination exonerate corporate and government polluters from rising rates of cancer, while the science of liberal economic models seems to create no alternative to massive economic subsidies of the financial sector. How culpability, exoneration, transformative action, institutional stasis, and political rely on the production of certainty, ambiguity, and doubt. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 334. Trauma and Healing. 5 Units.

This course considers class and recent work on culture and psychiatry with an emphasis on trauma. We consider work on the main diagnostic categories like depression and schizophrenia, but also the work on dissociation, war combat, PTSD, and psychosis.

ANTHRO 335A. Animism and Alter-Native Modernities. 5 Units.

For many years indigenous knowledges were treated as a field of research for anthropologists and as "mistaken epistemologies," i. e., un-scientific and irrational folklore and childish worldviews. This old view of animism was a product of the evolutionist and anthropocentric worldview of the Enlightenment. However within the framework of ecological humanities, current interest in posthumanism, postsecularism and discussions on building altermodernity (Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri), indigenous thought is used to critique modern epistemology and develop an alternative to the Western worldview. Treating native thought as an equivalent to Western knowledge will be presented as (potentially) a decolonizing and liberating practice. The term alter-native modernities will be treated as response to the challenges of Euromodernity and suggests modernities that might emerge out of indigenous ways of being in the world. To examine this problem a comparison between literature on indigenous cultures from Latin America and from Russia will be offered (animism in Amazonia and Siberia). Following recent works by anthropologists and archaeologists such as Nurit Bird-Rose, Philippe Descola, Graham Harvey, Tim Ingold and Viveiros de Castro, new animism will be treated as an alternative (relational) ontology that allows rethinking the problem of matter and agency, goes beyond human exeptionalism and embraces non-humans.nn nnTopics of the seminar will include: alternative modernities and alter-native modernities; Jean Piaget's theory of childhood animism; problem of anthropomorphism and personification as discussed within evolutionary theory as well as in the humanities; indigenous knowledge and the problem of epistemic violence; vitalist materialism (Jane Bennett, Rosi Braidotti); connectedness as the principle of life (relational epistemologies and ontologies); non-human agency (Bruno Latour).

ANTHRO 336. Anthropology of Rights. 5 Units.

Ideas of rights at the center of contemporary politics around the world. An anthropological perspective on how rights are invoked, claimed, and translated into institutional policies in ethnographic cases. The limitations of liberal notions of rights and innovative forms of politics emerging within and against rights talk. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 337. The Politics of Humanitarianism. 5 Units.

What does it mean to want to help, to organize humanitarian aid, in times of crisis? At first glance, the impulse to help issui generis a good one. Helping is surely preferable to indifference and inaction. This does not mean that humanitarian interventions entail no ethical ot political stakes ¿ or that they are beyond engaged critique. We need to critique precisely that which we value, and to ask some hard questions, among them these: What are the differences among humanitarianism, charity, and philanthropy? What of social obligations and solidarities? How does the neoliberal world order currently create structural inequalities that ensure the reproduction of poverty and violence? How does the current order of things resemble or differ from the colonial world order? This course examines the history of humanitarian sensibilities and the emergence of organized action in the ¿cause of humanity¿. In the early years of humanitarian intervention, political neutrality was a key principle; it has now come under ever greater analytical and political scrutiny. We will examine the reasons for the politicization and militarization of aid -- be it humanitarian aid in natural disasters or political crises; development programs in the impoverished south (¿the Third World¿), or peace-keeping. We will end with a critical exploration of the concept of human rights, humanity, and personhood. The overall methodological aim of the course is to demonstrate what insights an ethnographic approach to the politics, ethics, and aesthetics of humanitarianism can offer.

ANTHRO 338. Anthropological Approaches to Religion. 5 Units.

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ANTHRO 339. Anthropology of Religion. 5 Units.

This course presents classic and contemporary work on the anthropology of religion: Durkheim Elementary Forms of the Religious Life; Levy-Bruhl; Primitive Mentality; Douglas Purity and Danger; Evans Pritchard Nuer Religion; and recent ethnographies/scholarly work by Robbins, Keane, Keller, Boyer, Barrett, and others.

ANTHRO 339A. Technologies of Extinctions: Ecocides and Genocides. 5 Units.

This course will explore the relationship between history, ecological evolution and mass killing in the age of humanly caused species extinction. It will explore the universalization of the notion of the Jewish Holocaust, its use to integrate into genocide studies the Native American "spiritual" holocaust, the Japanese nuclear holocaust and the Rwandan genocide, and the ethical dilemmas posed by the ideas of biotic, animal and ecological holocausts. Anthropology and history of genocides and extinctions as well as posthumanist, multispecies theories will provide theoretical frames for the course.
Same as: FRENCH 339A

ANTHRO 341. The Archaeololgy of Religious Crusading in Medieval Europe. 5 Units.

This course will present a chronologically framed outlined of the three main regions that witnessed the greatest impact of the crusading period. Commencing with the initial capture of Jerusalem and the subsequent establishment of a crusader kingdom in the Middle East in AD1099, till its eventual end in 1291, this will be followed by the `pagan conversions¿ of the Northern Baltic. Centred on Poland (Prussia) and Latvia (Livonia) from the 13th to 15th c., this example will also be compared with neighbouring Lithuania, which never fell under the political hegemony of the Monastic Orders. Finally, the course covers the Iberian case, where the Reconquista ¿ or `reconquest¿ - of lands from Muslim groups concluded with the fall of Granada and the unification of Spain in 1492. Through archaeological and historical evidence, the materials, technologies and ideas of the crusading groups will be compared and contrasted, with a particularly emphasis on bioarchaeological datasets. Ultimately, the course deals with the economic, social and practical mechanisms used by the religious orders to `colonise¿, once the initial conquest had been achieved. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 343. Culture as Commodity. 5 Units.

Focus is on theories of commodification, interests in tourism, national cultures as marketable objects, and how identities are constituted through production and consumption. The formation of global style and taste. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 344. Graphic Medicine. 5 Units.

In this course students will study medical cultures through visual communication ranging from x-rays and PET scans to graphic novels. Course will also include literature on visual theory.

ANTHRO 345. New Visions in Medical Anthropology. 5 Units.

Recent experimental histories of the field. Emphasis is on how, working within anthropology's classic format, the ethnographic monograph, authors have innovatively responded to the challenges of representing amorphous, unspoken, and often violent relationships between the body and social change. The authors' expository techniques, and how they engage and extend theoretical debate. How to assess works within medical anthropology and its allied fields. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 346. The Social Imagination. 5 Units.

The imagination as such has not been an accustomed object of ethnographic fieldwork or theoretical debate in anthropology. This seminar consists of a cluster of thematic explorations including: the spatial imagination of states; the imagination of race, colonialism, and domination; the social imagination of evil and of the good; and conceptualizations of the creative imagination.

ANTHRO 346A. Sexuality Studies in Anthropology. 5 Units.

Current research on sexuality from perspectives including paleoanthropology, archaeology, ethnography, and linguistic anthropology. Readings paired with case studies that explore theoretical and methodological issues. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 347. Religion and Modernity. 5 Units.

What role has the category of religion played in the development of the modern state, both colonial and national? How have central concepts of liberal political thought, such as freedom, progress, and history, depended on certain normative ideas of religion? Through various genealogical, historical, and ethnographic inquires, this course examines how the category of religion has both subtended and disturbed formations of colonial and post-colonial modernity.
Same as: RELIGST 332X

ANTHRO 348. Representing Medicine. 5 Units.

The seminar will offer the opportunity to discuss the recent work of a series of 9 scholars known for their innovation in writing and research. The seminar will offer professional networking as well as the opportunity to engage authors in questions of writing, approaches to fieldwork, strategies for career advancement, and brainstorming on how to structure relevant arguments. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 349. Anthropology of Capitalism. 5 Units.

This advanced graduate seminar explores capitalism as an historically-situated and culturally-mediated articulation of practices rather than as an economic system or social structure governed by an internal logic. It draws on poststructural theories of culture, society and subjectivity to investigate the processes through which diverse capitalist practices are produced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology or permission of the instructor. Previous graduate level coursework in cultural anthropology, social theory or cultural studies is required. No auditing is permitted. Enrollment limited to 12.

ANTHRO 352. Foucault: The Question of Method. 5 Units.

Foucault as methodological exemplar for historical and social research. Emphasis is on his historical studies of clinical medicine, prisons, and sexuality, and on applying his methods to empirical studies of topics such as colonialism, race, and liberal governmental rationality.

ANTHRO 353. Landscape. 5 Units.

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of landscape, noting the various processes and projects that have help create them. Readings draw together a broad range of theoretical approaches that are attentive to human-non-human interactions and the overlapping and divergent spatial and temporal questions of the exchanges between landscapes and humans. The readings will also draw attention to representational and non-representational ways that material and symbolic aspects of landscapes help constitute the making of place. The aim of the seminar is to explore the various methodologies for what they offer for the study of place.

ANTHRO 355. Cities in Global Perspective. 5 Units.

Interdisciplinary approach to examining global cities. The concept of the global city, and the interdependent processes that help produce urban spaces. Situating the transformation of urban spaces within globalization and its differential effects; current explanatory frameworks that pay attention to multiple scales of spatial and economic articulation. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 356. The Anthropology of Development. 5 Units.

Multidisciplinary. Topics vary annually. Areas include Africa, S. Asia, and Latin America. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 357. Other Minds: Puzzles in Psychiatric and Psychological Anthropology. 5 Units.

Problems in the way anthropologists explore other minds anthropologically and the ways in which anthropologists seek to understand the models of other minds held by the people observed. Topics include theory of mind, witchcraft, belief, empathy, psychosis, trauma, Freud, Vygotsky, and cognitive dissonance. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Under grads cannot take this class without permission of the instructor.

ANTHRO 358. Anthropology and the Limit of Experience. 5 Units.

In this course, we will examine the concept of the ¿limit¿ in relation to questions of experience. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective, we will explore how the limit (as border, threshold, other, transgression, liminality, etc.) frames and disrupts discourses of experience in ethnography, philosophy and literature.

ANTHRO 359. Copies, Collections, and Commodities. 5 Units.

In this class we will grapple with multiple questions that arise with reproduction. On the one hand, reproduciblity is good: we want generic drugs to work as well as the originals, we want trial subjects to adequately stand in for the people likely to be having a treatment, and we want a cartographic map to describe the landscape that unfolds before us. On the other hand, the copy threatens the value the object it is meant to imitate or represent, and to take on a life of its own. A series of classic and new ethnographies will be organized around these issues.

ANTHRO 360. Social Structure and Social Networks. 5 Units.

In this course, we will explore social network analysis, a set of methods and theories used in the analysis of social structure. The fundamental conceit underlying social network analysis is that social structure emerges from relationships between individuals. We will therefore concentrate in particular on the measurement of relationships, emphasizing especially practical methodology for anthropological fieldwork. This is a somewhat unusual course because of its focus on social network research coming out of anthropological and ethological traditions. While most current practitioners of social network analysis are (probably) sociologists, many of both the methodological antecedents and theoretical justifications for the field can be found in these two traditions. A major goal of this course is to understand how the methods and perspectives of social network analysis can be usefully incorporated into contemporary approaches to ethnography and other anthropological modes of investigation. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 361. Life and Death in Contemporary Latin America: An Anthropological Inquiry. 5 Units.

This seminar explores life and death in contemporary Latin America. We will address anthropological understanding of the role of colonialism, migration, violence, urbanization, democratic transition and neoliberalism as they configure the experience of, and threshold between, vital and deadly processes. nnThis is not a standard survey course, covering the region as a whole however. Instead, we will critically engage several recent ethnographies that explore, for example: the politics and practices of memory; border thinking and living; the political economy of death and desire; state violence and social movements; the relationship between the laboring city and body. We will supplement ethnographies with contemporary Latin American critical theory, film, and literary texts. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 362. Human Spatial Dynamics: Seminar in Communicating Contemporary Science. 5 Units.

This seminar is designed to bring together all students and faculty currently working on issues related to human use of land and spatially defined resources. The focus is to provide a forum for reporting on recent results and question development, providing students with vital skills in designing and communicating the results of research. Under grads by permission of instructor.

ANTHRO 362A. Introduction to Human Evolution, Ecology, Genetics, and Culture. 5 Units.

Themes and topics of lasting heuristic value in the anthropological sciences. Combines the lecture content of 2A and 2B with a discussion section for graduate students. Must be taken in the Autumn Quarter of a student's first year in the graduate program.

ANTHRO 363. Demography and Life History Theory. 5 Units.

Problems in demography and theoretical population biology applied to human systems. Emphasis is on establishing relationships between models in theoretical population biology and empirical demographic methodology. Topics include philosophy of models and model building, population dynamics, stable population theory, species interactions in human ecology, models of infectious diseases and their control, cultural evolution. Prerequisites: HUMBIO 137 or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 364. EcoGroup: Current Topics in Ecological, Evolutionary, and Environmental Anthropology. 2-5 Units.

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 364A. EcoGroup: Problems in Ecological and Evolutionary Anthropology. 2-5 Units.

Seminar; restricted to graduate students. Topics vary with instructor. How to ask appropriate questions, how to derive research hypotheses from theory, how to design methodologies for testing hypotheses, and how to present results by reading and critiquing key contemporary papers in the field. Ph.D. students enrolling in this course to fulfill the department review course requirement must enroll in 5 units. Graduate students enrolling in this course to participate in a topical forum may enroll in 2 units. Course may be repeated for 2 units. Prerequisites: by consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 365. The Theory of the Modern Subject. 5 Units.

This course traces the emergence of a coherent theory of the modern subject through readings of philosophical works and social theory from 18th century to the 20th century. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 366. Material Semiotics. 5 Units.

This seminar will focus on the emerging body of literature on the materiality of the production, circulation, and mediation of paperwork as constituitive of modern forms of governance. We will discuss specific genres of paperworks¿notes, memos, files, documents, as well as archives and other mnemonic technologies¿both as cultural practices and reflexive objects, and examine how they produce modern social epistemologies of accountability, evidence, the fact, and truth in the fields of law, business, and public administration, as well as in civil society generally. Readings will include works by Max Weber, Bruno Latour, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Cornelia Vismann, Ann Stoler, and others. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 367. The Anthropology of Science: Global Politics and Laboratory Life. 5 Units.

Science and technology are important cultural products that often dramatically reorganize various aspects of human life. In this course we will explore how recent innovations in the life sciences and biomedicine may reconfigure crucial elements of social institutions, lend new structures to identity politics, and often change the way we interact with and conceive of nature. We will examine these issues in various global settings to explore how everyday politics shape politics of life in different locales.

ANTHRO 368. Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems. 5 Units.

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as ¿coupled human-natural systems.¿ We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a ¿human¿ vs. a ¿natural¿ system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.

ANTHRO 369. Advanced Topics in Human Behavioral. 2-5 Units.

Course covers a variety of advanced topics which rotate annually, such as: ownership and egalitarianism, the integration of landscape and behavioral ecology, conservation and indigenous subsistence, or fertility and demography. Course may be repeated for credit when topics change.

ANTHRO 370. Advanced Theory and Method in Historical Archaeology. 5 Units.

Current debates about theory and method. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 371. Proposal Writing for Archaeologists. 3 Units.

The conceptualization of dissertation research problems, the theories behind them, and the methods for exploring them. Participants draft a research prospectus suitable for a dissertation proposal and research grant applications. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: ARCHLGY 371

ANTHRO 372. Urban Ecologies. 5 Units.

At the intersections of urbanism and environmental studies, political ecology, postcolonial theory and the new materialism, new fields are in formation. This seminar explores scholarship that connects cities with countrysides rough questions of resources and infrastructures. We will consider questions id inequality access and community as well as unexpected urban ecologies.

ANTHRO 373. Things: An Archaeology of the Relationships Between Humans and Things. 5 Units.

This course examines a variety of approaches that claim to explore the relationships between humans and things. Some of the approaches include Marx and material culture studies; Heidegger; cognitive and phenomenological; Actor Network Theory. But there is a need also to examine behavioral and ecological and Darwinian approaches. Many of these approaches do not adequately deal with the physicality of things as objects and there is a need to seek a way to incorporate such aspects of things into social theory. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 374. Archaeology of Colonialism/Postcolonialisms. 5 Units.

Advanced graduate seminar focused on the archaeology of colonial and postcolonial contexts, both prehistoric and historic. Emphasis on intersections between archaeological research and and subaltern, postcolonial, and transnational feminist/queer theory. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 375. Archaeology and Globalism. 4-5 Units.

The emergence of archaeology as a discipline in the context of the rise of the nation state. Global economies and other issues have created a new context for archaeology. How are archaeology and heritage responding? The idea of world heritage. The impact of postcolonialism. The commodification of the past: the past as theme park, as travel tourism or nostalgia, as exotic and other. Conflict between uses of the past for identity and as theme park; between heritage and resource or play. The impact of the Goddess, New Age, and other movements. Archaeology and human rights issues including forensic archaeology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 376. Archaeology: The Emergence of a Discipline. 5 Units.

This course explores the key thinkers and practitioners who have founded the discipline of archaeology. Reaching back into the nineteenth century, the course examines in depth the key figures, their preoccupations and projects that shaped the way that archaeology grew through the 20th and into the 21st century. Global in scope, the emphasis will be on field projects and practical problems that stimulated the intellectual development of archaeology as an independent discipline closely tied to geology, history, anthropology, and the natural sciences. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 377. What is Authority?: Anthropological Perspectives. 5 Units.

The most influential distinction between power and authority is Weberian ¿ Weber saw power as the ability to exert one¿s will, authority in turn was the ability to have one¿s command obeyed as legitimate and valid. Power in this reckoning could force, whereas authority had to always be in some ways legitimated. Foucault¿s critique of such an account of power is well known and Foucauldian notions of power as dispersed, capillary, and as discursive has permeated anthropological discussions. Power has become the central and catch all term for all forms of asymmetrical social and state-subject relations. The contemporary turn to theories of sovereignty is an example of dissatisfaction with our current usages of power as dispersed and thus all encompassing. Authority, the former staple of classical anthropology has been left hanging theoretically, though notions of legitimate authority, popular, gendered, religious, national, continue to underpin the possibility of our analysis. While for Weber power was often located in persons and authority as a function of systems, in anthropology has often located power as that which emanates from institutionalized forms and authority as personally fashioned around culturally specific notions of credibility, sacrality, and legitimacy. In this course, we will discuss critical approaches to authority and power and try to generate some critical questions for how an anthropology of the political that explicitly (rather than implicitly) re-addresses authority might look.

ANTHRO 378. Dynamics of Coupled Human-Natural Systems. 5 Units.

This is a graduate research seminar on the interdisciplinary approach to the study of the dynamics of what is known as "coupled human-natural systems." We will take a critical perspective on such systems, asking to what extent the idea of coupling of discrete subsystems is intellectually profitable and what defines a "human" vs. a "natural" system? We will explore concepts such as coupling, nonlinearity, threshold behavior, feedback, complexity, resilience, and catastrophes. Case studies will be drawn from the literature on human ecology, population dynamics, disease ecology, and social dynamics. Emphasis will be on developing a working knowledge of mathematical and computational models of coupled systems embedded within a rigorous empirical framework of biosocial data collection.

ANTHRO 379. Empathy Lab. 5 Units.

This lab-based class examines the ways in which various disciplines and art forms conceive of, and tell stories about, the experiences and stories of others.

ANTHRO 380. Practice and Performance: Bourdieu, Butler, Giddens, de Certeau. 5 Units.

Poststructuralist theories of iteration and mimesis used by social scientists to negotiate the tension between social structure and social practice: Gidden's structuration theory; Bourdieu's practice theory; Butler's theories of gender performativity; and de Certeau's analysis of tactics and strategies. Ethnographic and archaeological case studies that employ methodologies inspired by these approaches. Intersections and contradictions between these theorists' work; their use in anthropological practice. Issues of gender, sexuality, and ethnicity. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 381. Archaeology of Violence. 5 Units.

This advanced graduate seminar reflects on archaeological research on violence in relation to readings in philosophy, political anthropology, cultural studies, and gender and ethnic studies. While some forensic approaches are discussed, the emphasis is more on structural and collective violence and the role of violence in the formation of the archaeological record.

ANTHRO 382. Advanced Topics in Medical Anthropology. 5 Units.

Graduate seminar. The history and theories of medical anthropology. Focus is on medical anthropology's transformations in the 20th century: how medical anthropology has emerged as a field of inquiry, grown in dialogue with other areas of scholarships, and come to offer a unique array of theoretical positions and modes of ethnographic engagement. Emphasis is on debates within interpretive and critical medical anthropology, and how an understanding of these debates may be used to assess contemporary works within the field. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 384. Sacrifice, Ethics and Modern Convictions. 5 Units.

This course is an investigation of how notions of sacrifice, of ethics and conviction are embedded in both ordinary and extraordinary practices in our contemporary world. The key question is how the modern global condition has transformed the way in which it is possible to hold convictions, and to frame forms of ethical conduct, be they religious or secular. We will ask if convictions based on choice or moral outrage differ from convictions based on inhabiting and reversing stigmatized racial and social identities. Rather than maintaining a categorical distinction between `the religious¿ and `the secular¿, we will focus on how groups and individuals have attached themselves passionately to ideas, abstractions, ritual communities or ethical frames. When do certain attachments appear necessary and compelling, almost beyond choice? How does one forge a sense of ethics and ethical conduct through social media rather than face-to-face contact?n nStudents will acquire a grounded and guided understanding of philosophical and anthropological theories of ideas of ethics, sacrifice, and political conviction as well as explore these ideas through contemporary ethnographic contexts.nReadings will be philosophical, historical and ethnographic ¿ drawing on original texts and ethnographic accounts from Europe, Asia and Africa.

ANTHRO 386. Epidemics, Chronics, and Contagion. 5 Units.

The seminar will take as its focal point the question: how do institutional and personal responses to disease result from judgements about threat level? Through a series of contemporary monographs on obesity, HIV/AIDS, avian flu, vaccination, cancer, and other health issues, this class will examine ways of understanding broader ideologies of health in the United States.

ANTHRO 387. Strangers and Intimate: Exploring Civility. 5 Units.

How do we encounter and read each other in public and private spaces? How are these very spaces historically constituted around such distinctions and manners of reading? What do these questions look like in dense heterogeneous cities with differentiated class, caste and ethnic communities? How might we consider the differentiation between private and public in different ethnographic contexts? What kinds of sociality might emerge from these kinds of encounters? This course will explore these questions through social theory and ethnographies. There are two major sets of concepts that will be explored and interrogated. The first is that deriving from the essays of the Georg Simmel such as ¿The Face¿ and ¿The Stranger¿ which explore the new forms of sociality enabled by seemingly anonymous city life, which in turn have been interpreted very differently by Zygmunt Bauman and James Siegel to understand the place of continually excluded outsiders and the high stakes of reading each other. The other is the strand of work on the emergence of the public sphere such as the work of Jurgen Habermas, Richard Sennet, Michael Warner, Nancy Fraser etc. While much of the social theory on the public, the stranger and civility emerge from studies of Euro-American mas politics and city spaces, in this course we will move some of these discussion into considering these questions in the global south and the kinds of sociality (including their historicity) that make up the dense fabric of ordinary life. How does this work out in contexts where we take into account intense social differentiation by class, race, and communitarian divisions? This could be asked of the historical and social context addressed in these theories as well as from the postcolonial world. The course will attempt to understand whether such theorizations can indeed be re-rooted and re-imagined or whether ethnographic and historical difference re-route them instead. In doing so we will also bring theories of the private and the intimate to bear on questions of the public and the stranger.

ANTHRO 388. Anthropology of the Extraordinary: Ontologies and Phenomenologies. 5 Units.

In the last few years anthropology has taken what has come to be called an ¿ontological turn¿ in which the ways an object or experience is felt to be real is explored from different perspectives. Often this involves exploring phenomena (like ghosts, talking trees and humans who become jaguars) which could be called ¿extraordinary¿ and which challenge secular, western expectations of what is real. There has also been a ¿phenomenological turn¿ in which anthropologists have become interested in classifying and categorizing human experience in particular detail. The class will explore the scholarship in this area. Readings will include an introduction to classic philosophical writing (William James, Karl Jaspers, Martin Heidegger) and more recent work such as David Hufford, The Terror that Comes in the Night; Eduardo Kohn How Forests Think; Morton Pederson Not Quite Shamans; Ann Taves Religious Experience Reconsidered; Annemarie Mol, The Body Multiple; Roger Lohmann Dream Travelers, and others.

ANTHRO 400. Dissertation Writers Seminar. 1-3 Unit.

Required of fifth-year Ph.D. students returning from dissertation field research and in the process of writing dissertations and preparing for professional employment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ANTHRO 401A. Qualifying Examination: Topic. 2-5 Units.

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeat for credit.

ANTHRO 401B. Qualifying Examination: Area. 2-5 Units.

Required of second- and third-year Ph.D. students writing the qualifying paper or the qualifying written examination. May be repeated for credit one time.

ANTHRO 440. Teaching Assistantship. 3-5 Units.

Supervised experience as assistant in one undergraduate course.

ANTHRO 441. Master's Research Thesis. 1-15 Unit.

Supervised work for terminal and coterminal master's students writing the master's project in the final quarter of the degree program.

ANTHRO 442. Reading Group. 2-3 Units.

Graduate student reading group on a thematic topic of interest.nnIntended for first or second-year cohort PhD students.nnSections: Liisa Malkki, Sylvia Yanagisako, Thomas Hansen, Paulla Ebron, andnnMiyako Inoue.

ANTHRO 444. Anthropology Colloquium. 1 Unit.

Department Colloquia Lecture Series. Lectures presented on a variety of anthropological topics. Colloquium is intended for the Department of Anthropology's under graduate majors and graduate students. May be repeated for credit.

ANTHRO 445. Anthropology Brown Bag Series. 1 Unit.

Current topics and trends in cultural/social anthropology, archaeology, and environmental and ecological anthropology. Enrollment in this noon-time series is restricted to the Department of Anthropology Master¿s students and First and Second-year PhD students.

ANTHRO 446A. Method of Analysis Program in the Social Sciences. 1 Unit.

Colloquium series. Creation and application of new methodological techniques for social science research. Presentations on methodologies of use for social scientists across departments at Stanford by guest speakers from Stanford and elsewhere. See http://mapss.stanford.edu.
Same as: COMM 310

ANTHRO 450. Research Apprenticeship. 1-15 Unit.

Supervised work on a research project with an individual faculty member. May be repeated for credit.

ANTHRO 451. Directed Individual Study. 1-15 Unit.

Supervised work for a qualifying paper, examination, or project with an individual faculty member.

ANTHRO 452. Graduate Internship. 3-5 Units.

Provides graduate students with the opportunity to pursue their area of specialization in an institutional setting such as a laboratory, clinic, research institute, or government agency.

ANTHRO 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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ANTHRO 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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