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African and African American Studies

Contacts

Office: 450 Serra Mall, Building 360, Suite 362
Mail Code: 94305-2084
Phone: (650) 723-3782
Email: aaas@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://aaas.stanford.edu

Undergraduate Program in African and African American Studies

The Program in African and African American Studies (AAAS), established in 1968, was the first ethnic studies program developed at Stanford University and the first African and African American Studies program at a private institution in the U.S. The AAAS program provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of peoples of African descent as a central component of American culture, offering a course of study that promotes research across disciplinary and departmental boundaries as well as providing research training and community service learning opportunities for undergraduates. It has developed an extensive network of Stanford scholars who work in race studies specific to AAAS and in concert with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity.

AAAS encourages an interdisciplinary program of study drawn from fields including anthropology, art, art history, economics,education, drama, history, languages, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology. The program emphasizes rigorous and creative scholarship and research, and fosters close academic advising with a faculty adviser, the AAAS Associate Director, and the Director.

AAAS is an interdisciplinary program (IDP) affiliated with the Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity (CCSRE) and offers a major independent of it. CCSRE offers additional majors in Asian American Studies, Chicana/o Studies, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, and Native American Studies.

Mission Statement for the Undergraduate Program in African and African American Studies

The mission of the undergraduate program in African and African American Studies is to provide students with an interdisciplinary introduction to the study of people of African descent as a central component of American culture. Courses in the major promote research across disciplinary and departmental boundaries as well as provide students with research training and community service learning opportunities. Courses of study are drawn from anthropology, art, art history, economics, education, drama, history, languages, linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, political science, psychology, religion, and sociology among others. The program provides an intellectual background for students considering graduate school or professional careers.

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to demonstrate:

  1. an interdisciplinary understanding of scholarship related to the African diaspora and Africa, drawing on interdisciplinary course work and each student's individualized concentration.
  2. the ability to identify and critically assess different disciplinary, methodological, and interpretive approaches to the study of the African Americans, Africans, and/or people of the African diaspora.
  3. an understanding of comparative approaches to race
  4. skills in disciplinary methods necessary for their study.
  5. the ability to express their interpretive and analytical arguments in clear, effective prose.

Bachelor of Arts in African and African American Studies

Majors must complete a total of 60 units, consisting of the following:

  1. AFRICAAM 105 Introduction to African and African American Studies or AFRICAAM 143 (not offered this year) (5 units)
  2. One Social Science course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)
  3. One Humanities course from AAAS approved core course list. (5 units)
  4. One course in African Studies. (5 units)
  5. AFRICAAM 200X Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar - WIM. (5 units)
  6. 35 units of AAAS Core and Related courses

Students also work closely with a faculty adviser, the AAAS associate director, and the AAAS director in developing a coherent thematic emphasis within their major that reflects their scholarly interests in the field.

Thematic Emphasis

AAAS majors select a thematic emphasis, devoting at least 25 units in their major program of study toward their emphasis. Selecting an emphasis allows students to customize their curriculum and synthesize course work taken across various departments and programs into a coherent focus. Emphases offered include:

All emphases (those listed as well as proposed alternatives) must be approved by the director and a course plan developed and approved by the director, associate director, and faculty adviser within the first year of declaring the major.

Core Courses

Units
AFRICAAM 16NAfrican Americans and Social Movements3
AFRICAAM 21African American Vernacular English3-5
AFRICAAM 30The Egyptians3-5
AFRICAAM 31RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAAM 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
AFRICAAM 40SIPossessive Investment in Whiteness1-2
AFRICAAM 43Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AFRICAAM 47History of South Africa3
AFRICAAM 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions3
AFRICAAM 50B19th Century America3
AFRICAAM 54NAfrican American Women's Lives3-4
AFRICAAM 64CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-19653
AFRICAAM 75EBlack Cinema2
AFRICAAM 101FRace & Technology1-2
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
AFRICAAM 116Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
AFRICAAM 123Great Works of the African American Tradition5
AFRICAAM 147History of South Africa5
AFRICAAM 152GGlobal Harlem Renaissance5
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 166Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle3-5
AFRICAAM 190Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 200YHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 200ZHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research3-5
AFRICAAM 201FRace & Technology1-2
AFRICAAM 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAAM 301RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora1
AFRICAST 72SIConflict in the Congo1-2
AFRICAST 109Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development5
AFRICAST 111Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 112AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 115South African Encounters1
AFRICAST 127African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
AFRICAST 135Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 139AForgotten Africa: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Africa5
AFRICAST 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
AFRICAST 142Challenging the Status Quo: Social Entrepreneurs Advancing Democracy, Development and Justice5
AFRICAST 151AIDS in Africa3
AFRICAST 190Madagascar Prefield Seminar1-2
AFRICAST 195BACK FROM AFRICA WORKSHOP1-2
AFRICAST 199Independent Study or Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAST 200The HIV/AIDS Epidemic in Tanzania: A Pre-Field Seminar1
AFRICAST 209Running While Others Walk: African Perspectives on Development5
AFRICAST 211Education for All? The Global and Local in Public Policy Making in Africa5
AFRICAST 212AIDS, Literacy, and Land: Foreign Aid and Development in Africa5
AFRICAST 224Memory and Heritage In South Africa Syllabus1
AFRICAST 235Designing Research-Based Interventions to Solve Global Health Problems3-4
AFRICAST 299Independent Study or Directed Reading1-10
AFRICAST 301AThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
AMSTUD 152EAfrican American Literature5
AMSTUD 166Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle3-5
AMSTUD 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMSTUD 262DAfrican American Poetics5
ARCHLGY 139AForgotten Africa: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Africa5
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
ARTSTUDI 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
COMPLIT 145BIdeas of Africa in Atlantic Writing3-5
ENGLISH 152EAfrican American Literature5
HISTORY 45BAfrica in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 47History of South Africa3
HISTORY 48NAfrican History through Literature and Film3-4
HISTORY 48QSouth Africa: Contested Transitions3
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
HISTORY 166Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle3-5
LINGUIST 152Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
LINGUIST 252Sociolinguistics and Pidgin Creole Studies2-4
POLISCI 246PThe Dynamics of Change in Africa4-5
SOC 16NAfrican Americans and Social Movements3
SOC 149The Urban Underclass5
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5

Honors Program

AAAS offers a special program leading to honors in African and African American Studies. Students accepted to this program must complete an honors thesis on an approved topic, on which work normally begins in the junior year and they will fulfill their Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement in this course completed by mid-May of the senior year. The honors thesis is intended to enable students to synthesize skills to produce a document or project demonstrating a measure of competence in their specialty.

The honors program begins with advising from the faculty adviser and a petition for honors, approved no later than the Spring Quarter of the junior year. Students must enroll in AFRICAAM 200X Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar (WIM), during Autumn Quarter of the senior year and may take up to an additional 10 units of honors work to be distributed across Winter and Spring quarters of senior year. Senior Research units are taken in addition to the required courses for the major. In May of the senior year, honors students share their research findings in a public presentation to which faculty and students are invited.

Majors who have maintained a grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.5 in the major may apply for the honors program. Forms are available in the AAAS office.

Minor in African and African American Studies

Students who minor in AAAS complete a minimum of 30 units from the list of AAAS courses. These courses must include:

Units
AFRICAAM 105Introduction to African and African American Studies5
One course from the Social Sciences list
One course from the Humanities list

See the "Bachelor of Arts in African and African American Studies" section of this bulletin to view the humanities and social sciences lists.

Students should seek to develop a coherent theme in their course selections in consultation with the program director or associate director. An appointment should be made to discuss the rationale for the minor theme preceding submission of the declaration forms.

Director: Dr. H. Samy Alim (Education)

Associate Director: Cheryl Brown

Advisory Committee: H. Samy Alim (Education), Jan Barker-Alexander (Director, Black Community Services Center), James Campbell (History), Clayborne Carson (History), Linda Darling-Hammond (Education), Harry Elam (Drama), Michele Elam (English), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Allyson Hobbs (History), Vaughn Rasberry (English), John R. Rickford (Linguistics), Joel Samoff (African Studies)

Affiliated Faculty: David Abernethy (Political Science, emeritus), Samy Alim (Education), R. Lanier Anderson (Philosophy), Anthony Antonio (Education), Arnetha Ball (Education), Richard Banks (Law), Lucius Barker (Political Science, emeritus), Don Barr (Sociology), Shasad Bashir (Religious Studies), Carl Bielefeldt (Religious Studies), Jennifer Brody (Drama), Bryan Brown (Education), Cheryl Brown (Associate Director, Program in African and African American Studies), Albert Camarillo (History), James Campbell (History), Clayborne Carson (History), Prudence Carter (Education), Gordon Chang (History), Wanda Corn (Art and Art History, emerita), Linda Darling-Hammond (Education), David Degusta (Anthropology), Sandra Drake (English, emerita), Jennifer Eberhardt (Psychology), Paulla Ebron (Anthropology), Harry Elam (Vice Provost), Michele Elam (English), Corey Fields (Sociology), James Ferguson (Anthropology), Shelley Fisher Fishkin (English), Charlotte Fonrobert (Religious Studies), Sean Hanretta (History), Aleta Hayes (Drama), Gina Hernandez (Director, Identity Diversity, and Aesthetics), Allyson Hobbs (History), Gavin Jones (English), Terry Karl (Political Science), Anthony Kramer (Drama), Teresa LaFromboise (Education), Brian Lowery (Graduate School of Business), Lisa Malkki (Anthropology), Hazel Markus (Psychology), Barbaro Martinez-Ruiz (Art and Art History), Monica McDermott (Sociology), Tania Mitchell (Director, Service Learning in Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Robert Moses (Drama), Paula Moya (English), Elisabeth Mudimbe-Boyi (French and Comparative Literature), Susan Olzak (Sociology), David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature), Arnold Rampersad (English), Vaughn Rasberry (English), John R. Rickford (Linguistics), Richard Roberts (History), Sonia Rocha (Sociology), Michael Rosenfeld (Sociology), José Saldívar (English) Ramón Saldívar (English), Joel Samoff (African Studies),Gary Segura (Director, Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Paul Sniderman (Political Science), C. Matthew Snipp (Sociology), Ewart Thomas (Psychology), Jeane Tsai (Psychology), Elizabeth Whal (Executive Director, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity), Jeremy Weinstein (Political Science), Bryan Wolf (American Art and Culture), Yvonne Yarbo-Bejarno (Spanish and Portuguese)

Overseas Studies Courses in African and African American Studies

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


Units
OSPCPTWN 15Segregation and Social Distance: The Politics of Social Separation4
OSPCPTWN 18Xhosa Language and Culture2
OSPCPTWN 19Hip Hop Africa: Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Education in Africa3-4
OSPCPTWN 22Preparation for Community-Based Research in Community Health and Development3
OSPCPTWN 24ATargeted Research Project in Community Health and Development3
OSPCPTWN 24BTargeted Research Project in Community Health and Development5
OSPCPTWN 31Political Economy of Foreign Aid3
OSPCPTWN 32Service, Citizenship and Social Change: Service Learning in the Contemporary South African Contex-5
OSPCPTWN 33Southern Africa: from Liberation Struggles to Region-Building4
OSPCPTWN 36The Archaeology of Southern African Hunter Gatherers4
OSPCPTWN 38Genocide: The African Experience3-5
OSPCPTWN 68Cities in the 21st Century: Urbanization, Globalization and Security4
OSPPARIS 186FContemporary African Literature in French4

Identities, Diversity, and Aesthetics (IDA)

Units
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
AFRICAAM 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
AFRICAAM 75EBlack Cinema2
AFRICAAM 103Dance, Text, Gesture: Performance and Composition1
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
AFRICAAM 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
AFRICAAM 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
AFRICAAM 190Directed Reading1-5
AFRICAAM 195Independent Study5
AFRICAAM 199Honors Project1-5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 262DAfrican American Poetics5
AFRICAST 127African Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 262DAfrican American Poetics5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ARTHIST 127AAfrican Art and Politics, c. 1900 - Present4
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
ARTHIST 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
ARTSTUDI 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Movement Band Performance Workshop2
DANCE 31Chocolate Head-Space: Crowd-Sourced Performance Experience2
DANCE 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
DANCE 60The Evolution of Hip Hop and the Dance Stage: From Broadway to Hollywood and MTV1
DANCE 103Dance, Text, Gesture: Performance and Composition1
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
EDUC 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
HISTORY 48NAfrican History through Literature and Film3-4
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
MUSIC 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
MUSIC 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
MUSIC 20AJazz Theory3
MUSIC 140GIdentity and Popular Music3-5
MUSIC 186AMusic and Religious Experience in the Contemporary World3-5
MUSIC 286AMusic and Religious Experience in the Contemporary World3-5
TAPS 32The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice1-5
TAPS 151HID21 STRATLAB: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Improvising Identities4-5
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5

Related Courses

Units
AFRICAAM 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
AFRICAAM 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
AFRICAAM 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
AFRICAAM 101FRace & Technology1-2
AFRICAAM 102Introduction to Public History in the U.S.,19th Century to the Present4-5
AFRICAAM 103Dance, Text, Gesture: Performance and Composition1
AFRICAAM 106Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
AFRICAAM 107CThe Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity4-5
AFRICAAM 112Urban Education3-4
AFRICAAM 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AFRICAAM 122EArt in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces4
AFRICAAM 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
AFRICAAM 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
AFRICAAM 130Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
AFRICAAM 133Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean4
AFRICAAM 145APoetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature5
AFRICAAM 145BAfrica in the 20th Century5
AFRICAAM 150B19th-Century America5
AFRICAAM 152EAfrican American Literature5
AFRICAAM 154Black Feminist Theory5
AFRICAAM 200XHonors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar5
AFRICAAM 204FThe Modern Tradition of Non-Violent Resistance5
AFRICAAM 233ACounseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective3-5
AFRICAAM 246CIslam and Christianity in Africa4-5
AFRICAAM 255Racial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
AFRICAAM 261EMixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa5
AMELANG 108AThird-Year Swahili, First Quarter4
AMSTUD 15Global Flows: The Globalization of Hip Hop Art, Culture, and Politics1-2
AMSTUD 50NThe Literature of Inequality: Have and Have-Nots from the Gilded Age to the Occupy Era3
AMSTUD 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
AMSTUD 101American Fiction into Film: How Hollywood Scripts and Projects Black and White Relations3-5
AMSTUD 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
AMSTUD 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
AMSTUD 121ZUrban Politics5
AMSTUD 143Introduction to African American Literature3-5
AMSTUD 150B19th-Century America5
AMSTUD 164CFrom Freedom to Freedom Now: African American History, 1865-19655
AMSTUD 166Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle3-5
AMSTUD 178Ethnicity and Dissent in United States Art and Literature4
AMSTUD 201History of Education in the United States3-5
AMSTUD 214The American 1960s: Thought, Protest, and Culture5
AMSTUD 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
AMSTUD 255DRacial Identity in the American Imagination4-5
ANTHRO 1Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 27NEthnicity and Violence: Anthropological Perspectives3-5
ANTHRO 32Theories in Race and Ethnicity: A Comparative Perspective5
ANTHRO 90BTheory of Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 121AHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
ANTHRO 135HConversations in CSRE: Case Studies in the Stanford Community1-2
ANTHRO 135ICSRE House Seminar: Race and Ethnicity at Stanford1-2
ANTHRO 139Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 139AForgotten Africa: An Introduction to the Archaeology of Africa5
ANTHRO 141AScience, Technology, and Medicine in Africa4
ANTHRO 145Race and Power5
ANTHRO 176Cultures, Minds, and Medicine1
ANTHRO 185Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ANTHRO 187AThe Anthropology of Race, Nature, and Animality5
ANTHRO 201Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology5
ANTHRO 239Ethnography of Africa5
ANTHRO 241The State in Africa5
ANTHRO 245Race and Power5
ANTHRO 276Cultures, Minds, and Medicine1
ANTHRO 285Medical Anthropology of Contemporary Africa5
ARTHIST 162Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Contemporary Art4
COMPLIT 51QComparative Fictions of Ethnicity4
CSRE 127ACan't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts4
CSRE 144Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class5
DANCE 30Chocolate Heads Movement Band Performance Workshop2
DANCE 31Chocolate Head-Space: Crowd-Sourced Performance Experience2
DANCE 45Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact2
DANCE 60The Evolution of Hip Hop and the Dance Stage: From Broadway to Hollywood and MTV1
DANCE 103Dance, Text, Gesture: Performance and Composition1
EDUC 12SCHip Hop as a Universal Language2
EDUC 103BRace, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices3-5
EDUC 110Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
EDUC 112XUrban Education3-4
EDUC 121XHip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language3-4
EDUC 146XPerspectives on the Education of Linguistic Minorities3-4
EDUC 157XEducation & Poverty: Research & Solutions1
EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
EDUC 193CPsychological Well-Being On Campus: Perspectives Of The Black Diaspora1
EDUC 201History of Education in the United States3-5
EDUC 212XUrban Education3-4
EDUC 216Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
EDUC 232Culture, Learning, and Poverty2-3
EDUC 243Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction3-5
EDUC 245Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development3-5
EDUC 274XSchool Choice: The Role of Charter Schools3
EDUC 279Urban Youth and Their Institutions: Research and Practice4-5
EDUC 322Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms3-5
ENGLISH 15SCThe New Millennium Mix: Crossings of Race & CultureCentury2
ENGLISH 64NGrowing Up in America3
ENGLISH 68NMark Twain and American Culture4
FEMGEN 107BEAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education1
FEMGEN 154Black Feminist Theory5
HISTORY 11WService-Learning Workshop on Issues of Education Equity1
HISTORY 49CTHE SLAVE TRADE3
HISTORY 50AColonial and Revolutionary America3
HISTORY 50B19th Century America3
HISTORY 50CThe United States in the Twentieth Century3
HISTORY 64Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Modern America4-5
HISTORY 74SSounds of the Century: Popular Music and the United States in the 20th Century5
HISTORY 106AGlobal Human Geography: Asia and Africa5
HISTORY 147History of South Africa5
HISTORY 150B19th-Century America5
HISTORY 150CThe United States in the Twentieth Century5
HISTORY 158BHistory of Education in the United States3-5
HISTORY 167AMartin Luther King, Jr. and the Global Freedom Struggle3-5
HISTORY 255EEducation, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-19903-5
HISTORY 258DSchool: What Is It Good For?3-4
HISTORY 260California's Minority-Majority Cities4-5
HISTORY 299MUndergraduate Directed Research: Martin Luther King, Jr., Research and Education Institute1-4
HUMBIO 121EEthnicity and Medicine1-3
HUMBIO 122SSocial Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health4
LINGUIST 65African American Vernacular English3-5
LINGUIST 156Language and Gender4
LINGUIST 251Sociolinguistic Field Methods3-5
LINGUIST 255BSociolinguistics Classics and Community Studies3-5
LINGUIST 256Language, Gender and Sexuality1-4
LINGUIST 265African American Vernacular English3-5
MUSIC 18AJazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-19403
MUSIC 18BJazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present3
MUSIC 20AJazz Theory3
MUSIC 140GIdentity and Popular Music3-5
MUSIC 186AMusic and Religious Experience in the Contemporary World3-5
MUSIC 286AMusic and Religious Experience in the Contemporary World3-5
POLISCI 11NThe Rwandan Genocide3
POLISCI 28NThe Changing Nature of Racial Identity in American Politics3
POLISCI 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
POLISCI 125VThe Voting Rights Act5
POLISCI 226Race and Racism in American Politics5
PSYCH 29NGrowing Up in America3
PSYCH 75Introduction to Cultural Psychology5
PSYCH 183Mind, Culture, and Society Research Core2-3
PSYCH 215Mind, Culture, and Society3
PSYCH 217Topics and Methods Related to Culture and Emotion1-3
PUBLPOL 121LRacial-Ethnic Politics in US5
SOC 14NInequality in American Society3
SOC 15NThe Transformation of Socialist Societies3
SOC 22NThe Roots of Social Protest3
SOC 45QUnderstanding Race and Ethnicity in American Society3
SOC 46NRace, Ethnic, and National Identities: Imagined Communities3
SOC 118Social Movements and Collective Action5
SOC 119Understanding Large-Scale Societal Change: The Case of the 1960s5
SOC 132Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools4
SOC 135Poverty, Inequality, and Social Policy in the United States4
SOC 140Introduction to Social Stratification3
SOC 142Sociology of Gender5
SOC 145Race and Ethnic Relations in the USA5
SOC 148Comparative Ethnic Conflict4
SOC 155The Changing American Family4
SOC 170Classics of Modern Social Theory3
TAPS 151HID21 STRATLAB: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Improvising Identities4-5
TAPS 156Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson4
TAPS 176SFinding Meaning in Life's Struggles: Narrative Ways of Healing5
URBANST 112The Urban Underclass5
URBANST 123Approaching Research and the Community2-3

Courses

AFRICAAM 16N. African Americans and Social Movements. 3 Units.

Theory and research on African Americans' roles in post-Civil Rights, US social movements. Topics include women¿s right, LGBT rights, environmental movement, and contemporary political conservativism.
Same as: CSRE 16N, SOC 16N.

AFRICAAM 18A. Jazz History: Ragtime to Bebop, 1900-1940. 3 Units.

From the beginning of jazz to the war years.
Same as: MUSIC 18A.

AFRICAAM 18B. Jazz History: Bebop to Present, 1940-Present. 3 Units.

Modern jazz styles from Bebop to the current scene. Emphasis is on the significant artists of each style.
Same as: MUSIC 18B.

AFRICAAM 21. African American Vernacular English. 3-5 Units.

The English vernacular spoken by African Americans in big city settings, and its relation to Creole English dialects spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The history of expressive uses of African American English (in soundin' and rappin'), and its educational implications. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265.

AFRICAAM 30. The Egyptians. 3-5 Units.

Overview of ancient Egyptian pasts, from predynastic times to Greco-Roman rule, roughly 3000 BCE to 30 BCE. Attention to archaeological sites and artifacts; workings of society; and cultural productions, both artistic and literary. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Same as: CLASSHIS 105.

AFRICAAM 31. RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora. 1 Unit.

Students to engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater & Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. Open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad).

AFRICAAM 32. The 5th Element: Hip Hop Knowledge, Pedagogy, and Social Justice. 1-5 Unit.

This course-series brings together leading scholars with critically-acclaimed artists, local teachers, youth, and community organizations to consider the complex relationships between culture, knowledge, pedagogy and social justice. Participants will examine the cultural meaning of knowledge as "the 5th element" of Hip Hop Culture (in addition to MCing, DJing, graffiti, and dance) and how educators and cultural workers have leveraged this knowledge for social justice. Overall, participants will gain a strong theoretical knowledge of culturally relevant and culturally sustaining pedagogies and learn to apply this knowledge by engaging with guest artists, teachers, youth, and community youth arts organizations.
Same as: AMSTUD 32, CSRE 32A, EDUC 32X, EDUC 432X, TAPS 32.

AFRICAAM 40SI. Possessive Investment in Whiteness. 1-2 Unit.

This course is designed to present students with an approachable but nuanced way of developing a notion of the construction and maintenance of whiteness in the United States. By focusing on George Lipsitz's book, we will work to challenge and refine the ideas of white privilege and race in the history and contemporary United States. By focusing on the single text, with some outside supplementary material, I do not contend that Lipsitz is providing the only truth, the class will look to complicate his notions and expand them with personal and outside understandings.Maybe repeat for credit.

AFRICAAM 43. Introduction to African American Literature. 3-5 Units.

(English majors and others taking 5 units, register for 143.) African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals, trickster tales, and slave narratives to recent developments such as black feminist theory, postmodern fiction, and hip hop lyricism. We will engage some of the defining debates and phenomena within African American cultural history, including the status of realist aesthetics in black writing; the contested role of literature in black political struggle; the question of diaspora; the problem of intra-racial racism; and the emergence of black internationalism. Attuned to the invariably hybrid nature of this tradition, we will also devote attention to the discourse of the Enlightenment, modernist aesthetics, and the role of Marxism in black political and literary history.
Same as: AMSTUD 143.

AFRICAAM 45. Dance Improvisation Techniques and Strategies Lab: From Hip Hop to Contact. 2 Units.

By learning various dance improvisation forms across cultures, students will develop techniques to gain a deep understanding of generating movement from the inside-out, inspired by conceptual strategies from master improvisors while harnessing that potential for creating dances. Guest dancer/choreographer workshops and Dance Jams enhance the learning experience. All Levels welcome.
Same as: DANCE 45.

AFRICAAM 47. History of South Africa. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 147. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Same as: HISTORY 47.

AFRICAAM 48Q. South Africa: Contested Transitions. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. The inauguration of Nelson Mandela as president in May 1994 marked the end of an era and a way of life for S. Africa. The changes have been dramatic, yet the legacies of racism and inequality persist. Focus: overlapping and sharply contested transitions. Who advocates and opposes change? Why? What are their historical and social roots and strategies? How do people reconstruct their society? Historical and current sources, including films, novels, and the Internet.
Same as: HISTORY 48Q.

AFRICAAM 50B. 19th Century America. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 150B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Same as: HISTORY 50B.

AFRICAAM 54N. African American Women's Lives. 3-4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. The everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America in comparative context of histories of European, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American women. Primary sources including personal journals, memoirs, music, literature, and film, and historical texts. Topics include slavery and emancipation, labor and leisure, consumer culture, social activism, changing gender roles, and the politics of sexuality.

AFRICAAM 64C. From Freedom to Freedom Now!: African American History, 1865-1965. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 164C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 164C.) Explores the working lives, social worlds, political ideologies and cultural expressions of African Americans from emancipation to the early civil rights era. Topics include: the transition from slavery to freedom, family life, work, culture, leisure patterns, resistance, migration and social activism. Draws largely on primary sources including autobiographies, memoirs, letters, personal journals, newspaper articles, pamphlets, speeches, literature, film and music.

AFRICAAM 75E. Black Cinema. 2 Units.

How filmmakers represent historical and cultural issues in Black cinema.

AFRICAAM 101F. Race & Technology. 1-2 Unit.

The program in African & African American Studies will be offering a weekly lecture series to expose and introduce underrepresented groups to the world of technology by creating a space where the idea of starting can lead to a "Start Up". The AAAS "Race & Technology" course endeavors to de-code the language of technology creation, how to build a team, problem solving, pitching an idea, leveraging the work of all disciplines in creating an entrepreneurship mindset. nnnScholars and industry people will cover topics such as the digital divide, women in technology, and social media.
Same as: AFRICAAM 201F.

AFRICAAM 102. Introduction to Public History in the U.S.,19th Century to the Present. 4-5 Units.

Gateway course for the History and Public Service interdisciplinary track. Topics include the production, presentation, and practice of public history through narratives, exhibits, web sites, and events in museums, historical sites, parks, and public service settings in nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and educational institutions. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: CSRE 201, HISTORY 201, HISTORY 301.

AFRICAAM 103. Dance, Text, Gesture: Performance and Composition. 1 Unit.

Students practice, compose and combine the languages of dance, gestural movement, music and text, to render complete expression in performance. Suitable for dancers, actors, spoken word artists and triple threat performers to devise original performance, dance and theater, culminating in an end of quarter showing.
Same as: DANCE 103.

AFRICAAM 105. Introduction to African and African American Studies. 5 Units.

Interdisciplinary. Central themes in African American culture and history related to race as a definitive American phenomenon. African survivals and interpretations of slavery in the New World, contrasting interpretations of the Black family, African American literature, and art. Possible readings: Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Richard Wright, Maya Angelou, James Baldwin, Malcolm X, Alice Walker, and Bell Hooks. Focus may vary each year.

AFRICAAM 106. Race, Ethnicity, and Linguistic Diversity in Classrooms: Sociocultural Theory and Practices. 3-5 Units.

Focus is on classrooms with students from diverse racial, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds. Studies, writing, and media representation of urban and diverse school settings; implications for transforming teaching and learning. Issues related to developing teachers with attitudes, dispositions, and skills necessary to teach diverse students.
Same as: CSRE 103B, EDUC 103B, EDUC 337.

AFRICAAM 107C. The Black Mediterranean: Greece, Rome and Antiquity. 4-5 Units.

Explore problems of race and ethnicity as viable criteria in studying ancient societies and consider the question, What is the Mediterranean?, in relation to premodern evidence. Investigate the role of blackness as a marker of ethnicity; the demography of slavery and its roles in forming social identities; and environmental determinism as a factor in ethnic and racial thinking. Consider Greek and Roman perspectives and behavior, and their impact on later theories of race and ethnicity as well as the Mediterranean as a whole.
Same as: CSRE 107.

AFRICAAM 112. Urban Education. 3-4 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: CSRE 112X, EDUC 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X.

AFRICAAM 115. South African Encounters. 1 Unit.

This course is a prerequisite for all those accepted to or on the wait list for the Spring BOSP Cape Town term abroad. It will explore issues in contemporary South Africa.
Same as: AFRICAST 115.

AFRICAAM 116. Education, Race, and Inequality in African American History, 1880-1990. 3-5 Units.

Seminar. The relationship among race, power, inequality, and education from the 1880s to the 1990s. How schools have constructed race, the politics of school desegregation, and ties between education and the late 20th-century urban crisis.
Same as: CSRE 216X, EDUC 216, HISTORY 255E.

AFRICAAM 121X. Hip Hop, Youth Identities, and the Politics of Language. 3-4 Units.

Focus is on issues of language, identity, and globalization, with a focus on Hip Hop cultures and the verbal virtuosity within the Hip Hop nation. Beginning with the U.S., a broad, comparative perspective in exploring youth identities and the politics of language in what is now a global Hip Hop movement. Readings draw from the interdisciplinary literature on Hip Hop cultures with a focus on sociolinguistics and youth culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 121X, ANTHRO 121A, CSRE 121X, EDUC 121X, LINGUIST 155.

AFRICAAM 122E. Art in the Streets: Identity in Murals, Site-specific works, and Interventions in Public Spaces. 4 Units.

This class will introduce students to both historical and contemporary public art practices and the expression of race and identity through murals, graffiti, site-specific works and performative interventions in public spaces. Involving lectures, guest speakers, field trips, and hands-on art practice, students will be expected to produce both an individual and group piece as a final project.
Same as: ARTSTUDI 122E, CSRE 122E.

AFRICAAM 123. Great Works of the African American Tradition. 5 Units.

Foundational African and African American scholarly figures and their work from the 19th century to the present. Historical, political, and scholarly context. Dialogues distinctive to African American culture. May be repeated for credit.

AFRICAAM 125V. The Voting Rights Act. 5 Units.

Focus is on whether and how racial and ethnic minorities including African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos are able to organize and press their demands on the political system. Topics include the political behavior of minority citizens, the strength and effect of these groups at the polls, the theory and practice of group formation among minorities, the responsiveness of elected officials, and the constitutional obstacles and issues that shape these phenomena.
Same as: CSRE 125V, POLISCI 125V.

AFRICAAM 127A. Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History Of The Hip-Hop Arts. 4 Units.

This course explores the history and development of the hip-hop arts movement, from its precursor movements in music, dance, visual arts, literature, and folk and street cultures to its rise as a neighborhood subculture in the Bronx in the early 1970s through its local, regional and global expansion and development. Hip-hop aesthetics, structures, and politics will be explored within the context of the movement¿s rise as a post-multicultural form in an era of neoliberal globalization.
Same as: CSRE 127A.

AFRICAAM 130. Community-based Research As Tool for Social Change:Discourses of Equity in Communities & Classrooms. 3-5 Units.

Issues and strategies for studying oral and written discourse as a means for understanding classrooms, students, and teachers, and teaching and learning in educational contexts. The forms and functions of oral and written language in the classroom, emphasizing teacher-student and peer interaction, and student-produced texts. Individual projects utilize discourse analytic techniques. Prerequisite: graduate status or consent of instructor.
Same as: CSRE 130, EDUC 123X, EDUC 322.

AFRICAAM 131. Genes and Identity. 5 Units.

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and ethnographies. We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (either as proof of heritage or disease risk) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. nnExamples include legal and political analyses of African ancestry testing as ¿evidence¿ in slavery reparations cases, debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, considerations on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel, close readings of The U.S. Food and Drug Administration¿s crackdown on personal genomics testing companies (such as 23andMe), examinations of genetic identity politics in health disparities funding and orphan disease research, inquiries into new social movements organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, and civil liberties concerns about genetic ¿familial searching¿ in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects. nnStudents will engage in a short observational ¿pilot¿ ethnographic project that allows them to further explore issues from the course for their final paper.
Same as: ANTHRO 131, CSRE 131.

AFRICAAM 133. Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean. 4 Units.

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, political and literary aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry, though we will also read some theoretical texts, as well as excerpts of Francophone theater. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary forms, terms and practices. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French (in addition to reading comprehension) both in and outside of class. Required readings include: Aimé Césaire, "Cahier d'un retour au pays natal," Albert Memmi, "La Statue de Sel," Abdelkebir Khatibi, "Amour bilingue," Abdelwahab Meddeb, "Talismano." nnTaught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Same as: FRENCH 133, JEWISHST 143.

AFRICAAM 145A. Poetics and Politics of Caribbean Women's Literature. 5 Units.

Mid 20th-century to the present. How historical, economic, and political conditions in Haiti, Cuba, Jamaica, Antigua, and Guadeloupe affected women. How Francophone, Anglophone, and Hispanophone women novelists, poets, and short story writers respond to similar issues and pose related questions. Caribbean literary identity within a multicultural and diasporic context; the place of the oral in the written feminine text; family and sexuality; translation of European master texts; history, memory, and myth; and responses to slave history, colonialism, neocolonialism, and globalization.

AFRICAAM 145B. Africa in the 20th Century. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 45B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 145B.) The challenges facing Africans from when the continent fell under colonial rule until independence. Case studies of colonialism and its impact on African men and women drawn from West, Central, and Southern Africa. Novels, plays, polemics, and autobiographies written by Africans.
Same as: HISTORY 145B.

AFRICAAM 147. History of South Africa. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 47. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 147.) Introduction, focusing particularly on the modern era. Topics include: precolonial African societies; European colonization; the impact of the mineral revolution; the evolution of African and Afrikaner nationalism; the rise and fall of the apartheid state; the politics of post-apartheid transformation; and the AIDS crisis.
Same as: HISTORY 147.

AFRICAAM 150B. 19th-Century America. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 50B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 150B.) Territorial expansion, social change, and economic transformation. The causes and consequences of the Civil War. Topics include: urbanization and the market revolution; slavery and the Old South; sectional conflict; successes and failures of Reconstruction; and late 19th-century society and culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 150B, HISTORY 150B.

AFRICAAM 152E. African American Literature. 5 Units.

What is African American literature? This course is both an introduction to some of the great works of black literary expression and an examination of this category. We will examine the formal and rhetorical strategies that figure most prominently in this literary tradition and investigate the historical circumstances (including slavery, Reconstruction, the Great Migration, and Jim Crow) that have shaped¿and been shaped by¿this body of literature. Topics to be addressed include canon formation, negotiations between fiction and history, sectional tensions (between North and South), gender politics, and folk culture.
Same as: AMSTUD 152E, ENGLISH 152E.

AFRICAAM 152G. Global Harlem Renaissance. 5 Units.

Examination of the explosion of African American artistic expression during 1920s and 30s New York known as the Harlem Renaissance. Amiri Baraka once referred to the Renaissance as a kind of ¿vicious Modernism,¿ as a ¿BangClash,¿ that impacted and was impacted by political, cultural and aesthetic changes not only in the U.S. but Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America. Focus on the literature, graphic arts, and the music of the era in this global context.
Same as: AMSTUD 152G.

AFRICAAM 154. Black Feminist Theory. 5 Units.

This course will examine black feminist theoretical traditions, marking black women¿s analytic interventions into sexual and pleasure politics and reproduction, critical culture and race theory, citizenship, identity, power and agency, representation, and questions of the body. Exploring concepts such as intersectionality, controlling images, the politics of respectability and the particularities of a black feminist liberation politic, we will look to black feminist scholars, activists, and artists from the 19th century to today.
Same as: FEMGEN 154.

AFRICAAM 156. Performing History: Race, Politics, and Staging the Plays of August Wilson. 4 Units.

This course purposefully and explicitly mixes theory and practice. Students will read and discuss the plays of August Wilson, the most celebrated and most produced contemporary American playwright, that comprise his 20th Century History Cycle. Class stages scenes from each of these plays, culminating in a final showcase of longer scenes from his work as a final project.
Same as: TAPS 156, TAPS 356.

AFRICAAM 166. Introduction to African American History: The Modern African American Freedom Struggle. 3-5 Units.

This course is an introduction to African-American Political movements of the period after 1930, with special emphasis on mass protest and civil rights activism as well as leaders such as W. E. B. Du Bois, Thurgood Marshall, Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcom X, Jesse Jackson, and Barack Obama. The lectures will utilize audio-visual materials extensively, and the exams will cover these materials as well as the traditional lectures. In addition to attending lectures, students are encouraged to undertake research projects.
Same as: AMSTUD 166, HISTORY 166.

AFRICAAM 190. Directed Reading. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

AFRICAAM 195. Independent Study. 5 Units.

AFRICAAM 199. Honors Project. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

AFRICAAM 200X. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Seminar. 5 Units.

Required for seniors. Weekly colloquia with AAAS Director and Associate Director to assist with refinement of research topic, advisor support, literature review, research, and thesis writing. Readings include foundational and cutting-edge scholarship in the interdisciplinary fields of African and African American studies and comparative race studies. Readings assist students situate their individual research interests and project within the larger. Students may also enroll in AFRICAAM 200Y in Winter and AFRICAAM 200Z in Spring for additional research units (up to 10 units total).

AFRICAAM 200Y. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research. 3-5 Units.

Winter. Required for students writing an Honors Thesis. Optional for Students writing a Senior Thesis.

AFRICAAM 200Z. Honors Thesis and Senior Thesis Research. 3-5 Units.

Spring. Required for students writing an Honors Thesis. Optional for Students writing a Senior Thesis.

AFRICAAM 201F. Race & Technology. 1-2 Unit.

The program in African & African American Studies will be offering a weekly lecture series to expose and introduce underrepresented groups to the world of technology by creating a space where the idea of starting can lead to a "Start Up". The AAAS "Race & Technology" course endeavors to de-code the language of technology creation, how to build a team, problem solving, pitching an idea, leveraging the work of all disciplines in creating an entrepreneurship mindset. nnnScholars and industry people will cover topics such as the digital divide, women in technology, and social media.
Same as: AFRICAAM 101F.

AFRICAAM 204F. The Modern Tradition of Non-Violent Resistance. 5 Units.

During the twentieth century, peasants and menial laborers who comprised the majority of humanity launched liberation movements to secure citizenship rights. Mohandas K. Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela are among the leaders whose ideas continue to influence contemporary movements for global peace with social justice in a sustainable environment.
Same as: CSRE 104F.

AFRICAAM 233A. Counseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective. 3-5 Units.

In an era of globalization characterized by widespread migration and cultural contacts, professionals face a unique challenge: How does one practice successfully when working with clients/students from so many different backgrounds? This course focuses upon the need to examine, conceptualize, and work with individuals according to the multiple ways in which they identify themselves. It will systematically examine multicultural counseling concepts, issues, and research. Literature on counselor and client characteristics such as social status or race/ethnicity and their effects on the counseling process and outcome will be reviewed. Issues in consultation with culturally and linguistically diverse parents and students and work with migrant children and their families are but a few of the topics covered in this course.
Same as: CSRE 233A, EDUC 233A.

AFRICAAM 245. Understanding Racial and Ethnic Identity Development. 3-5 Units.

African American, Native American, Mexican American, and Asian American racial and ethnic identity development; the influence of social, political and psychological forces in shaping the experience of people of color in the U.S. The importance of race in relationship to social identity variables including gender, class, and occupational, generational, and regional identifications. Bi- and multiracial identity status, and types of white racial consciousness.
Same as: CSRE 245, EDUC 245.

AFRICAAM 246C. Islam and Christianity in Africa. 4-5 Units.

History of the 20% of the Muslims and Christians in the world who live in Africa. The role of these religions in social, cultural and political transformations. Linkages between African religions and global/transnational institutions. African contributions to theology, religious practice and religious styles. Muslim/Christian relations and relations with "traditional" African religions.
Same as: HISTORY 346C.

AFRICAAM 255. Racial Identity in the American Imagination. 4-5 Units.

Major historical transformations shaping the understanding of racial identity and how it has been experienced, represented, and contested in American history. Topics include: racial passing and racial performance; migration, immigration, and racial identity in the urban context; the interplay between racial identity and American identity; the problems of class, gender, and sexuality in the construction of racial identity. Sources include historical and legal texts, memoirs, photography, literature, film, and music.
Same as: AMSTUD 255D, CSRE 255D, HISTORY 355D.

AFRICAAM 261E. Mixed Race Literature in the U.S. and South Africa. 5 Units.

As scholar Werner Sollors recently suggested, novels, poems, stories about interracial contacts and mixed race constitute ¿an orphan literature belonging to no clear ethnic or national tradition.¿ Yet the theme of mixed race is at the center of many national self-definitions, even in our U.S. post-Civil Rights and South Africa¿s post-Apartheid era. This course examines aesthetic engagements with mixed race politics in these trans- and post-national dialogues, beginning in the 1700s and focusing on the 20th and 21st centuries.
Same as: AMSTUD 261E.

AFRICAAM 262D. African American Poetics. 5 Units.

Examination of African American poetic expressive forms from the 1700s to the 2000s, considering the central role of the genre--from sonnets to spoken word, from blues poetry to new media performance--in defining an evolving literary tradition and cultural identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 262D.

AFRICAAM 301. RealTalk: Intimate Discussions about the African Diaspora. 1 Unit.

Students engage in an intellectual discussion about the African Diaspora with leading faculty at Stanford across departments including Education, Linguistics, Sociology, History, Political Science, English, and Theater and Performance Studies. Several lunches with guest speakers. Open graduate students. This course will meet in the Program for African & African American Studies Office in Building 360 Room 362B (Main Quad).