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Management Science and Engineering

Contacts

Office: Huang Engineering Center, 475 Via Ortega, 94305-4121
Mail Code: 94305-4026
Phone:
Web Site: http://stanford.edu/dept/MSandE

Courses offered by the Department of Management Science and Engineering are listed under the subject code MS&E on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The Department of Management Science and Engineering leads at the interface of engineering, business, and public policy. The department’s mission is, through education and research, to advance the design, management, operation, and interaction of technological, economic, and social systems. The department’s engineering research strength is integrated with its educational program at the undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral levels: graduates of the program are trained as engineers and future leaders in technology, policy, and industry. Research and teaching activities are complemented by an outreach program that encourages the transfer of ideas to the environment of Silicon Valley and beyond.

Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) provides programs of education and research by integrating three basic strengths:

  1. depth in conceptual and analytical foundations
  2. comprehensive coverage of functional areas of application
  3. interaction with other Stanford departments, Silicon Valley industry, and organizations throughout the world.

The analytical and conceptual foundations include decision and risk analysis, dynamic systems, economics, optimization, organizational science, and stochastic systems. The functional areas of application include entrepreneurship, finance, information, marketing, organizational behavior, policy, production, and strategy. Close associations with other engineering departments and with industry enrich the programs by providing opportunities to apply MS&E methods to important problems and by motivating new theoretical developments from practical experience. MS&E’s programs also provide a basis for contributing to other areas such as biotechnology, defense policy, environmental policy, information systems, and telecommunications.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Management Science and Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Management Science and Engineering is to provide students with the fundamentals of engineering systems analysis so that they are able to plan, design, and implement complex economic and technical management systems. The program builds on the foundational courses for engineering including calculus, engineering fundamentals, and physics or chemistry as well as management science. Students complete core courses in accounting, computer science, economics, ethics, organizational theory, mathematical modeling, optimization, probability, and statistics. To personalize their exploration, students select additional courses from different areas of the department, with greater emphasis in one of them. The major prepares students for a variety of career paths, including investment banking, management consulting, facilities and process management, or for graduate school in industrial engineering, operations research, businesseconomics, law, medicine, or public policy .

Learning Outcomes (Undergraduate)

The department expects undergraduate majors in the program to be able to demonstrate the following learning outcomes. These learning outcomes are used in evaluating students and the department's undergraduate program. Students are expected to be able:

  1. to apply the knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering;
  2. to design and conduct experiments;
  3. to design a system or components to meet desired needs;
  4. to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems;
  5. to use techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice;
  6. to function on multidisciplinary teams;
  7. to communicate effectively;
  8. to recognize the need for and demonstrate an ability to engage in life-long learning;
  9. to obtain the background necessary for admission to top professional graduate engineering or business programs;
  10. to understand professional and ethical responsibility;
  11. to obtain the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context; and
  12. to obtain a knowledge of contemporary issues pertinent to the field of management science and engineering.

Graduate Programs in Management Science and Engineering

MS&E offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The department also offers a coterminal B.S./M.S. degree,  a dual master’s degree in cooperation with each of the other departments in the School of Engineering, and joint master's degrees with the School of Law and the Public Policy Program.

For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the Registrar's coterminal degrees web site.

Applicants for admission as graduate students in MS&E must submit the results of the verbal, quantitative, and analytical parts of the Graduate Record Examination. The deadline for application to the doctoral program is December 2, 2014, and the deadline for application to the master's program is January 13, 2015.

Except in unusual circumstances, admission is limited to the Autumn Quarter because courses are arranged sequentially with basic courses and prerequisites offered early in the academic year.

Assistantships and Fellowships

A limited number of fellowships and assistantships are awarded each year. Applicants admitted to the doctoral program, who have indicated on their application that they would like to be considered for financial aid, are automatically considered for these assistantships and fellowships.  New and returning master's students may apply for course assistantships each quarter, but priority is given to MS&E doctoral students.

Information about loan programs and need-based aid for U.S. citizens and permanent residents can be obtained from the Financial Aid Office.

Learning Outcomes (Graduate)

The M.S. prepares engineers for a lifelong career addressing the critical technical and managerial needs of private and public organizations.  The program emphasizes developing analytic abilities, making better decisions, developing and executing strategies while also leading people who innovate.  Unlike an MBA, our master’s program addresses the technical as well as the behavioral challenges of running organizations and complex systems.  We emphasize quantitative analytic skills and an entrepreneurial spirit. 

The Ph.D. is conferred upon candidates who have demonstrated substantial scholarship and the ability to conduct independent research. Through course work and guided research, the program prepares students to make original contributions in Management Science and Engineering and related fields.

Careers in MS&E

MS&E students are candidates for careers in consulting, product and project management, financial analysis, and work in policy arenas. A significant number join or found start-ups. Many have become leaders in technology-based businesses which have an increasing need for analytically oriented people who understand both business and technology. Other graduates make careers tackling the problems faced by local, national, and international governments by developing new healthcare systems, new energy systems and a more sustainable environment. The major problems of the day demand an ability to integrate the technical, social and economic ways of thinking. This is precisely what the department educates its students to do. 

Bachelor of Science in Management Science and Engineering

The program leading to the B.S. degree in Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) is outlined in the School of Engineering section of this bulletin; more information is contained in the School of Engineering’s Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs. Students are encouraged to plan their academic programs as early as possible, ideally in the freshman or sophomore year. Students should not wait until they are declaring a major to consult with the department’s student services staff. This is particularly important for students who would like to study overseas or pursue another major or minor.

The undergraduate curriculum in Management Science and Engineering provides students training in the fundamentals of engineering systems analysis to prepare them to plan, design, and implement complex economic and technological management systems where a scientific or engineering background is necessary or desirable. The major prepares students for a variety of career paths, including investment banking, management consulting, facilities and process management, or for graduate school in industrial engineering, operations research, business, economics, law, medicine, or public policy .

The educational objectives of the undergraduate degree program are:

  • Principles and Skills—provide students with a basic understanding of management science and engineering principles, including analytical problem solving and communications skills.
  • Preparation for Practice—prepare students for practice in a field that sees rapid changes in tools, problems, and opportunities.
  • Preparation for Continued Growth—prepare students for graduate study and self development over an entire career.
  • Preparation for Service—develop in students the awareness, background, and skills necessary to become responsible citizens, employees, and leaders.

See also the department's undergraduate Learning Outcomes for additional learning objectives.

The program builds on the foundational courses for engineering, including calculus, mathematical modeling, probability, statistics, engineering fundamentals, and physics or chemistry.

Students interested in a minor should see the Minor tab in this section.

MS&E also participates with the departments of Computer Science, Mathematics, and Statistics in a program leading to a B.S. in Mathematical and Computational Science. See the “Mathematical and Computational Science” section of this bulletin.

Core

The department core, taken for all areas, includes courses in accounting, computer science, deterministic optimization, economics, organization theory, and a capstone senior project. Through the core, students in the program are exposed to the breadth of faculty interests, and are in a good position to choose an area during the junior year.

Areas

The major is designed to allow a student to explore all three areas of the department in greater depth.

  1. Finance and Decision: focuses on the design and analysis of financial and strategic plans.
  2. Operations and Analytics: focuses on algorithms, theory, and the design and analysis of manufacturing, production, and service systems.
  3. Organizations, Technology, and Policy: focuses on understanding, design, and analysis of organizations and public policy, particularly technology-based issues. 

Management Science and Engineering (MS&E)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Management Science and Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Management Science and Engineering.

Requirements

Mathematics and Science
All required; see SoE Basic Requirements 1 and 2 1
CME 100Vector Calculus for Engineers5
or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
CME 103Introduction to Matrix Methods5
MS&E 120Probabilistic Analysis5
MS&E 121Introduction to Stochastic Modeling4
MS&E 125Introduction to Applied Statistics4
Select one of the following sequences: 8
Chemical Principles II
   and Structure and Reactivity
Chemical Principles Accelerated
   and Structure and Reactivity
Mechanics and Heat
   and Mechanics and Heat Laboratory
   and Electricity and Optics
   and Electricity and Optics Laboratory
Mechanics
   and Electricity and Magnetism
Electives from SoE approved list or AP/IB credit 113
Technology in Society
Select one of the following; see SoE Basic Requirement 43
Digital Media in Society
Computers and Interfaces
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society
Ethical Issues in Engineering
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy
Technology and National Security (WIM)
Ethics, Technology, and Public Policy (WIM)
Engineering Fundamentals 2
Three courses; see SoE Basic Requirement 3
CS 106AProgramming Methodology 35
Select one of the following: 3
Biotechnology
Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use
Introductory Electronics
Introductory Electronics
An Intro to Making: What is EE
Physics of Electrical Engineering
Introduction to Bioengineering
Select one of the following (or ENGR 25, ENGR 40, or ENGR 80 if not used above):3
Introduction to Engineering Analysis
Intro to Solid Mechanics
Dynamics
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Engineering Thermodynamics
Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis
Engineering Economy
Environmental Science and Technology
Engineering Depth 2
Core Courses (all six required)25
Mathematical Foundations of Computing 4
Programming Abstractions
Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
Economic Analysis I
Senior Project
Introduction to Optimization 4
Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs
Financial Accounting Concepts and Analysis
Organizations: Theory and Management
Area Courses (see below)27
Choose four or five courses (minimum 15 units) from a primary area and two courses (minimum 6 units) from each of the other two areas.
Depth Areas
Finance and Decision Area6-15
Students choosing F&D as their primary area must take at least two of ECON 51, MS&E 145, and MS&E 152
Introductory (appropriate for freshmen and sophomores)
Introductory Financial Analysis
Introduction to Decision Analysis (WIM)
Intermediate (appropriate for juniors and seniors)
Corporate Financial Management
Finance for Non-MBAs
Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis
Advanced (intended primarily for graduate students)
Investment Science
Engineering Risk Analysis
Project Course in Engineering Risk Analysis
Advanced Investment Science
Operations and Analytics Area6-15
Students choosing O&A as their primary area may also include CS 161, CS 229, and STATS 202 in their selections 4
Introductory (no prerequisites)
Interactive Management Science
Methods
Simulation
"Small" Data
Stochastic Control
Applications
Information Networks and Services
Networked Markets
Introduction to Operations Management
Supply Chain Management
Healthcare Operations Management
Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing
Operations Strategy
Organizations, Technology, and Policy Area6-15
Students choosing OT&P as their primary area must take at least two of ENGR 145, MS&E 175, MS&E 181, MS&E 185, PSYCH 70, and SOC 114 (but not both PSYCH 70 and SOC 114) 4
Introductory (no prerequisites)
Ethical Issues in Engineering 4
The Spirit of Entrepreneurship
Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications
Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis
Technology and National Security (WIM) 4
Ethics, Technology, and Public Policy (WIM) 4
Advanced (has prerequisites and/or appropriate for juniors and seniors)
Technology Entrepreneurship
Innovation, Creativity, and Change
Engineering Innovation
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy 4
Global Work
Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis
Health Policy Modeling
Climate Policy Analysis
Energy Policy Analysis
1

Math and Science must total a minimum of 44 units. Electives must come from the School of Engineering approved list, or, PSYCH 50 Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience, or PSYCH 70 Introduction to Social Psychology, and many not repeat material from any other requirement. AP/IB credit for Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics may be used.

2

Engineering fundamentals plus engineering depth must total a minimum of 60 units.

3

Students may petition to place out of CS 106A Programming Methodology.

4

Courses used to satisfy the Math, Science, Technology in Society, or Engineering Fundamental requirement may not also be used to satisfy an engineering depth requirement.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) Minor

The following courses are required to fulfill the minor requirements:

Background requirements (two courses)
CME 100Vector Calculus for Engineers5
or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
CS 106AProgramming Methodology5
Minor requirements (seven courses, letter-graded)
MS&E 111Introduction to Optimization4
MS&E 120Probabilistic Analysis5
MS&E 121Introduction to Stochastic Modeling4
MS&E 125Introduction to Applied Statistics4
MS&E 180Organizations: Theory and Management4
Electives (select any two 100- or 200-level MS&E courses)6
Recommended courses
In addition to the required background and minor courses, it is recommended that students also take the following courses.
ECON 50Economic Analysis I5
MS&E 140Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs (may be used as one of the required electives above)2-4
or MS&E 140X Financial Accounting Concepts and Analysis

Master of Science in Management Science and Engineering

The M.S. degree programs require a minimum of 45 units beyond the equivalent of a B.S. degree at Stanford. All programs represent substantial progress in the major field beyond the bachelor’s degree.

University requirements for the master’s degree are described in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

The master’s in Management Science and Engineer prepares engineers for a lifelong career addressing the technical and managerial needs of private and public organizations. The program emphasizes developing analytic abilities, making better decisions, and developing and executing strategies while also leading people who innovate. Unlike an M.B.A., the department's master’s program addresses the technical as well as the behavioral challenges of running organizations and complex systems, emphasizing quantitative analytic skills and an entrepreneurial spirit. 

MS&E students know math, engineering, as well as behavioral science. They can conduct experiments to design better systems, organizations and work processes. They understand how to analyze data to solve real world problems. They can develop mathematical and computational models to inform action. They know how to surface and examine unarticulated assumptions and root causes. These students can communicate effectively in the team environments found in so many contemporary organizations.

MS&E master’s students have breadth as well as depth. All are required to develop competence in optimization and analytics, organizations and decisions, and probability.  In addition every student pursues a specialty in one of six areas:

  1. Financial Analytics:Students who concentrate in Financial Analytics are prepared for careers requiring analytical rigor and the ability to innovate around market challenges. Example career paths include financial services, risk management, investment management, financial technology and data processing, financial regulation and policy, exchanges and clearing houses, and auditing and compliance. The concentration combines the in-depth study of quantitative techniques with practical, hands-on business problem solving. Students learn to use mathematical models and quantitative tools to solve complex problems in finance practice. The concentration exploits the intellectual ties between finance, operations research, computer science, and engineering. It offers a high level of flexibility and a range of elective courses that allow students to tailor the program to their specific career goals. Required courses immerse students in quantitative methods and deepen their understanding of finance fundamentals. Projects courses feature practical, data-driven team projects and case studies, fostering group learning and interaction with peers. 
  2. Operations and Analytics: Students following the Operations and Analytics track become prepared in the fundamentals and applications that are critical to careers in a fields ranging from operations management in the service, health care, production, manufacturing, computer, telecommunications, banking, industries to modern Silicon Valley information technology and data analytics. The program emphasizes a balance between the technical rigor of methodologies with lasting value and insightful modern applications and design challenges in a variety of established and emerging industries and operations environments. It offers a portfolio of courses in probabilistic modeling, optimization, simulation, algorithms, data science, networks, markets, and corresponding applications.
  3. Technology and Engineering Management -- Students who concentrate in Technology and Engineering Management are prepared for careers including product and project management, management consulting, and entrepreneurship.  They acquire skills to manage technical organizations, foster innovation, and deal with rapidly evolving technologies and dynamic markets.  Specialized coursework is flexible, allowing students to explore and gain depth, understanding technical organizations to develop a culture of successful innovation and entrepreneurship, along with methods for decision making under uncertainty, financial analysis, and strategic planning.
  4. Decision and Risk Analysis: Students who specialize in Decision and Risk Analysis are prepared for careers including management consulting, policy analysis, and risk management, applying engineering systems analysis to tackle complex economic and technical management problems in the private and public sectors.  They acquire the skills to identify and develop opportunities in uncertain situations while recognizing and hedging the downside risks. Specialized course work includes the mathematical foundations for modeling in dynamic uncertain environments to value and manage uncertain opportunities and risks, applications to public policy, and an opportunity to work on a client project under faculty guidance. 
  5. Energy and Environment: The Energy and Environment track is designed for students interested in energy and environmental issues from the perspectives of public policy, nongovernmental organizations, or corporations. This track includes core courses; courses in economic analysis, energy resources, and energy/environmental policy analysis; and an individually designed concentration, typically emphasizing policy, strategy, or technology. Seminars provide insights into current corporate strategy, public policy, and research community developments. Energy/environmental project courses give practice in applying methodologies and concepts.
  6. Health Systems Modeling: The Health Systems Modeling track is designed for students interested in healthcare operations and policy. The courses in this track emphasize the application of mathematical and economic analysis to problems in public health policy and the design and operation of healthcare services.

The master’s degree is designed to be a terminal degree program with a professional focus. The M.S. degree can be earned in one academic year (three academic quarters) of full-time work, although most students choose to complete the program in five academic quarters, or eighteen months, and work as an intern in the Summer Quarter.

Background Requirements

Students are expected to have completed both MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables , or an equivalent multivariable differential calculus course, and CS 106A Programming Methodology, or an equivalent general programming course, before beginning graduate study.  These courses do not count toward degree requirements.

Degree Requirements

Students must take a minimum of 45 course units as follows:

  • Three core courses (9-12 units)
  • A primary or specialized concentration (12-24 units)
  • One project course or two integrated project courses (0-8 units)
  • Elective courses (1-24 units; see restrictions below)

Core Courses (three courses required)

Optimization and Analytics (select one)
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 226"Small" Data3
Relevant 200 or 300 level course in optimization or anayltics if a comparable introductory course in optimization or analytics has already been completed.3-4
Organizations and Decisions (select one)
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 280Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action3-4
Relevant 200 or 300 level course in organizations or decisions if a comparable introductory course in organizations or decisions has already been completed.3-4
Probability (select one)
MS&E 220Probabilistic Analysis3-4
MS&E 221Stochastic Modeling3
Relevant 200 or 300 level course in probability or stochastics if a comparable introductory course in probability or stochastics has already been completed.3-4

Primary Concentrations

Financial Analytics Concentration (five courses required)
Financial Theory and Modeling (select one):
MS&E 245AInvestment Science3
MS&E 245BAdvanced Investment Science3
MS&E 246Financial Risk Management3
Quantitative Methods (two required):
Select one (whichever wasn't taken for core):
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 226"Small" Data3
Select one:
MS&E 322Stochastic Calculus and Control3
STATS 240Statistical Methods in Finance3-4
STATS 241Econometric Modeling Methodology and Applications to Financial Markets3-4
Financial Applications (select two):
MATH 237Default and Systemic Risk3
MS&E 347Credit Risk: Modeling and Management3
MS&E 348Optimization of Uncertainty and Applications in Finance3
MS&E 445Projects in Wealth Management3-4
MS&E 447Systemic and Market Risk : Notes on Recent History, Practice, and Policy3
MS&E 448Big Financial Data and Algorithmic Trading3
Operations and Analytics Concentration (four courses required)
Required Courses
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization (whichever course wasn't taken for core)3-4
or MS&E 226 "Small" Data
MS&E 221Stochastic Modeling (or a more advanced course in probability (i.e. MS&E 223 Simulation) if a student has taken an equivalent class in stochastic modeling)3
MS&E 251Stochastic Control3
MS&E 260Introduction to Operations Management3
or MS&E 261 Inventory Control and Production Systems
or MS&E 263 Healthcare Operations Management
Recommended Elective Courses:
MS&E 223Simulation3
MS&E 233Networked Markets3
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
MS&E 245AInvestment Science3
MS&E 250AEngineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 251Stochastic Control3
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 260Introduction to Operations Management3
MS&E 261Inventory Control and Production Systems3
MS&E 262Supply Chain Management3
MS&E 263Healthcare Operations Management3
MS&E 264Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing3-4
MS&E 268Operations Strategy3
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 292Health Policy Modeling3
MS&E 467Strategic Operations Consulting3
Technology and Engineering Management Concentration (five courses required)

The course used to satisfy the Organizations and Decisions Core may also be counted here.

Organizations and Strategy (select at least one):
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 274Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy3
MS&E 278Patent Law and Strategy for Innovators and Entrepreneurs2-3
MS&E 280Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action3-4
MS&E 283Scaling up Excellence in Organizations4
Entrepreneurship and Innovation (select at least one):
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 271Global Entrepreneurial Marketing3-4
MS&E 272Startup Boards3
MS&E 273Technology Venture Formation3-4
MS&E 276Entrepreneurial Management and Finance3
MS&E 277Creativity and Innovation3-4
ENGR 245The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground3-4
Finance and Decisions (select at least one):
MS&E 240Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs3-4
MS&E 245AInvestment Science3
MS&E 245GFinance for Non-MBAs3
MS&E 250AEngineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 352Decision Analysis II: Professional Decision Analysis3-4

Specialized Concentrations (must have approval of the academic advisor)

Decision and Risk Analysis Concentration (four courses required)
Core Courses are restricted as follows:
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 221Stochastic Modeling3
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
Required Courses (select two):
MS&E 241Economic Analysis3-4
MS&E 250AEngineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 352Decision Analysis II: Professional Decision Analysis3-4
Policy Course (select one):
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
MS&E 292Health Policy Modeling3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
MS&E 294Climate Policy Analysis3
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3
Project Course (select one):
MS&E 250BProject Course in Engineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 452Decision Analysis Projects: Helping Real Leaders Make Real Decisions3
Energy and Environment Concentration (six courses required)
Required Courses:
CEE 207AEnergy Resources3-5
MS&E 241Economic Analysis3-4
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
Three additional courses from energy, policy, or strategy areas below.
Policy:
EARTHSYS 247
ECON 251Natural Resource and Energy Economics2-5
ENERGY 158Bringing New Energy Technologies to Market: Optimizing Technology Push and Market Pull3
GSBGEN 336Energy Markets and Policy4
LAW 455Energy Law3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
MS&E 294Climate Policy Analysis3
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3
Strategy:
ECON 203N203 For Non-Economics Ph.D. Students2-5
ENERGY 158Bringing New Energy Technologies to Market: Optimizing Technology Push and Market Pull3
GSBGEN 538Energy Policy, Markets, and Climate Change2
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 271Global Entrepreneurial Marketing3-4
MS&E 272Startup Boards3
MS&E 273Technology Venture Formation3-4
MS&E 274Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy3
MS&E 276Entrepreneurial Management and Finance3
MS&E 277Creativity and Innovation3-4
MS&E 278Patent Law and Strategy for Innovators and Entrepreneurs2-3
Energy:
ENERGY 102Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes3
ENERGY 104Transition to sustainable energy systems3
ENERGY 158Bringing New Energy Technologies to Market: Optimizing Technology Push and Market Pull3
ME 370AEnergy Systems I: Thermodynamics3
ME 370BEnergy Systems II: Modeling and Advanced Concepts4
PHYSICS 240Introduction to the Physics of Energy3
PHYSICS 241Introduction to Nuclear Energy3
Recommended Seminars:
ECON 341Public Economics and Environmental Economics Seminar1-10
ENERGY 301The Energy Seminar1
MS&E 441Policy and Economics Research Roundtable1
MS&E 472Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar1
Recommended Elective Courses:
ECON 250Environmental Economics2-5
ECON 270Intermediate Econometrics I2-5
ECON 278Behavioral and Experimental Economics I2-5
MGTECON 603Econometric Methods I4
MS&E 201Dynamic Systems3-4
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 244Economic Growth and Development3
MS&E 251Stochastic Control3
Health Systems Modeling Concentration (four courses required)
Required Courses
HRP 263Advanced Decision Science Methods and Modeling in Health3
HRP 392Analysis of Costs, Risks, and Benefits of Health Care4
MS&E 263Healthcare Operations Management3
MS&E 292Health Policy Modeling3
Recommended Elective Courses:
HRP 241Measuring Global Health4
HRP 256Economics of Health and Medical Care5
HRP 391Health Care Regulation, Finance and Policy3
MS&E 256Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices3

Projects

Select one project course or two integrated project courses; may double-count as part of the core or concentration. 

Project Courses
MS&E 250BProject Course in Engineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 348Optimization of Uncertainty and Applications in Finance3
MS&E 403Integrative Modeling3
MS&E 445Projects in Wealth Management3-4
MS&E 447Systemic and Market Risk : Notes on Recent History, Practice, and Policy3
MS&E 448Big Financial Data and Algorithmic Trading3
MS&E 452Decision Analysis Projects: Helping Real Leaders Make Real Decisions3
MS&E 464Global Project Coordination3-4
MS&E 467Strategic Operations Consulting3
Integrated Project Courses
MS&E 201Dynamic Systems3-4
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 233Networked Markets3
MS&E 243Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis3
MS&E 245AInvestment Science3
MS&E 256Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices3
MS&E 260Introduction to Operations Management3
MS&E 262Supply Chain Management3
MS&E 264Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing3-4
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 271Global Entrepreneurial Marketing3-4
MS&E 273Technology Venture Formation3-4
MS&E 274Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy3
MS&E 277Creativity and Innovation3-4
MS&E 280Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action3-4
MS&E 294Climate Policy Analysis3
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3
MS&E 311Optimization3
MS&E 315Numerical Optimization3
MS&E 331Introduction to Computational Social Science3
MS&E 337Information Networks3
MS&E 338Advanced Topics in Information Science and Technology3
MS&E 347Credit Risk: Modeling and Management3
MS&E 355Influence Diagrams and Probabilistics Networks3

 Additional Requirements

  1. At least 45 units must be in courses numbered 100 and above.
  2. The degree program must be completed with a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher.
  3. At least 27 units must be in courses numbered 200 and above in MS&E, taken for a letter grade and a minimum of two units each.
  4. At least 36 letter-graded units must be in MS&E or closely related fields. Closely related fields include any department in the School of Engineering, mathematics, statistics, economics, sociology, psychology, or business.
  5. All courses used to satisfy core, concentration, or project requirements must be taken for a letter grade.
  6. A maximum of three units of 1-unit courses such as seminars, colloquia, workshops, in any department, including MS&E 208A, B, and C, Curricular Practical Training.
  7. A maximum of 18 non-degree option (NDO) units through the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD).
  8. Courses in athletics may not be applied toward the degree.

Dual Master's Degree Program

The dual degree program enables a small group of graduate students to obtain two master’s degrees simultaneously. Students complete the course requirements for each department. A total of 90 units is required to complete the dual master’s degree.

Admission

For the dual degree, admission to two departments is required, but is coordinated by designated members of both admissions committees who make recommendations to the committees of their respective departments. Students may apply to only one department initially. After the first quarter at Stanford, students may apply to be admitted to the second department.

Advising

Every student in the dual degree program has one adviser in each department.

Joint MS&E and Law Degrees

The School of Law and the Department of Management Science and Engineering offer joint degree programs leading to a J.D. degree and an M.S. degree in MS&E, or to a J.D. and Ph.D. in MS&E. These programs are designed for students who wish to prepare themselves for careers in areas relating to both law and to the decision making, policy making, and problem solving knowledge and skills developed in the MS&E program. Students interested in either joint degree program must apply and gain admission separately to the School of Law and the Department of Management Science and Engineering and, as an additional step, must secure consent from both academic units to pursue degrees in those units as part of a joint degree program. Interest in either joint degree program should be noted on the student’s admission applications and may be considered by the admission committee of each program. Alternatively, an enrolled student in either the Law School or MS&E may apply for admission to the other program and for joint degree status in both academic units after commencing study in either program.

Joint degree students may elect to begin their course of study in either the School of Law or MS&E. Students are assigned to a joint program committee composed of at least one faculty member from Law and one from MS&E. This committee plans the student’s program jointly with the student. Students must be enrolled full time in the Law School for the first year of law studies, and it is recommended that students devote exclusively one Autumn Quarter to the MS&E M.S. program to initiate their MS&E work. After that time, enrollment may be in MS&E or Law, and students may choose courses from either program regardless of where enrolled. A candidate in the joint J.D./Ph.D. program should spend a substantial amount of full time residency in MS&E. Students must satisfy the requirements for both the J.D. and the M.S. or Ph.D. degrees as specified in this bulletin or by the School of Law. The Law School may approve courses from MS&E or courses in the student’s MS&E program from outside of the Department of Management Science and Engineering that may count toward the J.D. degree, and MS&E may approve courses from the Law School that may count toward the M.S. or Ph.D. degree in MS&E. In either case, approval may consist of a list applicable to all joint degree students or may be tailored to each individual student’s program. The lists may differ depending on whether the student is pursuing an M.S. or a Ph.D. in MS&E.

In the case of a J.D./M.S. program, no more than 45 units of approved courses may be counted toward both degrees. In the case of a J.D./Ph.D. program, no more than 54 units of approved courses may be counted toward both degrees. In either case, no more than 36 units of courses that originate outside the Law School may count toward the law degree. To the extent that courses under this joint degree program originate outside the Law School but count toward the law degree, the law credits permitted under Section 17(1) of the Law School Regulations are reduced on a unit-per-unit basis, but not below zero. The maximum number of law school credits that may be counted toward the M.S. in MS&E is the greater of: (a) 18 units in the case of the M.S., or (b) the maximum number of hours from courses outside the department that an M.S. candidate in MS&E is permitted to count toward the applicable degree under general departmental guidelines or under departmental rules that apply in the case of a particular student.

Tuition and financial aid arrangements are normally through the school in which the student is then enrolled.

Joint MS&E and Master of Public Policy Degree

MS MS&E students who wish to apply their analytical and management skills to the field of public policy can simultaneously pursue a master degree in MS&E and a master degree in Public Policy.  The MPP is a two-year degree program, but MS MS&E students who pursue the joint program can earn both degrees in a minimum of two years, depending on prior preparation and elective choices, by counting up to 45 quarter units of course work toward both degrees.  After admission to the Department of Management Science and Engineering, incoming or current MS students request that their application file be forwarded to the MPP program director for review.

Students in the joint program normally will spend most of their first year taking MS&E core courses.  The second year is typically devoted to the MPP core, concentration, and practicum.  The joint degree requires 90 quarter units.  Tuition for the first year of study is paid at the Graduate Engineering rate, the remaining time at the Graduate rate.

Professional Education

The Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD) provides opportunities for employees of some local and remote companies to take courses at Stanford.

The Honors Cooperative Program (HCP) provides opportunities for employees of SCPD member companies to earn an M.S. degree, over a longer period, by taking one or two courses per academic quarter. Some courses are only offered on campus; HCP students may attend those courses at Stanford to meet the degree requirements. It is possible to complete this program as a remote HCP student although the remote offerings are limited. Students must apply for a degree program through the standard application process, and must meet the standard application deadlines.

The non-degree option (NDO) allows employees of some local companies to take courses for credit from their company sites before being admitted to a degree program. Students apply to take NDO courses each quarter through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. Up to 18 units taken as an NDO student may be applied toward a degree program. For additional information about the NDO application process and deadlines, see the SCPD web site, or contact SCPD at (650) 725-3000.

Certificate

The department offers a certificate program within the framework of the NDO program. A certificate can be obtained by completing three MS&E core courses, plus one MS&E elective course for a total of four courses. For further information, see http://scpd.stanford.edu/scpd/programs/certs/managementSci.htm.

Doctor of Philosophy in Management Science and Engineering

University requirements for the Ph.D. degree are described in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin.

The Ph.D. degree in MS&E is intended for students primarily interested in a career of research and teaching, or high-level technical work in universities, industry, or government. The program requires three years of full-time graduate study, at least two years of which must be at Stanford. Typically, however, students take about four to five years after entering the program to complete all Ph.D. requirements. The Ph.D. is generally organized around the requirement that the students acquire a breadth across some of the eight areas of the department, and depth in one of them. These fields of study are:

  • Decision analysis and risk analysis
  • Economics and finance
  • Information science and technology
  • Organization, technology, and entrepreneurship
  • Policy and strategy
  • Probability and stochastic systems
  • Production and operations management
  • Systems modeling and optimization

Each student admitted to the Ph.D. program must satisfy a breadth requirement and pass a qualification procedure. The purpose of the qualification procedure is to assess the student’s command of the field and to evaluate his or her potential to complete a high-quality dissertation in a timely manner. The student must complete specified course work in one of the eight areas of the department, or the Systems Program which is a combination of several areas. The qualification decision is based on the student’s grade point average (GPA), on the one or two preliminary papers prepared by the student, and on the student’s performance in an area examination. Considering this evidence, the department faculty votes on advancing the student to candidacy in the department at large. The Ph.D. requires a minimum of 135 units, at least 54 of which must be in courses of 3 units or more. At least 48 course units in courses of 3 units or more must be taken for a letter grade. Finally, the student must pass a University oral examination and complete a Ph.D. dissertation. During the course of the Ph.D. program, students who do not have a master’s degree are strongly encouraged to complete one, either in MS&E or in another Stanford department.

Breadth Requirement

  1. The breadth requirement is to be satisfied by a choice of four courses spanning four out of the above mentioned eight areas of the department.
  2. The Ph.D. candidacy form must contain four courses that satisfy the breadth requirement.
  3. Courses chosen to satisfy the breadth requirement must be taken for letter grades.
  4. At least one of the four courses chosen to satisfy the breadth requirement must be at the 300 level.

Courses Satisfying the Breadth Requirement:

Choose at least one course from four different areas.  Courses used to satisfy the breadth requirement may also be used to satisfy the depth requirement.

Systems Modeling and Optimization:
MS&E 201Dynamic Systems3-4
MS&E 211Linear and Nonlinear Optimization3-4
MS&E 310Linear Programming3
MS&E 311Optimization3
MS&E 312Advanced Methods in Numerical Optimization3
MS&E 314Linear and Conic Optimization with Applications3
MS&E 315Numerical Optimization3
MS&E 316Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms3
MS&E 317Algorithms for Modern Data Models3
MS&E 318Large-Scale Numerical Optimization3
MS&E 319Approximation Algorithms3
Probability and Stochastic Systems:
MS&E 220Probabilistic Analysis3-4
MS&E 221Stochastic Modeling3
MS&E 223Simulation3
MS&E 321Stochastic Systems3
MS&E 322Stochastic Calculus and Control3
MS&E 335Queueing and Scheduling in Processing Networks3
MS&E 336Platform and Marketplace Design3
MS&E 337Information Networks3
MS&E 338Advanced Topics in Information Science and Technology3
Information Science and Technology:
MS&E 233Networked Markets3
MS&E 335Queueing and Scheduling in Processing Networks3
MS&E 336Platform and Marketplace Design3
MS&E 337Information Networks3
MS&E 338Advanced Topics in Information Science and Technology3
Economics and Finance:
MS&E 241Economic Analysis3-4
MS&E 244Economic Growth and Development3
MS&E 245AInvestment Science3
MS&E 245BAdvanced Investment Science3
MS&E 347Credit Risk: Modeling and Management3
MS&E 348Optimization of Uncertainty and Applications in Finance3
Decision Analysis and Risk Analysis:
MS&E 250AEngineering Risk Analysis3
MS&E 251Stochastic Control3
MS&E 252Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 351Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control3
MS&E 352Decision Analysis II: Professional Decision Analysis3-4
MS&E 353Decision Analysis III: Frontiers of Decision Analysis3
MS&E 355Influence Diagrams and Probabilistics Networks3
Production and Operations Management:
MS&E 260Introduction to Operations Management3
MS&E 261Inventory Control and Production Systems3
MS&E 262Supply Chain Management3
MS&E 263Healthcare Operations Management3
MS&E 264Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing3-4
MS&E 268Operations Strategy3
MS&E 365Advanced Models in Operations Management3
Organization, Technology, and Entrepreneurship:
MS&E 280Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action3-4
MS&E 380Doctoral Research Seminar in Organizations3
MS&E 381Doctoral Research Seminar in Work, Technology, and Organization2-3
MS&E 383Doctoral Seminar on Ethnographic Research3
MS&E 384Groups and Teams3
Policy and Strategy:
MS&E 270Strategy in Technology-Based Companies3-4
MS&E 292Health Policy Modeling3
MS&E 293Technology and National Security3
MS&E 294Climate Policy Analysis3
MS&E 295Energy Policy Analysis3
MS&E 371Innovation and Strategic Change2-3
MS&E 372Entrepreneurship Doctoral Research Seminar1-3
MS&E 374Dynamic Corporate Strategy3
MS&E 375Research on Entrepreneurship3
MS&E 376Strategy Doctoral Research Seminar3
MS&E 389Seminar on Organizational Theory5
MS&E 390Doctoral Research Seminar in Health Systems Modeling1-3
MS&E 391Doctoral Research Seminar in Energy-Environmental Systems Modeling and Analysis1-3

 Qualification Procedure Requirements

The qualification procedure is based both on breadth across the department’s disciplines and depth in an area of the student’s choice. The qualification process must be completed by the end of the month of May of the student’s second year of graduate study in the department. The performance of all doctoral students is reviewed every year at a department faculty meeting at the end of May or beginning of June. Ph.D. qualification decisions are made at that time and individual feedback is provided.

The Ph.D. qualification requirements comprise these elements:

  1. Grade Point Average: A student must maintain a GPA of at least 3.4 in the four courses chosen to satisfy the breadth requirements, and a GPA of at least 3.4 in the set of all courses taken by the student within the department. In both cases, the GPA is computed on the basis of the nominal number of units for which each course is offered.
  2. Paper(s): A student may choose between two options, either of which is to be completed before the Spring Quarter of the student’s second year. The first option involves one paper supervised by a primary faculty adviser and a faculty consultant. This paper should be written in two quarters.
    1. The second option involves two shorter sequential tutorials, with two different faculty advisers. Each tutorial should be completed in one quarter. In both options, the student chooses the faculty adviser(s)/consultant with the faculty members’ consent.
    2. A student may register for up to 3 units per tutorial and up to 6 units for a paper. These paper or tutorial units do not count towards the 54 course units required for the Ph.D., and letter grades are not given.
  3. Area Qualification: In addition, during the second year, a student must pass an examination in one of the eight areas of the MS&E department or the Systems Program, a combination of several areas, which is of the student’s choice. This area examination is written, oral, or both, at the discretion of the area faculty administering the exam.
  4. Area Course Requirement: Students must complete the depth requirements of one of the eight fields of study of the MS&E department or the Systems Program which is a combination of several areas. Courses used to satisfy depth requirements must be taken for a letter grade. The Ph.D. requirements for the eight areas of the MS&E department are available from the MS&E student services office.

Ph.D. Minor in Management Science and Engineering

Students pursuing a Ph.D. in another department who wish to receive a Ph.D. minor in Management Science and Engineering should consult the MS&E student services office. A minor in MS&E may be obtained by completing 20 units of approved graduate-level MS&E courses, of which at least 6 units must be at the 300-level. Courses approved for the minor must form a coherent program, and must include one course from at least three of the eleven MS&E Master of Science core options. The program must include a minimum of 16 letter-graded units, and a minimum grade point average of 3.3 must be achieved in these courses.

Emeriti: (Professors) James L. Adams, Kenneth J. Arrow, Richard W. Cottle, B. Curtis Eaves, Frederick S. Hillier, Donald L. Iglehart, David G. Luenberger, Michael M. May, William J. Perry, Henry E. Riggs, David A. Thompson

Chair: Peter W. Glynn

Professors: Nicholas Bambos, Stephen R. Barley, Margaret L. Brandeau, Kathleen M. Eisenhardt, Peter W. Glynn, Ashish Goel, Warren H. Hausman, Ronald A. Howard, Riitta Katila, M. Elisabeth Paté-Cornell, Robert I. Sutton, James L. Sweeney, Benjamin Van Roy, Yinyu Ye

Associate Professors: Samuel S. Chiu, Kay Giesecke, Pamela J. Hinds, Ramesh Johari, Amin Saberi, Ross D. Shachter, Edison T. S. Tse

Assistant Professors: Charles E. Eesley, Sharad Goel, Melissa A. Valentine

Professors (Research): Siegfried S. Hecker, Walter Murray, Michael A. Saunders, John P. Weyant

Professors (Teaching): Thomas H. Byers, Robert E. McGinn

Professor of the Practice: Tina L. Seelig

Courtesy Professors: Anat Admati, Stephen P. Boyd, Douglas K. Owens, Sylvia Plevritis, Walter Powell, Balaji Prabhakar, Tim Roughgarden

Lecturers: Daniel Barreto, Ravi Belani, Lisa Borland, David Chang, Toby Corey, Jeff Epstein, Jack Fuchs, Rebeca Hwang, Colin Kessinger, Clint Korver, Arik Lifschitz, Trevor Loy, Mary Morrison, Heidi Roizen, Rosanne Siino, Lynda Kate Smith, Andrew Wong

Consulting Professors: Peter Haas, Gerd Infanger, Thomas Kosnik, Burke Robinson, Sam L. Savage, Behnam Tabrizi

Consulting Associate Professors: Steve Blank, Michael Lyons, Audrey MacLean, Jan Pietzsch,  F. Victor Stanton, Peter Woehrmann

Consulting Assistant Professors: Blake E. Johnson

Visiting Professor: Olivier de La Grandville

Director of the Industrial Affiliates Program: Yinyu Ye

Courses

MS&E 20. Discrete Probability Concepts And Models. 4 Units.

Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, belief networks, random variables, conditioning, and expectation.

MS&E 22Q. The Flaw of Averages. 3 Units.

Uncertain assumptions in business and public policy are often replaced with single ¿best guess¿ or average numbers. This leads to a fallacy as fundamental as the belief that the earth is flat, which I call the Flaw of Averages. It states, in effect, that: plans based on average assumptions are wrong on average. This class will discuss mitigations of the flaw of averages using simulation and other methods from probability management.

MS&E 41. Financial Literacy. 1 Unit.

Practical knowledge about personal finance and money management including budgeting, pay checks, credit cards, banking, insurance, taxes, and saving. Class especially appropriate for those soon to be self-supporting. Limited enrollment. Admission by order of enrollment in Axess.

MS&E 52. Introduction to Decision Making. 3 Units.

How to sustain focus, discipline, and passion across the Decision Making Spectrum. Comprehensive examples illustrate decision analysis theories and concepts. Consulting case studies highlight practical solutions for real decisions. Student teams present insights from their decision analyses for current organizations. Topics: decision quality, context, processes, framing, structuring, modeling, assessment, judgment under uncertainty, bias reduction, probabilistic inference, robust analysis, sensitivity diagrams, information appraisal, portfolio analysis, risk management, creativity, decision psychology, communication strategies, gaining commitment, decision culture, and decision leadership and management. Not intended for MS&E majors.

MS&E 92Q. International Environmental Policy. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Science, economics, and politics of international environmental policy. Current negotiations on global climate change, including actors and potential solutions. Sources include briefing materials used in international negotiations and the U.S. Congress.

MS&E 93Q. Nuclear Weapons, Energy, Proliferation, and Terrorism. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. At least 20 countries have built or considered building nuclear weapons. However, the paths these countries took in realizing their nuclear ambitions vary immensely. Why is this the case? How do the histories, cultures, national identities, and leadership of these countries affect the trajectory and success of their nuclear programs? This seminar will address these and other questions about nuclear weapons and their proliferation. Students will learn the fundamentals of nuclear technology, including nuclear weapons and nuclear energy, and be expected to use this knowledge in individual research projects on the nuclear weapons programs of individual countries. Case studies will include France, UK, China, India, Israel, Pakistan, North Korea, South Africa, Libya, Iraq, and Iran, among others. Please note any language skills in your application. Recommended: 193 or 193W or 293.

MS&E 101. Undergraduate Directed Study. 1-15 Unit.

Subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member. Prerequisite: faculty sponsor.

MS&E 107. Interactive Management Science. 3 Units.

Analytical techniques such as linear and integer programming, Monte Carlo simulation, forecasting, decision analysis, and Markov chains in the environment of the spreadsheet. Probability management. Materials include spreadsheet add-ins for implementing these and other techniques. Emphasis is on building intuition through interactive modeling, and extending the applicability of this type of analysis through integration with existing business data structures.
Same as: MS&E 207

MS&E 108. Senior Project. 5 Units.

Restricted to MS&E majors in their senior year. Students carry out a major project in groups of four, applying techniques and concepts learned in the major. Project work includes problem identification and definition, data collection and synthesis, modeling, development of feasible solutions, and presentation of results. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).

MS&E 111. Introduction to Optimization. 4 Units.

Formulation and analysis of linear optimization problems. Solution using Excel solver. Polyhedral geometry and duality theory. Applications to contingent claims analysis, production scheduling, pattern recognition, two-player zero-sum games, and network flows. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Same as: ENGR 62

MS&E 120. Probabilistic Analysis. 5 Units.

Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on focusing on structuring, model building, and analysis. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Topics include axioms of probability, probability trees, random variables, distributions, conditioning, expectation, change of variables, and limit theorems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.

MS&E 121. Introduction to Stochastic Modeling. 4 Units.

Stochastic processes and models in operations research. Discrete and continuous time parameter Markov chains. Queuing theory, inventory theory, simulation. Prerequisite: 120 or Statistics 116.

MS&E 125. Introduction to Applied Statistics. 4 Units.

An increasing amount of data is now generated in a variety of disciplines, ranging from finance and economics, to the natural and social sciences. Making use of this information, however, requires both statistical tools and an understanding of how the substantive scientific questions should drive the analysis. In this hands-on course, we learn to explore and analyze real-world datasets. We cover techniques for summarizing and describing data, methods for statistical inference, and principles for effectively communicating results. Prerequisite: 120 or equivalent, CS 106A.

MS&E 130. Information Networks and Services. 3 Units.

Architecture of the Internet and performance engineering of computer systems and networks. Switching, routing and shortest path algorithms. Congestion management and queueing networks. Peer-to-peer networking. Wireless and mobile networking. Information service engineering and management. Search engines and recommendation systems. Reputation systems and social networking technologies. Security and trust. Information markets. Select special topics and case studies. Prerequisites: 111, 120, and CS 106A.

MS&E 140. Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs. 3-4 Units.

Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.
Same as: MS&E 240

MS&E 140X. Financial Accounting Concepts and Analysis. 2 Units.

Introductory course in financial accounting. Accounting is referred to as the language of business. Developing students¿ ability to read, understand, and use business financial statements. Understanding the mapping between the underlying economic events and financial statements, and how this mapping can affect inferences about future firm profitability. Introduction to measuring and reporting of the operating cycle; the process of preparing and presenting primary financial statements; the judgment involved and discretion allowed in making accounting choices; the effects of accounting discretion on the quality of the (reported) financial information; and the fundamentals of financial statement analysis. Class time will be allocated to a combination of lectures, cases and discussions of cases. Capstone project analyzing a company¿s financials at the end of the quarter.

MS&E 145. Introductory Financial Analysis. 3 Units.

Formerly MS&E 142. Evaluation and management of money, complicated by temporary distributions and uncertainty. The "time-value of money" and its impact on economic decisions (both personal and corporate) with the introduction of interest rate (constant or varying over time); several approaches critically examined and made consistent as suitable metrics of comparison. The concept of investment diversification in the presence of uncertainty; portfolio selection and efficient frontier analysis leading to the formulation of the Capital Asset Pricing Model; practical implementation of the concepts, including comparison of loan (e.g., house and auto) terms, credit card financial terms, interest rate term structure and its relationship to rate-of-return analysis, and graphical presentation of uncertain investment alternatives; and current economic news of interest. Critical thinking, discussion, and interaction, using group and computer labs assignments. Prerequisites: differential calculus and probability. Recommended: optimization.

MS&E 146. Corporate Financial Management. 4 Units.

Key functions of finance in both large and small companies, and the core concepts and key analytic tools that provide their foundation. Making financing decisions, evaluating investments, and managing cashflow, profitability and risk. Designing performance metrics to effectively measure and align the activities of functional groups and individuals within the firm. Structuring relationships with key customers, partners and suppliers. Prerequisite: 142 or 245G or equivalent.

MS&E 152. Introduction to Decision Analysis. 3-4 Units.

How to make good decisions in a complex, dynamic, and uncertain world. People often make decisions that on close examination they regard as wrong. Decision analysis uses a structured conversation based on actional thought to obtain clarity of action in a wide variety of domains. Topics: distinctions, possibilities and probabilities, relevance, value of information and experimentation, relevance and decision diagrams, risk attitude. Students seeking to fulfill the Writing in the Major requirement should register for MS&E 152W.
Same as: MS&E 152W

MS&E 152W. Introduction to Decision Analysis. 3-4 Units.

How to make good decisions in a complex, dynamic, and uncertain world. People often make decisions that on close examination they regard as wrong. Decision analysis uses a structured conversation based on actional thought to obtain clarity of action in a wide variety of domains. Topics: distinctions, possibilities and probabilities, relevance, value of information and experimentation, relevance and decision diagrams, risk attitude. Students seeking to fulfill the Writing in the Major requirement should register for MS&E 152W.
Same as: MS&E 152

MS&E 174. Social Entrepreneurship Collaboratory. 4 Units.

Interdisciplinary student teams create and develop U.S. and international social entrepreneurship initiatives. Proposed initiatives may be new entities, or innovative projects, partnerships, and/or strategies impacting existing organizations and social issues in the U.S. and internationally. Focus is on each team¿s research and on planning documents to further project development. Project development varies with the quarter and the skill set of each team, but should include: issue and needs identification; market research; design and development of an innovative and feasible solution; and drafting of planning documents. In advanced cases, solicitation of funding and implementation of a pilot project. Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 131 and 132, or consent of instructor.
Same as: URBANST 133

MS&E 175. Innovation, Creativity, and Change. 3-4 Units.

Problem solving in organizations; creativity and innovation skills; thinking tools; creative organizations, teams, individuals, and communities. Limited enrollment. (Katila).

MS&E 177. Engineering Innovation. 4 Units.

This experiential course explores a wide array of tools that are used to enhance innovation and how those tools are applied across engineering disciplines. Using workshops, demonstrations, and field trips, students will learn how creative problem solving is deployed across engineering fields and, in partnership with the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab, expand their own creative problem solving skills with virtual reality experiences that stretch their imagination. Limited enrollment. Admission by application.

MS&E 178. The Spirit of Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

Is there more to entrepreneurship than inventing the better mouse trap? This course uses the speakers from the Entrepreneurial Thought Leader seminar (MS&E472) to drive research and discussion about what makes an entrepreneur successful. Topics include venture financing, business models, and interpersonal dynamics in the startup environment. Students meet before and after MS&E 472 to prepare for and debrief after the sessions. Enrollment limited to 50 students. Admission by application.

MS&E 180. Organizations: Theory and Management. 4 Units.

For undergraduates only; preference to MS&E majors. Classical and contemporary organization theory; the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Students must attend first session.

MS&E 181. Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy. 3 Units.

How changes in technology and organization are altering work and lives. Approaches to studying and designing work. How understanding work and work practices can assist engineers in designing better technologies and organizations. Topics include job design, distributed and virtual organizations, the blurring of boundaries between work and family life, computer supported cooperative work, trends in skill requirements and occupational structures, monitoring and surveillance in the workplace, downsizing and its effects on work systems, project work and project-based lifestyles, the growth of contingent employment, telecommuting, electronic commerce, and the changing nature of labor relations. Enrollment limited to 50 students. Preference to MS&E, STS, and CEE seniors, followed by MS&E, STS, and CEE juniors.

MS&E 185. Global Work. 4 Units.

Issues, challenges, and opportunities facing workers, teams, and organizations working across national boundaries. Topics include geographic distance, time zones, language and cultural differences, technologies to support distant collaboration, team dynamics, and corporate strategy. Limited enrollment. Admission by application.

MS&E 189. Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications. 3 Units.

Introduces students to the theoretical, substantive, and methodological foundations of social networks. The social network paradigm seeks to explain how social relations facilitate and constrain an actor¿s opportunities, behaviors, and cognitions. Topics include: network concepts and principles; network data collection, measurement, and analysis; and applications in management, engineering, and related disciplines.

MS&E 190. Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis. 3 Units.

Guest lectures by departmental practitioners. Emphasis is on links among theory, application, and observation. Environmental, national security, and health policy; marketing, new technology, and new business strategy analyses. Comparisons between domains and methods.

MS&E 193. Technology and National Security. 3 Units.

The interaction of technology and national security policy from the perspective of history to implications for the new security imperative, homeland defense. Key technologies in nuclear and biological weapons, military platforms, and intelligence gathering. Policy issues from the point of view of U.S. and other nations. The impact of terrorist threat. Guest lecturers include key participants in the development of technology and/or policy.
Same as: MS&E 293

MS&E 197. Ethics, Technology, and Public Policy. 5 Units.

Ethical issues in science- and technology-related public policy conflicts. Focus is on complex, value-laden policy disputes. Topics: the nature of ethics and morality; rationales for liberty, justice, and human rights; and the use and abuse of these concepts in policy disputes. Case studies from biomedicine, environmental affairs, technical professions, communications, and international relations.

MS&E 201. Dynamic Systems. 3-4 Units.

Goal is to think dynamically in decision making, and recognize and analyze dynamic phenomena in diverse situations. Concepts: formulation and analysis; state-space formulation; solutions of linear dynamic systems, equilibria, dynamic diagrams; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of linear systems, the concept of feedback; nonlinear dynamics, phase plane analysis, linearized analysis, Liapunov functions, catastrophe theory. Examples: grabber-holder dynamics, technology innovation dynamics, creation of new game dynamics in business competition, ecosystem dynamics, social dynamics, and stochastic exchange dynamics. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.

MS&E 207. Interactive Management Science. 3 Units.

Analytical techniques such as linear and integer programming, Monte Carlo simulation, forecasting, decision analysis, and Markov chains in the environment of the spreadsheet. Probability management. Materials include spreadsheet add-ins for implementing these and other techniques. Emphasis is on building intuition through interactive modeling, and extending the applicability of this type of analysis through integration with existing business data structures.
Same as: MS&E 107

MS&E 208A. Practical Training. 1 Unit.

MS&E students obtain employment in a relevant industrial or research activity to enhance professional experience, consistent with the degree program they are pursuing. Students submit a one-page statement showing relevance to degree program along with offer letter before the start of the quarter, and a 2-3 page final report documenting the work done and relevance to degree program at the conclusion of the quarter. Students may take each of A, B, and C once.

MS&E 208B. Practical Training. 1 Unit.

MS&E students obtain employment in a relevant industrial or research activity to enhance professional experience, consistent with the degree program they are pursuing. Students submit a one-page statement showing relevance to degree program along with offer letter before the start of the quarter, and a 2-3 page final report documenting the work done and relevance to degree program at the conclusion of the quarter. Students may take each of A, B, and C once.

MS&E 208C. Practical Training. 1 Unit.

MS&E students obtain employment in a relevant industrial or research activity to enhance professional experience, consistent with the degree program they are pursuing. Students submit a one-page statement showing relevance to degree program along with offer letter before the start of the quarter, and a 2-3 page final report documenting the work done and relevance to degree program at the conclusion of the quarter. Students may take each of A, B, and C once.

MS&E 211. Linear and Nonlinear Optimization. 3-4 Units.

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.

MS&E 220. Probabilistic Analysis. 3-4 Units.

Concepts and tools for the analysis of problems under uncertainty, focusing on model building and communication: the structuring, processing, and presentation of probabilistic information. Examples from legal, social, medical, and physical problems. Spreadsheets illustrate and solve problems as a complement to analytical closed-form solutions. Topics: axioms of probability, probability trees, random variables, distributions, conditioning, expectation, change of variables, and limit theorems. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51. Recommended: knowledge of spreadsheets.

MS&E 221. Stochastic Modeling. 3 Units.

Focus is on time-dependent random phenomena. Topics: discrete and continuous time Markov chains, renewal processes, queueing theory, and applications. Emphasis is on building a framework to formulate and analyze probabilistic systems. Prerequisite: 220 or consent of instructor.

MS&E 223. Simulation. 3 Units.

Discrete-event systems, generation of uniform and non-uniform random numbers, Monte Carlo methods, programming techniques for simulation, statistical analysis of simulation output, efficiency-improvement techniques, decision making using simulation, applications to systems in computer science, engineering, finance, and operations research. Prerequisites: working knowledge of a programming language such as C, C++, Java, Python, or FORTRAN; calculus-base probability; and basic statistical methods.

MS&E 226. "Small" Data. 3 Units.

This course is about understanding "small data": these are datasets that allow interaction, visualization, exploration, and analysis on a local machine. The material provides an introduction to applied data analysis, with an emphasis on providing a conceptual framework for thinking about data from both statistical and machine learning perspectives. Topics will be drawn from the following list, depending on time constraints and class interest: approaches to data analysis: statistics (frequentist, Bayesian) and machine learning; binary classification; regression; bootstrapping; causal inference and experimental design; time series modeling. Class lectures will be supplemented by data-driven problem sets and a project. Prerequisites: CME 100 or MATH 51; 120, 220 or STATS 116; experience with R at the level of CME/STATS 195 or equivalent.

MS&E 233. Networked Markets. 3 Units.

An introduction to economic analysis for modern online services and systems. Topics include: Examples of networked markets. Online advertising. Recommendation and reputation systems. Pricing digital media. Network effects and network externalities. Social learning and herd behavior. Markets and information. Prerequisites: CME 100 or MATH 51, and probability at the level of MS&E 220 or equivalent. No prior economics background will be assumed; requisite concepts will be introduced as needed.

MS&E 238. Leading Trends in Information Technology. 3 Units.

Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Virtualization, Cloud Computing, Security, Mobility and Unified Communications.

MS&E 238A. Leading Trends in Information Technology. 1 Unit.

Focuses on new trends and disruptive technologies in IT. Emphasis on the way technologies create a competitive edge and generate business value. Broad range of views presented by guest speakers, including top level executives of technology companies, and IT executives (e.g. CIOs) of Fortune 1000 companies. Special emphasis in technologies such as Virtualization, Cloud Computing, Security, Mobility and Unified Communications.

MS&E 240. Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs. 3-4 Units.

Non-majors and minors who have taken or are taking elementary accounting should not enroll. Introduction to accounting concepts and the operating characteristics of accounting systems. The principles of financial and cost accounting, design of accounting systems, techniques of analysis, and cost control. Interpretation and use of accounting information for decision making. Designed for the user of accounting information and not as an introduction to a professional accounting career. Enrollment limited. Admission by order of enrollment.
Same as: MS&E 140

MS&E 241. Economic Analysis. 3-4 Units.

Principal methods of economic analysis of the production activities of firms, including production technologies, cost and profit, and perfect and imperfect competition; individual choice, including preferences and demand; and the market-based system, including price formation, efficiency, and welfare. Practical applications of the methods presented. See 341 for continuation of 241. Recommended: 211, ECON 50.

MS&E 243. Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis. 3 Units.

Concepts, methods, and applications. Energy/environmental policy issues such as automobile fuel economy regulation, global climate change, research and development policy, and environmental benefit assessment. Group project. Prerequisite: MS&E 241 or ECON 50, 51.

MS&E 244. Economic Growth and Development. 3 Units.

Formerly 249. What generates economic growth. Emphasis is on theory accompanied by intuition, illustrated with country cases. Topics: the equation of motion of an economy; optimal growth theory; calculus of variations and optimal control approaches; deriving the Euler and Pontriaguine equations from economic reasoning. Applications: former planned economies in Russia and E. Europe; the present global crisis: causes and consequences; a comparative study of India and China. The links between economic growth and civilization; the causes of the rise and decline of civilizations; lessons for the future. Intended for graduate students. Prerequisite: multivariate calculus and permission of instructor. To receive permission, submit an application at http://www.stanford.edu/~lcottle/forms/249app.fb.

MS&E 245A. Investment Science. 3 Units.

Formerly MS&E 242. Introduction to the basic concepts of modern quantitative finance and investments. Focus is on basic principles and how they are applied in practice. Topics: basic interest rates; evaluating investments: present value and internal rate of return; fixed-income markets: bonds, yield, duration, portfolio immunization; term structure of interest rates; measuring risk: volatility and value at risk; designing optimal security portfolios; the capital asset pricing model. Group projects involving financial market data. No prior knowledge of finance required. Appropriate for engineering or science students wishing to apply their quantitative skills to develop a basic understanding of financial modeling and markets. Prerequisite: basic preparation in probability, statistics, and optimization.

MS&E 245B. Advanced Investment Science. 3 Units.

Formerly MS&E 342. Topics: forwards and futures contracts, continuous and discrete time models of stock price behavior, geometric Brownian motion, Ito's lemma, basic options theory, Black-Scholes equation, advanced options techniques, models and applications of stochastic interest rate processes, and optimal portfolio growth. Computational issues and general theory. Teams work on independent projects. Prerequisite: 242.

MS&E 245G. Finance for Non-MBAs. 3 Units.

For graduate students and advanced undergraduates. The foundations of finance; applications in corporate finance and investment management. Financial decisions made by corporate managers and investors with focus on process valuation. Topics include criteria for investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, market efficiency, and the valuation of derivative securities. Corporate financial instruments including debt, equity, and convertible securities. Equivalent to core MBA finance course, FINANCE 220. Prerequisites: ECON 51, or ENGR 60, or equivalent; ability to use spreadsheets, and basic probability and statistics concepts including random variables, expected value, variance, covariance, and simple estimation and regression.
Same as: ECON 135

MS&E 246. Financial Risk Management. 3 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the measurement and management of financial risk. Topics include risk classification, regulatory framework, risk measures, estimation, capital allocation, derivatives hedging, credit portfolio risk, factor models, risk analysis of mortgages and mortgage backed securities, peer-to-peer lending risk. Data-driven group projects. Prerequisite: 245A or similar.

MS&E 250A. Engineering Risk Analysis. 3 Units.

The techniques of analysis of engineering systems for risk management decisions involving trade-offs (technical, human, environmental aspects). Elements of decision analysis; probabilistic risk analysis (fault trees, event trees, systems dynamics); economic analysis of failure consequences (human safety and long-term economic discounting); and case studies such as space systems, nuclear power plants, and medical systems. Public and private sectors. Prerequisites: probability, decision analysis, stochastic processes, and convex optimization.

MS&E 250B. Project Course in Engineering Risk Analysis. 3 Units.

Students, individually or in groups, choose, define, formulate, and resolve a real risk management problem, preferably from a local firm or institution. Oral presentation and report required. Scope of the project is adapted to the number of students involved. Three phases: risk assessment, communication, and management. Emphasis is on the use of probability for the treatment of uncertainties and sensitivity to problem boundaries. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: MS&E 250A and consent of instructor.

MS&E 251. Stochastic Control. 3 Units.

Introduction to stochastic control, with applications taken from a variety of areas including supply-chain optimization, advertising, finance, dynamic resource allocation, caching, and traditional automatic control. Markov decision processes, optimal policy with full state information for finite-horizon case, infinite-horizon discounted, and average stage cost problems. Bellman value function, value iteration, and policy iteration. Approximate dynamic programming. Linear quadratic stochastic control. Formerly EE365. Prerequisites: EE 263, EE 178 or equivalent.
Same as: EE 266

MS&E 252. Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis. 3-4 Units.

Coherent approach to decision making, using the metaphor of developing a structured conversation having desirable properties, and producing actional thought that leads to clarity of action. Socratic instruction; computational problem sessions. Emphasis is on creation of distinctions, representation of uncertainty by probability, development of alternatives, specification of preference, and the role of these elements in creating a normative approach to decisions. Information gathering opportunities in terms of a value measure. Relevance and decision diagrams to represent inference and decision. Principles are applied to decisions in business, technology, law, and medicine. See 352 for continuation.

MS&E 254. The Ethical Analyst. 1-3 Unit.

The ethical responsibility for consequences of professional analysts who use technical knowledge in support of any individual, organization, or government. The means to form ethical judgments; questioning the desirability of physical coercion and deception as a means to reach any end. Human action and relations in society in the light of previous thought, and research on the desired form of social interactions. Attitudes toward ethical dilemmas through an explicit personal code.

MS&E 256. Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices. 3 Units.

(Formerly 475.) Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new medical technologies as a key component of product commercialization. The regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, and common methods of health technology assessment. Framework to identify factors relevant to adoption of new medical devices, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases. Case studies; guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry.

MS&E 256A. Technology Assessment and Regulation of Medical Devices. 1 Unit.

Regulatory approval and reimbursement for new medical technologies as a key component of product commercialization. The regulatory and payer environment in the U.S. and abroad, and common methods of health technology assessment. Framework to identify factors relevant to adoption of new medical devices, and the management of those factors in the design and development phases. Case studies; guest speakers from government (FDA) and industry.

MS&E 257. Healthcare Reforms and Value-Based Biomedical Technology Innovation. 3 Units.

A fundamental transformation of the healthcare system is underway in which policymakers, payers and administrators are intensely focused on new policy mechanisms designed to constrain healthcare costs while promoting quality, outcomes and value. This class evaluates healthcare reforms in the U.S. and abroad with specific focus on examining their impact on the biomedical technology innovation process. Lectures and case studies, guest speakers from health plans, providers, and the medical technology industry perspectives. Students investigate real-world technology innovations in projects.

MS&E 257A. Healthcare Reforms and Value-Based Biomedical Technology Innovation. 1 Unit.

A fundamental transformation of the healthcare system is underway in which policymakers, payers and administrators are intensely focused on new policy mechanisms designed to constrain healthcare costs while promoting quality, outcomes and value. This class evaluates healthcare reforms in the U.S. and abroad with specific focus on examining their impact on the biomedical technology innovation process. Lectures and case studies, guest speakers from health plans, providers, and the medical technology industry perspectives. Students investigate real-world technology innovations in projects.

MS&E 260. Introduction to Operations Management. 3 Units.

Operations management focuses on the effective planning, scheduling, and control of manufacturing and service entities. This course introduces students to a broad range of key issues in operations management. Topics include determination of optimal facility location, production planning, optimal timing and sizing of capacity expansion, and inventory control. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets, probability, and optimization.

MS&E 261. Inventory Control and Production Systems. 3 Units.

Topics in the planning and control of manufacturing systems. The functions of inventory, determination of order quantities and safety stocks, alternative inventory replenishment systems, item forecasting, production-inventory systems, materials requirements planning (MRP), just-in-time systems, master and operations scheduling, supply chain management, and service operations. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: 120, or STATS 116, or equivalent.

MS&E 262. Supply Chain Management. 3 Units.

Definition of a supply chain; coordination difficulties; pitfalls and opportunities in supply chain management; inventory/service tradeoffs; performance measurement and incentives. Global supply chain management; mass customization; supplier management. Design and redesign of products and processes for supply chain management; tools for analysis; industrial applications; current industry initiatives. Enrollment limited to 50. Admission determined in the first class meeting. Prerequisite: 260 or 261.

MS&E 263. Healthcare Operations Management. 3 Units.

With healthcare spending in the US exceeding 17% of GDP and growing, improvements in the quality and efficiency of healthcare services are urgently needed. This class focuses on the use of analytical tools to support efficient and effective delivery of health care. Topics include quality control and management, capacity planning, resource allocation, management of patient flows, and scheduling. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of Excel spreadsheets, probability, and optimization.

MS&E 264. Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing. 3-4 Units.

For SCPD students only in 2014; not offered on-campus. Strategies and techniques for development of sustainable products and manufacturing processes. Topics: strategic decisions in new product development when environmental and resource externalities are accounted for; effect of regulatory requirements on ability of a firm to achieve its business objectives; contributions of sustainable products/processes to the firm's competitive advantage and operational efficiency and to enabling entrepreneurial opportunities; industrial ecology and life cycle analysis techniques in integrating traditional product development requirements with those of the environment and society. May be repeatable for credit once.

MS&E 268. Operations Strategy. 3 Units.

The development and implementation of the operations functional strategy. The integration of operations strategy with business and corporate strategies of a manufacturing-based firm. Topics: types and characteristics of manufacturing technologies, quality management, capacity planning and facilities choice, organization and control of operations, and operations' role in corporate strategy. Prerequisites: 260 or 261, or equivalent experience.

MS&E 270. Strategy in Technology-Based Companies. 3-4 Units.

For graduate students only. Introduction to the basic concepts of strategy, with emphasis on high technology firms. Topics: competitive positioning, resource-based perspectives, co-opetition and standards setting, and complexity/evolutionary perspectives. Limited enrollment.

MS&E 271. Global Entrepreneurial Marketing. 3-4 Units.

Skills needed to market new technology-based products to customers around the world. Case method discussions. Cases include startups and global high tech firms. Course themes: marketing toolkit, targeting markets and customers, product marketing and management, partners and distribution, sales and negotiation, and outbound marketing. Team-based take-home final exam. Limited enrollment. Admission by application.

MS&E 272. Startup Boards. 3 Units.

Accelerate your startup through hands-on guidance from your own "board of directors" comprised of venture capitalists and experienced entrepreneurs. Like real startup boards, your board will help your team identify critical milestones, assist in achieving them, and hold your team accountable through regular board meetings. Learn how to avoid common mistakes that lead to ineffective board meetings, fired CEOs, and startup failures. Experience the other side of the table as a board member for another startup and learn the principles of effective board services. Topics include building boards, managing board meetings, making strategic decisions, executing board responsibilities, and replacing CEOs. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Preference given to teams with demonstrated commitment to a viable startup business.

MS&E 273. Technology Venture Formation. 3-4 Units.

Open to graduate students interested in technology driven start-ups. Provides the experience of an early-stage entrepreneur seeking initial investment, including: team building, opportunity assessment, customer development, go-to-market strategy, and IP. Teaching team includes serial entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. Student teams validate the business model using R&D plans and financial projections, and define milestones for raising and using venture capital. Final exam is an investment pitch delivered to a panel of top tier VC partners. In addition to lectures, teams interact with mentors and teaching team weekly. Enrollment by application: http://www.stanford.edu/class/msande273. Recommended: 270, 271, or equivalent.

MS&E 274. Dynamic Entrepreneurial Strategy. 3 Units.

Primarily for graduate students. How entrepreneurial strategy focuses on creating structural change or responding to change induced externally. Grabber-holder dynamics as an analytical framework for developing entrepreneurial strategy to increase success in creating and shaping the diffusion of new technology or product innovation dynamics. Topics: First mover versus follower advantage in an emerging market; latecomer advantage and strategy in a mature market; strategy to break through stagnation; and strategy to turn danger into opportunity. Modeling, case studies, and term project.

MS&E 276. Entrepreneurial Management and Finance. 3 Units.

For graduate students only, with a preference for engineering and science majors. Emphasis on managing high-growth, early-stage enterprises, especially those with innovation-based products and services. Students work in teams to develop skills and approaches necessary to becoming effective entrepreneurial leaders and managers. Topics include assessing risk, understanding business models, analyzing key operational metrics, modeling cash flow and capital requirements, evaluating sources of financing, structuring and negotiating investments, managing organizational culture and incentives, managing the interplay between ownership and growth, and handling adversity and failure. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. Recommended: basic accounting.

MS&E 277. Creativity and Innovation. 3-4 Units.

Experiential course explores factors that promote and inhibit creativity and innovation in individuals, teams, and organizations. Teaches creativity tools using workshops, case studies, field trips, expert guests, and team design challenges. Enrollment limited to 40. Admission by application. See http://dschool.stanford.edu/classes.

MS&E 278. Patent Law and Strategy for Innovators and Entrepreneurs. 2-3 Units.

Inventors and entrepreneurs have four concerns related to patent law: protecting their inventions in the very early stages of product development, determining the patentability of their invention, avoiding infringement of a competitor's patent, and leveraging their patent as a business asset. This course will address each of these concerns through the application of law cases and business cases to an invention of the Studentâ¿¿s choice. Although listed as a ME/MSE course, the course is not specific to any discipline or technology.
Same as: ME 208

MS&E 279A. Entrepreneurial Leadership. 1 Unit.

This seminar will explore entrepreneurial leadership: models, opportunities, issues and challenges, through discussion, cases and guest speakers. This course sequence is part of the DFJ Entrepreneurial Leaders Program which will be announced in Fall 2014.

MS&E 279B. Entrepreneurial Leadership. 1 Unit.

This seminar will explore entrepreneurial leadership: models, opportunities, issues and challenges, through discussion, cases and guest speakers. This course sequence is part of the DFJ Entrepreneurial Leaders Program which will be announced in Fall 2014.

MS&E 280. Organizational Behavior: Evidence in Action. 3-4 Units.

Organization theory; concepts and functions of management; behavior of the individual, work group, and organization. Emphasis is on cases and related discussion. Enrollment limited; priority to MS&E students. Autumn Quarter section is restricted to SCPD students; the class will not be available to on-campus students in the Autumn Quarter.

MS&E 282. Transformational Leadership. 3 Units.

The personal, team-based and organizational skills needed to become a transformative leader. Case method discussions and lectures. Themes include: personal transformation; the inside-out effect, group transformation; cross-functional teams; re-engineering; rapid - non-profit and for profit - organizational transformation; and social transformation. Course includes a group project that is defined and approved during the first two weeks of class. Limited enrollment. Graduate students only. Admission by application. Prerequisite: 180 or 280.

MS&E 283. Scaling up Excellence in Organizations. 4 Units.

A problem for every manager is to make 'good' behaviors spread quickly and to shrink 'undesirable' behaviors quickly. This course provides you practical frameworks to accomplish these managerial goals. We will examine issues such as scaling Idea generation, scaling knowledge sharing, scaling the adoption of ideas across firms, scaling change in global firms. We will be using a newly written series of cases for this course and also draw on guest speakers.

MS&E 284. Designing Modern Work Organizations. 3 Units.

This practice-based experiential lab course is geared toward MS&E masters students. Students will master the concepts of organizational design, with an emphasis on applying them to modern challenges (technology, growth, globalization, and the modern workforce). Students will also gain mastery of skills necessary for success in today's workplace (working in teams, communicating verbally, presenting project work). Guest speakers from industry will present real-world challenges related to class concepts. Students will complete a quarter-long project designing and managing an actual online organization. Limited to 25. Admission by application.

MS&E 292. Health Policy Modeling. 3 Units.

Primarily for master's students; also open to undergraduates and doctoral students. The application of mathematical, statistical, economic, and systems models to problems in health policy. Areas include: disease screening, prevention, and treatment; assessment of new technologies; bioterrorism response; and drug control policies.

MS&E 293. Technology and National Security. 3 Units.

The interaction of technology and national security policy from the perspective of history to implications for the new security imperative, homeland defense. Key technologies in nuclear and biological weapons, military platforms, and intelligence gathering. Policy issues from the point of view of U.S. and other nations. The impact of terrorist threat. Guest lecturers include key participants in the development of technology and/or policy.
Same as: MS&E 193

MS&E 294. Climate Policy Analysis. 3 Units.

Design and application of formal analytical methods in climate policy development. Issues include instrument design, technology development, resource management, multiparty negotiation, and dealing with complexity and uncertainty. Links among art, theory, and practice. Emphasis is on integrated use of modeling tools from diverse methodologies and requirements for policy making application. Prerequisites: ECON 50, MS&E 211, MS&E 252, or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

MS&E 295. Energy Policy Analysis. 3 Units.

Design and application of formal analytical methods for policy and technology assessments of energy efficiency and renewable energy options. Emphasis is on integrated use of modeling tools from diverse methodologies and requirements for policy and corporate strategy development. Prerequisites: ECON 50, MS&E 211, MS&E 252, or equivalents, or permission of instructor.

MS&E 299. Voluntary Social Systems. 1-3 Unit.

Ethical theory, feasibility, and desirability of a social order in which coercion by individuals and government is minimized and people pursue ends on a voluntary basis. Topics: efficacy and ethics; use rights for property; contracts and torts; spontaneous order and free markets; crime and punishment based on restitution; guardian-ward theory for dealing with incompetents; the effects of state action-hypothesis of reverse results; applications to help the needy, armed intervention, victimless crimes, and environmental protection; transition strategies to a voluntary society.

MS&E 300. Ph.D. Qualifying Tutorial or Paper. 1-3 Unit.

Restricted to Ph.D. students assigned tutorials as part of the MS&E Ph.D. qualifying process. Enrollment optional.

MS&E 301. Dissertation Research. 1-15 Unit.

Prerequisite: doctoral candidacy.

MS&E 310. Linear Programming. 3 Units.

Formulation of standard linear programming models. Theory of polyhedral convex sets, linear inequalities, alternative theorems, and duality. Variants of the simplex method and the state of art interior-point algorithms. Sensitivity analyses, economic interpretations, and primal-dual methods. Relaxations of harder optimization problems and recent convex conic linear programs. Applications include game equilibrium facility location. Prerequisite: MATH 113 or consent of instructor.

MS&E 311. Optimization. 3 Units.

Applications, theories, and algorithms for finite-dimensional linear and nonlinear optimization problems with continuous variables. Elements of convex analysis, first- and second-order optimality conditions, sensitivity and duality. Algorithms for unconstrained optimization, and linearly and nonlinearly constrained problems. Modern applications in communication, game theory, auction, and economics. Prerequisites: MATH 113, 115, or equivalent.

MS&E 312. Advanced Methods in Numerical Optimization. 3 Units.

Topics include interior-point methods, relaxation methods for nonlinear discrete optimization, sequential quadratic programming methods, optimal control and decomposition methods. Topic chosen in first class; different topics for individuals or groups possible. Individual or team projects. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: CME 334

MS&E 314. Linear and Conic Optimization with Applications. 3 Units.

Linear, semidefinite, conic, and convex nonlinear optimization problems as generalizations of classical linear programming. Algorithms include the interior-point, barrier function, and cutting plane methods. Related convex analysis, including the separating hyperplane theorem, Farkas lemma, dual cones, optimality conditions, and conic inequalities. Complexity and/or computation efficiency analysis. Applications to combinatorial optimization, sensor network localization, support vector machine, and graph realization. Prerequisite: MS&E 211 or equivalent.
Same as: CME 336

MS&E 315. Numerical Optimization. 3 Units.

Solution of nonlinear equations; unconstrained optimization; linear programming; quadratic programming; global optimization; general linearly and nonlinearly constrained optimization. Theory and algorithms to solve these problems. Prerequisite: background in analysis and numerical linear algebra.
Same as: CME 304

MS&E 316. Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms. 3 Units.

Topics: Basic Algebraic Graph Theory, Matroids and Minimum Spanning Trees, Submodularity and Maximum Flow, NP-Hardness, Approximation Algorithms, Randomized Algorithms, The Probabilistic Method, and Spectral Sparsification using Effective Resistances. Topics will be illustrated with applications from Distributed Computing, Machine Learning, and large-scale Optimization. Prerequisites: CS 261 is highly recommended, although not required.
Same as: CME 305

MS&E 317. Algorithms for Modern Data Models. 3 Units.

We traditionally think of algorithms as running on data available in a single location, typically main memory. In many modern applications including web analytics, search and data mining, computational biology, finance, and scientific computing, the data is often too large to reside in a single location, is arriving incrementally over time, is noisy/uncertain, or all of the above. Paradigms such as map-reduce, streaming, sketching, Distributed Hash Tables, Bulk Synchronous Processing, and random walks have proved useful for these applications. This course will provide an introduction to the design and analysis of algorithms for these modern data models. Prerequisite: Algorithms at the level of CS 261.
Same as: CS 263

MS&E 318. Large-Scale Numerical Optimization. 3 Units.

The main algorithms and software for constrained optimization emphasizing the sparse-matrix methods needed for their implementation. Iterative methods for linear equations and least squares. The simplex method. Basis factorization and updates. Interior methods. The reduced-gradient method, augmented Lagrangian methods, and SQP methods. Prerequisites: Basic numerical linear algebra, including LU, QR, and SVD factorizations, and an interest in MATLAB, sparse-matrix methods, and gradient-based algorithms for constrained optimization. Recommended: MS&E 310, 311, 312, 314, or 315; CME 108, 200, 302, 304, 334, or 335.
Same as: CME 338

MS&E 319. Approximation Algorithms. 3 Units.

Combinatorial and mathematical programming techniques to derive approximation algorithms for NP-hard optimization problems. Prossible topics include: greedy algorithms for vertex/set cover; rounding LP relaxations of integer programs; primal-dual algorithms; semidefinite relaxations. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 112 or CS 161.

MS&E 321. Stochastic Systems. 3 Units.

Topics in stochastic processes, emphasizing applications. Markov chains in discrete and continuous time; Markov processes in general state space; Lyapunov functions; regenerative process theory; renewal theory; martingales, Brownian motion, and diffusion processes. Application to queueing theory, storage theory, reliability, and finance. Prerequisites: 221 or STATS 217; MATH 113, 115. (Glynn).

MS&E 322. Stochastic Calculus and Control. 3 Units.

Ito integral, existence and uniqueness of solutions of stochastic differential equations (SDEs), diffusion approximations, numerical solutions of SDEs, controlled diffusions and the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation, and statistical inference of SDEs. Applications to finance and queueing theory. Prerequisites: 221 or STATS 217: MATH 113, 115.

MS&E 331. Introduction to Computational Social Science. 3 Units.

With a vast amount of data now collected on our online and offline actions -- from what we buy, to where we travel, to who we interact with -- we have an unprecedented opportunity to study complex social systems. This opportunity, however, comes with scientific, engineering, and ethical challenges. In this hands-on course, we develop ideas from computer science and statistics to address problems in sociology, economics, political science, and beyond. We cover techniques for collecting and parsing data, methods for large-scale machine learning, and principles for effectively communicating results. To see how these techniques are applied in practice, we discuss recent research findings in a variety of areas.

MS&E 335. Queueing and Scheduling in Processing Networks. 3 Units.

Advanced stochastic modeling and control of systems involving queueing and scheduling operations. Stability analysis of queueing systems. Key results on single queues and queueing networks. Controlled queueing systems. Dynamic routing and scheduling in processing networks. Applications to modeling, analysis and performance engineering of computing systems, communication networks, flexible manufacturing, and service systems. Prerequisite: 221 or equivalent.

MS&E 336. Platform and Marketplace Design. 3 Units.

The last decade has witnessed a meteoric rise in the number of online markets and platforms competing with traditional mechanisms of trade. Examples of such markets include online marketplaces for goods, such as eBay; online dating markets; markets for shared resources, such as Lyft, Uber, and Airbnb; and online labor markets. We will review recent research that aims to both understand and design such markets. Emphasis on mathematical modeling and methodology, with a view towards preparing Ph.D. students for research in this area. Prerequisites: Mathematical maturity; 300-level background in optimization and probability; prior exposure to game theory.

MS&E 337. Information Networks. 3 Units.

Network structure of the Internet and the web. Modeling, scale-free graphs, small-world phenomenon. Algorithmic implications in searching and inter-domain routing; the effect of structure on performance. Game theoretic issues, routing games, and network creation games. Security issues, vulnerability, and robustness. Prerequisite: basic probability and graph theory.

MS&E 338. Advanced Topics in Information Science and Technology. 3 Units.

Advanced material in this area is sometimes taught for the first time as a topics course. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MS&E 347. Credit Risk: Modeling and Management. 3 Units.

Credit risk modeling, valuation, and hedging emphasizing underlying economic, probabilistic, and statistical concepts. Point processes and their compensators. Structural, incomplete information and reduced form approaches. Single name products: corporate bonds, equity, equity options, credit and equity default swaps, forwards and swaptions. Multiname modeling: index and tranche swaps and options, collateralized debt obligations. Implementation, calibration and testing of models. Industry and market practice. Data and implementation driven group projects that focus on problems in the financial industry.

MS&E 348. Optimization of Uncertainty and Applications in Finance. 3 Units.

How to make optimal decisions in the presence of uncertainty, solution techniques for large-scale systems resulting from decision problems under uncertainty, and applications in finance. Decision trees, utility, two-stage and multi-stage decision problems, approaches to stochastic programming, model formulation; large-scale systems, Benders and Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition, Monte Carlo sampling and variance reduction techniques, risk management, portfolio optimization, asset-liability management, mortgage finance. Projects involving the practical application of optimization under uncertainty to financial planning.

MS&E 351. Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control. 3 Units.

Markov population decision chains in discrete and continuous time. Risk posture. Present value and Cesaro overtaking optimality. Optimal stopping. Successive approximation, policy improvement, and linear programming methods. Team decisions and stochastic programs; quadratic costs and certainty equivalents. Maximum principle. Controlled diffusions. Examples from inventory, overbooking, options, investment, queues, reliability, quality, capacity, transportation. MATLAB. Prerequisites: MATH 113, 115; Markov chains; linear programming.

MS&E 352. Decision Analysis II: Professional Decision Analysis. 3-4 Units.

How to organize the decision conversation, the role of the decision analysis cycle and the model sequence, assessing the quality of decisions, framing decisions, the decision hierarchy, strategy tables for alternative development, creating spare and effective decision diagrams, biases in assessment, knowledge maps, uncertainty about probability. Sensitivity analysis, approximations, value of revelation, joint information, options, flexibility, bidding, assessing and using corporate risk attitude, risk sharing and scaling, and decisions involving health and safety. See 353 for continuation. Prerequisite: 252.

MS&E 353. Decision Analysis III: Frontiers of Decision Analysis. 3 Units.

The concept of decision composite; probabilistic insurance and other challenges to the normative approach; the relationship of decision analysis to classical inference and data analysis procedures; the likelihood and exchangeability principles; inference, decision, and experimentation using conjugate distributions; developing a risk attitude based on general properties; alternative decision aiding practices such as analytic hierarchy and fuzzy approaches. Student presentations on current research. Goal is to prepare doctoral students for research. Prerequisite: 352.

MS&E 355. Influence Diagrams and Probabilistics Networks. 3 Units.

Network representations for reasoning under uncertainty: influence diagrams, belief networks, and Markov networks. Structuring and assessment of decision problems under uncertainty. Learning from evidence. Conditional independence and requisite information. Node reductions. Belief propagation and revision. Simulation. Linear-quadratic-Gaussian decision models and Kalman filters. Dynamic processes. Bayesian meta-analysis. Prerequisites: 220, 252, or equivalents, or consent of instructor.

MS&E 365. Advanced Models in Operations Management. 3 Units.

Primarily for doctoral students. Focus on quantitative models dealing with sustainability and related to operations management. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.

MS&E 371. Innovation and Strategic Change. 2-3 Units.

Doctoral research seminar, limited to Ph.D. students. Current research on innovation strategy. Topics: scientific discovery, innovation search, organizational learning, evolutionary approaches, and incremental and radical change. Topics change yearly. Recommended: course in statistics or research methods.

MS&E 372. Entrepreneurship Doctoral Research Seminar. 1-3 Unit.

Classic and current research on entrepreneurship. Limited enrollment, restricted to PhD students. Prerequisites: SOC 363 or equivalent, and permission of instructor.

MS&E 374. Dynamic Corporate Strategy. 3 Units.

Restricted to Ph.D. students. Research on the creation and shaping of disruptive industry dynamics and how companies can formulate and implement strategies to excel in such changing environments. Dynamic system model approach; case studies. Prerequisites: 201 or equivalent, 274.

MS&E 375. Research on Entrepreneurship. 3 Units.

Restricted to Ph.D. students. Organization theory, economics, and strategy perspectives. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: SOC 360 or equivalent, and consent of instructor.

MS&E 376. Strategy Doctoral Research Seminar. 3 Units.

Classic and current research on business and corporate strategy. Limited enrollment, restricted to PhD students. Prerequisites: SOC 363 or equivalent, and permission of instructor. Course may be repeated for credit.

MS&E 380. Doctoral Research Seminar in Organizations. 3 Units.

Limited to Ph.D. students. Topics from current published literature and working papers. Content varies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MS&E 381. Doctoral Research Seminar in Work, Technology, and Organization. 2-3 Units.

Enrollment limited to Ph.D. students. Topics from current published literature and working papers. Content varies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

MS&E 383. Doctoral Seminar on Ethnographic Research. 3 Units.

For graduate students; upper-level undergraduates with consent of instructor. Ethnosemantic interviewing and participant observation. Techniques for taking, managing, and analyzing field notes and other qualitative data. 15 hours per week outside class collecting and analyzing own data. Methods texts and ethnographies offer examples of how to analyze and communicate ethnographic data. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. (Barley).

MS&E 384. Groups and Teams. 3 Units.

Research on groups and teams in organizations from the perspective of organizational behavior and social psychology. Topics include group effectiveness, norms, group composition, diversity, conflict, group dynamics, temporal issues in groups, geographically distributed teams, and intergroup relations.

MS&E 388. Themes in Contemporary Meso-level Field Research. 3 Units.

Doctoral research seminar, limited to Ph.D. students. Current meso-level field research on organizational behavior, especially work and coordination. Topics: work design, job design, roles, teams, organizational change and learning, knowledge management, performance. Focus on understanding theory development and research design in contemporary field research. Topics change yearly. Recommended: course in statistics or research methods.

MS&E 389. Seminar on Organizational Theory. 5 Units.

The social science literature on organizations assessed through consideration of the major theoretical traditions and lines of research predominant in the field.
Same as: EDUC 375A, SOC 363A

MS&E 390. Doctoral Research Seminar in Health Systems Modeling. 1-3 Unit.

Restricted to PhD students, or by consent of instructor. Doctoral research seminar covering current topics in health policy, health systems modeling, and health innovation. May be repeated for credit.

MS&E 391. Doctoral Research Seminar in Energy-Environmental Systems Modeling and Analysis. 1-3 Unit.

Restricted to PhD students, or by consent of instructor. Doctoral research seminar covering current topics in energy and environmental modeling and analysis. Current emphasis on approaches to incorporation of uncertainty and technology dynamics into complex systems models. May be repeated for credit.

MS&E 401. Data Science Consulting Workshop. 1 Unit.

Students participate as consultants in the Data Science Drop-in, the department's free consulting service for members of the Stanford community. Participants learn to work with clients, help analyze data, and prepare formal written reports. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: course work in applied statistics or data analysis, and consent of instructor.

MS&E 403. Integrative Modeling. 3 Units.

Modeling approaches for examining real life problems: how to get started. Critical thinking in framing and problem formulation leading to actionable solutions and communication of results to decision makers. Models to identify and evaluate multiple objectives/metrics. Models examined include both deterministic and probabilistic components. Overview of optimization and probability, decomposition principles to model large scale problems, appropriate integration of uncertainties into model formulations. Primarily team-project based assignments, with three to four group projects. Project topics drawn from applications with real data. Sample project topics include: optimizing group phone plans for large corporations, life insurance business models, making sense of the health care debate, logistic decision problems. Project teams will critically grade other teams¿ project reports using provided guidelines. Project presentations throughout the quarter. Prerequisites: 211, 220.

MS&E 408. Directed Reading and Research. 1-15 Unit.

Directed study and research on a subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member. Prerequisite: faculty sponsor.nn (Staff).

MS&E 441. Policy and Economics Research Roundtable. 1 Unit.

Research in progress or contemplated in policy and economics areas. Emphasis depends on research interests of participants, but is likely to include energy, environment, transportation, or technology policy and analysis. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: PERR

MS&E 445. Projects in Wealth Management. 3-4 Units.

Recent theory and standard practice in portfolio design for institutions, individuals, and funds. Student projects and case studies derived from the financial industry.

MS&E 447. Systemic and Market Risk : Notes on Recent History, Practice, and Policy. 3 Units.

The global financial crisis of 2007-8 threw into sharp relief the ongoing challenges of understanding risk, the financial system, links with the global economy, and interactions with policy. We will explore elements of the crisis, a few other key events, and ongoing debates about systemic risk. Group projects will explore in more detail past events and current topics in systemic risk. Supplements a rigorous technical curriculum in modern finance with select aspects relevant to understanding the practice and broader context of modern financial activities such as derivatives, financial engineering, and risk management.

MS&E 448. Big Financial Data and Algorithmic Trading. 3 Units.

Project course emphasizing the connection between data, models, and reality. Vast amounts of high volume, high frequency observations of financial quotes, orders and transactions are now available, and poses a unique set of challenges. This type of data will be used as the empirical basis for modeling and testing various ideas within the umbrella of algorithmic trading and quantitative modeling related to the dynamics and micro-structure of financial markets. Due to the fact that it is near impossible to perform experiments in finance, there is a need for empirical inference and intuition, any model should also be justified in terms of plausibility that goes beyond pure econometric and data mining approaches. Introductory lectures, followed by real-world type projects to get a hands-on experience with realistic challenges and hone skills needed in the work place. Work in groups on selected projects that will entail obtaining and cleaning the raw data and becoming familiar with techniques and challenges in handling big data sets. Develop a framework for modeling and testing (in computer languages such as Python, C++ , Matlab and R) and prepare presentations to present to the class. Example projects include optimal order execution, developing a market making algorithm, design of an intra-day trading strategy, and modeling the dynamics of the bid and ask. Prerequisites: MS&E 211, 242, 342, or equivalents, some exposure to statistics and programming. Enrollment limited. Admission by application; details at first class.

MS&E 450. Lessons in Decision Making. 1 Unit.

Entrepreneurs, senior management consultants, and executives from Fortune 500 companies share real-world stories and insights from their experience in decision making.

MS&E 452. Decision Analysis Projects: Helping Real Leaders Make Real Decisions. 3 Units.

A virtual consulting firm directed by professional decision analysts who offer advice and guidance as student teams help local organizations make a current business strategy or public policy decision. Projects for businesses, governments, or other institutions typically include start-up venture funding, R&D portfolio planning, new product or market entry, acquisition or partnering, cost reduction, program design, or regulatory policy decisions. Emphasis is on developing clarity of action and delivering insights to clients. Satisfies MS&E project course requirement. Prerequiste: 252. Recommended: 352.

MS&E 453. Decision Analysis Applications: Business Strategy and Public Policy. 2-3 Units.

What are the most essential, efficient, and effective ways that important decisions are being made in the real world? Experienced practitioners provide insights from technically challenging and organizationally complex decisions that they helped analyze for decision makers in businesses, nonprofits, and governments. Both the process and content of such decisions are discussed. Process includes disciplined qualitative and quantitative approaches for framing, structuring, modeling, assessing, evaluating, appraising, and communicating decisions. Content broadly covers business and corporate strategy, venture capital investing, financial derivatives and hedging, R&D portfolio management, new product design, technology manufacturing alternatives, business renewal, real estate investment and development, intellectual property litigation risk, interplanetary contamination risk, energy economics and policies, electric power production, nuclear waste disposal, environmental cleanup of mines, marine fisheries and resource protection, medical diagnosis and treatment options, health insurance plans, hospital risk management, pharmaceutical drug trials and backups, behavioral economics lessons, effective interaction techniques, and implications of social psychology for improved organizational decision making. Prerequisite: 252.

MS&E 454. Decision Analysis Seminar. 1 Unit.

Current research and related topics presented by doctoral students and invited speakers. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 252.

MS&E 464. Global Project Coordination. 3-4 Units.

Students engage in projects that are global in nature and related to the planning, design, and operations of supply chains, marketing, manufacturing, and product development processes. Stanford students work with students from an overseas university in teams of 6-8, using email, teleconferencing, and videoconferencing to meet on a regular basis. As part of the course, students travel to Hong Kong during Stanford's spring break. Applications due by November 15. Information session on October 29. Please see https://stanford.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_3a8ZBx2NWB8p73T for more information.

MS&E 467. Strategic Operations Consulting. 3 Units.

Restricted to MS&E masters students. Guided by industry practitioners, students work in teams to conduct an in-depth consulting project for a sponsoring company, assessing operational challenges and developing effective solutions. Projects range from the planning, design, and operation of supply chains to manufacturing to new product introduction. Emphasis is on developing diagnostic skills and designing effective and actionable solutions that provide new insights to clients. Students will be taught and coached on business writing and presentation skills. Projects culminate with a comprehensive presentation of findings and recommended actions to the sponsor. Satisfies MS&E project course requirement. Prerequisites: 260 or 261. Admission by application, limited enrollment.

MS&E 472. Entrepreneurial Thought Leaders' Seminar. 1 Unit.

Entrepreneurial leaders share lessons from real-world experiences across entrepreneurial settings. ETL speakers include entrepreneurs, leaders from global technology companies, venture capitalists, and best-selling authors. Half-hour talks followed by half hour of class interaction. Required web discussion. May be repeated for credit.

MS&E 476. Entrepreneurship Through the Lens of Venture Capital: Venture Capital From Past to Present. 2 Units.

Fundamentals for building a successful company taught by a teaching team and guest lecturers with vast venture capital experience and years of practice innentrepreneurship. Explores change occurring within the venture capital industry: new entrants, from incubators to angels to different models of venture capital. Explores how companies are funded, grown, and scale by meeting with the individuals who have been at the forefront of this change. See lensofvc.stanford.edu.

MS&E 488. Prototyping and Rapid Experiment Lab. 4 Units.

Gain a deeper understanding of the prototyping and user feedback parts of the design thinking process with a focus on rapid experimentation. Explore prototyping and user feedback that happens in later stages of iteration when design ideas are somewhat gelled, but designers are still uncertain about whether the design will meet the need and evoke the response intended. Introduce and generate creative ways to discover what users will do in the real world with the designs we envision. For seasoned students who thoroughly understand the design thinking process or, more broadly, human-centered design and now want to focus on one later stage aspect of it in more depth. An application process will happen in Fall Quarter. Please contact the d.school for more details.

MS&E 489. d.Leadership: Design Leadership in Context. 1-3 Unit.

d.Leadership is a course that teaches the coaching and leadership skills needed to drive good design process in groups. d.leaders will work on real projects driving design projects within organizations, and gain real world skills as they experiment with their leadership style while coaching innovation projects. Take this course if you are inspired by past design classes and want skills to lead design projects beyond Stanford. Preference given to students who have taken other Design Group or d.school classes. Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.
Same as: ME 368

MS&E 490. Health Operations and Policy: Thought Leaders Seminar. 1 Unit.

Thought leaders in healthcare policy and healthcare design and delivery share ideas about how to improve our healthcare system. Speakers include individuals from government, industry, and academia with a broad range of experience and perspective.

MS&E 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

.