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School of Engineering

Contacts

Office: 135 Huang Engineering Center
Mail Code: 94305-4027
Phone: (650) 723-5984
Web Site: http://engineering.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the School of Engineering are listed under the subject code ENGR on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

The School of Engineering offers undergraduate programs leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science (B.S.), programs leading to both B.S. and Master of Science (M.S.) degrees, other programs leading to a B.S. with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in a field of the humanities or social sciences, dual-degree programs with certain other colleges, and graduate curricula leading to the degrees of M.S., Engineer, and Ph.D.

The school has nine academic departments: Aeronautics and Astronautics, Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Management Science and Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. These departments and one interdisciplinary program, the Institute for Computational and Mathematical Engineering, are responsible for graduate curricula, research activities, and the departmental components of the undergraduate curricula.

In research where faculty interest and competence embrace both engineering and the supporting sciences, there are numerous programs within the school as well as several interschool activities, including the Army High Performance Computing Research Center, Biomedical Informatics Training Program, Center for Integrated Systems, Center for Work, Technology, and Organization, Center on Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies, Collaboratory for Research on Global Projects, National Center for Physics-Based Simulation in Biology, Center for Position, Navigation, and Time, the Energy Modeling Forum, the NIH Biotechnology Graduate Training Grant in Chemical Engineering, and the Stanford Technology Ventures Program. Energy Resources Engineering (formerly Petroleum Engineering) is offered through the School of Earth Sciences.

The School of Engineering's Hasso Plattner Institute of Design (http://dschool.stanford.edu) brings together students and faculty in engineering, business, education, medicine, and the humanities to learn design thinking and work together to solve big problems in a human-centered way.

The Woods Institute for the Environment (http://environment.stanford.edu) brings together faculty, staff, and students from the schools, institutes and centers at Stanford to conduct interdisciplinary research, education, and outreach to promote an environmentally sound and sustainable world.

The School of Engineering has a summer internship program in China for undergraduate and graduate students. For more information, see http://engineering.stanford.edu/portals/student/jobs-and-internships/programs-in-china. The department also has an exchange program available to graduate students whose research would benefit from collaboration with Chinese academic institutions.

Instruction in Engineering is offered primarily during Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters of the regular academic year. During the Summer Quarter, a small number of undergraduate and graduate courses are offered.

Undergraduate Programs in the School of Engineering

The principal goals of the undergraduate engineering curriculum are to provide opportunities for intellectual growth in the context of an engineering discipline, for the attainment of professional competence, and for the development of a sense of the social context of technology. The curriculum is flexible, with many decisions on individual courses left to the student and the adviser. For a student with well-defined educational goals, there is often a great deal of latitude.

In addition to the special requirements for engineering majors described below, all undergraduate engineering students are subject to the University general education, writing, and foreign language requirements outlined in the first pages of this bulletin. Depending on the program chosen, students have the equivalent of from one to three quarters of free electives to bring the total number of units to 180.

The School of Engineering's Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs is the definitive reference for all undergraduate engineering programs. It is available online at http://ughb.stanford.edu and provides detailed descriptions of all undergraduate programs in the school, as well as additional information about extracurricular programs and services. Because it is revised in the summer, and updates are made to the web site on a continuing basis, the handbook reflects the most up-to-date information on School of Engineering programs for the academic year.

Accreditation

The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) accredits college engineering programs nationwide using criteria and standards developed and accepted by U.S. engineering communities. At Stanford, the following undergraduate programs are accredited:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

In ABET-accredited programs, students must meet specific requirements for engineering science, engineering design, mathematics, and science course work. Students are urged to consult the School of Engineering Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs and their adviser.

Accreditation is important in certain areas of the engineering profession; students wishing more information about accreditation should consult their department office or the office of the Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs in 135 Huang Engineering Center.

Policy on Satisfactory/No Credit Grading and Minimum Grade Point Average

All courses taken to satisfy major requirements (including the requirements for mathematics, science, engineering fundamentals, Technology in Society, and engineering depth) for all engineering students (including both department and School of Engineering majors) must be taken for a letter grade if the instructor offers that option.

For departmental majors, the minimum combined GPA (grade point average) for all courses taken in fulfillment of the Engineering Fundamentals requirement and the Engineering Depth requirement is 2.0. For School of Engineering majors, the minimum GPA on all engineering courses taken in fulfillment of the major requirements is 2.0.

Admission

Any students admitted to the University may declare an engineering major if they elect to do so; no additional courses or examinations are required for admission to the School of Engineering.

Recommended Preparation

Freshman

Students who plan to enter Stanford as freshmen and intend to major in engineering should take the highest level of mathematics offered in high school. (See the "Mathematics" section of this bulletin for information on advanced placement in mathematics.) High school courses in physics and chemistry are strongly recommended, but not required. Additional elective course work in the humanities and social sciences is also recommended.

Transfer Students

Students who do the early part of their college work elsewhere and then transfer to Stanford to complete their engineering programs should follow an engineering or pre-engineering program at the first school, selecting insofar as possible courses applicable to the requirements of the School of Engineering, that is, courses comparable to those described under "Undergraduate Programs." In addition, students should work toward completing the equivalent of Stanford's foreign language requirement and as many of the University's General Education Requirements (GERs) as possible before transferring. Some transfer students may require more than four years (in total) to obtain the B.S. degree. However, Stanford affords great flexibility in planning and scheduling individual programs, which makes it possible for transfer students, who have wide variations in preparation, to plan full programs for each quarter and to progress toward graduation without undue delay.

Transfer credit is given for courses taken elsewhere whenever the courses are equivalent or substantially similar to Stanford courses in scope and rigor. The policy of the School of Engineering is to study each transfer student's preparation and make a reasonable evaluation of the courses taken prior to transfer by means of a petition process. Inquiries may be addressed to the Office of Student Affairs in 135 Huang Engineering Center. For more information, see the transfer credit section of the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu.

Degree Program Options

The School of Engineering offers two types of B.S. degrees:

  • Bachelor of Science in Engineering
  • Bachelor of Science for Individually Designed Majors in Engineering (IDMENs)

There are eight Engineering B.S. subplans that have been proposed by cognizant faculty groups and pre-approved by the Undergraduate Council:

  • Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Architectural Design
  • Atmosphere/Energy
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomechanical Engineering
  • Biomedical Computation
  • Engineering Physics
  • Product Design.

The B.S. for an Individually Designed Major in Engineering has also been approved by the council.

Curricula for majors are offered by the departments of:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil and Environmental Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Management Science and Engineering
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Curricula for majors in these departments have the following components:

  • 36-45 units of mathematics and science (see Basic Requirements 1 and 2 at the end of this section)
  • engineering fundamentals (three course minimum, at least one of which must be unspecified by the department, see Basic Requirement 3)
  • Technology in Society (TIS) (one course minimum, see Basic Requirement 4)
  • engineering depth (courses such that the total number of units for Engineering Fundamentals and Engineering Depth is between 60 and 72)
  • ABET accredited majors must meet a minimum number of Engineering Science and Engineering Design units; (see Basic Requirement 5)

Consult the 2013-14 Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs for additional information.

Dual and Coterminal Programs

A Stanford undergraduate may work simultaneously toward two bachelor's degrees or toward a bachelor's and a master's degree, that is, B.A. and M.S., B.A. and M.A., B.S. and M.S., or B.S. and M.A. The degrees may be granted simultaneously or at the conclusion of different quarters. Five years are usually required for a dual or coterminal program or for a combination of these two multiple degree programs. For further information, inquire with the School of Engineering's student affairs office, 135 Huang Engineering Center, or with department contacts listed in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs, available at http://ughb.stanford.edu.

Dual B.A. and B.S. Degree Program—To qualify for both degrees, a student must:

  1. complete the stated University and department requirements for each degree
  2. complete 15 full-time quarters, or 3 full-time quarters after completing 180 units
  3. complete a total of 225 units (180 units for the first bachelor's degree plus 45 units for the second bachelor's degree)

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degree Program—A Stanford undergraduate may be admitted to graduate study for the purpose of working simultaneously toward a bachelor's degree and a master's degree, in the same or different disciplines. To qualify for both degrees, a student must:

  1. complete, in addition to the 180 units required for the bachelor's degree, the number of units required by the graduate department for the master's degree which in no event is fewer than the University minimum of 45 units
  2. complete the requirements for the bachelor's degree (department, school, and University) and apply for conferral of the degree at the appropriate time
  3. complete the department and University requirements for the master's degree and apply for conferral of the degree at the appropriate time

A student may complete the bachelor's degree before completing the master's degree, or both degrees may be completed in the same quarter.

Admission to the coterminal program requires admission to graduate status by the pertinent department. Admission criteria vary from department to department.

Procedure for Applying for Admission to Coterminal Degree Programs

A Stanford undergraduate may apply to the pertinent graduate department using the University coterminal application form after completing 120 bachelor's degree units. Application deadlines vary by department, but in all cases the student must apply early enough to allow a departmental decision at least one quarter in advance of the anticipated date of conferral of the bachelor's degree.

Students should refer to the University Registrar's Office or its web site for details about when courses begin to count toward the master's degree requirements and when graduate tuition is assessed; this may affect the decision about when to apply for admission to graduate status.

The University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, also see http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/registrar/publications#Coterm.

Graduate Programs in the School of Engineering

Admission

Application for admission with graduate standing in the school should be made to the graduate admissions committee in the appropriate department or program. While most graduate students have undergraduate preparation in an engineering curriculum, it is feasible to enter from other programs, including chemistry, geology, mathematics, or physics.

For further information and application instructions, see the department sections in this bulletin or http://gradadmissions.stanford.edu. Stanford undergraduates may also apply as coterminal students; details can be found under "Degree Program Options" in the "Undergraduate Programs in the School of Engineering" section of this bulletin.

Fellowships and Assistantships

Departments and divisions of the School of Engineering award graduate fellowships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships each year.

Curricula in the School of Engineering

For further details about the following programs, see the department sections in this bulletin.

Related aspects of particular areas of graduate study are commonly covered in the offerings of several departments and divisions. Graduate students are encouraged, with the approval of their department advisers, to choose courses in departments other than their own to achieve a broader appreciation of their field of study. For example, most departments in the school offer courses concerned with nanoscience, and a student interested in an aspect of nanotechnology can often gain appreciable benefit from the related courses given by departments other than her or his own.

Departments and programs of the school offer graduate curricula as follows:

Aeronautics and Astronautics

  • Aeroelasticity and Flow Simulation
  • Aircraft Design, Performance, and Control
  • Applied Aerodynamics
  • Computational Aero-Acoustics
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Computational Mechanics and Dynamical Systems
  • Control of Robots, including Space and Deep-Underwater Robots
  • Conventional and Composite Materials and Structures
  • Direct and Large-Eddy Simulation of Turbulence
  • High-Lift Aerodynamics
  • Hybrid Propulsion
  • Hypersonic and Supersonic Flow
  • Micro and Nano Systems and Materials
  • Multidisciplinary Design Optimization
  • Navigation Systems (especially GPS)
  • Optimal Control, Estimation, System Identification
  • Sensors for Harsh Environments
  • Space Debris Characterization
  • Space Environment Effects on Spacecraft
  • Space Plasmas
  • Spacecraft Design and Satellite Engineering
  • Turbulent Flow and Combustion

Bioengineering

  • Biomedical Computation
  • Biomedical Devices
  • Biomedical Imaging
  • Cell and Molecular Engineering
  • Regenerative Medicine

Chemical Engineering

  • Applied Statistical Mechanics
  • Biocatalysis
  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Biophysics
  • Computational Materials Science
  • Colloid Science
  • Dynamics of Complex Fluids
  • Energy Conversion
  • Functional Genomics
  • Hydrodynamic Stability
  • Kinetics and Catalysis
  • Microrheology
  • Molecular Assemblies
  • Nanoscience and Technology
  • Newtonian and Non-Newtonian Fluid Mechanics
  • Polymer Physics
  • Protein Biotechnology
  • Renewable Fuels
  • Semiconductor Processing
  • Soft Materials Science
  • Solar Utilization
  • Surface and Interface Science
  • Transport Mechanics

Civil and Environmental Engineering

  • Atmosphere/Energy
  • Construction Engineering and Management
  • Design/Construction Integration
  • Environmental Engineering and Science
  • Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology
  • Environmental and Water Studies
  • Geomechanics
  • Structural Engineering
  • Sustainable Design and Construction

Computational and Mathematical Engineering

  • Applied and Computational Mathematics
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Computational Geometry and Topology
  • Computational Geosciences
  • Computational Medicine
  • Data Science
  • Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms
  • Numerical Analysis
  • Optimization
  • Partial Differential Equations
  • Stochastic Processes
  • Uncertainty Quantification
  • Financial Mathematics

Computer Science

See http://forum.stanford.edu/research/areas.php for a comprehensive list.

  • Algorithmic Game Theory
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Autonomous Agents
  • Biomedical Computation
  • Compilers
  • Complexity Theory
  • Computational and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Computational Biology
  • Computational Geometry and Topology
  • Computational Logic
  • Computational Photography
  • Computational Physics
  • Computer Architecture
  • Computer Graphics
  • Computer Security
  • Computer Science Education
  • Computer Vision
  • Cryptography
  • Database Systems
  • Data Center Computing
  • Data Mining
  • Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • Digital Libraries
  • Distributed and Parallel Computation
  • Distributed Systems
  • Electronic Commerce
  • Formal Verification
  • Haptic Display of Virtual Environments
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Image Processing
  • Information and Communication Technologies for Development
  • Information Management
  • Learning Theory
  • Machine Learning
  • Mathematical Theory of Computation
  • Mobile Computing
  • Multi-Agent Systems
  • Nanotechnology-enabled Systems
  • Natural Language and Speech Processing
  • Networking and Internet Architecture
  • Operating Systems
  • Parallel Computing
  • Probabilistic Models and Methods
  • Programming Systems/Languages
  • Robotics
  • Robust System Design
  • Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis
  • Sensor Networks
  • Social and Information Networks
  • Social Computing
  • Ubiquitous and Pervasive Computing
  • Visualization
  • Web Application Infrastructure

Electrical Engineering

  • Biomedical Devices and Bioimaging
  • Communication Systems: Wireless, Optical, Wireline
  • Control, Learning, and Optimization
  • Electronic and Magnetic Devices
  • Energy: Solar Cells, Smart Grid, Load Control
  • Environmental and Remote Sensing: Sensor Nets, Radar Systems, Space
  • Fields and Waves
  • Graphics, HCI, Computer Vision, Photography
  • Information Theory and Coding: Image and Data Compression, Denoising
  • Integrated Circuit Design: MEMS, Sensors, Analog, RF
  • Network Systems and Science: Nest Gen Internet, Wireless Networks
  • Nano and Quantum Science
  • Photonic Devices
  • Systems Software: OS, Compilers, Languages
  • Systems Hardware: Architecture, VLSI, Embedded Systems
  • VLSI Design

Management Science and Engineering

  • Decision and Risk Analysis
  • Dynamic Systems
  • Economics
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Finance
  • Information
  • Marketing
  • Optimization
  • Organization Behavior
  • Organizational Science
  • Policy
  • Production
  • Stochastic Systems
  • Strategy

Materials Science and Engineering

  • Biomaterials
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Computational Materials Science
  • Electrical and Optical Behavior of Solids
  • Electron Microscopy
  • Fracture and Fatigue
  • Imperfections in Crystals
  • Kinetics
  • Magnetic Behavior of Solids
  • Magnetic Storage Materials
  • Nanomaterials
  • Photovoltaics
  • Organic Materials
  • Phase Transformations
  • Physical Metallurgy
  • Solid State Chemistry
  • Structural Analysis
  • Thermodynamics
  • Thin Films
  • X-Ray Diffraction

Mechanical Engineering

  • Biomechanics
  • Combustion Science
  • Computational Mechanics
  • Controls
  • Design of Mechanical Systems
  • Dynamics
  • Environmental Science
  • Experimental Stress and Analysis
  • Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics
  • Finite Element Analysis
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Heat Transfer
  • High Temperature Gas Dynamics
  • Kinematics
  • Manufacturing
  • Mechatronics
  • Product Design
  • Robotics
  • Sensors
  • Solids
  • Thermodynamics
  • Turbulence

Bachelor of Science in the School of Engineering

Departments within the School of Engineering offer programs leading to the B.S. degree in the following fields:

  • Chemical Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Management Science and Engineering
  • Materials Science and Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

The School of Engineering itself offers interdisciplinary programs leading to the B.S. degree in Engineering with specializations in:

  • Aeronautics and Astronautics
  • Architectural Design
  • Atmosphere/Energy
  • Bioengineering
  • Biomechanical Engineering
  • Biomedical Computation
  • Engineering Physics
  • Product Design

In addition, students may elect a B.S. in an Individually Designed Major in Engineering.

Bachelor of Arts and Science (B.A.S.) in the School of Engineering

This degree is available to students who complete both the requirements for a B.S. degree in engineering and the requirements for a major or program ordinarily leading to the B.A. degree. For more information, see the "Undergraduate Degrees" section of this bulletin.

Independent Study, Research, and Honors

The departments of Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering, as well as the faculty overseeing the Architectural Design, Atmosphere/Energy, Bioengineering, Biomechanical Engineering, Biomedical Computing, and Engineering Physics majors, offer qualified students opportunities to do independent study and research at an advanced level with a faculty mentor in order to receive a Bachelor of Science with honors. An honors option is also available to students pursuing an independently designed major, with the guidance and approval of their adviser.

Petroleum Engineering

Petroleum Engineering is offered by the Department of Energy Resource Engineering in the School of Earth Sciences. Consult the "Energy Resources Engineering" section of this bulletin for requirements. School of Engineering majors who anticipate summer jobs or career positions associated with the oil industry should consider enrolling in ENGR 120.

Programs in Manufacturing

Programs in manufacturing are available at the undergraduate, master's, and doctorate levels. The undergraduate programs of the departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Management Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering provide general preparation for any student interested in manufacturing. More specific interests can be accommodated through Individually Designed Majors in Engineering (IDMENs).

Basic Requirements

Basic Requirement 1 (Mathematics)

Engineering students need a solid foundation in the calculus of continuous functions, linear algebra, an introduction to discrete mathematics, and an understanding of statistics and probability theory. Students are encouraged to select courses on these topics. To meet ABET accreditation criteria, a student's program must include the study of differential equations. Courses that satisfy the math requirement are listed at http://ughb.stanford.edu in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

Basic Requirement 2 (Science)

A strong background in the basic concepts and principles of natural science in such fields as biology, chemistry, geology, and physics is essential for engineering. Most students include the study of physics and chemistry in their programs. Courses that satisfy the science requirement are listed at http://ughb.stanford.edu in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

Basic Requirement 3 (Engineering Fundamentals)

The Engineering Fundamentals requirement is satisfied by a nucleus of technically rigorous introductory courses chosen from the various engineering disciplines. It is intended to serve several purposes. First, it provides students with a breadth of knowledge concerning the major fields of endeavor within engineering. Second, it allows the incoming engineering student an opportunity to explore a number of courses before embarking on a specific academic major. Third, the individual classes each offer a reasonably deep insight into a contemporary technological subject for the interested non-engineer.

The requirement is met by taking three courses from the following list, at least one of which is chosen by the student rather than by the department:

Units
ENGR 10Introduction to Engineering Analysis4
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ENGR 20Introduction to Chemical Engineering (same as CHEMENG 20)3
ENGR 25BBiotechnology 13
ENGR 25EEnergy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use (same as CHEMENG 25E) 13
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 40Introductory Electronics 1,25
ENGR 40AIntroductory Electronics3
ENGR 40CEngineering Wireless Networks5
ENGR 40PPhysics of Electrical Engineering 15
ENGR 50Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis 1,24
ENGR 50EIntroduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis 14
ENGR 50MIntroduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis 14
ENGR 60Engineering Economy3
ENGR 62Introduction to Optimization (same as MS&E 111)4
ENGR 70A/CS 106AProgramming Methodology 15
ENGR 70B/CS 106BProgramming Abstractions 15
ENGR 70X/CS 106XProgramming Abstractions (Accelerated) 15
ENGR 80Introduction to Bioengineering (same as BIOE 80)4
ENGR 90Environmental Science and Technology (same as CEE 70)3

1

Only one course from each numbered series can be used in the Engineering Fundamentals category within a major program.

2

ENGR 40 Introductory Electronics and ENGR 50 Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis may be taken on video at some of Stanford's Overseas Centers.

Basic Requirement 4 (Technology in Society)

It is important for the student to obtain a broad understanding of engineering as a social activity. To foster this aspect of intellectual and professional development, all engineering majors must take one course devoted to exploring issues arising from the interplay of engineering, technology, and society. Courses that fulfill this requirement are listed online at http://ughb.stanford.edu in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

Basic Requirement 5 (Engineering Topics)

In order to satisfy ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology) requirements, a student majoring in Chemical, Civil, Environmental, or Mechanical Engineering must complete one and a half years of engineering topics, consisting of a minimum of 68 units of Engineering Fundamentals and Engineering Depth appropriate to the student's field of study. In most cases, students meet this requirement by completing the major program core and elective requirements. A student may need to take additional courses in Depth in order to fulfill the minimum requirement. Appropriate courses assigned to fulfill each major's program are listed online at http://ughb.stanford.edu in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

Experimentation

Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering must include experimental experience appropriate to the discipline. Lab courses taken in the sciences, as well as experimental work taken in courses within the School of Engineering, will fulfill this requirement.

Overseas Studies Courses in Engineering

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site (http://explorecourses.stanford.edu) or the Bing Overseas Studies web site (http://bosp.stanford.edu). Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

 

Aeronautics and Astronautics (AA)

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Aeronautics and Astronautics

The mission of the undergraduate program in Aeronautics and Astronautics Engineering is to provide students with the principles and techniques necessary for success and leadership in the conception, design, implementation, and operation of aerospace and related engineering systems. Courses in the major introduce students to engineering principles. Students learn to apply this fundamental knowledge to conduct laboratory experiments and aerospace system design problems. Courses in the major include engineering fundamentals, mathematics, and the sciences, as well as in-depth courses in aeronautics and astronautics, dynamics, mechanics of materials, fluids engineering, and heat transfer. The major prepares students for careers in aircraft and spacecraft engineering, space exploration, air and space-based telecommunication industries, teaching, research, military service, and many related technology-intensive fields.

Completion of the undergraduate program in Aeronautics and Astronautics leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Aeronautics and Astronautics" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (24-25)
24 units minimum 1
MATH 41Calculus (or AP Calculus)5
MATH 42Calculus (or AP Calculus)5
CME 100/ENGR 154Vector Calculus for Engineers5
or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
CME 102/ENGR 155AOrdinary Differential Equations for Engineers5
or MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
CME 106/ENGR 155CIntroduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (or STATS 110, STATS 116, CS 109)4-5
or STATS 110 Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
or STATS 116 Theory of Probability
or CS 109 Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Science (19-22)
19 units minimum
PHYSICS 41Mechanics (or AP Physics)4
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism (or AP Physics)4
PHYSICS 45Light and Heat4
CHEM 31XChemical Principles ( or CHEM 31A+B, AP Chemistry)4-5
or ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology
Science elective 23-5
Technology in Society (one course required) (3-5)
3 units minimum 33-5
Engineering Fundamentals (three courses required) (11-13)
11 units minimum
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 70AProgramming Methodology5
Fundamentals Elective 43-5
Engineering Depth (30-32)
30 units minimum
AA 100Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics3
AA 190Directed Research and Writing in Aero/Astro3-5
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 131AHeat Transfer4
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ME 161Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control4
or PHYSICS 110 Advanced Mechanics
CEE 101AMechanics of Materials4
or ME 80 Mechanics of Materials
Aero/Astro Depth (18-30)
18 units minimum
Engineering Electives (two courses required) 56-10
See Course List AA-1 below for a list of options
Depth Area I (two courses required) 66-10
See Course List AA-2 below for a list of options
Depth Area II (two courses required) 66-10
See Course List AA-2 below for a list of options
Total Units105-127

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

1

It is recommended that the CME series (100, 102, 104) be taken rather than the MATH series (51, 52, 53). If students take the MATH series, it is recommended to take MATH 51M Introduction to MATLAB for Multivariable Mathematics, offered Autumn Quarter.

2

Courses that satisfy the Science elective are listed in Figure 3-2 in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu.

3

Courses that satisfy the Technology in Society Requirement are listed in Figure 3-3 in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu. ENGR 70B or X (same as CS 106B or X) is not allowed to fulfill the third fundamentals requirement.

4

Courses that satisfy the Engineering Fundamentals elective are listed in Figure 3-4 in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu.

5

Courses that satisfy the Engineering Electives are listed in Figure AA-1 in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu, as well as Course List AA-1 below.

6

Courses that satisfy the Depth Area choices are listed in Figure AA-2 in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu, as well as Course List AA-2 below.


Units
AA-1. Engineering Electives: Two Courses Required
ENGR 240Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems3
ME 210Introduction to Mechatronics4
ME 220Introduction to Sensors3-4
ME 227Vehicle Dynamics and Control3
ME 250Internal Combustion Engines3-5
ME 257Turbine and Internal Combustion Engines3
ME 260Fuel Cell Science and Technology3
ME 324Precision Engineering4
ME 331AAdvanced Dynamics & Computation3
ME 331BAdvanced Dynamics, Simulation & Control3
ME 345Fatigue Design and Analysis3
ME 348Experimental Stress Analysis3
ME 351AFluid Mechanics3
ME 351BFluid Mechanics3
CHEMENG 140Micro and Nanoscale Fabrication Engineering3
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems3-5
CS 110Principles of Computer Systems3-5
CS 140Operating Systems and Systems Programming3-4
CS 161Design and Analysis of Algorithms3-5
EE 102ASignal Processing and Linear Systems I4
EE 102BSignal Processing and Linear Systems II4
EE 101ACircuits I4
EE 101BCircuits II4
EE 108ADigital Systems I3-4
EE 108BDigital Systems II3-4
ENERGY 121Fundamentals of Multiphase Flow3
ENERGY 191Optimization of Energy Systems3-4
ENERGY 226Thermal Recovery Methods3
MATSCI 155Nanomaterials Synthesis4
MATSCI 156Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution3-4
MATSCI 197Rate Processes in Materials3-4
MATSCI 198Mechanical Properties of Materials3-4
PHYSICS 100Introduction to Observational and Laboratory Astronomy4
* It is recommended that students review prerequisites for all courses.

Units
AA-2. Depth Area: Four Courses Required, Two From Each of Two Areas
Dynamics and Controls
ENGR 105Feedback Control Design3
ENGR 205Introduction to Control Design Techniques3
AA 242AClassical Dynamics3
AA 271ADynamics and Control of Spacecraft and Aircraft3
AA 279ASpace Mechanics3
Systems Design
AA 236ASpacecraft Design3-5
AA 236BSpacecraft Design Laboratory3-5
AA 241AIntroduction to Aircraft Design, Synthesis, and Analysis3
AA 241BIntroduction to Aircraft Design, Synthesis, and Analysis3
AA 284BPropulsion System Design Laboratory3
Fluids and CFD
AA 200Applied Aerodynamics3
AA 210AFundamentals of Compressible Flow3
AA 214A/CME 206/ME 300CIntroduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering3
AA 283Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion3
ME 131BFluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery4
ME 140Advanced Thermal Systems5
Structures
AA 240AAnalysis of Structures3
AA 240BAnalysis of Structures3
AA 256Mechanics of Composites3
AA 280Smart Structures3
ME 335AFinite Element Analysis3
* It is recommended that students review prerequisites for all courses.

Architectural Design (AD)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Architectural Design leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Architectural Design" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Architectural Design

The mission of the undergraduate program in Architectural Design is to develop students' ability to integrate engineering and architecture in ways that blend innovative architectural design with cutting-edge engineering technologies. Courses in the program combine hands-on architectural design studios with a wide variety of other courses. Students can choose from a broad mix of elective courses concerning energy conservation, sustainability, building systems, and structures, as well as design foundation and fine arts courses. In addition to preparing students for advanced studies in architecture and construction management, the program's math and science requirements prepare students well for graduate work in other fields such as civil and environmental engineering, law, and business.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics and Science (36 units minimum) (0) 1
Mathematics (18-20)
MATH 19Calculus3
MATH 20Calculus3
MATH 21Calculus4
Or the following sequence:
Calculus
Calculus
CME 100Vector Calculus for Engineers (Recommended)5
One course in Statistics (required)3-5
Science (4)
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
Recommended:
Energy and the Environment
Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes
Introduction to Geology: The Physical Science of the Earth (or GES 1B or 1C)
Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions
Environmental Science and Technology
Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering
Electricity and Optics
Electricity and Magnetism
Or from School of Engineering approved list
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course required, see Basic Requirement 43-5
Engineering Fundamentals (16-22)
Three courses minimum, see Basic Requirement 39-15
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 60Engineering Economy 23
or CEE 146A Engineering Economy
AD Depth Core (26) 3
CEE 31Accessing Architecture Through Drawing4
or CEE 31Q Accessing Architecture Through Drawing
CEE 100Managing Sustainable Building Projects4
CEE 110ABuilding Information Modeling and Short Course4
CEE 130Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process4
CEE 137BAdvanced Architecture Studio5
ARTHIST 3Introduction to the History of Architecture- Domes: from the Pantheon to the Present5
Depth Options (12)12
See Note 3 for course options
Depth Electives (3)
Elective units must be such that courses in ENGR Fundamentals, Core, Depth Options, and Depth Electives total at least 60 units. One of the following must be taken:
CEE 131AProfessional Practice: Mixed-Use Design in an Urban Setting3
or CEE 32A Psychology of Architecture
or CEE 32B Design Theory
or CEE 32D Construction: The Writing of Architecture
or CEE 32F Light, Color, and Space
or CEE 131A Professional Practice: Mixed-Use Design in an Urban Setting
or CEE 139 Design Portfolio Methods
Total Units82-92

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

1

 School of Engineering approved list of math and science courses available in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu.

2

CEE 146A, offered Autumn quarter, may be used in place of ENGR 60 for the second ENGR Fundamental.


3

Engineering depth options: Choose at least 12 units from the following courses: CEE 101A, CEE 101B, CEE 101C, CEE 156, CEE 172, CEE 172A, CEE 176A, CEE 180, CEE 181, CEE 182, CEE 183, CEE 226, CEE 241, OR CEE 242. Students should investigate any prerequisites for the listed courses and carefully plan course sequences with the AD director.

Electives:

  • CEE 32A, CEE 32B, CEE 32D, CEE 32F, CEE 32Q,  CEE 101B, CEE 101C, CEE 110BM CEE 110CM CEE 122A, CEE 122B, CEE 124, CEE 131A, CEE 132, CEE 134B, CEE 135A, CEE 139, CEE 154, CEE 172A, CEE 176A, CEE 180, CEE 181, CEE 182, CEE 183
  • ENGR 50, ENGR 103, ENGR 131
  • ME 10AX, ME 101, ME 110, ME 115A/B/C, ME 120, ME 203
  • ARTSTUDI 4, ARTSTUDI 11A, ARTSTUDI 13, ARTSTUDI 14, ARTSTUDI 140, ARTSTUDI 145, ARTSTUDI 147S, ARTSTUDI 151, ARTSTUDI 160, ARTSTUDI 170, ARTSTUDI 180, ARTSTUDI 262
  • ARTHIST 107A, ARTHIST 142, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 188A
  • FILMPROD 114
  • TAPS 137
  • URBANST 110, URBANST 113, URBANST 163, URBANST 171


Atmosphere/Energy (A/E)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Atmosphere/Energy leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Atmosphere/Energy" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Atmosphere/Energy

Atmosphere and energy are strongly linked: fossil-fuel energy use contributes to air pollution, global warming, and weather modification; and changes in the atmosphere feed back to renewable energy resources, including wind, solar, hydroelectric, and wave resources. The mission of the undergraduate program in Atmosphere/Energy (A/E) is to provide students with the fundamental background necessary to solve large- and local-scale climate, air pollution, and energy problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. To accomplish this goal, students learn in detail the causes and proposed solutions to the problems, and learn to evaluate whether the proposed solutions are truly beneficial. A/E students take courses in renewable energy resources, indoor and outdoor air pollution, energy efficient buildings, climate change, renewable energy and clean-vehicle technologies, weather and storm systems, energy technologies in developing countries, electric grids, and air quality management. The curriculum is flexible. Depending upon their area of interest, students may take in-depth courses in energy or atmosphere and focus either on science, technology, or policy. The major is designed to provide students with excellent preparation for careers in industry, government, and research; and for study in graduate school.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics and Science (45 units minimum): (0)
Mathematics (23)23
23 units minimum, including at least one course from each group:
Group A
Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
Group B
Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Introduction to Statistical Methods: Precalculus
Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
Science (24)20
20 units minimum, including all of the following:
Mechanics
Electricity and Magnetism
Light and Heat
Select one of the following: 4
Chemical Principles II
Chemical Principles
Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology
Environmental Science and Technology 1
Technology in Society (1 course) (5)
MS&E 197Ethics and Public Policy (WIM)5
Engineering Fundamentals (9-12)
Three courses minimum, including the following:
ENGR 25EEnergy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use3
Plus one of the following courses, plus one elective (see Basic Requirement 3):6-9
Introduction to Engineering Analysis
Engineering Thermodynamics
Engineering Economy
Programming Methodology
Engineering Depth (41-42)
Required: 2
CEE 64Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (cannot also fulfill science requirement)3
CEE 173AEnergy Resources4-5
At least 34 units from the following with at least four courses from each group:34
Group A: Atmosphere
Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics
Weather and Storms
Mechanics of Fluids
or ME 70
Introductory Fluids Engineering
Introduction to Physical Oceanography
Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation
Air Quality Management
Indoor Air Quality ((given alt years))
Green House Gas Mitigation
Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis
Biology and Global Change
Climate Change from the Past to the Future
Remote Sensing of Land
Fundamentals of Geographic Information Science (GIS)
Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation (alt years)
Climate and Agriculture
Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery
International Environmental Policy
Group B: Energy
Creating a Green Student Workforce to Help Implement Stanford's Sustainability Vision (alternate years)
Green Architecture
Negotiating Sustainable Development
Building Systems
Energy Efficient Buildings
Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency
Energy Systems Field Trips: China Energy Systems ((given alt years))
Design for a Sustainable World
Renewable Energy for a Sustainable World
Energy and the Environment
Renewable Energy Sources and Greener Energy Processes
Energy, the Environment, and the Economy
Transition to sustainable energy systems
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Electric Vehicle Design
Total Units102-106

 

1

Can count as a science requirement or Engineering Fundamental, but not both.

2

To fulfill the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement take Technology in Society course STS 110 or MS&E 193W. Alternative WIM Courses: CEE 100, EARTHSYS 200,  HUMBIO 4B, or the combination of 2 units of CEE 199 with 1 unit of E199W.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 


Bioengineering (BioE)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Bioengineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Bioengineering" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Bioengineering

The Stanford Bioengineering (BioE) major enables students to combine engineering and the life sciences in ways that advance scientific discovery, healthcare and medicine, manufacturing, environmental quality, culture, education, and policy. Students who major in BioE earn a fundamental engineering degree for which the raw materials, underlying basic sciences, fundamental toolkit, and future frontiers are all defined by the unique properties of living systems.

Students will complete engineering fundamentals courses, including an introduction to BioE and computer programming. A series of core BioE classes beginning in the second year leads to a student-selected depth area and a senior capstone design project. The department also organizes a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program. BioE graduates are well prepared to pursue careers and lead projects in research, medicine, business, law, and policy.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (28-30) 1
28 units minimum required, see Basic Requirement 1)
MATH 41
  & MATH 42
Calculus
   and Calculus (or AP Calculus)
10
Select one of the following:
CME 100Vector Calculus for Engineers (Recommended)5
or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
Select one of the following:
CME 102Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (Recommended)5
or MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
Select one of the following:
CME 104Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers (Recommended)5
or MATH 52 Integral Calculus of Several Variables
CME 106Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers (Recommended)3-5
or STATS 110 Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
or STATS 141 Biostatistics
Science (28-33) 2
28 units minimum:
CHEM 31XChemical Principles5-10
or CHEM 31A
  & CHEM 31B
Chemical Principles I
   and Chemical Principles II
CHEM 33Structure and Reactivity5
BIO 41Genetics, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology5
BIO 42Cell Biology and Animal Physiology5
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism4
Technology in Society (3)
One course required; see Basic Requirement 4
BIOE 131Ethics in Bioengineering3
Engineering Fundamentals (12-14)
ENGR 70AProgramming Methodology (same as CS 106A)5
ENGR 80Introduction to Bioengineering4
Fundamentals Elective; see UGHB Fig. 3-4 for approved course list; may not use ENGR 70B or ENGR 70X3-5
Bioengineering Core (36)
BIOE 41Physical Biology of Macromolecules4
BIOE 42Physical Biology of Cells4
BIOE 44Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab4
BIOE 51Anatomy for Bioengineers4
BIOE 101Systems Biology4
BIOE 103Systems Physiology and Design4
BIOE 123Optics and Devices Lab4
BIOE 141ASenior Capstone Design I4
BIOE 141BSenior Capstone Design II4
Bioengineering Depth Electives (12)
Four courses, minimum 12 units:12
Computational Modeling of Microbial Communities
Introduction to Biomedical Informatics Research Methodology
Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
Introduction to Imaging and Image-based Human Anatomy
Multimodality Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects I
Multimodality Molecular Imaging in Living Subjects II
Physics and Engineering of X-Ray Computed Tomography
Advanced Frameworks and Approaches for Engineering Integrated Genetic Systems
Tissue Engineering
Biomechanics of Movement
Principles and Practice of Optogenetics for Optical Control of Biological Tissues
Diagnostic Devices Lab
Biophysics of Multi-cellular Systems and Amorphous Computing
Total Units119-128

1

It is strongly recommended that CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers, CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers, and CME 104 Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers) be taken rather than MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables, MATH 52 Integral Calculus of Several Variables, and MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra. CME 106 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers utilizes MATLAB, a powerful technical computing program, and should be taken rather than STATS 110 Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences or STATS 141 Biostatistics. If  you are taking the MATH 50 series, it is strongly recommended to take MATH 51M Introduction to MATLAB or CME 192 Introduction to MATLAB.

2

Science must include both Chemistry (CHEM 31A Chemical Principles I and CHEM 31B Chemical Principles II; or CHEM 31X Chemical Principles or ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology) and calculus-based Physics, with two quarters of course work in each, in addition to two courses of BIO core. CHEM 31A Chemical Principles I and CHEM 31B Chemical Principles II are considered one course even though given over two quarters. Premeds should take Chemistry, not ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB). Students pursuing a premed program need to take additional courses; see the UGHB, BioE Premed 4-Year Plan.

Honors Program

The School of Engineering offers a program leading to a Bachelor of Science in Engineering: Bioengineering with Honors (ENGR-BSH, BIOE). This program provides the opportunity for qualified BioE majors to conduct independent research at an advanced level with a faculty research adviser and documented in an honors thesis.

In order to receive departmental honors, students admitted to the program must:

  1. Declare the honors program in Axess (ENGR-BSH, Subplan: Bioengineering).
  2. Maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.5 as calculated on the unofficial transcript.
  3. Complete at least two quarters of research with a minimum of nine units of BIOE 191 Bioengineering Problems and Experimental Investigation or BIOE 191X Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Bioengineering for a letter grade; up to three units may be used towards the bioengineering depth elective requirements.  
  4. Submit a completed thesis draft to the honors adviser and second reader by the first week of Spring Quarter. Further revisions and final endorsement are to be finished by the second Monday in May, when two signed bound copies plus one PC-compatible CD-ROM are to be submitted to the student services officer.
  5. Attend the Bioengineering Honors Symposium at the end of Spring Quarter and give a poster or oral presentation, or present in another approved suitable forum.  

 For more information and application instructions, see the department's undergraduate site


Biomechanical Engineering (BME)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Biomechanical Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Biomechanical Engineering" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Biomechanical Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Biomechanical Engineering is to help students address health science challenges by applying engineering mechanics and design to the fields of biology and medicine. The program is interdisciplinary in nature, integrating engineering course work with biology and clinical medicine. Research and teaching in this discipline focus primarily on neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and cell and tissue biomechanics. This major prepares students for graduate studies in bioengineering, medicine or related areas.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (21)21
21 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 1
Science (22 units Minimum) (29) 1
CHEM 31XChemical Principles (or CHEM 31A+B)5
CHEM 33Structure and Reactivity5
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
BIO 44XCore Molecular Biology Laboratory5
Biology or Human Biology A/B core courses10
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course required, see Basic Requirement 43-5
Engineering Topics (Engineering Science and Design) (10-12)
Engineering Fundamentals (minimum three courses; see Basic Requirement 3):
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 25BBiotechnology3
or ENGR 80 Introduction to Bioengineering
Fundamentals Elective3-5
Engineering Depth (34)
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 80Mechanics of Materials4
ME 389Biomechanical Research Symposium 21
Options to complete the ME depth sequence (3 courses, minimum 9 units):9
Feedback Control Design
Visual Thinking
Mechanical Systems Design 3
Mechanical Engineering Design
Heat Transfer 3
Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery
Advanced Thermal Systems 3
Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control
Design and Manufacturing
Introduction to Mechatronics
Introduction to Sensors
Options to complete the BME depth sequence (3 courses, minimum 9 units) and WIM: 39
Tissue Engineering
Introduction to Physiology and Biomechanics of Hearing
Skeletal Development and Evolution
Biomechanics of Movement
Introduction to Biomechanics
Mechanics of Biological Tissues
Medical Device Design Lab
Medical Robotics ((with permission of instructor))
Total Units97-101

1

Science must include both Chemistry and Physics with one year of course work (3 courses) in at least one, two courses of HUMBIO core or BIO core, and CHEM 31A and B or X, or ENGR 31. CHEM 31A and B are considered one course even though given over two quarters.


2

If ME 389 is not offered, other options include BIOE 393, ME 571, or course by petition.

3

 There are two options for fulfilling the WIM requirement. The first option is to complete one of ME112, ME131A, or ME140 (ME 131A must be taken for 5 units to fulfill WIM). The second option is to perform engineering research over the summer or during the academic year and enroll in 3 units of ENGR 199W “Writing of Original Research for Engineers,” (preferably during the time you are performing research or the following quarter) to write a technical report on your research. This second option requires an agreement with your faculty research supervisor.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).


Biomedical Computation (BMC)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Biomedical Computation leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Biomedical Computation" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Biomedical Computation

As biology and medical science enter the 21st century, the importance of computational methods continues to increase dramatically. These methods span the analysis of biomedical data, the construction of computational models for biological systems, and the design of computer systems that help biologists and physicians create and administer treatments to patients. The Biomedical Computation major prepares students to work at the cutting edge of this interface between computer science, biology, and medicine. Students begin their journey by gaining a solid fundamental understanding of the underlying biological and computational disciplines. They learn techniques in informatics and simulation and their countless applications in understanding and analyzing biology at all levels, from individual molecules in cells to entire organs, organisms, and populations. Students then focus their efforts pm a depth area of their choice, and participate in a substantial research project with a Stanford faculty member. Upon graduation, students are prepared to enter a wide range of cutting-edge fields in both academia and industry.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (16-20)
21 unit minimum, see Basic Requirement 1
MATH 41Calculus5
MATH 42Calculus5
STATS 116Theory of Probability 13-5
CS 103Mathematical Foundations of Computing3-5
Science (29)
17 units minimum, see Basic Requirement 2
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
CHEM 31XChemical Principles5
CHEM 33Structure and Reactivity5
BIO 41Genetics, Biochemistry, and Molecular Biology5
or HUMBIO 2A Genetics, Evolution, and Ecology
BIO 42Cell Biology and Animal Physiology5
or HUMBIO 3A Cell and Developmental Biology
BIO 43Plant Biology, Evolution, and Ecology5
or HUMBIO 4A The Human Organism
Engineering Fundamentals (3-5)
CS 106BProgramming Abstractions3-5
or CS 106X Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
For the second required course, see concentrations
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course required, see Basic Requirement 43-5
Engineering (15-19)
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems3-5
CS 161Design and Analysis of Algorithms3-5
Select one of the following: 3
Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving
A Computational Tour of the Human Genome
Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
Translational Bioinformatics
Research: 6 units of biomedical computation research in any department 2,36
Engineering Depth Concentration (select one of the following concentrations): 7
Cellular/Molecular Concentration (0)
Mathematics: Select one of the following:
Vector Calculus for Engineers
Biostatistics
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
One additional Engineering Fundamental 4
Biology (four courses):
Cellular Dynamics I: Cell Motility and Adhesion
Cellular Dynamics II: Building a Cell
Biochemistry I (or CHEM 135 or CHEM 171)
Informatics Electives (two courses) 5,6
Simulation Electives (two courses) 5, 6
Simulation, Informatics, or Cell/Mol Elective (one course) 5,6
Informatics Concentration (6-10)
Mathematics: Select one of the following:
Biostatistics
Introduction to Regression Models and Analysis of Variance
Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics
One additional Engineering Fundamental 4
Informatics Core (three courses):
Introduction to Databases
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
One additional course from the previous two lines
Informatics Electives (three courses) 5,6
Cellular Electives (two courses) 5,6
Organs Electives (two courses) 5,66-10
Organs/Organisms Concentration (0)
Mathematics (select one of the following):
Vector Calculus for Engineers
Biostatistics
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
One additional Engineering Fundamental 4
Biology (two courses):
Human Physiology
Biochemistry I
Introduction to Imaging and Image-based Human Anatomy
Two additional Organs Electives 5,6
Simulation Electives (two courses) 5,6
Informatics Electives (two courses) 5,6
Simulation, Informatics, or Organs Elective (one course) 5,6
Simulation Concentration (17)
Mathematics:
Vector Calculus for Engineers
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
Engineering Fundamentals:
Engineering Thermodynamics
Simulation Core:
CME 102Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers5
or MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
ENGR 80Introduction to Bioengineering4
BIOE 101Systems Biology4
BIOE 103Systems Physiology and Design4
Simulation Electives (two courses) 5, 6
Cellular Elective (one course) 5,6
Organs Elective (one course) 5,6
Simulation, Cellular, or Organs Elective (two courses) 5,6
Total Units89-105

1

CS 109 Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists, MS&E 120 Probabilistic Analysis, MS&E 220 Probabilistic Analysis, EE 178 Probabilistic Systems Analysis, and CME 106 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers are acceptable substitutes for STATS 116 Theory of Probability.

2

Research projects require pre-approval of BMC Coordinators

3

Research units taken as CS 191W Writing Intensive Senior Project or in conjunction with ENGR 199W Writing of Original Research for Engineers fulfill the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement. CS 272 Introduction to Biomedical Informatics Research Methodology, which does not have to be taken in conjunction with research, also fulfills the WIM requirement.

4

One 3-5 unit course required; CS 106A Programming Methodology may not be used. See Fundamentals list in Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

5

The list of electives is continually updated to include all applicable courses. For the current list of electives, see http://bmc.stanford.edu.

6

A course may only be counted towards one elective or core requirement; it may not be double-counted.

7

A total of 40 Engineering units must be taken. The core classes only provide 27 Engineering units, so the remaining units must be taken from within the electives.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB). Also see http://bmc.stanford.edu.


Chemical Engineering (CHE)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Chemical Engineering

Chemical engineers are responsible for the conception and design of processes for the purpose of production, transformation, and transportation of materials. This activity begins with experimentation in the laboratory and is followed by implementation of the technology in full-scale production. The mission of the undergraduate program in Chemical Engineering is to develop students' understanding of the core scientific, mathematical, and engineering principles that serve as the foundation underlying these technological processes. The program's core mission is reflected in its curriculum which is built on a foundation in the sciences of chemistry, physics, and biology. Course work includes the study of applied mathematics, material and energy balances, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, energy and mass transfer, separations technologies, chemical reaction kinetics and reactor design, and process design. The program provides students with excellent preparation for careers in the corporate sector and government, or for graduate study.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (24-30) 1
MATH 41Calculus5
MATH 42Calculus5
Select one of the following: 5-10
Vector Calculus for Engineers
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
   and Integral Calculus of Several Variables
Select one of the following: 5
Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
Select one of the following: 4-5
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers
Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Science (25) 1
CHEM 31XChemical Principles5
CHEM 33Structure and Reactivity5
CHEM 35Organic Monofunctional Compounds4
CHEM 36Organic Chemistry Laboratory I3
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism4
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course required, see Basic Requirement 43-5
Engineering Fundamentals (9-11)
Three courses minimum; see Basic Requirement 3
ENGR/CHEMENG 20Introduction to Chemical Engineering3
Fundamentals Elective from another School of Engineering department3-5
See the UGHB for a list of courses.
Select one of the following: 3
Biotechnology (same as CHEMENG 25B)
Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use (same as CHEMENG 25E)
Chemical Engineering Depth (59)
Minimum 68 Engineering Science and Design units; see Basic Requirement 5
CHEMENG 10The Chemical Engineering Profession1
CHEMENG 100Chemical Process Modeling, Dynamics, and Control3
CHEMENG 110Equilibrium Thermodynamics3
CHEMENG 120AFluid Mechanics4
CHEMENG 120BEnergy and Mass Transport4
CHEMENG 130Separation Processes3
CHEMENG 150Biochemical Engineering3
CHEMENG 170Kinetics and Reactor Design3
CHEMENG 180Chemical Engineering Plant Design3
CHEMENG 181Biochemistry I3
CHEMENG 185AChemical Engineering Laboratory A (WIM)4
CHEMENG 185BChemical Engineering Laboratory B4
CHEM 130Organic Chemistry Laboratory II3
CHEM 131Organic Polyfunctional Compounds3
CHEM 171Physical Chemistry3
CHEM 173Physical Chemistry3
CHEM 175Physical Chemistry3
Select two of the following: 26
Micro and Nanoscale Fabrication Engineering
Basic Principles of Heterogeneous Catalysis with Applications in Energy Transformations
Polymer Science and Engineering
Polymers for Clean Energy and Water
Environmental Microbiology I
Biochemistry II
Note 3
Total Units120-130

1

 Unit count is higher if program includes one of more of the following: MATH 51 and  MATH 52 in lieu of CME 100; or CHEM 31A and CHEM 31B in lieu of CHEM 31X.

2

 Any two acceptable except combining 160 and 162 or 174 and 183.

3

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB)



Civil Engineering (CE)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Civil Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Civil Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Civil Engineering is to provide students with the principles of engineering and the methodologies necessary for civil engineering practice. This pre-professional program balances the fundamentals common to many specialties in civil engineering and allows for concentration in structures and construction or environmental and water studies.  Students in the major learn to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and civil engineering to conduct experiments, design structures and systems to creatively solve engineering problems, and communicate their ideas effectively. The curriculum includes course work in structural, construction, and environmental engineering. The major prepares students for careers in consulting, industry and government, as well as for graduate studies in engineering.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics and Science (45)45
45 units minimum; see Basic Requirements 1 and 2 1
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course; see Basic Requirement 4 23-5
Engineering Fundamentals (10-12)
Three courses minimum, see Basic Requirement 3
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 90/CEE 70Environmental Science and Technology3
Fundamentals Elective3-5
Engineering Depth (57-61)
Minimum of 68 Engineering Fundamentals plus Engineering Depth; see Basic Requirement 5
CEE 100Managing Sustainable Building Projects 34
CEE 101AMechanics of Materials4
CEE 101BMechanics of Fluids4
CEE 101CGeotechnical Engineering4
CEE 146AEngineering Economy3
Specialty courses in either: 35-42
Environmental and Water Studies (see below)
Structures and Construction (see below)
Other School of Engineering Electives3-0
Total Units115-123

1

Mathematics must include CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers/CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (or Math 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables/MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra) and a Statistics course. Science must include Physics 41 Mechanics; either ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology, CHEM31A Chemical Principles I or CHEM 31X Chemical Principles; two additional quarters in either chemistry or physics and GES 1A Introduction to Geology: The Physical Science of the Earth (or GES 1B or 1C); for students in the Environmental and Water Studies track, the additional chemistry or physics must include CHEM 33; for students in the Structures and Construction track, it must include PHYSICS 43 or 45.

2

 Chosen TiS class must specifically include an ethics component, such as STS 101 Science Technology and Contemporary Society, STS 110 Ethics and Public Policy, STS 115 Ethical Issues in Engineering. 

3

 CEE 100 meets the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement

Environmental and Water Studies

Units
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics 13
CEE 101DComputations in Civil and Environmental Engineering 23
CEE 160Mechanics of Fluids Laboratory2
CEE 161ARivers, Streams, and Canals3-4
CEE 166AWatersheds and Wetlands3
CEE 166BFloods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts3
CEE 171Environmental Planning Methods3
CEE 172Air Quality Management3
CEE 177Aquatic Chemistry and Biology4
CEE 179AWater Chemistry Laboratory3
Remaining specialty units from:
CEE 63Weather and Storms 23
CEE 64Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions 23
CEE 109Creating a Green Student Workforce to Help Implement Stanford's Sustainability Vision2
CEE 129Climate Change Adaptation for Seaports: Engineering and Policy for a Sustainable Future3
CEE 164Introduction to Physical Oceanography4
CEE 166DWater Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips2
CEE 172AIndoor Air Quality2-3
CEE 173AEnergy Resources4-5
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176BElectric Power: Renewables and Efficiency3-4
CEE 178Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis3
CEE 199Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering1-4

Structures and Construction

Units
Select one of the following: 4
Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis
CEE 102Legal Aspects of Engineering and Construction3
CEE 156Building Systems4
CEE 180Structural Analysis4
CEE 181Design of Steel Structures4
CEE 182Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures4
CEE 183Integrated Civil Engineering Design Project4
Remaining specialty units from:
ENGR 15Dynamics4
CME 104Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers5
CEE 101DComputations in Civil and Environmental Engineering3
CEE 122AComputer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction2
CEE 122BComputer Integrated A/E/C2
CEE 129Climate Change Adaptation for Seaports: Engineering and Policy for a Sustainable Future3
CEE 141A/141BInfrastructure Project Development3
CEE 142ANegotiating Sustainable Development3
CEE 151Negotiation3
CEE 155Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE4
CEE 160Mechanics of Fluids Laboratory2
CEE 161ARivers, Streams, and Canals3-4
CEE 171Environmental Planning Methods3
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176BElectric Power: Renewables and Efficiency3-4
CEE 195Fundamentals of Structural Geology3
CEE 196Engineering Geology and Global Change3
CEE 199Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering1-4
CEE 203Probabilistic Models in Civil Engineering3-4
One of the following can also count as remaining specialty units.3-4
Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process
Professional Practice: Mixed-Use Design in an Urban Setting
Intermediate Arch Studio

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).


Computer Science (CS)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Computer Science leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Computer Science

The mission of the undergraduate program in Computer Science is to develop students' breadth of knowledge across the subject areas of computer sciences, including their ability to apply the defining processes of computer science theory, abstraction, design, and implementation to solve problems in the discipline. Students take a set of core courses. After learning the essential programming techniques and the mathematical foundations of computer science, students take courses in areas such as programming techniques, automata and complexity theory, systems programming, computer architecture, analysis of algorithms, artificial intelligence, and applications. The program prepares students for careers in government, law, and the corporate sector, and for graduate study.

Requirements

Mathematics (26 units minimum)
CS 103Mathematical Foundations of Computing 15
CS 109Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists 25
MATH 41
  & MATH 42
Calculus
   and Calculus 3
10
Plus two electives 4
Science (11 units minimum)
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism4
Science elective 53
Technology in Society (3-5 units)
One course; see Basic Requirement 4
Engineering Fundamentals (13 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 3)
CS 106BProgramming Abstractions5
or CS 106X Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
ENGR 40Introductory Electronics5
or ENGR 40N
Fundamentals Elective (may not be 70A, B, or X)3-5
Writing in the Major
Select one of the following:
Computers, Ethics and Public Policy
Writing Intensive Senior Project
Software Project
Software Project Experience with Corporate Partners
Computer Science Core (15 units)—
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems5
CS 110Principles of Computer Systems 65
CS 161Design and Analysis of Algorithms 75

Computer Science Depth

Choose one of the following ten CS degree tracks (a track must consist of at least 25 units and 7 classes):

Artificial Intelligence Track

Units
CS 221Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques4
Select two of the following:6-8
Introduction to Robotics
Multi-Agent Systems
Natural Language Processing
Statistical Techniques in Robotics
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
Computer Vision: Foundations and Applications
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
One additional course from the list above or the following:3-4
From Languages to Information
Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics
Rational Agency and Intelligent Interaction
Spoken Language Processing
Natural Language Understanding
Social and Information Network Analysis
Experimental Robotics
Robot Programming Laboratory
General Game Playing
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
The Cutting Edge of Computer Vision
Computational Genomics
Information Retrieval and Web Search
Experimental Haptics
Topics in Artificial Intelligence (with adviser consent)
Algorithms in Biology
Interdisciplinary Topics (with adviser consent)
Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems
Information Theory
Introduction to Control Design Techniques
Analysis and Control of Nonlinear Systems
Stochastic Control
Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Control
Modern Applied Statistics: Learning
Modern Applied Statistics: Data Mining
Note: CS225B and MS&E 339 no longer offered
Track Electives (at least three additional courses from the above lists, the general CS electives list, or the following): 99-13
Translational Bioinformatics
Convex Optimization I
Convex Optimization I
Convex Optimization II
Game Theory and Economic Applications
Decision Analysis I: Foundations of Decision Analysis
Decision Analysis II: Professional Decision Analysis
Influence Diagrams and Probabilistics Networks
Computability and Logic
Cognitive Neuroscience
Human Neuroimaging Methods
Computational Neuroimaging: Analysis Methods
Introduction to Statistical Inference
Data Mining and Analysis
Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics
Note: CS 278 no longer offered

Biocomputation Track

Units
The Mathematics, Science, and Engineering Fundamentals requirements are non-standard for this track. See Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs for details.
Select one of the following:3-4
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
Select one of the following:
A Computational Tour of the Human Genome
A Computational Tour of the Human Genome
Computational Genomics
Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving
Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
Translational Bioinformatics
One additional course from the lists above or the following:3-4
From Languages to Information
Introduction to Databases
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
Interactive Computer Graphics
Computational Genomics
Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving
A Computational Tour of the Human Genome
Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
Translational Bioinformatics
One course from either the general CS electives list, BIOE 101, or the list of Biomedical Computation (BMC) Informatics electives (see http://bmc.stanford.edu and select Informatics from the elective options) 93-4
One course from the BMC Informatics elective list3-4
One course from either the BMC Informatics, Cellular/Molecular, or Organs/Organisms electives lists3-5
One course from either the BMC Cellular/Molecular or Organs/Organisms electives lists3-5

Computer Engineering Track

Units
EE 108A
  & EE 108B
Digital Systems I
   and Digital Systems II
6-8
Select two of the following:8
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Satisfy the requirements of one of the following concentrations:
1) Digital Systems Concentration
Operating Systems and Systems Programming
Compilers
Digital Systems Design Lab
Introduction to VLSI Systems
Select two of the following (6-8 units):
Operating Systems and Systems Programming 8
Compilers
Introduction to Computer Networking
Parallel Computing
Embedded Wireless Systems
Advanced Topics in Networking
Digital Systems Engineering
Computer Systems Architecture
2) Robotics and Mechatronics Concentration
Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics
Introduction to Robotics
Introduction to Mechatronics
Feedback Control Design
Select one of the following (3-4 units):
Experimental Robotics
Robot Programming Laboratory
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
Experimental Haptics
Introduction to Control Design Techniques
Control System Design
Linear Control Systems I
Linear Control Systems II
3) Networking Concentration
Operating Systems and Systems Programming
   and Introduction to Computer Networking
Select three of the following (9-11 units):
Advanced Topics in Operating Systems
Advanced Topics in Networking
Distributed Systems
Networked Wireless Systems
Object-Oriented Programming from a Modeling and Simulation Perspective
Large-scale Software Development
Analog and Digital Communication Systems

Graphics Track

Units
CS 148
  & CS 248
Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging
   and Interactive Computer Graphics
8
Select one of the following: 103-5
Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers
Introduction to Scientific Computing
Integral Calculus of Several Variables
Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
Select two of the following:6-8
Computing with Physical Objects: Algorithms for Shape and Motion
Digital Photography
Mathematical Methods for Fluids, Solids, and Interfaces
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
Computer Graphics: Geometric Modeling
Computer Graphics: Image Synthesis Techniques
Topics in Computer Graphics
Track Electives: at least two additional courses from the lists above, the general CS electives list, or the following: 96-8
Design I : Fundamental Visual Language
Introduction to Photography
Digital Art I
Numerical Linear Algebra
Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations
Two-Dimensional Imaging
Digital Signal Processing
Digital Image Processing
Visual Thinking
Introduction to Perception
Applied Vision and Image Systems
Game Studies: Issues in Design, Technology, and Player Creativity
Note: CS 48N and EE 278 not given this year

Human-Computer Interaction Track

Units
CS 147Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design4
Select one of the following:4
Human-Computer Interaction Design Studio
Topics in Human-Computer Interaction
Data Visualization
Software Project Experience with Corporate Partners
Select one of the following:3-6
Introduction to Cognition and the Brain
Introduction to Social Psychology
Statistical Methods for Behavioral and Social Sciences
Visual Thinking
Or any MS&E 18*
Select one of the following:3-4
Object-Oriented Systems Design
From Languages to Information
Operating Systems and Systems Programming
Web Applications
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
Object-Oriented Programming from a Modeling and Simulation Perspective
Select one of the following:3-4
Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging
Research Topics in Human-Computer Interaction
Software Design Experiences
Track Electives: at least two additional courses from the lists above, the general CS electives list, or the following: 96-9
Design I : Fundamental Visual Language
Music, Computing, and Design I: Software Paradigms for Computer Music
Introduction to Human Values in Design
Product Design Methods
Note: CS 476A not given this year

Information Track

Units
CS 124From Languages to Information4
CS 145Introduction to Databases4
Two courses, from different areas:6-9
1) Information-based AI applications
Natural Language Processing
Spoken Language Processing
Machine Learning
2) Database and Information Systems
Operating Systems and Systems Programming
Web Applications
Database Systems Principles
Mining Massive Data Sets
Project in Mining Massive Data Sets
Database System Implementation
Parallel and Distributed Data Management
Note: CS 346 no longer offered
3) Information Systems in Biology
Computational Genomics
Modeling Biomedical Systems: Ontology, Terminology, Problem Solving
Representations and Algorithms for Computational Molecular Biology
4) Information Systems on the Web
Social and Information Network Analysis
Information Retrieval and Web Search
Topics in Algorithmic Game Theory
At least three additional courses from the above areas or the general CS electives list. 9

Systems Track

Units
CS 140Operating Systems and Systems Programming4
Select one of the following:3-4
Compilers
Digital Systems II
Two additional courses from the list above or the following:6-8
Introduction to Computer Networking
Introduction to Databases
Parallel Computing
Computer and Network Security
Advanced Topics in Operating Systems
Programming Languages
Program Analysis and Optimizations
Advanced Topics in Networking
Database Systems Principles
Introduction to VLSI Systems
Computer Systems Architecture
Track Electives: at least three additional courses selected from the list above, the general CS electives list, or the following: 99-12
Embedded Wireless Systems
Readings and Projects in Distributed Systems
Networked Wireless Systems
Parallel Computer Architecture and Programming
Advanced Multi-Core Systems
Parallel Computing Research Project
Project in Mining Massive Data Sets
Advanced Topics in Compilers
Topics in Computer Networks
Advanced Wireless Networks
Database System Implementation
Parallel and Distributed Data Management
Topics in Programming Systems (with permission of undergraduate advisor)
Topics in Computer Graphics
Interconnection Networks
Internet Routing Protocols and Standards
Wireless Local and Wide Area Networks
Performance Engineering of Computer Systems & Networks
Packet Switch Architectures
Note: CS 346, EE 382A, and EE 384Y no longer offered
Note: EE 384B not given this year

Theory Track

Units
CS 154Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory4
Select one of the following:3
Computing with Physical Objects: Algorithms for Shape and Motion
Readings in Algorithms
Introduction to Cryptography
Optimization and Algorithmic Paradigms
Randomized Algorithms and Probabilistic Analysis
Advanced Algorithms
Advanced Algorithms
Two additional courses from the list above or the following:6-8
Compilers
Computer and Network Security
Logic and Automated Reasoning
First-Order Logic
Data Structures
Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Programming Languages
Computational Complexity
Computational Genomics
Graph Algorithms
Topics in Circuit Complexity
Advanced Topics in Cryptography
Advanced Topics in Formal Methods
Topics in Programming Language Theory
Topics in the Theory of Computation (with adviser consent)
Algorithmic Game Theory
Topics in Algorithmic Game Theory
Algebraic Graph Algorithms
Topics in Analysis of Algorithms (with adviser consent)
Algorithms in Biology
Linear Programming
Note: CS 374 not given this year
Track Electives: at least three additional courses from the list above, the general CS electives list, or the following: 99-12
Numerical Linear Algebra
Discrete Mathematics and Algorithms
Computability and Logic

Unspecialized Track

Units
CS 154Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory4
Select one of the following:4
Operating Systems and Systems Programming
Compilers
One additional course from the list above or the following:3-4
Introduction to Computer Networking
Computer and Network Security
Programming Languages
Advanced Topics in Networking
Digital Systems II
Select one of the following:3-4
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Introduction to Robotics
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
Machine Learning
Computer Vision: From 3D Reconstruction to Recognition
Select one of the following:3-4
Introduction to Databases
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging
Interactive Computer Graphics
Computational Genomics
At least two courses from the general CS electives list 9

Individually Designed Track

Students may propose an individually designed track. Proposals should include a minimum of seven courses, at least four of which must be CS courses numbered 100 or above. See Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs for further information.

Senior Capstone Project (3 units minimum)
Senior Project 11
Writing Intensive Senior Project 11
Software Project
Software Project
Software Project Experience with Corporate Partners
Research Project in Computer Science

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB)

1

Students who took CS 103X are required to complete one additional unit in their track or elective courses (i.e. 26 total units for track and elective courses).

2

Students who completed STATS 116 Theory of Probability, MS&E 120 Probabilistic Analysis, or CME 106 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers in Winter Quarter 2008-09 or earlier may count that course as satisfying the CS 109 Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists requirement. These same courses taken in Spring Quarter 2008-09 or later cannot be used to satisfy the CS 109 requirement.

3

MATH 19 Calculus, MATH 29, and MATH 21 Calculus may be taken instead of MATH 41 Calculus and MATH 42 Calculusas long as at least 26 MATH units are taken.

4

The math electives list consists of: MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables, MATH 104 Applied Matrix Theory, MATH 108 Introduction to Combinatorics and Its Applications, MATH 109 Applied Group Theory, MATH 110 Applied Number Theory and Field Theory, MATH 113 Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory; CS 157 Logic and Automated Reasoning, CS 205A Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics; PHIL 151 First-Order Logic; CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers, CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers, CME 104 Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers. Completion of MATH 52 Integral Calculus of Several Variablesand MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra counts as one math elective. Restrictions: CS 157 Logic and Automated Reasoning and PHIL 151 First-Order Logicmay not be used in combination to satisfy the math electives requirement. Students who have taken both MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables and MATH 52 Integral Calculus of Several Variables may not count CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers as an elective. Courses counted as math electives cannot also count as CS electives, and vice versa.

5

The science elective may be any course of 3 or more units from the School of Engineering lists plus PSYCH 30 Introduction to Perception or PSYCH 55 Introduction to Cognition and the Brain; AP Chemistry and Physics also may be used to meet this requirement. Either of the PHYSICS sequences 61/63 or 21/23 may be substituted for 41/43 as long as at least 11 science units are taken.

6

Students who completed CS 108 Object-Oriented Systems Design and either CS 140 Operating Systems and Systems Programming or CS 142 Web Applications by Winter Quarter 2008-09 or earlier, may choose to count CS 108 Object-Oriented Systems Design as satisfying the CS 110 Principles of Computer Systems requirement. In such a case, CS 108 Object-Oriented Systems Design may not also be counted as an elective and the student is required to complete one additional unit in their track or elective courses (i.e., 26 total units for track and elective courses).

7

Students who took CS 161 Design and Analysis of Algorithms for 4 units are required to complete one additional unit in their track or elective courses (i.e., 26 total units for track and elective courses).

8

Students may take CS 140 Operating Systems and Systems Programming or CS 143 Compilers for this requirement if not already counted above.

9

General CS Electives: CS 108, CS 121 or CS 221, CS 131, CS 140, CS 142, CS 143 CS 143, CS 147, CS 148, CS 149, CS 154, CS 155, CS 156, CS 157or PHIL 151, CS 164, CS 166, CS 167, CS 205A, CS 205B, CS 210A, CS 222, CS 223A, CS 224M, CS 224N, CS 224S, CS 224U, CS 224W, CS 225A, CS 225B, CS 226, CS 227, CS 227B, CS 228, CS 228T, CS 229, CS 229A, CS 229T, CS 231A, CS 235, CS 240, CS 240H, CS 241, CS 242, CS 243, CS 244, CS 244B, CS 245, CS 246, CS 247, CS 248, CS 249A, CS 249B, CS 254, CS 255, CS 258, CS 261, CS 262, CS 263, CS 265, CS 267, CS 270, CS 271, CS 272, CS 173or CS 273A, CS 274, CS 276, CS 277, CS 295; CME 108; EE 108B, EE 282.

10

CS 205A Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics is recommended in this list for the Graphics track. Students taking CME 104 Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers are also required to take its prerequisite, CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers.

11

Independent study projects (CS 191 Senior Projector CS 191W Writing Intensive Senior Project) require faculty sponsorship and must be approved by the adviser, faculty sponsor, and the CS senior project adviser (P. Young). A signed approval form, along with a brief description of the proposed project, should be filed the quarter before work on the project is begun. Further details can be found in the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.



Electrical Engineering (EE)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Electrical Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Electrical Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program of the Department of Electrical Engineering is to augment the liberal education expected of all Stanford undergraduates, to impart a basic understanding of electrical engineering built on a foundation of physical science, mathematics, computing, and technology, and to provide majors in the department with knowledge of electrical engineering principles along with the required supporting knowledge of mathematics, science, computing, and engineering fundamentals. The program develops students' skills in performing and designing experimental projects and communicating their findings to the scientific community effectively. Students in the major are required to select one sub-discipline for specialization.  Choices include: electronic circuits, devices and photonics; signal processing, communication and controls; hardware and software systems; bio-electronics and bio-imaging; music; and energy and environment.  The program prepares students for careers in government agencies, the corporate sector, or for future study in graduate or professional schools.

Requirements

Mathematics (26-27)
MATH 41Calculus5
MATH 42Calculus5
CME 100/ENGR 154Vector Calculus for Engineers (Same as ENGR 154)5
CME 102/ENGR 155AOrdinary Differential Equations for Engineers 15
EE Math. One additional 100-level course. Select one of the following: 23
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II (if not used in Track)
Engineering Electromagnetics
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers
Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory
Mathematical Foundations of Computing
Probability. Select one of the following:3-4
Probabilistic Systems Analysis (Preferred)
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Science (12)
Select one of the following sequences:8
Mechanics
   and Electricity and Magnetism 3
Mechanics and Special Relativity
   and Electricity, Magnetism, and Waves
Math or Science electives 44
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course, see Basic Requirement 4 in the School of Engineering section3-5
Engineering Fundamentals (11-15) 5
Select one of the following:
CS 106B/ENGR 70BProgramming Abstractions5
or CS 106X/ENGR 70X Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
At least two additional courses, at least one of which is not in EE or CS (CS 106A is not allowed). Choose from table in Undergraduate Handbook. One from ENGR 40, ENGR 40N or ENGR 40P recommended.6-10
Writing in the Major (WIM) (3-4)
Select one of the following:3-4
Digital Systems Design Lab (WIM)
Analog Communications Design Laboratory (WIM)
Introduction to Photonics (WIM)
Introduction to Digital Image Processing (WIM)
Special Studies and Reports in Electrical Engineering (WIM; Department approval required) 6
Software Project (WIM)
Core Electrical Engineering Courses (21)
EE 100The Electrical Engineering Profession1
EE 101ACircuits I4
EE 102ASignal Processing and Linear Systems I4
EE 108ADigital Systems I4
Physics in Electrical Engineering:
EE 41/ENGR 40PPhysics of Electrical Engineering 75
EE 141Engineering Electromagnetics3
Depth Courses (14)14
Select four courses from one of the following Depth areas. Courses should include one required course, one Design course, and 2 additional courses.
Design Course (3-4)3-4
Select one of the following:
Digital Systems Design Lab (WIM)
Analog Communications Design Laboratory (WIM)
Introduction to Photonics (WIM)
Green Electronics
Introduction to Digital Image Processing (WIM)
Two-Dimensional Imaging
Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
Software Project (WIM)
Depth Electives (12)12
May include up to two additional Engineering Fundamentals, any CS 193 course and any letter graded EE or EE Related courses (minus any previously noted restrictions). Freshman and Sophmore seminars, EE191 and CS 106A do not count toward the 60 units.

1

MATH 52 and MATH 53 can be substituted for CME 100 and CME 102A.

2

EE 102B may count as Math units if not used as an EE Depth course.

3

The EE introductory class ENGR 40 may be taken concurrently with PHYSICS 43.

4

A minimum of 12 science units must be taken. A minimum of 40 math and science units combined must be taken.

5

EE Engineering Topics: Fundamentals and Depth courses must total 60 units minimum. 

6

EE 191W may satisfy WIM only if it is a follow-up to an REU or independent study project, where a faculty agrees to provide supervision of writing a technical paper and with suitable support from the Writing Center.

7

 EE 41/ENGR 40P can meet this requirement only if it is not used to fulfill the Engineering Fundamentals requirement.

Depth Areas
Units
Bio-electronics and Bio-imaging (27)
EE 101BCircuits II (Required)4
or EE 102B Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
EE 122BIntroduction to Biomedical Electronics3
EE 124Introduction to Neuroelectrical Engineering3
EE 134Introduction to Photonics (WIM)4
EE 168Introduction to Digital Image Processing (WIM)4
EE 169Introduction to Bioimaging3
EE 202Electrical Engineering in Biology and Medicine3
EE 225Bio-chips, Imaging and Nanomedicine3
Circuits and Devices (33)
EE 101BCircuits II (Required)4
EE 114Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design3
EE 116Semiconductor Device Physics3
EE 122AAnalog Circuits Laboratory3
EE 133Analog Communications Design Laboratory (WIM)4
EE 152Green Electronics4
EE 212Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes3
EE 214BAdvanced Analog Integrated Circuit Design3
EE 216Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices3
EE 271Introduction to VLSI Systems3
Computer Hardware (23-26)
EE 108BDigital Systems II (Required)3-4
EE 109Digital Systems Design Lab (WIM)4
EE 152Green Electronics4
EE 271Introduction to VLSI Systems3
EE 273Digital Systems Engineering3
EE 282Computer Systems Architecture3
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems3-5
Computer Software (34-45)
EE 108BDigital Systems II (Required)3-4
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems3-5
CS 108Object-Oriented Systems Design3-4
CS 110Principles of Computer Systems3-5
CS 140Operating Systems and Systems Programming3-4
CS 143Compilers3-4
CS 144Introduction to Computer Networking3-4
or EE 284 Introduction to Computer Networks
CS 145Introduction to Databases3-4
CS 148Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging3-4
EE 152Green Electronics4
CS 194WSoftware Project (WIM)3
Energy and Environment (55-61)
EE 101BCircuits II (Required)4
or EE 108B Digital Systems II
EE 116Semiconductor Device Physics3
EE 134Introduction to Photonics (WIM)4
EE 151Sustainable Energy Systems3
EE 152Green Electronics4
EE 168Introduction to Digital Image Processing (WIM)3-4
EE 263Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems3
EE 292JPower Electronics3
EE 293ASolar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution3-4
EE 293BFundamentals of Energy Processes3
CEE 173AEnergy Resources4-5
CEE 176AEnergy Efficient Buildings3-4
CEE 176BElectric Power: Renewables and Efficiency3-4
ENGR 105Feedback Control Design3
ENGR 205Introduction to Control Design Techniques3
ME 185Electric Vehicle Design3
MATSCI 156Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution3-4
Music (29-48)
EE 102BSignal Processing and Linear Systems II (Required)4
or MUSIC 320 Introduction to Digital Audio Signal Processing
EE 109Digital Systems Design Lab (WIM)4
EE 122AAnalog Circuits Laboratory3
EE 264Digital Signal Processing3-4
or EE 265 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
MUSIC 256AMusic, Computing, and Design I: Software Paradigms for Computer Music1-4
MUSIC 256BMusic, Computing, Design II: Mobile Music1-4
MUSIC 420ASignal Processing Models in Musical Acoustics3-4
MUSIC 420BSoftware for Sound Synthesis and Audio Effects1-10
MUSIC 421AAudio Applications of the Fast Fourier Transform3-4
MUSIC 422Perceptual Audio Coding3
MUSIC 424Signal Processing Techniques for Digital Audio Effects3-4
Photonics, Solid State and Electromagnetics (41)
EE 101BCircuits II (Required)4
EE 116Semiconductor Device Physics3
EE 134Introduction to Photonics (WIM)4
EE 136Introduction to Nanophotonics and Nanostructures3
EE 141Engineering Electromagnetics3
EE 216Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices3
EE 222Applied Quantum Mechanics I3
EE 223Applied Quantum Mechanics II3
EE 228Basic Physics for Solid State Electronics3
EE 236AModern Optics3
EE 236BGuided Waves3
EE 242Electromagnetic Waves3
EE 247Introduction to Optical Fiber Communications3
Signal Processing, Communications and Controls (43-45)
EE 102BSignal Processing and Linear Systems II (Required)4
EE 124Introduction to Neuroelectrical Engineering3
EE 133Analog Communications Design Laboratory (WIM)3-4
EE 168Introduction to Digital Image Processing (WIM)3-4
EE 169Introduction to Bioimaging3
EE 179Analog and Digital Communication Systems3
EE 261The Fourier Transform and Its Applications3
EE 262Two-Dimensional Imaging3
EE 263Introduction to Linear Dynamical Systems3
EE 264Digital Signal Processing3
or EE 265 Digital Signal Processing Laboratory
EE 278BIntroduction to Statistical Signal Processing3
EE 279Introduction to Digital Communication3
ENGR 105Feedback Control Design3
ENGR 205Introduction to Control Design Techniques3

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

Engineering Physics (EPHYS)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Engineering Physics leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Engineering Physics" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Engineering Physics

The mission of the undergraduate program in Engineering Physics is to provide students with a strong foundation in physics and mathematics, together with engineering and problem solving skills. All majors take high-level math and physics courses as well as engineering courses. This background prepares them to tackle complex problems in multidisciplinary areas that are at the forefront of 21st-century technology such as solid state devices, quantum optics and photonics, materials science, nanotechnology, electromechanical systems, energy systems, biophysics, computational science, and any other engineering field that requires a solid background in physics. Because the program emphasizes science, mathematics, and engineering, students are well prepared to pursue graduate work in engineering, physics, or applied physics..

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (18)
Select one of the following sequences:10
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
   and Integral Calculus of Several Variables
Vector Calculus for Engineers
   and Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers
MATH 53Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra5
or CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
MATH 131PPartial Differential Equations I3
Science (20)
PHYSICS 41Mechanics (or PHYSICS 61)4
PHYSICS 42Classical Mechanics Laboratory (or PHYSICS 62) 11
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism (or PHYSICS 63)4
PHYSICS 67Introduction to Laboratory Physics 22
PHYSICS 45Light and Heat (or PHYSICS 65)4
PHYSICS 46Light and Heat Laboratory (or PHYSICS 67)1
PHYSICS 70Foundations of Modern Physics (if taking the 40 series)4
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course required, see Basic Requirement 43-5
Engineering Fundamentals (9-14)
Three courses minimum (CS 106A or X recommended) 39-14
Engineering Physics Depth (core) (18-24)
Advanced Mathematics:
One advanced math elective such as:3-5
The Fourier Transform and Its Applications
Mathematical Methods of Physics
Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists
Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Also qualified are EE 263, any Math or Statistics course numbered 100 or above, and any CME course numbered 200 or above, except CME 206.
Advanced Mechanics: 43-4
AA 242AClassical Dynamics (or ME 333 or PHYSICS 110)3
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism:6-8
Engineering Electromagnetics
   and Electromagnetic Waves
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I
   and Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II
Numerical Methods:
Select one of the following:3-4
Numerical Methods for Physicists and Engineers
Introduction to Scientific Computing
Introduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering
Computational Physics
Electronics Lab (3-5)
Select one of the following:3-5
Introductory Electronics (ENGR 40A is not allowed)
Circuits II
Analog Circuits Laboratory
Intermediate Physics Laboratory I: Analog Electronics
Laboratory Electronics
Writing Lab (WIM) (12-15)
Select one of the following:4-5
ENGR 199WWriting of Original Research for Engineers (for students pursuing an independent research project)1-3
BIOE 131Ethics in Bioengineering (for Biophysics specialty only)3
CS 181WComputers, Ethics and Public Policy (for Computational Science specialty only)4
Introduction to Photonics (for Photonics specialty only)
Nanocharacterization Laboratory (Okay for Materials Science, Renewable Energy and Solid State Physics specialties)
Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory (Okay for Materials Science, Renewable Energy and Solid State Physics specialties)
Intermediate Physics Laboratory II: Experimental Techniques and Data Analysis (for Phontonics specialty)
Quantum Mechanics (6-8)
Select one of the following sequences:6-8
Applied Quantum Mechanics I
   and Applied Quantum Mechanics II
Quantum Mechanics
   and Quantum Mechanics II
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics (3-4)
PHYSICS 170Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory, and Statistical Mechanics I3-4
or ME 346A Introduction to Statistical Mechanics
Design Course (3-4)
Select one of the following:3-4
Object-Oriented Systems Design
Analog Communications Design Laboratory
Design and Manufacturing
Introduction to Mechatronics
Advanced Physics Laboratory: Project
Specialty Tracks (12-16)
Select three courses from one specialty area:9-12
Solid State Physics:
Solid State Physics
Solid State Physics
Solid State Physics II
Semiconductor Device Physics
Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices
Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids
Photonics:
Principles and Models of Semiconductor Devices
Photonics Laboratory
Semiconductor Optoelectronic Devices
Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids
Materials Science:
Any MATSCI courses numbered 151 to 199 (except 159Q) or PHYSICS 172
Electromechanical System Design:
Mechanics of Materials
Mechanical Systems Design
Introduction to Mechatronics
Introduction to Mechatronics
Energy Systems:
Heat Transfer
Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery
Advanced Thermal Systems
Renewable Energy:
Solar Energy Conversion
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Fundamentals of Energy Processes
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Solar Cells
Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology
Fuel Cell Science and Technology
Biophysics:
Advanced Imaging Lab in Biophysics
Physical Biology of Macromolecules
Physical Biology of Cells
Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab
Systems Biology
Systems Physiology and Design
Optics and Devices Lab
Computational Genomics
Introduction to Bioimaging
Medical Imaging Systems I
Computational Science:
Advanced Programming for Scientists and Engineers
Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics
Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics
Any CME course with course number greater than 300 and less than 390
Mathematical Foundations of Computing
Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory
Design and Analysis of Algorithms
Computing with Physical Objects: Algorithms for Shape and Motion
Mathematical Methods for Robotics, Vision, and Graphics
Mathematical Methods for Fluids, Solids, and Interfaces
Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques
Probabilistic Graphical Models: Principles and Techniques
or CS 229A
CS 229Machine Learning3-4
Data Mining and Analysis
Introduction to Graphical Models
Total Units107-133

1

PHYSICS 42 Classical Mechanics Laboratory or PHYSICS 62 Classical Mechanics Laboratory, Mechanics Lab (1 unit), required in 2011-12 and beyond

2

PHYSICS 67 Introduction to Laboratory Physics (2 units), recommended in place of PHYSICS 44 Electricity and Magnetism Lab

3

The Engineering Fundamental courses are to be selected from the Basic Requirements 3 list. Fundamentals courses acceptable for the core program may also be used to satisfy the fundamentals requirement as long as 45 unduplicated units of Engineering are taken.

4

ENGR 15 Dynamics, allowed for students who matriculated in 2011/2012 or earlier; however, AA 242A Classical Dynamics, ME 333 Mechanics or PHYSICS 110 Advanced Mechanics recommended instead of, or in addition to, ENGR 15 Dynamics.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 

Environmental Engineering (ENV)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Environmental Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Environmental Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Environmental Engineering is to equip students with the problem solving skills and knowledge necessary to assess and develop solutions to environmental problems impacting the biosphere, land, water, and air quality. The Environmental Engineering major offers a more focused program in Environmental and Water Studies than the Environmental and Water Studies concentration in the Civil Engineering degree program. Courses in the program are multidisciplinary in nature, combining fundamental principles drawn from physics, chemistry, geology, engineering, and biology. Students learn to apply analytical methods necessary to evaluate environmental changes and to design strategies to remediate problems that inevitably may have resulted from human activities. The program prepares students for careers in consulting, industry, and government, and for graduate school in engineering.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics and Science (45)
See Basic Requirement 1 and 2 145
Technology in Society (TiS) (3-5)
One 3-5 unit course required, see Basic Requirement 4 23-5
Engineering Fundamentals (9-11)
Three courses minimum, including the two listed below; see Basic Requirement 3
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 90/CEE 70Environmental Science and Technology3
Fundamentals Elective3-5
Environmental Engineering Depth (57)
Minimum of 68 units of Engineering Fundamentals plus Engineering Depth; see Basic Requirement 5
CEE 64Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions3
CEE 100Managing Sustainable Building Projects4
CEE 101BMechanics of Fluids4
CEE 101DComputations in Civil and Environmental Engineering3
CEE 146AEngineering Economy3
CEE 160Mechanics of Fluids Laboratory2
CEE 161ARivers, Streams, and Canals4
CEE 166AWatersheds and Wetlands3
CEE 166BFloods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts3
CEE 171Environmental Planning Methods3
CEE 172Air Quality Management3
CEE 177Aquatic Chemistry and Biology4
CEE 179AWater Chemistry Laboratory3
CEE 179CEnvironmental Engineering Design (or CEE 169 (offered alt years))5
CEE Breadth Electives 310
Other School of Engineering Electives (0-2 units)
Total Units114-118

1

Math must include CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers/CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers (or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables/MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra) and a Statistics course. Science must include PHYSICS 41 Mechanics; either ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology, CHEM 31A Chemical Principles I or CHEM 31X Chemical Principles; CHEM 33 Structure and Reactivity; GES 1A Introduction to Geology: The Physical Science of the Earth (or GES 1B or 1C); and one other physics or chemistry class for at least 3 units.

2

Chosen TiS class must specifically include an ethics component, such as STS 1 The Public Life of Science and Technology; COMM 169 ; CS 181 Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy; or MS&E 181 Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy

3

Breadth electives currently include CEE 63 Weather and Storms, CEE 101C Geotechnical Engineering, CEE 109 Creating a Green Student Workforce to Help Implement Stanford's Sustainability Vision, CEE 129 Climate Change Adaptation for Seaports: Engineering and Policy for a Sustainable Future, CEE 164 Introduction to Physical Oceanography, CEE 166D Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips, CEE 172A Indoor Air Quality, CEE 173A Energy Resources, CEE 176A Energy Efficient Buildings, CEE 176B Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency, CEE 178 Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis, and CEE 199 Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 

Individually Designed Majors in Engineering (IDMENS)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Individually Designed Majors in Engineering (IDMEN) leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in an Individually Designed Major: (approved title). The approved title of the IDMEN also appears on the transcript.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Individually Designed Majors in Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Individually Designed Majors in Engineering (IDMEN) is to provide students with an understanding of engineering principles and the analytical and problem solving, design, and communication skills necessary to be successful in the field. The B.S. for IDMENs is intended for undergraduates interested in pursuing engineering programs that, by virtue of their focus and intellectual content, cannot be accommodated by existing departmental majors or the pre-approved School of Engineering majors. Core courses in the curriculum include engineering fundamentals, mathematics, technology in society, and the sciences. Students then take additional courses pertinent to their IDMEN major. The program prepares students for careers in government and the corporate sector, and for graduate study.

B.S. in Individually Designed Majors in Engineering

The B.S. degree for IDMENs is intended for undergraduates interested in pursuing engineering programs that, by virtue of their focus and intellectual content, cannot be accommodated by existing departmental majors or the pre-approved School of Engineering majors. IDMEN curricula are designed by students with the assistance of two faculty advisers of their choice and are submitted to the Undergraduate Council's Subcommittee on Individually Designed Majors. The degree conferred is "Bachelor of Science in Individually Designed Major in Engineering: (approved title)."

Students must submit written proposals to the IDMEN subcommittee detailing their course of study. Programs must meet the following requirements: mathematics (21 unit minimum, see Basic Requirement 1 below), science (17 units minimum, see Basic Requirement 2 below), Technology in Society (one approved course, see Basic Requirement 4 below), engineering (40 units minimum), and sufficient relevant additional course work to bring the total number of units to at least 90 and at most 107. Students may take additional courses pertinent to their IDMEN major, but the IDMEN proposal itself may not exceed 107 units. The student's curriculum must include at least three Engineering Fundamentals courses, see Basic Requirement 4 for a list of courses.

Units
ENGR 10Introduction to Engineering Analysis4
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ENGR 20Introduction to Chemical Engineering3
ENGR 25BBiotechnology3
ENGR 25EEnergy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use3
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ENGR 40Introductory Electronics5
ENGR 40AIntroductory Electronics3
ENGR 40CEngineering Wireless Networks5
ENGR 40PPhysics of Electrical Engineering5
ENGR 50/50E/50MIntroduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis4
ENGR 50EIntroduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis4
ENGR 50MIntroduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis4
ENGR 60Engineering Economy3
ENGR 62Introduction to Optimization4
ENGR 70AProgramming Methodology3-5
ENGR 70BProgramming Abstractions3-5
ENGR 70XProgramming Abstractions (Accelerated)3-5
ENGR 80Introduction to Bioengineering4
ENGR 90Environmental Science and Technology3

Students are responsible for completing the prerequisites for all courses included in their majors.

Each proposal should begin with a statement describing the proposed major. In the statement, the student should make clear the motivation for and goal of the major, and indicate how it relates to her or his projected career plans. The statement should specify how the courses to be taken relate to and move the student toward realizing the major's goal. A proposed title for the major should be included. The title approved by the IDMEN Subcommittee is listed on the student's official University transcript and on the diploma in this form: "Individually Designed Major in Subplan", where "Subplan" is the title approved by the IDMEN Subcommittee.

The proposal statement should be followed by a completed Program Sheet listing all the courses comprising the student's IDMEN curriculum, organized by the five categories printed on the sheet (mathematics, science, technology in society, engineering fundamentals, and engineering depth). Normally, the courses selected should comprise a well-coordinated sequence or sequences that provide mastery of important principles and techniques in a well-defined field. In some circumstances, especially if the proposal indicates that the goal of the major is to prepare the student for graduate work outside of engineering, a more general engineering program may be appropriate. A four-year study plan, showing courses to be taken each quarter, should also be included in the student's IDMEN proposal.

The proposal must be signed by two faculty members who certify that they endorse the major as described in the proposal and that they agree to serve as the student's permanent advisers. One of the faculty members, who must be from the School of Engineering, acts as the student's primary adviser. The proposal must be accompanied by a statement from that person giving an appraisal of the academic value and viability of the proposed major.

Students proposing IDMENs must have at least four quarters of undergraduate work remaining at Stanford after the quarter in which their proposals are first submitted. Any changes in a previously approved major must be endorsed by the advisers and re-approved by the IDMEN subcommittee. A request by a student to make changes in her or his approved curriculum must be made sufficiently far in advance so that, should the request be denied, adequate time remains to complete the original, approved curriculum. Proposals are reviewed and acted upon once a quarter. Forms may be obtained from the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs at http://ughb.stanford.edu. Completed proposals should be submitted to Darlene Lazar in the Office of Student Affairs, Huang Engineering Center, Suite 135. An IDMEN cannot be a student's secondary major.

 

Management Science and Engineering (MS&E)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Management Science and Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Management Science and Engineering.

Requirements

Mathematics (32-34)
Seven courses and 32 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 1 1
MATH 41Calculus5
MATH 42Calculus5
MATH 51Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables5
or CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers
MATH 53Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra5
or CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
MS&E 120Probabilistic Analysis5
MS&E 121Introduction to Stochastic Modeling4
STATS 110Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences3-5
or STATS 200 Introduction to Statistical Inference
Science (11-13)
Three courses and 11 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 2 1
Select one of the following sequences: 8
Chemical Principles II
   and Structure and Reactivity
Chemical Principles
   and Structure and Reactivity
Mechanics and Heat
   and Mechanics and Heat Laboratory
   and Electricity and Optics
   and Electricity and Optics Laboratory
Mechanics
   and Electricity and Magnetism
Science Elective3-5
Technology in Society (3-5)
Select one of the following; see Basic Requirement 43-5
Digital Media in Society
Computers, Ethics, and Public Policy
Ethical Issues in Engineering
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy
Technology and National Security (WIM)
Ethics and Public Policy (WIM)
Engineering Fundamentals (11-15) 4
Three courses; see Basic Requirement 3
CS 106AProgramming Methodology 25
Select one of the following: 3-5
Biotechnology
Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use
Introductory Electronics
Introductory Electronics
Engineering Wireless Networks
Physics of Electrical Engineering
Introduction to Bioengineering
Select one of the following (or E25, E40, or E80 if not used above):3-5
Introduction to Engineering Analysis
Intro to Solid Mechanics
Dynamics
Introduction to Chemical Engineering
Engineering Thermodynamics
Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis
Engineering Economy
Environmental Science and Technology
Engineering Depth (core; six courses) (22-25) 4
MS&E 108Senior Project5
MS&E 111Introduction to Optimization 54
MS&E 180Organizations: Theory and Management4
Select one of the following: 3-5
Mathematical Foundations of Computing
Programming Abstractions 5
Programming Abstractions (Accelerated) 5
Select one of the following:3
Information Networks and Services
Networked Markets
Select one of the following:3-4
Introductory Financial Analysis 3
Introduction to Operations Management 3
Engineering Depth (concentration; seven or eight courses) (21-30)
Concentration: choose one of the following 5 concentrations: 421-30
Financial and Decision Engineering Concentration (25-29) 4
ECON 50Economic Analysis I5
ECON 51Economic Analysis II5
MS&E 140Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs3-4
MS&E 152Introduction to Decision Analysis (WIM)3-4
MS&E 245GFinance for Non-MBAs3
Select two of the following: 6-8
Technology Entrepreneurship
Interactive Management Science
Corporate Financial Management
Simulation
Engineering Risk Analysis
Introduction to Operations Management 3
Operations Research Concentration (21-24) 4
MATH 113Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory 53
MATH 115Functions of a Real Variable 53
MS&E 152Introduction to Decision Analysis (WIM)3-4
MS&E 241Economic Analysis3-4
MS&E 251Stochastic Control3
STATS 202Data Mining and Analysis 53
Select one of the following:3-4
Introductory Financial Analysis 3
Introduction to Operations Management 3
Organization, Technology, and Entrepreneurship Concentration (22-30) 4
Select one of the following: 4-5
Economic Analysis I
Introduction to Social Psychology 5
Economic Sociology
Select two of the following: 6-8
Technology Entrepreneurship
Innovation, Creativity, and Change
Issues in Technology and Work for a Postindustrial Economy 5
Select at least four of the following courses (may also include E145, MS&E 175, or MS&E 181, if not used above): 12-17
Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design
Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society 5
Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs
The Spirit of Entrepreneurship
Global Work
Social Networks - Theory, Methods, and Applications
Management of New Product Development
Policy and Strategy Concentration (25-30) 4
ECON 50Economic Analysis I5
ECON 51Economic Analysis II5
MS&E 190Methods and Models for Policy and Strategy Analysis3
At least four of the following courses, including at least one course in policy and at least one course in strategy:12-17
Policy:
Technology and National Security (WIM) 5
Ethics and Public Policy (WIM ) 5
Energy and Environmental Policy Analysis
Economics of Natural Resources
Health Policy Modeling
Strategy:
Technology Entrepreneurship
Innovation, Creativity, and Change
Management of New Product Development
Production and Operations Management Concentration (25-29) 4
ECON 50Economic Analysis I5
ECON 51Economic Analysis II5
MS&E 140Accounting for Managers and Entrepreneurs3-4
MS&E 152Introduction to Decision Analysis (WIM)3-4
Select three of the following: 9-11
Introductory Financial Analysis 3
Finance for Non-MBAs
Supply Chain Management
Healthcare Operations Management
Sustainable Product Development and Manufacturing
Management of New Product Development
Operations Strategy

1

Math and Science must total a minimum of 45 units. Electives must come from the School of Engineering approved list, or, PHYSICS 25 Modern Physics, PHYSICS 26 Modern Physics Laboratory; PSYCH 55 Introduction to Cognition and the Brain, PSYCH 70 Introduction to Social Psychology. AP credit for Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics may be used.

2

Students may petition to place out of CS 106A Programming Methodology.

3

Students may not count 142 or 260 for both core and concentration. Students doing the Financial and Decision Engineering concentration must take 142 for core, and may also take 260 as a concentration elective.  Students doing the Operations Research concentration must take both 142 and 260 (one for core, and one for concentration).  Students doing the Production and Operations Management concentration must take 260 for core, and may also take 142 as a concentration elective.

4

Engineering fundamentals, engineering depth (core), and engineering depth (concentration) must total a minimum of 60 units.

5

Courses used to satisfy the Math, Science, Technology in Society, or Engineering Fundamental requirement may not also be used to satisfy an engineering depth requirement.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 

Materials Science and Engineering (MATSCI)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Materials Science and Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and Engineering.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (20)
20 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 1 1
Select one of the following: 5
Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables
Vector Calculus for Engineers
Select one of the following:5
Integral Calculus of Several Variables
Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers
Select one of the following: 5
Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers
One additional course5
Science (20)
20 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 2 220
Must include a full year of physics or chemistry, with one quarter of study in the other subject.
Technology in Society (3-5)
One course; see Basic Requirement 3 33-5
Engineering Fundamentals (10-13)
Three courses minimum; see Basic Requirement 4 4
Select one of the following: 4
Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis 4
Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis 4
Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis 4
At least two additional courses6-9
Materials Science and Engineering Depth (50)
Materials Science Fundamentals:
MATSCI 153Nanostructure and Characterization4
MATSCI 154Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies 54
MATSCI 155Nanomaterials Synthesis4
MATSCI 157Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials4
Two of the following courses:8
Microstructure and Mechanical Properties
Electronic Materials Engineering
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Organic and Biological Materials
Materials Chemistry
Atomic Arrangements in Solids
Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria
Waves and Diffraction in Solids
Defects in Crystalline Solids
Rate Processes in Materials
Mechanical Properties of Materials
Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids
Engineering Depth16
One of the following courses:
Nanocharacterization Laboratory
Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory (WIM)
Three of the following courses:
Nanomaterials Laboratory
X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory
Mechanical Behavior Laboratory
Nanoscale Materials Physics Computation Laboratory
Focus Area Options 610
1

Basic Requirement 1 (20 units minimum): see a list of approved Math Courses.

2

Basic Requirement 2 (20 units minimum): see a list of approved Science Courses.

3

Basic Requirement 3 (one course minimum): see a list of approved Technology in Society Courses.

4

Basic Requirement 4 (3 courses minimum): see a list of approved Engineering Fundamentals Courses. If both ENGR 50Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis, ENGR 50E Introduction to Materials Science - Energy Emphasis, and/or ENGR 50M Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis are taken, one may be used for the Materials Science Fundamentals requirement.

5

ENGR 30 Engineering Thermodynamics may be substituted for MATSCI 154 Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies as long as the total MATSCI program units total 50 or more.

6

Focus Area Options: 10 units from one of the following Focus Area Options below.

Focus Area Options

Bioengineering (10 units minimum)
Introduction to Imaging and Image-based Human Anatomy
Biomechanics of Movement
Cardiovascular Bioengineering
Interfacial Phenomena and Bionanotechnology
Orthopaedic Bioengineering
Organic and Biological Materials
Nano-Biotechnology
Biomaterials in Regenerative Medicine
Bio-chips, Imaging and Nanomedicine
Chemical Engineering (10 units minimum)
Physical Chemistry
Separation Processes
Micro and Nanoscale Fabrication Engineering
Biochemical Engineering
Polymer Science and Engineering
Chemistry (10 units minimum)
Inorganic Chemistry I
Inorganic Chemistry II
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Physical Chemistry
Biochemistry I
Biochemistry II
Biochemistry III
Electronics & Photonics (10 units minimum)
Circuits I
Circuits II
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Semiconductor Device Physics
Introduction to Photonics
Introduction to Nanophotonics and Nanostructures
Engineering Electromagnetics
Organic Semiconductors for Electronics and Photonics
Energy Technology (10 units minimum)
Fundamentals of Energy Processes
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Solar Cells
Principles, Materials and Devices of Batteries
Fuel Cell Science and Technology
Materials Characterization Techniques (10 units minimum)
Nanocharacterization of Materials
Transmission Electron Microscopy
Thin Film and Interface Microanalysis
X-Ray Science and Techniques
Mechanical Behavior & Design (10 units minimum)
Analysis of Structures
Analysis of Structures
Mechanics of Composites
Mechanical Properties of Materials
Fracture and Fatigue of Materials and Thin Film Structures
Mechanics of Materials
Mechanics of Materials
Design and Manufacturing
Medical Device Design
Nanoscience (10 units minimum)
Interfacial Phenomena and Bionanotechnology
Introduction to Nanophotonics and Nanostructures
Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems
Nanoscale Science, Engineering, and Technology
Nanocharacterization of Materials
Nanophotonics
Introduction to Magnetism and Magnetic Nanostructures
Nano-Biotechnology
Physics (10 units minimum)
Foundations of Modern Physics
Advanced Mechanics
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism I
Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism II
Quantum Mechanics
Quantum Mechanics II
Advanced Topics in Quantum Mechanics
Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory, and Statistical Mechanics I
Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory, and Statistical Mechanics II
Solid State Physics
Self-Defined Option (10 units minimum)
Petition for a self-defined cohesive program.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

 

Mechanical Engineering (ME)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Mechanical Engineering leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Mechanical Engineering

The mission of the undergraduate program in Mechanical Engineering is to provide students with a balance of intellectual and practical experiences that enable them to address a variety of societal needs. The curriculum encompasses elements from a wide array of disciplines built around the themes of biomedicine, computational engineering, design, energy, and multiscale engineering. Course work may include mechatronics, computational simulation, solid and fluid dynamics, microelectromechanical systems, biomechanical engineering, energy science and technology, propulsion, sensing and control, nano- and micro- mechanics, and design. The program prepares students for entry-level work as mechanical engineers and for graduate studies in either an engineering discipline or another field where a broad engineering background is useful.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics (8-10)
24 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 1 1
CME 102/ENGR 155AOrdinary Differential Equations for Engineers5
or MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra
Select one of the following: 3-5
Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers
Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences
Theory of Probability
Science (5)
20 units minimum; see Basic Requirement 2 1
CHEM 31XChemical Principles5
or ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology
Technology in Society (0)
One course from approved SoE list; see Basic Requirement 4
Engineering Fundamentals (13-15)
Three courses minimum; see Basic Requirement 3 2
ENGR 40Introductory Electronics5
ENGR 70AProgramming Methodology (same as CS 106A)5
Fundamentals Elective 23-5
Engineering Depth (52-54)
Minimum of 68 Engineering Science and Design ABET units; see Basic Requirement 5
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 80Mechanics of Materials4
ME 101Visual Thinking4
ME 103DEngineering Drawing and Design 31
ME 112Mechanical Systems Design 44
ME 113Mechanical Engineering Design4
ME 131AHeat Transfer3-5
ME 131BFluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery4
ME 140Advanced Thermal Systems 45
ME 161Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control4
ME 203Design and Manufacturing 34

1

Math and science must total 45 units.

  • Math: 24 units required and must include a course in differential equations (CME 102 Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers or MATH 53 Ordinary Differential Equations with Linear Algebra; one of these required) and calculus-based Statistics (CME 106 Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers or STATS 110 Statistical Methods in Engineering and the Physical Sciences or STATS 116 is required.
  • Science: 20 units minimum and requires courses in calculus-based Physics and Chemistry, with at least a full year (3 courses) in one or the other. CHEM 31A Chemical Principles I/CHEM 31B Chemical Principles II are considered one course because they cover the same material as CHEM 31X Chemical Principles but at a slower pace. CHEM 31X Chemical Principles or ENGR 31 Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology are recommended.
2

ME Fundamental elective may not be a course counted for other requirements. Students may opt to use ENGR 14 Intro to Solid Mechanics, ENGR 15 Dynamics, or ENGR 30 Engineering Thermodynamics from the required depth courses as the third fundamental class. However, total units for Engineering Topics (Fundamentals + Depth) must be a minimum of 68 units; additional options courses may be required to meet unit requirements. ENGR 70A (CS 106A) must be taken for 5 units.

3

Courses ME 103D and ME 203 must be taken concurrently .

4

 ME 112, ME 131A and ME 140 together fulfill the WIM requirement.

Options to complete the ME depth sequence: see the list of options in the ME major section of the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 

Product Design (PD)

Completion of the undergraduate program in Product Design leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Product Design" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Mission of the Undergraduate Program in Product Design

The mission of the undergraduate program in Product Design is to graduate designers who can synthesize technology, human factors, and business factors in the service of human need. The program teaches a design process that encourages creativity, craftsmanship, aesthetics, and personal expression, and emphasizes brainstorming and need finding. The course work provides students with the skills necessary to carry projects from initial concept to completion of working prototypes. Students studying product design follow the basic mechanical engineering curriculum and are expected to meet the University requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree. The program prepares students for careers in industry and for graduate study.

Conferral of the undergraduate program in Product Design leads to the conferral of the Bachelor of Science in Engineering. The subplan "Product Design" appears on the transcript and on the diploma.

Requirements

Units
Mathematics and Science (0)43 minimum
Mathematics (20)20
20 units minimum
Recommended: one course in Statistics
Science (20-22)23 units minumum
23 units minimum: 8 units of social science (inc PSYCH 1) and 15 units must be from School of Engineering approved list 1
PHYSICS 41Mechanics4
PHYSICS 43Electricity and Magnetism4
PHYSICS 45Light and Heat4
PSYCH 1Introduction to Psychology5
PSYCH elective from courses numbered 30-200 13-5
Technology in Society (3)
ME 120History and Philosophy of Design3
Engineering Fundamentals (11-14)11 units minimum
ENGR 40Introductory Electronics3-5
or ENGR 40A Introductory Electronics
ENGR 70AProgramming Methodology5
Fundamentals Elective 23-4
Product Design Engineering Depth (55)55 units minimum
Three Art Studio courses numbered 100 or higher 12
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics 34
ME 80Mechanics of Materials4
ME 101Visual Thinking 34
ME 103DEngineering Drawing and Design 41
ME 110Design Sketching (May be repeated for credit)1
ME 112Mechanical Systems Design 54
ME 115AIntroduction to Human Values in Design3
ME 115BProduct Design Methods3
ME 115CDesign and Business Factors 63
ME 203Design and Manufacturing 44
ME 216AAdvanced Product Design: Needfinding4
ME 216BAdvanced Product Design: Implementation 14
ME 216CAdvanced Product Design: Implementation 24

1

School of Engineering approved science list available at http://ughb.stanford.edu. If the Psychology elective was taken prior to the requirement being increased to 3 units minimum in 2012-13, student will be short 1 unit in Science/Behavioral Science; this is approved without petition.

2

Select one of the following: ENGR 10, ENGR 15, ENGR 20, ENGR 25B or ENGR 25E, ENGR 30, ENGR 50 or ENGR 50E or ENGR 50M, ENGR 60, ENGR 62, ENGR 90; CS 106B or CS 106X not allowed to fulfill elective.

3

If ENGR 14 and/or ME 110 were taken prior to the courses being offered for 4 units, depth total may be reduced by 1-2 units with no petition required.

4

ME 103D and ME 203 should be taken concurrently.

5

  ME 112 meets the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for Product Design.

6

 Students who elect to go overseas should go Sophomore year or spring quarter of Junior year; these students are allowed to waive ME 115C ONLY. Total Depth required will be reduced by 3 units, as will the Fundamentals+Depth total. This is approved without petition.

For additional information and sample programs see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs (UGHB).

 

Minor in the School of Engineering

An undergraduate minor in some Engineering programs may be pursued by interested students; see the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs, or consult with a department's undergraduate program representative or the Office of Student Affairs, Huang Engineering Center, Suite 135.

General requirements and policies for a minor in the School of Engineering are:

  1. A set of courses totaling not less than 20 and not more than 36 units, with a minimum of six courses of at least 3 units each. These courses must be taken for a letter grade except where letter grades are not offered, and a minimum GPA of 2.0 within the minor course list must be maintained (departments may require a higher GPA if they choose).
  2. The set of courses should be sufficiently coherent as to present a body of knowledge within a discipline or subdiscipline.
  3. Prerequisite mathematics, statistics, or science courses, such as those normally used to satisfy the school's requirements for a department major, may not be used to satisfy the requirements of the minor; conversely, engineering courses that serve as prerequisites for subsequent courses must be included in the unit total of the minor program.
  4. Courses used for the major and/or minor core must not be duplicated within any other of the student's degree programs; that is, students may not overlap (double-count) courses for completing major and minor requirements except in the case of prerequisite courses as noted in #3.

Departmentally based minor programs are structured at the discretion of the sponsoring department, subject only to requirements 1, 2, 3, and 4 above. Interdisciplinary minor programs may be submitted to the Undergraduate Council for approval and sponsorship. A general Engineering minor is not offered.

Aeronautics and Astronautics (AA) Minor

The Aero/Astro minor introduces undergraduates to the key elements of modern aerospace systems. Within the minor, students may focus on aircraft, spacecraft, or disciplines relevant to both. The course requirements for the minor are described in detail below. Courses cannot be double-counted within a major and a minor, or within multiple minors; if necessary, the Aero/Astro adviser can help select substitute courses to fulfill the AA minor core.

The following core courses fulfill the minor requirements:

Units
AA 100Introduction to Aeronautics and Astronautics3
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics *4
ENGR 15Dynamics *4
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics *3
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 131AHeat Transfer3-5
Two courses from one of the upper-division elective areas below (min. 6 units)
Plus one course from a second area below (min. 3 units)9-11
Aerospace Systems Synthesis/Design (0)
Spacecraft Design
   and Spacecraft Design Laboratory
Introduction to Aircraft Design, Synthesis, and Analysis
   and Introduction to Aircraft Design, Synthesis, and Analysis
Propulsion System Design Laboratory
Dynamics and Controls (0)
Classical Dynamics
Dynamics and Control of Spacecraft and Aircraft
Feedback Control Design
Introduction to Control Design Techniques
Fluids (0)
Applied Aerodynamics
Fundamentals of Compressible Flow
Introduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering
Introduction to Numerical Methods for Engineering
Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion
Fluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery
Advanced Thermal Systems
Structures (0)
Analysis of Structures
Analysis of Structures
Mechanics of Composites
Smart Structures
Finite Element Analysis

*

ENGR 14 Intro to Solid Mechanics, ENGR 15 Dynamics, or ENGR 30 Engineering Thermodynamics are waived as minor requirements if already taken as part of the major.


 

Chemical Engineering (CHE) Minor

The following core courses fulfill the minor requirements:

Units
ENGR/CHEMENG 20Introduction to Chemical Engineering3
CHEMENG 100Chemical Process Modeling, Dynamics, and Control3
CHEMENG 110Equilibrium Thermodynamics3
CHEMENG 120AFluid Mechanics4
CHEMENG 120BEnergy and Mass Transport4
CHEMENG 170Kinetics and Reactor Design3
CHEMENG 185AChemical Engineering Laboratory A4
CHEM 171Physical Chemistry3
Select one of the following: 3
Micro and Nanoscale Fabrication Engineering
Basic Principles of Heterogeneous Catalysis with Applications in Energy Transformations
Polymer Science and Engineering
Polymers for Clean Energy and Water
Environmental Microbiology I
Biochemistry I
Total Units30

 

Civil Engineering (CE) Minor

The civil engineering minor is intended to give students a focused introduction to one or more areas of civil engineering. Departmental expertise and undergraduate course offerings are available in the areas of Architectural Design, Construction Engineering and Management, and Structural and Geotechnical Engineering. Students interested in Environmental and Water Studies should refer to the environmental engineering minor.

The minimum prerequisite for a civil engineering minor is MATH 42 Calculus (or MATH 21 Calculus); however, many courses of interest require PHYSICS 41 Mechanics and/or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables as prerequisites. The minimum prerequisite for a Civil Engineering minor focusing on architectural design is MATH 41 Calculus (or MATH 19 Calculus) and a course in Statistics. Students should recognize that a minor in civil engineering is not an ABET-accredited degree program.

Since undergraduates having widely varying backgrounds may be interested in obtaining a civil engineering minor, and the field itself is so broad, no single set of course requirements will be appropriate for all students. Instead, interested students are encouraged to propose their own set of courses within the guidelines listed below. Additional information, including example minor programs, are provided on the CEE web site and in Chapter 6 of the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

General guidelines are:

  1. A civil engineering minor must contain at least 24 units of course work not taken for the major, and must consist of at least six classes of at least 3 units each of letter-graded work, except where letter grades are not offered.
  2. The list of courses must represent a coherent body of knowledge in a focused area, and should include classes that build upon one another. Example programs are given on the CEE webpage.

Professor Anne Kiremidjian (kiremidjian@stanford.edu) is the CEE undergraduate minor adviser in Structural Engineering and Construction Engineering and Management. John Barton (jhbarton@stanford.edu), Program Director for Architectural Design, is the undergraduate minor adviser in Architectural Design. Students must consult the appropriate adviser when developing their minor program, and obtain approval of the finalized study list from them.

 

Computer Science (CS) Minor

The following core courses fulfill the minor requirements. Prerequisites include the standard mathematics sequence through MATH 51.

Units
Introductory Programming (AP Credit may be used to fulfill this requirement):
CS 106BProgramming Abstractions5
or CS 106X Programming Abstractions (Accelerated)
Core:
CS 103Mathematical Foundations of Computing5
CS 107Computer Organization and Systems5
CS 109Introduction to Probability for Computer Scientists5
Electives (choose two courses from different areas):
Artificial Intelligence—
CS 124From Languages to Information4
CS 221Artificial Intelligence: Principles and Techniques4
Human-Computer Interaction—
CS 147Introduction to Human-Computer Interaction Design4
Software—
CS 108Object-Oriented Systems Design4
CS 110Principles of Computer Systems5
Systems—
CS 140Operating Systems and Systems Programming4
CS 143Compilers4
CS 144Introduction to Computer Networking4
CS 145Introduction to Databases4
CS 148Introduction to Computer Graphics and Imaging4
Theory—
CS 154Introduction to Automata and Complexity Theory4
CS 157Logic and Automated Reasoning3
CS 161Design and Analysis of Algorithms5

Note: for students with no programming background and who begin with CS 106A, the minor consists of seven or eight courses.


Electrical Engineering (EE) Minor

The options for completing a minor in EE are outlined below. Students must complete a minimum of 25 units, as follows:

Units
Select one of the following courses:5
Introductory Electronics
Engineering Wireless Networks
Physics of Electrical Engineering
Select one of the following options:8
Option I:
Circuits I
Circuits II
Option II:
Signal Processing and Linear Systems I
Signal Processing and Linear Systems II
Option III:
Digital Systems I
Digital Systems II
In addition, four letter-graded EE or Related courses at the 100-level or higher must be taken (12 units minimum)12


Environmental Engineering (ENV) Minor

The Environmental Engineering minor is intended to give students a focused introduction to one or more areas of Environmental Engineering. Departmental expertise and undergraduate course offerings are available in the areas of environmental engineering and science, environmental fluid mechanics and hydrology, and atmosphere/energy. The minimum prerequisite for an Environmental Engineering minor is MATH 42 Calculus (or MATH 21 Calculus); however, many courses of interest require PHYSICS 41 Mechanics and/or MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables as prerequisites. Students should recognize that a minor in Environmental Engineering is not an ABET-accredited degree program.

Since undergraduates having widely varying backgrounds may be interested in obtaining an environmental engineering minor, no single set of course requirements is appropriate for all students. Instead, interested students are encouraged to propose their own set of courses within the guidelines listed below. Additional information on preparing a minor program is available in Chapter 6 of the Handbook for Undergraduate Engineering Programs.

General guidelines are—

  • An Environmental Engineering minor must contain at least 24 units of course work not taken for the major, and must consist of at least six classes of at least 3 units each of letter-graded work, except where letter grades are not offered.
  • The list of courses must represent a coherent body of knowledge in a focused area, and should include classes that build upon one another. Example programs are available on the CEE web site.

Professor Lynn Hildemann (hildemann@stanford.edu) is the CEE undergraduate minor adviser in Environmental Engineering. Students must consult with Professor Hildemann in developing their minor program, and obtain approval of the finalized study list from her.


Management Science and Engineering (MS&E) Minor

The following courses are required to fulfill the minor requirements:

Units
Background requirements (two courses) (10)
CS 106AProgramming Methodology5
MATH 51Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables5
or CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers
Minor requirements (seven courses) (26-27)
MS&E 111Introduction to Optimization4
MS&E 120Probabilistic Analysis5
MS&E 121Introduction to Stochastic Modeling4
MS&E 180Organizations: Theory and Management4
MS&E 130Information Networks and Services3
or MS&E 233 Networked Markets
MS&E 142Introductory Financial Analysis3
or MS&E 260 Introduction to Operations Management
Elective (select any 100- or 200-level MS&E course)3-4

Materials Science and Engineering (MATSCI) Minor

A minor in Materials Science and Engineering allows interested students to explore the role of materials in modern technology and to gain an understanding of the fundamental processes that govern materials behavior.

The following courses fulfill the minor requirements:

Units
Engineering Fundamentals (4)
Select one of the following:4
Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis
Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis
Materials Science Fundamentals and Engineering Depth (24)
Select six of the following: 24
Microstructure and Mechanical Properties
Electronic Materials Engineering
Nanostructure and Characterization
Thermodynamic Evaluation of Green Energy Technologies
Nanomaterials Synthesis
Solar Cells, Fuel Cells, and Batteries: Materials for the Energy Solution
Quantum Mechanics of Nanoscale Materials
Nanomaterials Laboratory
Nanocharacterization Laboratory
X-Ray Diffraction Laboratory
Mechanical Behavior Laboratory
Electronic and Photonic Materials and Devices Laboratory
Nanoscale Materials Physics Computation Laboratory
Organic and Biological Materials
Materials Chemistry
Atomic Arrangements in Solids
Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria
Waves and Diffraction in Solids
Defects in Crystalline Solids
Rate Processes in Materials
Mechanical Properties of Materials
Electronic and Optical Properties of Solids
Total Units28

Mechanical Engineering (ME) Minor

The following courses fulfill the minor requirements:

Units
General Minor (25-27) *
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 101Visual Thinking4
Plus two of the following:6-8
Mechanics of Materials
Heat Transfer
Dynamic Systems, Vibrations and Control
Design and Manufacturing
Thermosciences Minor (25) **
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 30Engineering Thermodynamics3
ME 70Introductory Fluids Engineering4
ME 131AHeat Transfer5
ME 131BFluid Mechanics: Compressible Flow and Turbomachinery4
ME 140Advanced Thermal Systems5
Mechanical Design Minor (27-28) ***
ENGR 14Intro to Solid Mechanics4
ENGR 15Dynamics4
ME 80Mechanics of Materials4
ME 101Visual Thinking4
ME 112Mechanical Systems Design4
ME 203Design and Manufacturing4
Plus one of the following:3-4
Mechanical Engineering Design
Introduction to Mechatronics
Introduction to Sensors
Total Units77-80

*

This minor aims to expose students to the breadth of ME in terms of topics and analytic and design activities. Prerequisites: MATH 41 Calculus, MATH 42 Calculus, and PHYSICS 41 Mechanics.

**

Prerequisites: MATH 41 Calculus, MATH 42 Calculus, MATH 51 Linear Algebra and Differential Calculus of Several Variables (or CME 100 Vector Calculus for Engineers) and PHYSICS 41 Mechanics.

***

This minor aims to expose students to design activities supported by analysis. Prerequisites: MATH 41 Calculus, PHYSICS 42 Classical Mechanics Laboratory, and PHYSICS 41 Mechanics.


Master of Science in the School of Engineering

The M.S. degree is conferred on graduate students in engineering according to the University regulations stated in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin, and is described in the various department listings. A minimum of 45 units is usually required in M.S. programs in the School of Engineering. The presentation of a thesis is not a school requirement. Further information is found in departmental listings.

Master of Science in Engineering

The M.S. in Engineering is available to students who wish to follow an interdisciplinary program of study that does not conform to a normal graduate program in a department. There are three school requirements for the M.S. degree in Engineering:

  1. The student's program must be a coherent one with a well-defined objective and must be approved by a department within the school which has experience with graduate-level teaching and advising in the program area.
  2. The student's program must include at least 21 units of courses within the School of Engineering with catalog numbers of 200 or above in which the student receives letter grades.
  3. The program must include a total of at least 45 units.

Each student's program is administered by the particular department in which it is lodged and must meet the standard of quality of that department. Transfer into this program is possible from any graduate program by application through the appropriate department; the department then recommends approval to the Office of Student Affairs in the School of Engineering. The application should be submitted before completing 18 units of the proposed program; it should include a statement describing the objectives of the program, the coherence of the proposed course work, and why this course of study cannot conform to existing graduate programs. Normally, it would include the approval of at least one faculty member willing to serve as adviser. (A co-advising team may be appropriate for interdisciplinary programs.) The actual transfer is accomplished through the Graduate Authorization Petition process.

Engineer in the School of Engineering

The degree of Engineer is intended for students who want additional graduate training beyond that offered in an M.S. program. The program of study must satisfy the student's department and must include at least 90 units beyond the B.S. degree. The presentation of a thesis is required. The University regulations for the Engineer degree are stated in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin, and further information is available in the individual departmental sections of this bulletin.

Doctor of Philosophy in the School of Engineering

Programs leading to the Ph.D. degree are offered in each of the departments of the school. University regulations for the Ph.D. are given in the "Graduate Degrees" section of this bulletin. Further information is found in departmental listings.

Honors Cooperative Program

Industrial firms, government laboratories, and other organizations may participate in the Honors Cooperative Program (HCP), a program that permits qualified engineers, scientists, and technology professionals admitted to Stanford graduate degree programs to register for Stanford courses and obtain the degree on a part-time basis. In many areas of concentration, the master's degree can be obtained entirely online.

Through this program, many graduate courses offered by the School of Engineering on campus are made available through the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD). SCPD delivers more than 250 courses a year online. For HCP employees who are not part of a graduate degree program at Stanford, courses and certificates are also available through a non-degree option (NDO) and a non-credit professional education program. Non-credit short courses may be customized to meet a company's needs. For a full description of educational services provided by SCPD, see http://scpd.stanford.edu; call (650) 725-3000; fax (650) 725-2868; or email scpd-registration@stanford.edu.

Dean: James D. Plummer

Senior Associate Deans: Laura L. Breyfogle (External Relations), Curtis W. Frank (Faculty and Academic Affairs), Bernd Girod (Online Learning & Professional Development), Scott Calvert (Administration), Brad Osgood (Student Affairs)

Associate Dean: Noé P. Lozano (Diversity Programs)

Assistant Dean: Sally Gressens (Graduate Student Affairs)

Faculty Teaching General Engineering Courses

Professors: Stacey F. Bent, Sarah Billington, Brian Cantwell, Mark Cappelli, Roger Howe, Chaitan Khosla, Jeffrey Koseff, Paul McIntyre, Parviz Moin, Brad Osgood, Channing R. Robertson (Emeritus), Stephen M. Rock, Michael Shanks, Sheri Sheppard, Robert Sinclair, Olav Solgaard, Simon Wong

Associate Professors: Jennifer Cochran, Margot Gerritsen, Allison Okamura, Beth Pruitt, Adrian Lew, Amin Saberi, Alberto Salleo

Assistant Professors: Sarah Heilshorn, Werber Ihme, Sachin Katti, Ali Mani, Clifford L. Wang, Xiaolin Zheng

Professors (Teaching): Thomas H. Byers,  Robert McGinn

Associate Professor (Teaching): Mehran Sahami

Professor of the Practice: Tina L. Seelig

Senior Lecturers: Vadim Khayms, Claude Reichard

Lecturers: Abbas Emami-Naeini, David Evans, David Jaffe, Keith Schwarz, Robyn Wright Dunbar

Consulting Associate Professor: Steve Blank

Other Teaching: Noé P. Lozano, Michale Minion, Paul Mitiguy

Overseas Studies Courses in Engineering

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


Units
OSPBER 40BIntroductory Electronics5
OSPBER 50MIntroductory Science of Materials4
OSPFLOR 50MIntroductory Science of Materials4
OSPKYOTO 40KIntroductory Electronics5
OSPPARIS 40PIntroductory Electronics5
OSPPARIS 50MIntroductory Science of Materials4
OSPPARIS 74Climate Change Challenges in France and Europe: from Project to Policy4

Courses

ENGR 10. Introduction to Engineering Analysis. 4 Units.

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses.

ENGR 14. Intro to Solid Mechanics. 4 Units.

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in PHYSICS 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval.

ENGR 15. Dynamics. 4 Units.

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.

ENGR 20. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. 3 Units.

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Same as: CHEMENG 20.

ENGR 25B. Biotechnology. 3 Units.

Biology and chemistry fundamentals, genetic engineering, cell culture, protein production, pharmaceuticals, genomics, viruses, gene therapy, evolution, immunology, antibodies, vaccines, transgenic animals, cloning, stem cells, intellectual property, governmental regulations, and ethics. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and MATH 41 or equivalent courage.
Same as: CHEMENG 25B.

ENGR 25E. Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use. 3 Units.

An introduction and overview to the challenges and opportunities of energy supply and consumption. Emphasis on energy technologies where chemistry and engineering play key roles. Review of energy fundamentals along with historical energy perspectives and current energy production technologies. In depth analysises of solar thermal systems, biofuels, photovoltaics and electrochemical devices (batteries and fuel cells). Prerequisites: high school chemistry or equivalent.
Same as: CHEMENG 25E.

ENGR 30. Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 Units.

The basic principles of thermodynamics are introduced in this course. Concepts of energy and entropy from elementary considerations of the microscopic nature of matter are discussed. The principles are applied in thermodynamic analyses directed towards understanding the performances of engineering systems. Methods and problems cover socially responsible economic generation and utilization of energy in central power generation plants, solar systems, refrigeration devices, and automobile, jet and gas-turbine engines.

ENGR 31. Chemical Principles with Application to Nanoscale Science and Technology. 4 Units.

Preparation for engineering disciplines emphasizing modern technological applications of solid state chemistry. Topics include: crystallography; chemical kinetics and equilibria; thermodynamics of phase changes and reaction; quantum mechanics of chemical bonding, molecular orbital theory, and electronic band structure of crystals; and the materials science of basic electronic and photonic devices. Prerequisite: high school or college chemistry background in stoichiometry, periodicity, Lewis and VSEPR structures, dissolution/precipitation and acid/base reactions, gas laws, and phase behavior.

ENGR 40. Introductory Electronics. 5 Units.

Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. Digital logic fundamentals, logic gates, and basic combinatorial logic blocks. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 200. Lab. Corequisite: PHYSICS 43.

ENGR 40A. Introductory Electronics. 3 Units.

Abbreviated version of E40, for students not pursuing degree in Electrical Engineering. Instruction to be completed in the first seven weeks of the quarter. Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 200. Lab. Corequisite: PHYSICS 43.

ENGR 40C. Engineering Wireless Networks. 5 Units.

A hands on introduction to the design and implementation of modern wireless networks. Via a quarter long project on programmable radios, students will learn the fundamentals of wireless channels, encoding and decoding information, modeling of errors and error recovery algorithms, and the engineering of packet-switched networks. These concepts will be used to illustrate general themes in EE and CS: the role of abstraction and modularity in engineering design, building reliable systems using imperfect components, understanding the limits imposed by energy and noise, choosing effective representations for information, and engineering tradeoffs in complex systems. Formerly ENGR40N.

ENGR 40M. An Intro to Making: What is EE. 3-5 Units.

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. You will build a ¿useless box¿ and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build.

ENGR 40P. Physics of Electrical Engineering. 5 Units.

How everything from electrostatics to quantum mechanics is used in common high-technology products. Electrostatics are critical in micro-mechanical systems used in many sensors and displays, and Electromagnetic waves are essential in all high-speed communication systems. How to propagate energy on transmission lines, optical fibers,and in free space. Which aspects of modern physics are needed to generate light for the operation of a DVD player or TV. Introduction to semiconductors, solid-state light bulbs, and laser pointers. Hands-on labs to connect physics to everyday experience. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 43
Same as: EE 41.

ENGR 50. Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis. 4 Units.

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.

ENGR 50E. Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis. 4 Units.

Materials structure, bonding and atomic arrangements leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic, thermal and mechanical behavior; emphasizing energy related materials and challenges.

ENGR 50M. Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis. 4 Units.

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.

ENGR 60. Engineering Economy. 3 Units.

Fundamentals of economic analysis. Interest rates, net present value, and internal rate of return. Applications to personal and corporate financial decisions. Mortgage evaluation, insurance decision, hedging/risk reduction, project selection, capital budgeting, and investment valuation. Effects of taxes on personal and business decisions. Investment decisions under uncertainty and utility theory. Prerequisites: precalculus and elementary probability.

ENGR 62. Introduction to Optimization. 4 Units.

Formulation and analysis of linear optimization problems. Solution using Excel solver. Polyhedral geometry and duality theory. Applications to contingent claims analysis, production scheduling, pattern recognition, two-player zero-sum games, and network flows. Prerequisite: MATH 51.
Same as: MS&E 111.

ENGR 70A. Programming Methodology. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Uses the Java programming language. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of the Java language. No prior programming experience required.
Same as: CS 106A.

ENGR 70B. Programming Abstractions. 3-5 Units.

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent.
Same as: CS 106B.

ENGR 70X. Programming Abstractions (Accelerated). 3-5 Units.

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Same as: CS 106X.

ENGR 80. Introduction to Bioengineering. 4 Units.

Broad but rigorous overview of the field of bioengineering, centered around the common theme of engineering analysis and design of biological systems. Topics include biomechanics, systems and synthetic biology, physical biology, biomolecular engineering, tissue engineering, and devices. Emphasis on critical thinking and problem solving approaches, and quantitative methods applied to biology. 4 units, Spr (Cochran)
Same as: BIOE 80.

ENGR 90. Environmental Science and Technology. 3 Units.

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Same as: CEE 70.

ENGR 100. Teaching Public Speaking. 3 Units.

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 103. Public Speaking. 3 Units.

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 105. Feedback Control Design. 3 Units.

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: EE 102, ME 161, or equivalent.

ENGR 110. Perspectives in Assistive Technology. 1-3 Unit.

Seminar and student project course. Medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of assistive technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and seniors. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Tours of local facilities. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). 3 units for students who pursue a team-based assistive technology project. Projects can be continued in ME113 or CS194 or as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center for Public Service).
Same as: ENGR 210.

ENGR 113A. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu. (This class is also being offered as ENGR 213A for grad students) Enrolled students will meet for work sessions Tuesdays & Thursdays 4-6 pm in Y2E2 266.

ENGR 113B. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu. (This class is also being offered as ENGR 213B for grad students).

ENGR 113C. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu. (This class is also being offered as ENGR 213C for grad students).

ENGR 113D. SOLAR DECATHLON. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu. (This class is also being offered as ENGR 213A for grad students).

ENGR 115. Design the Tech Challenge. 2 Units.

Students work with Tech Museum of San Jose staff to design the Tech Challenge, a yearly engineering competition for 6-12th grade students. Brainstorming, field trips to the museum, prototyping, coaching, and presentations to the Tech Challenge advisory board. See at http://techchallenge.thetech.org. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENGR 215.

ENGR 118. Cross-Cultural Design for Service. 3 Units.

Students spend the summer in China working collaboratively to use design thinking for a project in the countryside. Students learn and apply the principles of design innovation including user research, ideation, prototyping, storytelling and more in a cross cultural setting to design a product or service that will benefit Chinese villagers. Students should be prepared to work independently in a developing region of China, to deal with persistent ambiguity, and to work with a cross-cultural, diverse team of students on their projects. Applications for Summer 2012 were due in March.

ENGR 120. Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering. 3 Units.

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Same as: ENERGY 120.

ENGR 130. Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society. 4-5 Units.

Key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments; distinctive features of science and engineering as sociotechnical activities; major influences of scientific and technological developments on 20th-century society, including transformations and problems of work, leisure, human values, the fine arts, and international relations; ethical conflicts in scientific and engineering practice; and the social shaping and management of contemporary science and technology.

ENGR 131. Ethical Issues in Engineering. 4 Units.

Moral rights and responsibilities of engineers in relation to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; cost-benefit-risk analysis, safety, and informed consent; the ethics of whistle blowing; ethical conflicts of engineers as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering design, manufacturing, and operations; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical implications of the social and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering. Case studies, guest practitioners, and field research. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 140A. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 3-4 Units.

First of three-part sequence for students selected to the Mayfield Fellows Program. Management and leadership within high technology startups, focusing on entrepreneurial skills related to product and market strategy, venture financing and cash flow management, team recruiting and organizational development, and the challenges of managing growth and handling adversity in emerging ventures. Other engineering faculty, founders, and venture capitalists participate as appropriate. Recommended: accounting or finance course (MS&E 140, ECON 90, or ENGR 60).

ENGR 140B. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 1-2 Unit.

Open to Mayfield Fellows only; taken during the summer internship at a technology startup. Students exchange experiences and continue the formal learning process. Activities journal. Credit given following quarter.

ENGR 140C. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 2-3 Units.

Open to Mayfield Fellows only. Capstone to the 140 sequence. Students, faculty, employers, and venture capitalists share recent internship experiences and analytical frameworks. Students develop living case studies and integrative project reports.

ENGR 145. Technology Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

How do you create a successful start-up? What is entrepreneurial leadership in a large firm? What are the differences between an idea and true opportunity? How does an entrepreneur form a team and gather the resources necessary to create a great enterprise? This class mixes mentor-guided team projects, in-depth case studies, research on the entrepreneurial process, and the opportunity to network and ask questions of Silicon Valley's top entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors who seek to understand the formation and growth of high-impact start-ups in areas such as information, green/clean, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 150. Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. 1-6 Unit.

(Graduate students register for 250.) The art of innovation and entrepreneurship for social benefit. Project team develops, tests, and iteratively improves technology-based social innovation and business plan to deploy it. Feedback and coaching from domain experts, product designers, and successful social entrepreneurs. Limited enrollment; application required. See http://sie.stanford.edu for course information.
Same as: ENGR 250.

ENGR 154. Vector Calculus for Engineers. 5 Units.

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green's, divergence, and Stokes' theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: MATH 41 and 42, or 10 units AP credit.
Same as: CME 100.

ENGR 155A. Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers. 5 Units.

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and non-linear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR 154 or MATH 51.
Same as: CME 102.

ENGR 155B. Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers. 5 Units.

Linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, Gaussian elimination, undetermined and overdetermined systems, coupled systems of ordinary differential equations, eigensystem analysis, normal modes. Fourier series with applications, partial differential equations arising in science and engineering, analytical solutions of partial differential equations. Numerical methods for solution of partial differential equations: iterative techniques, stability and convergence, time advancement, implicit methods, von Neumann stability analysis. Examples and applications from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: CME 102/ENGR 155A.
Same as: CME 104.

ENGR 155C. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers. 3-4 Units.

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51.
Same as: CME 106.

ENGR 159Q. Japanese Companies and Japanese Society. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Same as: MATSCI 159Q.

ENGR 192. Engineering Public Service Project. 1-2 Unit.

Volunteer work on a public service project with a technical engineering component. Project requires a faculty sponsor and a community partner such as a nonprofit organization, school, or individual. Required report. See http://soe.stanford.edu/publicservice. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 199. Special Studies in Engineering. 1-15 Unit.

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the section number corresponding to the particular faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 199W. Writing of Original Research for Engineers. 1-3 Unit.

Technical writing in science and engineering. Students produce a substantial document describing their research, methods, and results. Prerequisite: completion of freshman writing requirements; prior or concurrent in 2 units of research in the major department; and consent of instructor. WIM for BioMedical Computation.

ENGR 202S. Writing: Special Projects. 1 Unit.

Writing tutorial for students working on non-course projects such as theses, journal articles, and conference papers. Weekly individual conferences.

ENGR 202W. Technical Writing. 3 Units.

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.

ENGR 204. Research Ethics for Engineers and Scientists. 1-2 Unit.

Explores ethical responsibilities of engineering and science researchers in relation to laboratory safety, data acquisition and management, experiment and product design, collaborative research, authorship and peer review, mentorship, human subjects research, funding applications and funded research, media accounts of research, and new and emerging technologies (e.g., in nanotechnology and bioengineering). Responsibilities of researchers toward society at large, and Stanford and government policies regarding the conduct of engineering and science research will also be addressed. Lectures, discussion, guest researchers, and real case studies. Primarily for graduate students and post-doctoral researchers in engineering and science. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 205. Introduction to Control Design Techniques. 3 Units.

Review of root-locus and frequency response techniques for control system analysis and synthesis. State-space techniques for modeling, full-state feedback regulator design, pole placement, and observer design. Combined observer and regulator design. Lab experiments on computers connected to mechanical systems. Prerequisites: 105, MATH 103, 113. Recommended: Matlab.

ENGR 206. Control System Design. 3-4 Units.

Design and construction of a control system and working plant. Topics include: linearity, actuator saturation, sensor placement, controller and model order; linearization by differential actuation and sensing; analog op-amp circuit implementation. Emphasis is on qualitative aspects of analysis and synthesis, generation of candidate design, and engineering tradeoffs in system selection. Large team-based project. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: 105.

ENGR 207A. Linear Control Systems I. 3 Units.

Introduction to control of discrete-time linear systems. State-space models. Controllability and observability. The linear quadratic regulator. Prerequisite: 105 or 205.

ENGR 207B. Linear Control Systems II. 3 Units.

Probabilistic methods for control and estimation. Statistical inference for discrete and continuous random variables. Linear estimation with Gaussian noise. The Kalman filter. Prerequisite: EE 263.

ENGR 209A. Analysis and Control of Nonlinear Systems. 3 Units.

Introduction to nonlinear phenomena: multiple equilibria, limit cycles, bifurcations, complex dynamical behavior. Planar dynamical systems, analysis using phase plane techniques. Describing functions. Lyapunov stability theory. SISO feedback linearization, sliding mode control. Design examples. Prerequisite: 205.

ENGR 210. Perspectives in Assistive Technology. 1-3 Unit.

Seminar and student project course. Medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of assistive technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and seniors. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Tours of local facilities. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). 3 units for students who pursue a team-based assistive technology project. Projects can be continued in ME113 or CS194 or as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center for Public Service).
Same as: ENGR 110.

ENGR 213. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a personal work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu.

ENGR 213A. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a personal work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu.

ENGR 213B. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a personal work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu.

ENGR 213C. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a personal work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu.

ENGR 215. Design the Tech Challenge. 2 Units.

Students work with Tech Museum of San Jose staff to design the Tech Challenge, a yearly engineering competition for 6-12th grade students. Brainstorming, field trips to the museum, prototyping, coaching, and presentations to the Tech Challenge advisory board. See at http://techchallenge.thetech.org. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENGR 115.

ENGR 231. Transformative Design. 3-5 Units.

Project-based. How interactive technologies can be designed to encourage behavioral transformation. Topics such as self-efficacy, social support, and mechanism of cultural change in domains such as weight-loss, energy conservation, or safe driving. Lab familiarizes students with hardware and software tools for interaction prototyping. Students teams create functional prototypes for self-selected problem domains. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.
Same as: ANTHRO 332.

ENGR 240. Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems. 3 Units.

Miniaturization technologies now have important roles in materials, mechanical, and biomedical engineering practice, in addition to being the foundation for information technology. This course will target an audience of first-year engineering graduate students and motivated senior-level undergraduates, with the goal of providing an introduction to M/NEMS fabrication techniques, selected device applications, and the design tradeoffs in developing systems. The course has no specific prerequisites, other than graduate or senior standing in engineering; otherwise, students will require permission of the instructors.

ENGR 245. Technology Entrepreneurship and Lean Startups. 3-4 Units.

Apply emerging entrepreneurship principles including the popular "lean startups" and "customer development" frameworks to prototype, test, and iterate your product while discovering if you have a profitable business model. Work and study in teams or, in rare cases, alone. Proposal required during first week of the quarter. Proposals can be software, physical good, or service of any kind. Projects are treated as real start-ups, so work will be intense. Perquisite; interest and passion in exploring whether a technology idea can become a real company.

ENGR 250. Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship. 1-6 Unit.

(Graduate students register for 250.) The art of innovation and entrepreneurship for social benefit. Project team develops, tests, and iteratively improves technology-based social innovation and business plan to deploy it. Feedback and coaching from domain experts, product designers, and successful social entrepreneurs. Limited enrollment; application required. See http://sie.stanford.edu for course information.
Same as: ENGR 150.

ENGR 280. From Play to Innovation. 2-4 Units.

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application.

ENGR 281. d.media 4.0 - Designing Media that Matters. 2-3 Units.

Design practicum; project-based. Explore the why & how of designing media. What motivates our consumption of media, what real needs linger beneath the surface? How do you design a new media experience? Join us and find out. The world is Changing, What Are You Going to Do About It? In the shift from a consumer culture to a creative society has old media institutions collapsing while participatory media frameworks are emerging. Media designers of all types have an opportunity and responsibility to make this change positive. 3 Projects explore: Communication Design, Digital Interaction, User Motivations. Admission by application. Design Institute class; see http://dschool.stanford.edu.

ENGR 290. Graduate Environment of Support. 1 Unit.

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.

ENGR 298. Seminar in Fluid Mechanics. 1 Unit.

Interdepartmental. Problems in all branches of fluid mechanics, with talks by visitors, faculty, and students. Graduate students may register for 1 unit, without letter grade; a letter grade is given for talks. May be repeated for credit.

ENGR 299. Special Studies in Engineering. 1-15 Unit.

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the corresponding section. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 311A. Women's Perspectives. 1 Unit.

Master's and Ph.D. seminar series driven by student interests. Possible topics: time management, career choices, health and family, diversity, professional development, and personal values. Guest speakers from academia and industry, student presentations with an emphasis on group discussion. Graduate students share experiences and examine scientific research in these areas. May be repeated for credit.

ENGR 311B. Designing the Professional. 1 Unit.

How to Get a Life as well as a PhD: Seminar open to ALL doctoral students (Humanities, Sciences and Engineering). Apply principles of design thinking to designing your professional life following Stanford. Topics include: Introduction to "design thinking", a framework for vocational wayfinding and locating profession within life overall; tools to investigate multiple professional paths. Creation of personal "Odyssey Plan" to innovate multiple prototypes for post-PhD professional launch.

ENGR 312. Science and Engineering Course Design. 2-3 Units.

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Same as: CTL 312.

ENGR 313. Topics in Engineering and Science Education. 1-2 Unit.

This seminar series focuses on teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses based on education research. Each year focuses on a different topic related to STEM education. This course may be repeated for credit each year.This year we will focus on active learning techniques for STEM courses. Specific topics that will likely be covered include: problem-based learning, flipped classrooms, leading effective discussions, group work, peer evaluation, and concept mapping. Throughout the quarter, there will be several opportunities for directly practicing and/or analyzing the methods from STEM education literature.

ENGR 341. Micro/Nano Systems Design and Fabrication. 3-5 Units.

Laboratory course in micro and nano fabrication technology that combines lectures on theory and fundamentals with hands-on training in the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility. Prerequisite: ENGR 240 or equivalent.

ENGR 342. MEMS Laboratory II. 3-4 Units.

Emphasis is on implementation of fabricated N/MEMS-based solutions. Student teams collaborate to develop, fabricate and test N/MEMS solutions proposed in E341. Design alternatives fabricated and tested in SNF with emphasis on manufacturability, assembly, test, and design. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ENGR 341.