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Graduate School of Education

Contacts

Office: Graduate School of Education
Mail Code: 94305-3096
Phone: (650) 723-2109
Email: info@gse.stanford.edu
Web Site: http://ed.stanford.edu

Courses offered by the Graduate School of Education are listed under the subject code EDUC on the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses web site.

Aiming towards the ideal of enabling all people to achieve maximum benefit from their educational experiences, the Graduate School of Education seeks to continue as a world leader in ground-breaking, cross-disciplinary inquiries that shape educational practices, their conceptual underpinnings, and the professions that serve the enterprise. The Graduate School of Education prepares scholars, teachers, teacher educators, policy analysts, evaluators, researchers, administrators, and other educational specialists. Two graduate degrees with specialization in education are granted by the University: Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. While no undergraduate majors are offered, the school offers a number of courses for undergraduates, an undergraduate minor and undergraduate honors program, and a variety of tutoring programs.

The Graduate School of Education is organized into three program area committees: Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE); Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS); and Social Sciences, Humanities, and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS).

In addition, several cross-area programs are sponsored by faculty from more than one area. These programs include the doctoral program in Learning Sciences and Technology Design (LSTD); two master’s level programs: the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) and the Learning, Design, and Technology Program (LDT); and the undergraduate honors and minor programs.

These program area committees function as administrative units that act on admissions, plan course offerings, assign advisers, and determine program requirements. Various concentrations exist within most of these areas. Faculty members are affiliated primarily with one area but may participate in several programs. While there is a great deal of overlap and interdisciplinary emphasis across areas and programs, students are affiliated with one area committee or program and must meet its degree requirements.

Detailed information about admission and degree requirements, faculty members, and specializations related to these area committees and programs can be found in the Academics section of the School's website.

The Graduate School of Education offers an eight-week summer session for admitted students only. The school offers no correspondence or extension courses, and in accordance with University policy, no part-time enrollment is allowed. Work in an approved internship or as a research assistant is accommodated within the full-time program of study.

Undergraduate Programs in Education

The Graduate School of Education offers a minor and an honors program at the undergraduate level. Further information about these programs can be found at the Graduate School of Education web site.

Regardless of whether they are enrolled in one of these undergraduate programs, undergraduates are also welcome in many graduate-level courses at the GSE.

Graduate Programs in Education

The Graduate School of Education offers Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in several programs described below. University and Graduate School of Education requirements must be met for each degree. The University requirements are detailed in the “Graduate Degrees” section of this bulletin. Students are urged to read this section carefully, noting residency, tuition, and registration requirements. A student who wishes to enroll for graduate work in the Graduate School of Education must be admitted to graduate standing by one of the school’s area committees and with the approval of the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.

Complete information about admissions procedures and requirements is available from Graduate Admissions, or at the Graduate School of Education web site. All applicants, except coterminal applicants, must submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination General Test (verbal, quantitative, and analytical or analytical writing areas); TOEFL scores are also required from those whose first language is not English. Applicants to the Stanford Teacher Education Program are also required to submit specific test scores or acceptable equivalents as required by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing; see the section on STEP. Test information is available at the Graduate School of Education web site.

Honors Program in Education

An honors program in Education is available to undergraduates to supplement their regular majors by applying their studies to the field of education, broadly conceived. This program enables qualified undergraduates at Stanford to extend the training in their major field of study by pursuing additional courses and a research thesis in a related area in the study of education.

Students apply for entry during the junior year. Application information can be found at the Graduate School of Education web site. The current director of the honors program is Professor John Willinsky.

Near the end of Spring Quarter, successful candidates for honors present brief reports of their work and findings at a mini-conference that all the honors students in Education, as well as other members of the academic community, attend.

Required Coursework:

  1. Students are required to enroll in the Undergraduate Honors Seminar during their senior year: EDUC 199A Undergraduate Honors Seminar (Autumn, 3 credits), EDUC 199B (Winter, 1 credit), and EDUC 199C (Spring, 1 credit)
  2. Students are required to enroll in Honors Research (EDUC 140 ) with their adviser during Winter and Spring quarters of their senior year. The number of units is to be determined in consultation with the faculty adviser.
  3. Students must complete a minimum of 3 courses taken for a minimum of 3 units each in Education (EDUC units). All courses must be taken for a letter grade. Coursework completed for the Honors program in Education should address varied topics in the field of education, and must be approved by the Honors Director and student's faculty adviser.

Minor in Education (Undergraduate)

The Graduate School of Education awards an undergraduate minor in the field of Education. The minor is structured to provide a substantial introduction to education through a broad-based and focused study of educational research, theory and practice. The goals of the minor are to allow undergraduates to develop an understanding of the core issues facing educators and policymakers, to make connections to their major programs of study, and to provide rigorous preparation for graduate studies in education.

Students interested in pursuing an undergraduate minor in Education begin by contacting the minor director (Jennifer Lynn Wolf, jlwolf@stanford.edu), who is responsible for advising all candidates and approving each student's minor plan of study. Applications for the minor are due no later than the second quarter of the junior year.

The Education minor requires three core courses to ensure coverage of the disciplines of the field, while allowing flexibility for students wanting to pursue specific interests within Education. In order to graduate with a minor in Education, undergraduates must complete the minor program of study as described here, for a total of not less than 20 units and not more than 30 units, with a minimum of six courses.

Course Requirements and Distribution

  1. All minor students are required to take the minor core course:
    EDUC 1014
  2. All students are also required to take two foundational courses, such as the following:
    EDUC 103B3-5
    EDUC 1104
    EDUC 120C4-5
    EDUC 201
    EDUC 204Introduction to Philosophy of Education3
  3. Each student identifies a subfield of study in which to take at least three elective courses. Established subfields of study within the School of Education include: Teaching and Learning; Education Research and Policy; and Educational Technology. Suitable elective courses include:
    1. Subfield 1: Teaching and Learning—
    EDUC 103ATutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy4
    EDUC 111
    EDUC 112XUrban Education3-4
    EDUC 121X3-4
    EDUC 149Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism3-5
    EDUC 171Early Childhood Education Practicum2-4
    EDUC 256Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth4
    EDUC 357Science and Environmental Education in Informal Contexts3-4
    1. Subfield 2: Education Research and Policy—
    EDUC 117Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access3
    EDUC 121X3-4
    EDUC 165History of Higher Education in the U.S.3-5
    EDUC 1974
    EDUC 218Topics in Cognition and Learning: Induction, Proof, Discovery, and Statistics3
    EDUC 223Good Districts and Good Schools: Research, Policy, and Practice3-4
    EDUC 277Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives4
    1. Subfield 3: Learning Design and Technology
    EDUC 139X3-5
    EDUC 303X3-4
    EDUC 3283
    EDUC 333AUnderstanding Learning Environments3
    EDUC 3423
  4. Course work completed for the Education Minor must meet the following criteria:
    • All courses must be taken for a letter grade.
    • All courses must be completed with a minimum GPA of 3.0.
    • Courses used to fulfill the minor may not be used to fulfill any other department degree requirements (major or minor).
    • All courses must be taken at Stanford University.

Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Program in Education

The Graduate School of Education admits a small number of students from undergraduate departments within the University into a coterminal bachelor’s and master's program. For information about the coterminal option through the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP), see the details under STEP. Students in this program receive the bachelor’s degree in their undergraduate major and the master’s degree in Education. Approval of the student’s undergraduate department and admission to the School of Education M.A. program are required. Undergraduates may apply when they have completed at least 120 units toward graduation (UTG). The number of units required for the M.A. degree depends on the program requirements within the Graduate School of Education; the minimum is 45 units.

Applicants may learn more about the coterminal application process and download the application from the Graduate School of Education's web site.

University requirements for the coterminal M.A. are described in the "Coterminal Bachelor's and Master's Degrees" section of this bulletin. For University coterminal degree program rules and University application forms, see the Stanford Undergrad Coterm Guide.

Master of Arts in Education

The M.A. degree is conferred by the University upon recommendation of the faculty of the Graduate School of Education. The minimum unit requirement is 45 quarter units earned at Stanford as a graduate student. Students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better in courses applicable to the degree, and a minimum of 27 units must be taken in the Graduate School of Education. Students typically enroll in 15 to 18 units per quarter. They must enroll in at least 11 units of work each quarter unless their program makes special provision for a lower quarterly minimum. Master’s students should obtain detailed program requirements from the Master's Handbook. Some programs require a final project or scholarly paper. Additional detailed information regarding program content, entrance, and degree requirements is available at the Graduate School of Education's web site. Before the program begins, each student is assigned a faculty adviser from the appropriate area committee to begin early planning of a coherent program.

Master of Arts degrees are offered for the following specializations:

  • Curriculum and Teacher Education. (CTE) (This is not a credentialing program; see STEP below.)
  • International Comparative Education (ICE)
  • International Education Policy Analysis (IEPA)
  • Joint Degree with Graduate School of Business (M.B.A./M.A.)
  • Joint Degree with Law School (J.D./M.A.)
  • Joint Degree with Public Policy Program (M.A./M.P.P.)
  • Learning, Design, and Technology (LDT)
  • Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies (POLS)

In addition, an M.A. degree with a teaching credential is offered in the Stanford Teacher Education Program.

Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP)

STEP is a 12-month, full-time program leading to a Master of Arts and a preliminary California teaching credential. STEP offers a Master of Arts in Education that prepares program graduates for careers as teachers in single or multiple subject classrooms. STEP Elementary prepares students to become teachers in multiple subject classrooms. STEP Secondary prepares students to become teachers of English, World Languages (French, German, Japanese, Mandarin, Spanish), Mathematics, Science (biology, chemistry, earth science, physics), and History/Social Science. STEP seeks to prepare and support teacher candidates to work with diverse learners to achieve high intellectual, academic, and social standards by creating equitable and successful schools and classrooms.

The 12-month STEP year begins in June with a summer quarter of intensive academic preparation and placement in a local summer school. During the academic year, students continue their course work and begin year-long field placements under the guidance of expert teachers in local schools. The Master of Arts and teaching credential require a minimum of 45 quarter units, taken during four quarters of continuous residency.

Stanford undergraduates who enroll in STEP through the coterminal program must complete their undergraduate coursework and have their bachelor's degree conferred prior to beginning in the STEP year. Coterminal STEP students graduate with a Master of Arts in Education and a recommendation for a preliminary California teaching credential.

Applicants to STEP Elementary are required to pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST), an approved out of state basic skills exam, or CSET: Writing Skills. Applicants must also pass the California Multiple Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET), and the Reading Instruction Competence Assessment Test (RICA).

Applicants to STEP Secondary are required to pass the California Basic Educational Skills Test (CBEST) or an approved out of state basic skills exam, and must demonstrate subject matter competence in one of two ways:

  1. by passing the California Subject Examination for Teachers (CSET) in their content area; or
  2. by completing a California state-approved subject matter preparation program.

Further information regarding admission requirements, course work, and credential requirements is available at the Stanford Teacher Education Program website.

Doctoral Degrees in Education

The Graduate School of Education offers the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in all program area committees. The degree is conferred by the University upon recommendation by the faculty of the Graduate School of Education and the University Committee on Graduate Studies. The Ph.D. requires a minimum of 135 units of course work and research completed at Stanford beyond the baccalaureate degree. Students may transfer up to 45 units of graduate course work. Students must consult with the doctoral programs officer if they intend to transfer prior course work. Students must maintain a grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) or better in courses applicable to the degree.

Students should note that admission to the doctoral program does not constitute admission to candidacy for the degree. Students must qualify and apply for candidacy by the end of their second year of study and should obtain information about procedures and requirements during their first year from the doctoral programs officer in Cubberley 135.

The Ph.D. degree is designed for students who are preparing for research work in public school systems, branches of government, or specialized institutions; teaching roles in education in colleges or universities, and research connected with such teaching; or other careers in educational scholarship and research.

Ph.D. students must complete a minor in another discipline taught outside the school, or hold an acceptable master’s degree outside the field of education, or complete an approved individually designed distributed minor that combines relevant advanced work taken in several disciplines outside the school.

Upon admission, the admitting area committee assigns an initial adviser from its faculty who works with the student to establish an appropriate and individualized course of study, a relevant minor, and project research plans. Other faculty members may also be consulted in this process. Details about administrative and academic requirements for each area committee and the Graduate School of Education, along with the expected time frame to complete program milestones, are given in the publication Graduate School of Education Doctoral Degree Handbook, available for download at http://ed.stanford.edu/academics/doctoral-handbook.

The following doctoral specializations, with their sponsoring area and concentration, are offered:

  • Anthropology of Education (SHIPS)
  • Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS)
  • Economics of Education (SHIPS)
  • Educational Linguistics (SHIPS)
  • Educational Policy (SHIPS)
  • Elementary Education (CTE)
  • Higher Education (SHIPS)
  • History/Social Science Education (CTE)
  • History of Education (SHIPS)
  • International Comparative Education (SHIPS)
  • Learning Sciences and Technology Design (CTE, DAPS, SHIPS)
  • Linguistics (SHIPS)
  • Literacy, Language, and English Education (CTE)
  • Mathematics Education (CTE)
  • Organizational Studies (SHIPS)
  • Philosophy of Education (SHIPS)
  • Race, Inequality, and Language in Education (SHIPS)
  • Science Education (CTE)
  • Sociology of Education (SHIPS)
  • Teacher Education (CTE)

Ph.D. Minor in Education

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in other departments or schools of the University may elect to minor in Education. Requirements include a minimum of 20 quarter units of graduate course work in Education and a field of concentration. Students choosing to minor in Education should meet with the Associate Dean for Student Affairs to determine a suitable course of study early in their program.

Emeriti: (Professors) J. Myron Atkin, John Baugh, Edwin M. Bridges, Robert C. Calfee, Larry Cuban, James Greeno, Edward Haertel, Michael Kamil, Michael W. Kirst, Henry M. Levin, Richard Lyman (President Emeritus), James G. March, William F. Massy, Milbrey McLaughlin, Nel Noddings, Ingram Olkin, Denis C. Phillips, Thomas Rohlen, Richard J. Shavelson, Lee S. Shulman, Claude Steele, Myra H. Strober, Patrick Suppes, Carl E. Thoresen, David B. Tyack, Decker F. Walker, Hans Weiler

Dean: Deborah Stipek

Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs: Francisco O. Ramirez

Associate Dean for Student Affairs: Eamonn Callan

Senior Associate Dean for Administration: Stephen Olson

Associate Dean for External Relations: Rebecca T. Smith

Assistant Dean for Academic Services: Shu-Ling Chen

Assistant Dean for HR, Faculty Affairs, Facilities, and Admin Support: Priscilla Fiden

Assistant Dean for Information Technology and CTO: Paul Kim

Professors: H. Samy Alim, Arnetha Ball, Jo Boaler, Hilda Borko, Eamonn Callan, Martin Carnoy, Prudence Carter, Geoffrey Cohen, William Damon, Linda Darling-Hammond, Tom Dee, Claude Goldenberg, Pamela Grossman, Patricia J. Gumport, Kenji Hakuta, Connie Juel, John D. Krumboltz, David F. Labaree, Teresa D. LaFromboise, Susanna Loeb, Bruce D. McCandliss, Raymond P. McDermott, Daniel A. McFarland, Jonathan Osborne, Amado M. Padilla, Roy Pea, Walter Powell, Francisco O. Ramirez, Sean Reardon, Daniel Schwartz, Deborah J. Stipek, Guadalupe Valdés, Carl Wieman, John Willinsky, Sam Wineburg

Associate Professors: Anthony L. Antonio, Brigid J. Barron, Eric Bettinger, Bryan Brown, Ari Y. Kelman, David Rogosa, Mitchell Stevens

Assistant Professors: Nicole M. Ardoin, Maren Songmy Aukerman, Paulo Blikstein, Leah Gordon, Jennifer Langer-Osuna, Jelena Obradović, Candace Thille

Professors (Teaching): Shelley Goldman, Rachel Lotan

Associate Professors (Teaching): David Brazer, Ira Lit, Christine Min Wotipka

Professor (Research): David Plank

Associate Professor (Research): Janet Carlson

Assistant Professor (Research): Michelle Reininger

Courtesy Professors: Richard Banks, Stephen Barley, Albert Camarillo, Carol Dweck, Eric Hanushek, William Koski, John C. Mitchell, Terry Moe, Clifford Nass, Brad Osgood, John Rickford, Cecilia Ridgeway, Caroline Winterer

Courtesy Associate Professors: Stephen Cooper, Robert Reich

Courtesy Professor (Teaching): Don Barr

Courtesy Assistant Professor: Shashank Joshi

Affiliated Faculty: Prashant Loyalka

Senior Lecturers: Gay Hoagland, Denise Pope, Ann Porteus, Jennifer Wolf

Overseas Studies Courses in Education

The Bing Overseas Studies Program manages Stanford study abroad programs for Stanford undergraduates. Students should consult their department or program's student services office for applicability of Overseas Studies courses to a major or minor program.

The Bing Overseas Studies course search site displays courses, locations, and quarters relevant to specific majors.

For course descriptions and additional offerings, see the listings in the Stanford Bulletin's ExploreCourses or Bing Overseas Studies.


ExploreCoursesNo courses found: explorecourses:OSP::educ

Courses

EDUC 14SC. Public Education and Schooling: The Great Equalizer or the Fiercely Competitive Field?. 2 Units.

Everyone seems to have an opinion about the American educational landscape. After all, we all have attended schools of various sorts, which help to shape our understandings about education. Yet, the political, social, and cultural terrains are ever-changing, especially within public education. This seminar will focus on some of the main current issues in U.S. urban schools. This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to examining major issues facing public schools today and to discussing effective policies and practices. There are two main components to the seminar: first, students will engage in a review of current educational research and policy; and second, they will conduct some service learning activity in a local, low-income public high school. In small groups, students will co-design projects that both draw on ideas generated from their readings and discussions and involve local high school students and educators.nThrough various lenses, we will survey the landscape of urban education in the United States and explore myriad theories or explanations for existing conditions, crises, and policies. Students will read a number of works that focus on the multiple environs of the educational system¿the economy, the political context, the demands of accountability and standardization, residential patterns, and social and cultural relationships. Such explanations and issues may transcend U.S. boundaries and could be applicable in multiple contemporary urban education settings.

EDUC 98X. Service Learning Practicum. 1 Unit.

For Alternative Spring Break program leaders. The skills and philosophical framework to develop and lead an ASB experience.

EDUC 100C. EAST House Seminar: Current Issues and Debates in Education. 1 Unit.

Education and Society Theme (EAST) House seminar. In autumn quarter, faculty and other scholars from around the University discuss the latest issues, debates, and research in the field of Education. In winter quarter, research and practice pertaining to sex, gender, and education are presented by professionals and scholars. In the spring, the seminar revolves around race, ethnicity, and higher education with a particular emphasis on Asian American issues. Through an examination of these topics, students are able to share and develop their varied interests in educational research, policy, and practice.nnNotes: Attendance at first class required. Seminar meets in the EAST House Dining Hall located at 554 Governor's Ave. The seminar is open to all students at Stanford with first-priority given to pre-assign residents of EAST House followed by other residents of EAST and all other undergraduates. Graduate students are allowed to enroll on a space-available basis. Visitors/auditors are not allowed. The seminar is required for all pre-assigned residents of EAST House and is repeatable for credit.
Same as: ASNAMST 100C

EDUC 102. Examining Social Structures, Power, and Educational Access. 2-3 Units.

Goal is to prepare Education and Youth Development fellows for their work with adolescents in the Haas Center's pre-college summer programs and to define their role in addressing educational inequities in the summer programs and beyond.

EDUC 103A. Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy. 3-4 Units.

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Same as: EDUC 203A

EDUC 112X. Urban Education. 3-4 Units.

(Graduate students register for EDUC 212X or SOC 229X). Combination of social science and historical perspectives trace the major developments, contexts, tensions, challenges, and policy issues of urban education.
Same as: AFRICAAM 112, CSRE 112X, EDUC 212X, SOC 129X, SOC 229X

EDUC 117. Research and Policy on Postsecondary Access. 3 Units.

The transition from high school to college. K-16 course focusing on high school preparation, college choice, remediation, pathways to college, and first-year adjustment. The role of educational policy in postsecondary access. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center).
Same as: EDUC 417

EDUC 118S. Designing Your Stanford. 2 Units.

DYS uses a Design Thinking approach to help Freshmen and Sophomores learn practical tools and ideas to make the most of their Stanford experience. Topics include the purpose of college, major selection, educational wayfinding, and innovating college outcomes - all applied through an introduction to Design Thinking. This seminar class incorporates small group discussion, in-class activities, field exercises, personal reflection, and individual coaching. Admission to be confirmed by email to Axess registered students prior to first class session. More information at www.designingyourstanford.org.
Same as: ME 104S

EDUC 128X. Professional and Leadership Development for Frosh. 1-2 Unit.

As frosh often have difficulty finding relevant job/internships at this early stage in their education, this course represents a more thorough and direct approach to professional and leadership development. As a small cohort within Stern Hall, we will begin early discussion of career interests and exploration, develop an understanding of individual leadership styles, and garner professional leadership skill sets relevant to myriad sectors and resources to aid in this process. Final projects will work toward off site visits during spring break to explore these sectors hands-on and discuss content learned in class with key industry leaders.

EDUC 131. Mediation for Dispute Resolution. 3 Units.

Mediation as more effective and less expensive than other forms of settling disputes such as violence, lawsuits, or arbitration. How mediation can be structured to maximize the chances for success. Simulated mediation sessions.
Same as: PSYCH 152

EDUC 132N. Religion, Music and Identity. 3 Units.

Music is one of the most powerful artistic media in American culture. From coffee shops to shopping malls, it plays a crucial role in creating both common experiences and individual conceptions of self. Yet, music also has this powerful ability to seemingly transcend particular people, moments, or places. What is it about music that can so strongly anchor us to our own experiences, and paradoxically shake us loose from our mornings and wake us from our everyday lives? Lots of people have stories about music that evidences both of these tendencies. But nowhere else are these two, seemingly opposing qualities on display than in the music of religious communities. Whether we are talking about Gregorian chant, contemporary Christian worship music, Jewish cantillation of Sufi qawwali, music and musical style play a central role in the experience of ritual and in shaping how people understand themselves in relation to it. But what is it about music that fuels that experience? Does music have to be "religious" to do that kind of cultural work? Can you have a "religious" experience in a "secular" setting? The answer might depend on your relationship to the music you are hearing or playing. In this seminar, we are going to explore these questions by attending first and foremost to the sounds of religious life. We are going to begin by listening, and expand our understandings through readings and ethnographic fieldwork. Each of these modes of exploration will provide us with greater insight into the role that music plays in shaping religious experience and, in turn, how people understand themselves in relationship to both religion and music.

EDUC 133N. The Role of Language in Education and Society. 3 Units.

The goal of this course is to explore the various issues affecting educational policy and classroom practice in multilingual, multicultural settings. In this class we will examine US and international cases to illustrate more general concerns relating to learners' bilingual/multilingual development in formal educational settings. We begin at the macro level, looking at policy contexts and program structures, and move to the micro level to consider teaching and learning in the multilingual classroom. Throughout, we consider how discourses and identities are interwoven in multilingual education policy and practice. We will also consider the role of communities in implementing change in schools.

EDUC 134. Career and Personal Counseling. 3 Units.

Theories and methods for helping people create more satisfying lives for themselves. Simulated counseling experiences.
Same as: EDUC 234, PSYCH 192

EDUC 136B. Curricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population. 3-4 Units.

Recently two laws in Brazil (10639/2003 and 13465/2008), which came about due to intense pressure from Black and Indigenous social movements throughout the 20th century, have introduced changes in public education curriculum policies. These new curriculum policies mandate that the study of Afro-Brazilian, African, and Indigenous histories and cultures must be taught at all educational levels including at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. As part of this mandate, educators are now directed to incorporate considerations of ethnic-racial diversity in relation to people's thinking and experiences. These policies aim to fight racism as well as other forms of discrimination, and moreover, encourage the building of more equitable pedagogies. This course will discuss past and current policies and practices in Brazilian education from the point of view of different social projects organized by Indigenous Peoples, Afro-Brazilians, Asian-Brazilians, as well as Euro-Brazilians. It will also focus on Latin American efforts to promote equity in education, as well as to articulate different points of view, and reinforce and build epistemologies that support the decolonization of thinking, behaviors, research and policies. As part of this process, the course will study the experiences of people demanding these new public policies in terms of the extent to which they were able to influence institutional structures and to establish particular policy reforms. The course will also analyze theoretical frameworks employed by opponents of these movements to resist policies that might challenge their privileged place in society. In doing this, the course will offer theoretical and methodological avenues to promote research that can counter hegemonic curricular policies and pedagogical practices. The course will be fully participatory and oriented towards generating ongoing conversations and discussion about the various issues that arose in Brazil in relation to these two recent laws. To meet these goals, we will do a close reading of relevant scholarly works, paying particular attention to their theoretical frameworks, research designs, and findings.
Same as: AFRICAAM 126B, CSRE 126B, EDUC 236B, PUBLPOL 126B

EDUC 145. Writing Across Languages and Cultures: Research in Writing and Writing Instruction. 3-5 Units.

Theoretical perspectives that have dominated the literature on writing research. Reports, articles, and chapters on writing research, theory, and instruction; current and historical perspectives in writing research and research findings relating to teaching and learning in this area.
Same as: CSRE 243, EDUC 243

EDUC 149. Theory and Issues in the Study of Bilingualism. 3-5 Units.

Sociolinguistic perspective. Emphasis is on typologies of bilingualism, the acquisition of bilingual ability, description and measurement, and the nature of societal bilingualism. Prepares students to work with bilingual students and their families and to carry out research in bilingual settings.
Same as: EDUC 249

EDUC 155X. First Year Reflections Seminar. 1 Unit.

Restricted to first-year undergraduates; limited enrollment. There are two options for how to participate. You can either enroll in three class weekday sessions weeks 4, 5 & 6 or one Saturday section. These times provide a structured time for students to explore their identities, values, and the kind of lives they want to lead. Exercises and discussions led by faculty, staff, and upper-class student co-facilitators. Tuesday sessions will occur on 1/27, 2/3 & 2/10, Wednesday sessions will occur on 1/28, 2/4 & 2/11, Thursday sessions will occur on 1/29, 2/5 & 2/12, Saturday section is on 1/31, 2/7 OR 2/14 (Saturday sessions are longer and students only participate in one).

EDUC 165. History of Higher Education in the U.S.. 3-5 Units.

Major periods of evolution, particularly since the mid-19th century. Premise: insights into contemporary higher education can be obtained through its antecedents, particularly regarding issues of governance, mission, access, curriculum, and the changing organization of colleges and universities.
Same as: AMSTUD 165, EDUC 265, HISTORY 158C

EDUC 171. Early Childhood Education Practicum. 2-4 Units.

Restricted to students who participate in a service learning program focused on early math learning. Training for activities in preschool classrooms. Focus is on the teaching of math to young children, but also includes background on issues related to young children's cognitive, language, and social development; classroom management; cultural diversity; and early childhood education programs. May be repeated for credit.

EDUC 173. Gender and Higher Education: National and International Perspectives. 4 Units.

This course examines the ways in which higher education structures and policies affect females, males, and students in relation to each other and how changes in those structures and policies improve experiences for females and males similarly or differently. Students are expected to gain an understanding of theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to an understanding of the role of higher education in relation to structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Topics include undergraduate and graduate education; identity and sexuality; gender and science; gender and faculty; and the development of feminist scholarship and pedagogy. Attention is paid to how these issues are experienced by women and men in the United States, including people of color, and by academics throughout the world, and how these have changed over time.
Same as: EDUC 273, FEMST 173, SOC 173, SOC 273

EDUC 176X. The Design of Technologies for Casual Learning - Lab. 1 Unit.

Lab. Studio-based, participatory, and user-centered development of casual learning technologies is explored, using the Apple iPhone as a prototype platform. The term "casual" is borrowed from casual gaming to denote that the learning technologies are meant for learners to use in "extreme informal" learning circumstances (while "on the go", "any time and any place"). The class builds on learning about and synthesizing knowledge, theory and development activity in four areas including learning theories, mobile technologies, games and participatory design processes.

EDUC 177A. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 3 Units.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CHILATST 177A, CSRE 177E, HUMBIO 29A

EDUC 177B. Well-Being in Immigrant Children & Youth: A Service Learning Course. 1-3 Unit.

This is an interdisciplinary course that will examine the dramatic demographic changes in American society that are challenging the institutions of our country, from health care and education to business and politics. This demographic transformation is occurring first in children and youth, and understanding how social institutions are responding to the needs of immigrant children and youth to support their well-being is the goal of this course.
Same as: CHILATST 177B, CSRE 177F

EDUC 180. Directed Reading in Education. 1-15 Unit.

For undergraduates and master's degree students. (All Areas).

EDUC 189X. Language and Minority Rights. 3 Units.

Language as it is implicated in migration and globalization. The effects of globalization processes on languages, the complexity of language use in migrant and indigenous minority contexts, the connectedness of today's societies brought about by the development of communication technologies. Individual and societal multilingualism; preservation and revival of endangered languages.
Same as: CHILATST 189W, CSRE 189W

EDUC 192X. Interpersonal Learning & Leadership: An Introduction to the RA Role. 2 Units.

Preparing students for roles as Resident and Community Assistants, "Intelligent Leadership" explores research on college student development, leadership and the complex dynamics of our changing society both within and outside the college environment. Participants will engage in course work that builds skills relevant to their positions and allow students to implement these skills in a real world environment. Through reflection, self-examination and engagement in interpersonal dynamics and analysis, students will examine how their peer group develops while at the university.

EDUC 193A. Listen Up! Core Peer Counseling Skills. 2 Units.

Topics: verbal and non-verbal skills, open and closed questions, paraphrasing, working with feelings, summarization, and integration. Individual training, group exercises, role play practice with optional video feedback. Sections on relevance to crisis counseling and student life. Guest speakers from University and community agencies. Students develop and apply skills in University settings.

EDUC 193G. Psychological Well-Being on Campus: A Focus on Gender and Sexual Identities. 1 Unit.

This course examines mental health and psychological well-being across the spectrum of gender and sexual identities. It addresses the unique challenges that face LGBTQ-identified students, and provides tools for supporting peers as they navigate these challenges. Discussion topics include current conceptualizations of gender identity and sexual orientation, including sexual and gender fluidity; the intersection of queer identities with multiple identities such as ethnic/racial identify and faith/spirituality; unpacking stereotypes; queer relationships and sexuality, coming out and disclosure, and mental health issues.
Same as: FEMGEN 193G

EDUC 193S. Peer Counseling on Comprehensive Sexual Health. 1 Unit.

Information on sexually transmitted infections and diseases, and birth control methods. Topics related to sexual health such as communication, societal attitudes and pressures, pregnancy, abortion, and the range of sexual expression. Role-play and peer-education outreach projects. Required for those wishing to counsel at the Sexual Health Peer Resource Center (SHPRC).

EDUC 199A. Undergraduate Honors Seminar. 3 Units.

Required of juniors and seniors in the honors program in the School of Education. Student involvement and apprenticeships in educational research. Participants share ongoing work on their honors thesis. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit once.

EDUC 200A. Introduction to Data Analysis and Interpretation. 4 Units.

Primarily for master's students in the School of Education. Focus is on reading literature and interpreting descriptive and inferential statistics, especially those commonly found in education. Topics: basic research design, instrument reliability and validity, description statistics, correlation, t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and simple and multiple regression.

EDUC 200C. Introduction to Statistical Methods in Education. 3-4 Units.

(Formerly EDUC 160.) Basic techniques in descriptive and inferential statistics for educational research will be covered with an emphasis on rigorous preparation for intermediate and advanced courses. Topics include central tendency, variance, probability, distributions, confidence interval, t-test, F-test, correlation, regression, and analysis of variance. Non-parametric statistics and graphical principles for data representation will also be addressed. Students will also be introduced to STATA in preparation for subsequent higher level courses.

EDUC 202. Introduction to Comparative and International Education. 4-5 Units.

Contemporary theoretical debates about educational change and development, and the international dimension of issues in education. Emphasis is on the development of students' abilities to make cross-national and historical comparisons of educational phenomena.

EDUC 202I. International Education Policy Workshop. 4 Units.

This is a project-based workshop. Practical introduction to issues in educational policy making, education reform, educational planning, implementation of policy interventions, and monitoring and evaluation in developing country contexts. Preference to students enrolled in ICE/IEAPA, but open to other students interested in international development or comparative public policy with instructor's consent. Attendance at first class required for enrollment.

EDUC 203. The Anthropology of Education. 3-5 Units.

Learning across situations, organizations, institutions, and cultures. How and when people learn and where, with whom and for what and how answers to these questions change across the lifespan. Schools in relation to other settings in which learning takes place for children, adolescents, and adults. Apprenticeship, mentorship, and learning through observation and imitation.

EDUC 203A. Tutoring: Seeing a Child through Literacy. 3-4 Units.

Experience tutoring grade school readers in a low income community near Stanford under supervision. Training in tutoring; the role of instruction in developing literacy; challenges facing low income students and those whose first language is not English. How to see school and print through the eyes of a child. Ravenswood Reads tutors encouraged to enroll. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). May be repeated for credit.
Same as: EDUC 103A

EDUC 204. Introduction to Philosophy of Education. 3 Units.

How to think philosophically about educational problems. Recent influential scholarship in philosophy of education. No previous study in philosophy required.
Same as: PHIL 231

EDUC 206B. Applied Research Methods in International and Comparative Education II: Master's Paper Proposal. 1-3 Unit.

Required for M.A. students in ICE and IEPA. Development of research skills through theoretical and methodological issues in comparative and international education. Preparation of a research proposal for the M.A. monograph.

EDUC 206D. Applied Research Methods in International and Comparative Education IV: Master's Paper Workshop. 3 Units.

Conclusion of the M.A. program in ICE and IEPA; required of M.A. students. Reviews of students' research in preparation for their master's monograph.

EDUC 209A. Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies Seminar. 1-3 Unit.

This is a required course for all POLS students. The goals of the POLS Seminar (EDUC 209ABC) are to assist students in making the most of their Stanford graduate experience across several dimensions (academic, professional, and social). EDUC 209A is focused on orienting students to the academic and extra-curricular aspects of the experience as quickly as possible, while helping them coalesce as a group and learn how to leverage each other's professional knowledge. Another goals is to help student define their graduate degree goals, so they can plan their year in a very intentional manner that will result in a project or experiences they can highlight during the required Spring quarter POLS Project Forum.

EDUC 214. Museum Cultures: Material Representation in the Past and Present. 5 Units.

Students will open the ¿black box¿ of museums to consider the past and present roles of institutional collections, culminating in a student-curated exhibition. Today, museums assert their relevance as dynamic spaces for debate and learning. Colonialism and restitution, the politics of representation, human/object relationships, and changing frameworks of authority make museum work widely significant and consistently challenging. Through thinking-in-practice, this course reflexively explores ¿museum cultures¿: representations of ¿self¿ and ¿other¿ within museums and institutional cultures of the museum world itself.
Same as: ARCHLGY 134, ARCHLGY 234

EDUC 218. Topics in Cognition and Learning: Induction, Proof, Discovery, and Statistics. 3 Units.

This year, the topics course will consider how children, adults, and scientists induce pattern across multiple instances. The problem of induction has deep philosophical roots, because there is no guaranteed method of success. It also has implications for instruction; for example, what instances best help students discover important structure, and what psychological and pedagogical processes improve inductive learning? A unique feature of this course is that issues of human learning will be taught in concert with formal statistics, which scientists have developed to aid induction. The course will use an inductive (discovery) approach to learning statistical methods including analysis of variance, correlation, regression, and chi-square. In sum, the course will introduce the philosophy of inductive inference, its psychological process, the instructional applications of inductive learning, and students will learn statistics inductively. No prerequisites. Students who have taken the relevant statistics courses should also benefit from ¿re-learning¿ statistics inductively.

EDUC 220B. Introduction to the Politics of Education. 4 Units.

(Same as GSBGEN 349.) The relationships between political analysis and policy formulation in education; focus is on alternative models of the political process, the nature of interest groups, political strategies, community power, the external environment of organizations, and the implementations of policy. Applications to policy analysis, implementation, and politics of reform. (APA).

EDUC 223. Good Districts and Good Schools: Research, Policy, and Practice. 3-4 Units.

Recent studies of districts and schools that exceed expectations in producing desired results for students. Research methodologies, findings of studies, theories of change in reforming schools and districts and efforts to implement results. Components of good schools and districts. Required project studies a school or district to determine goodness. (SSPEP/APA, CTE).

EDUC 224. Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation. 2-4 Units.

(Same as STRAMGT 367). This course examines individuals and organizations that use entrepreneurial skills and approaches to develop innovative responses to social problems. Entrepreneurship has traditionally been seen as a way of creating wealth for the entrepreneur and for those who back her/his work. Social entrepreneurs employ "entrepreneurial skills," such as finding opportunities, inventing new approaches, securing and focusing resources and managing risk, in the service of creating a social value. As the intensity and complexity of social and environmental problems has grown in recent years social entrepreneurship, defined as innovative, social value creating activity that can occur within or across the nonprofit, government or business sectors, has become increasingly prominent. While virtually all enterprises, commercial and social, generate social value, fundamental to this definition is that the primary focus of social entrepreneurship is to achieve social impact above all else. We will study some of the most promising and the best-proven innovations for improving people's lives. We will also examine mature projects that are now tackling the issue of "scale", moving from local innovations to solutions that create deep systemic changes for larger numbers of economically disadvantaged individuals and communities throughout the world. This year we will focus on what are the constraints and opportunities for creating a social enterprise at scale. nn nnThe process of "scale" poses tremendous challenges. Even when organizations manage to overcome the many obstacles to growth, and achieve appreciable scale, this approach is seldom sufficient to achieve significant social impact on its own. This year our course will pay particular attention to network approaches which require the mobilization of a vast array of actors and resources, but have the potential to generate rapid and sustained social impact.

EDUC 224B. Social Entrepreneurship and Social Innovation. 2 Units.

(Same as STRAMGT 367). This course examines individuals and organizations that use entrepreneurial skills and approaches to develop innovative responses to social problems. Entrepreneurship has traditionally been seen as a way of creating wealth for the entrepreneur and for those who back her/his work. Social entrepreneurs employ "entrepreneurial skills", such as finding opportunities, inventing new approaches, securing and focusing resources and managing risk, in the service of creating a social value. As the intensity and complexity of social and environmental problems has grown in recent years social entrepreneurship, defined as innovative, social value creating activity that can occur within or across the nonprofit, government or business sectors, has become increasingly prominent. While virtually all enterprises, commercial and social, generate social value, fundamental to this definition is that the primary focus of social entrepreneurship is to achieve social impact above all else. We will study some of the most promising and the best-proven innovations for improving people's lives. We will also examine mature projects that are now tackling the issue of "scale", moving from local innovations to solutions that create deep systemic changes for larger numbers of economically disadvantaged individuals and communities throughout the world. This year we will focus on what are the constraints and opportunities for creating a social enterprise at scale.nnThe process of "scale" poses tremendous challenges. Even when organizations manage to overcome the many obstacles to growth, and achieve appreciable scale, this approach is seldom sufficient to achieve significant social impact on its own. This year our course will pay particular attention to network approaches which require the mobilization of a vast array of actors and resources, but have the potential to generate rapid and sustained social impact.

EDUC 226X. Curating Experience: Representation in and beyond Museums. 2-4 Units.

In an age when some 50% of museum visitors only "visit" museums online and when digital technologies have broken open archival access, anyone can be a curator, a critic, an historian, an archivist. In this context, how do museums create experiences that teach visitors about who they are and about the world around them? What are the politics of representation that shape learning in these environments? Using an experimental instructional approach, students will reconsider and redefine what it means to curate experience.
Same as: AMSTUD 226X, CSRE 226X

EDUC 228E. Becoming Literate in School I. 2 Units.

First in a three course sequence. Introduction to reading and language arts theory and methodology for candidates STEP Elementary Teacher program. Instructional methods, formats, and materials.

EDUC 228H. Literacy, History, and Social Science. 1 Unit.

How elementary school teachers can teach history and social science within a literacy framework. Topics include: historical thinking, reading, and writing; current research; applying nonfiction reading and writing strategies to historical texts; using primary sources with elementary students; adapting instruction to meet student needs; state standards; evaluating curriculum; assessing student knowledge; developing history and social science units; and embedding history and social science into the general literacy curriculum.

EDUC 229B. Learning Design and Technology Seminar. 1 Unit.

Four-quarter required seminar for the LDT master's program. Discussions and activities related to designing for learning with technology. Support for internships and Master's project. Theoretical and practical perspectives, hands-on development, and collaborative efforts. (LDT).

EDUC 229D. Learning Design and Technology Seminar. 2-5 Units.

Four-quarter required seminar for the LDT master's program. Discussions and activities related to designing for learning with technology. Support for internships and Master's project. Theoretical and practical perspectives, hands-on development, and collaborative efforts. (LDT).

EDUC 230X. Social Enterprise. 4 Units.

(Same as STRAMGT 341.) Approaches for creating social value through a social enterprises including nonprofits, for-profits, and hybrid forms of organization. Perspectives include entrepreneur, CEO, funder, and board member. Topics include undertaking the social entrepreneurship process; mobilizing economic and human resources; achieving social objectives with commercial vehicles; crafting alliances; managing growth; measuring and managing performance; governing for excellence. Case studies. Student teams carry out field-based research in a significant strategic or operational issue of a social enterprise.

EDUC 233A. Counseling Theories and Interventions from a Multicultural Perspective. 3-5 Units.

In an era of globalization characterized by widespread migration and cultural contacts, professionals face a unique challenge: How does one practice successfully when working with clients/students from so many different backgrounds? This course focuses upon the need to examine, conceptualize, and work with individuals according to the multiple ways in which they identify themselves. It will systematically examine multicultural counseling concepts, issues, and research. Literature on counselor and client characteristics such as social status or race/ethnicity and their effects on the counseling process and outcome will be reviewed. Issues in consultation with culturally and linguistically diverse parents and students and work with migrant children and their families are but a few of the topics covered in this course.
Same as: AFRICAAM 233A, CSRE 233A

EDUC 235X. The Creative Arts in Schools and Classrooms. 2 Units.

Students work alongside teachers and performing artists to plan and implement classroom activities with elementary school children to prepare them for a Lively Arts performance. Background theory in education and arts education. Students develop a follow-up classroom activity for children in their own art form.

EDUC 236B. Curricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population. 3-4 Units.

Recently two laws in Brazil (10639/2003 and 13465/2008), which came about due to intense pressure from Black and Indigenous social movements throughout the 20th century, have introduced changes in public education curriculum policies. These new curriculum policies mandate that the study of Afro-Brazilian, African, and Indigenous histories and cultures must be taught at all educational levels including at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. As part of this mandate, educators are now directed to incorporate considerations of ethnic-racial diversity in relation to people's thinking and experiences. These policies aim to fight racism as well as other forms of discrimination, and moreover, encourage the building of more equitable pedagogies. This course will discuss past and current policies and practices in Brazilian education from the point of view of different social projects organized by Indigenous Peoples, Afro-Brazilians, Asian-Brazilians, as well as Euro-Brazilians. It will also focus on Latin American efforts to promote equity in education, as well as to articulate different points of view, and reinforce and build epistemologies that support the decolonization of thinking, behaviors, research and policies. As part of this process, the course will study the experiences of people demanding these new public policies in terms of the extent to which they were able to influence institutional structures and to establish particular policy reforms. The course will also analyze theoretical frameworks employed by opponents of these movements to resist policies that might challenge their privileged place in society. In doing this, the course will offer theoretical and methodological avenues to promote research that can counter hegemonic curricular policies and pedagogical practices. The course will be fully participatory and oriented towards generating ongoing conversations and discussion about the various issues that arose in Brazil in relation to these two recent laws. To meet these goals, we will do a close reading of relevant scholarly works, paying particular attention to their theoretical frameworks, research designs, and findings.
Same as: AFRICAAM 126B, CSRE 126B, EDUC 136B, PUBLPOL 126B

EDUC 236X. Beyond Bits and Atoms: Designing Technological Tools. 3-4 Units.

Practicum in designing and building technology-enabled curricula and hands-on learning environments. Students use software toolkits and state-of-the-art fabrication machines to design educational software, educational toolkits, and tangible user interfaces. The course will focus on designing low-cost technologies, particularly for urban school in the US and abroad. We will explore theoretical and design frameworks from the constructionist learning perspective, critical pedagogy, interaction design for children.
Same as: CS 402

EDUC 238X. Teacher Policies in Latin America. 3-5 Units.

We will explore the complex, challenging and often troubled world of teacher policy in Latin America. Education policy is an important instrument of change and the hope of many teachers and students. They affect the lives of many people and therefore their design, implementation and evaluation must have high academic and political rigor. The emphasis of this course is on the design and implementation of teacher policies in Latin America. We will focus on how to use empirical evidence to take into account the impact, feasibility and political complexities of designing and implementing teacher policy in LA.

EDUC 240. Adolescent Development and Learning. 5 Units.

How do adolescents develop their identities, manage their inner and outer worlds, and learn? Presuppositions: that fruitful instruction takes into account the developmental characteristics of learners and the task demands of specific curricula; and that teachers can promote learning and motivation by mediating among the characteristics of students, the curriculum, and the wider social context of the classroom. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP).

EDUC 241X. Organizational Learning. 4 Units.

Why firms do not learn from their experiences and the opportunities created by flawed learning. Common mistakes in learning and barriers to the adoption of effective practices. How to avoid common mistakes and build organizations that learn more effectively to identify possible opportunities in markets. Concepts and findings from organization theory, psychology, decision theory, and statistics. Readings include teaching notes, papers in psychology and organization theory, HBR articles, and Moneyball by Michael Lewis who discusses market-level mistakes in professional baseball.

EDUC 244. Classroom Management and Leadership. 2 Units.

Student and teacher roles in developing a classroom community. Strategies for classroom management within a theoretical framework. STEP secondary only.

EDUC 244E. Elementary Classroom Leadership and Management. 1 Unit.

How to best manage a classroom. Student and teacher roles in developing a classroom community. Strategies for classroom management within a theoretical framework. STEP elementary only.

EDUC 246A. Secondary Teaching Seminar. 3 Units.

Preparation and practice in issues and strategies for teaching in classrooms with diverse students. Topics: instruction, curricular planning, classroom interaction processes, portfolio development, teacher professionalism, patterns of school organization, teaching contexts, and government educational policy. Classroom observation and student teaching with accompanying seminars during each quarter of STEP year. 16 units required for completion of the program. Prerequisite: STEP student.

EDUC 246D. Secondary Teaching Seminar. 2-7 Units.

Preparation and practice in issues and strategies for teaching in classrooms with diverse students. Topics: instruction, curricular planning, classroom interaction processes, portfolio development, teacher professionalism, patterns of school organization, teaching contexts, and government educational policy. Classroom observation and student teaching with accompanying seminars during each quarter of STEP year. 16 units required for completion of the program. Prerequisite: STEP student.

EDUC 254S. Leadership in Diverse Organizations. 2 Units.

(Same as OB 593) This course is designed to help students improve their capacity to exercise leadership and work effectively with others within the context of culturally diverse groups and organizations. The course is based on the premise that diversity can present unique challenges and opportunities and thereby pushes students to develop crucial leadership skills, many of which are relevant across a variety of situations. The class will address two primary questions: 1) What social and psychological obstacles limit people's ability to work effectively across identity-based differences? 2) What can you do to build the relational and organizational capacity to enable these differences to be a resource for learning and effectiveness within teams and organizations? Students should be prepared to experiment with various conceptual and analytic skills inside and outside of the classroom. While the course focuses on dynamics of race and gender, there will be opportunities for students to explore a variety of other dimensions of identity and difference in organizations, including (but not limited to) sexual orientation, nationality, class, and religion. The course is intended for students who expect to work in culturally diverse groups or organizations and will be equally relevant to those who plan to work in the not-for-profit, public, and for-profit sectors.

EDUC 256. Psychological and Educational Resilience Among Children and Youth. 4 Units.

Theoretical, methodological, and empirical issues pertaining to the psychological and educational resilience of children and adolescents. Overview of the resilience framework, including current terminology and conceptual and measurement issues. Adaptive systems that enable some children to achieve successful adaptation despite high levels of adversity exposure. How resilience can be studied across multiple levels of analysis, ranging from cell to society. Individual, family, school, and community risk and protective factors that influence children's development and adaptation. Intervention programs designed to foster resilient adaptation in disadvantaged children's populations.
Same as: HUMBIO 149

EDUC 262B. Curriculum and Instruction in English. 3 Units.

Approaches to teaching English in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. STEP secondary only.

EDUC 263E. Quantitative Reasoning in Mathematics I. 2 Units.

First of a three-course sequence in mathematics for STEP elementary teacher candidates. Content, pedagogy, and context. Mathematics subject matter; the orchestration of teaching and learning of elementary mathematics including curriculum, classroom and lesson design, and cases studies. Sociocultural and linguistic diversity, equity, differentiation of instruction, the impact of state and national standards, and home/community connections.

EDUC 263G. Quantitative Reasoning in Mathematics III. 2 Units.

Third of a three-course sequence in mathematics for STEP elementary teacher candidates. Content, pedagogy, and context. Mathematics subject matter; the orchestration of teaching and learning of elementary mathematics including curriculum, classroom and lesson design, and cases studies. Sociocultural and linguistic diversity, equity, differentiation of instruction, the impact of state and national standards, and home/community connections.

EDUC 264C. Curriculum and Instruction in World Languages. 3 Units.

Approaches to teaching foreign languages in the secondary school, including goals for instruction, teaching techniques, and methods of evaluation. Prerequisite: STEP student. (STEP).

EDUC 266X. Educational Neuroscience. 3 Units.

An introduction to the growing intersection between education research and emerging research on functional brain development. Students will probe the contributions and limitations of emerging theoretical and empirical contribution of neuroscience approaches to specific academic skills such as reading and mathematics, as well as exposure to general processes crucial for educational success, including motivation, attention, and social cognition. Final projects will explore these themes in the service of interventions designed to improve how these functions.

EDUC 267A. Curriculum and Instruction in Science. 2 Units.

Possible objectives of secondary science teaching and related methods: selection and organization of content and instructional materials; lab and demonstration techniques; evaluation, tests; curricular changes; ties with other subject areas. Prerequisite: STEP student or consent of instructor. (STEP).

EDUC 267E. Development of Scientific Reasoning and Knowledge. 2 Units.

For STEP elementary teacher candidates. Theories and methods of teaching and learning science. How to develop curricula and criteria for critiquing curricula. Students design a science curriculum plan for a real setting. State and national science frameworks and content standards. Alternative teaching approaches; how to select approaches that are compatible with learner experience and lesson objectives. Focus is on the linguistic and cultural diversity of California public school students.

EDUC 267F. Development of Scientific Reasoning and Knowledge II. 2 Units.

Continuation of 267E. Scientific knowledge and pedagogical skills for supporting science instruction. Topics include: how children build scientific understandings and what that understanding might look and sound like in young children; what school science is and how concepts are connected to the doing of it; physical, life, and earth science constructs.

EDUC 267G. Integrating the Garden into the Elementary Curriculum. 1 Unit.

This mini-course uses the garden and kitchen environments to provide teacher candidates with real-world contexts in which to explore some of the key issues that children face in health, nutrition, and sustainability. Teacher candidates will gain an understanding of how to integrate the various themes with content areas and standards and an appreciation for the importance of addressing children's health needs in an era when the country is facing increased obesity and other health problems.

EDUC 268B. Curriculum and Instruction in History and Social Science. 3 Units.

The methodology of history instruction: teaching for historical thinking and reasoning; linking the goals of teaching history with literacy; curriculum trends; and opportunities to develop teaching and resource units. Prerequisite: STEP student.

EDUC 268E. Elementary History and Social Science. 3-4 Units.

Teaching and learning history and social science in the elementary grades. What is included in the discipline and why it is important to teach. The development of historical thinking among children. How students learn and understand content in these disciplines.

EDUC 274X. School Choice: The Role of Charter Schools. 3 Units.

(Formerly EDUC 153X.) Is school choice, including vouchers, charter schools, contract schools, magnet schools, district options, and virtual schools, a threat or an opportunity for public education? Focus is on the charter school movement nationally and in California as reform strategy. Roles and responsibilities of charter schools emphasizing issues of governance, finance, curriculum, standards, and accountability.

EDUC 277. Education of Immigrant Students: Psychological Perspectives. 4 Units.

Historical and contemporary approaches to educating immigrant students. Case study approach focuses on urban centers to demonstrate how stressed urban educational agencies serve immigrants and native-born U.S. students when confronted with overcrowded classrooms, controversy over curriculum, current school reform movements, and government policies regarding equal educational opportunity.

EDUC 279X. American Jewish History: Learning to be Jewish in America. 2-4 Units.

This course will be a seminar in American Jewish History through the lens of education. It will address both the relationship between Jews and American educational systems, as well as the history of Jewish education in America. Plotting the course along these two axes will provide a productive matrix for a focused examination of the American Jewish experience. History students must take course for at least 3 units.
Same as: AMSTUD 279X, HISTORY 288D, JEWISHST 297X, RELIGST 279X

EDUC 285. Supporting Students with Special Needs. 2-3 Units.

For STEP teacher candidates. Needs of exceptional learners, identification of learning differences and disabilities, and adaptations in the regular inclusion classroom. Legal requirements of special education, testing procedures, development of individualized education plans, and support systems and services. Students follow a special needs learner to understand diagnosis, student needs, and types of services.

EDUC 291. Learning Sciences and Technology Design Research Seminar and Colloquium. 1-3 Unit.

Students and faculty present and critique new and original research relevant to the Learning Sciences and Technology Design doctoral program. Goal is to develop a community of scholars who become familiar with each other's work. Practice of the arts of presentation and scholarly dialogue while introducing seminal issues and fundamental works in the field.

EDUC 296X. School Leadership. 3 Units.

Can one person really make a difference for all the students in a school? Accurate or not, that's the expectation faced by school principals. This course will give students practice in translating school improvement ideas into practice and also help them develop a personal vision for school improvement. For students in POLS or MA/MBA program in School of Education.

EDUC 306D. World, Societal, and Educational Change: Comparative Perspectives. 4-5 Units.

Theoretical perspectives and empirical studies on the structural and cultural sources of educational expansion and differentiation, and on the cultural and structural consequences of educational institutionalization. Research topics: education and nation building; education, mobility, and equality; education, international organizations, and world culture.
Same as: EDUC 136, SOC 231

EDUC 307X. Organizing for Diversity: Opportunities and Obstacles in Groups and Organizations. 3-4 Units.

Obstacles in organizations and groups that prevent people from participating, working effectively, and developing relationships in the context of diversity. How to create conditions in which diversity enhances learning and effectiveness? Experiential exercises; students experiment with conceptual and analytic skills inside and outside of the classroom.

EDUC 308X. Mobile Learning Technology for the Marginalized. 1-3 Unit.

Learning design principles as a basis for developing and evaluating mobile learning systems to address educational inequalities in underserved communities. Students analyze mobile learning scenarios, prototypes, and authoring tools while collaborating with research teams to develop a small-scale mobile empowerment scenario addressing education needs such as language, math, health, and civic and life skills in developing countries.

EDUC 310. Sociology of Education: The Social Organization of Schools. 4 Units.

Seminar. Key sociological theories and empirical studies of the links between education and its role in modern society, focusing on frameworks that deal with sources of educational change, the organizational context of schooling, the impact of schooling on social stratification, and the relationships between the educational system and other social institutions such as families, neighborhoods, and the economy.
Same as: EDUC 110, SOC 132, SOC 332

EDUC 312B. Microsociology: Social Structure and Interaction. 4 Units.

How to interpret interpersonal situations using microsociological theories. Focuses on the role of intention, identity, routines, scripts, rituals, conceptual frameworks, talk and emotions in social interaction. Processes by which interactions reverberate outward to transform groups and social structures. Special consideration will be placed on organizational contexts like schools, workplaces and policy decision arenas.
Same as: SOC 224B

EDUC 317X. Workshop: Networks, Histories, and Theories of Action. 1-2 Unit.

Yearlong workshop where doctoral students are encouraged to collaborate with peers and faculty who share an interest in researching the network dynamics, histories and theories of action that help explain particular social phenomena. Students present their own research and provide helpful feedback on others' work. Presentations may concern dissertation proposals, grants, article submissions, book proposals, datasets, methodologies and other texts. Repeatable for credit.
Same as: SOC 317W

EDUC 325C. Proseminar 3. 2-4 Units.

Required of and limited to first-year Education doctoral students. Core questions in education: what is taught, to whom, and why; how do people learn; how do teachers teach and how do they learn to teach; how are schools organized; how are educational systems organized; and what are the roles of education in society?.

EDUC 326. Law, Litigation, and Educational Policy. 3 Units.

Same as LAW 364. Restricted to Education graduate students and Law students. Interplay among educational law and policy, administrative decision making, and practice. Issues include the relationship between schooling and the state, nature and scope of students' substantive and procedural rights inside the schoolhouse, and how law and litigation have advanced or stymied the goal of equality of educational opportunity.

EDUC 327A. The Conduct of Qualitative Inquiry. 3-4 Units.

Two quarter sequence for doctoral students to engage in research that anticipates, is a pilot study for, or feeds into their dissertations. Prior approval for dissertation study not required. Students engage in common research processes including: developing interview questions; interviewing; coding, analyzing, and interpreting data; theorizing; and writing up results. Participant observation as needed. Preference to students who intend to enroll in 327C.
Same as: SOC 331

EDUC 328A. Topics in Learning and Technology: d.compress - Designing Calm. 2-3 Units.

Contents of the course change each year. The course can be repeated. Stress silently but steadily damages physical and emotional well-being, relationships, productivity, and our ability to learn and remember. This highly experiential and project-oriented class will focus on designing interactive technologies to enable calm states of cognition, emotion, and physiology for better human health, learning, creativity and productivity.
Same as: CS 377D

EDUC 330X. Teaching English Language Learners: Issues in Policy, Leadership, and Instruction. 3-4 Units.

Current perspectives and research on issues facing educators serving the English language learner population. Issues include federal education legislation, civil rights law, national Common Core Standards, content and language proficiency standards assessment and accountability, school improvement models, school structure, community engagement, addressing issues of long-term English learners, programming for newcomer ELLs, early childhood education, and promoting bilingualism.

EDUC 333A. Understanding Learning Environments. 3 Units.

Advanced seminar. Theoretical approaches to learning used to analyze learning environments and develop goals for designing resources and activities to support effective learning practices.

EDUC 334C. Youth and Education Law Project: Clinical Coursework. 4 Units.

(Same as LAW 660C). The Youth and Education Law Project offers students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of educational rights and reform work, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. All students have an opportunity to represent elementary and high school students with disabilities in special education proceedings, to represent students in school discipline proceedings, or to work with community groups in advocating for the provision of better and more equitable educational opportunities to their children. In addition, the clinic may pursue a specific policy research and advocacy project that will result in a written policy brief and policy proposal. Students working on special education matters have the opportunity to handle all aspects of their clients' cases. Students working in this area interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, work with medical and mental health professionals and experts, conduct legal and educational research, create case plans, and represent clients at individual education program (IEP) team meetings, mediation, or special education due process hearings. This work offers students a chance to study the relationship between individual special education advocacy and system-wide reform efforts such as impact litigation. Students working on school discipline matters interview and counsel clients, investigate and develop facts, interview witnesses, conduct legal and educational research, create case plan, and represent clients at school discipline hearings such as expulsion hearings. Such hearings provide the opportunity to present oral and written argument, examine witnesses, and present evidence before a hearing officer. If appropriate and necessary, such proceedings also present the opportunity to represent students on appeal before the school district board of trustees or the county board of education. The education clinic includes two or three mandatory training sessions to be held at the beginning of the term, a weekly seminar that focuses on legal skills and issues in law and education policy, regular case review, and a one hour weekly meeting with the clinic instructor. Admission is by consent of instructor. Beginning with the 2009-2010 academic year, each of the Law School's clinical courses is being offered on a full-time basis for 12 credits.

EDUC 334X. Education Advocacy Clinic. 2-10 Units.

(Same as LAW 660.) For students enrolled in the Education (M.A.) and Law (J.D.) joint degree program and those who already possess Law degrees only. Students participate in educational rights and reform work with clients and communities, including direct representation of youth and families in special education and school discipline matters, community outreach and education, school reform litigation, and/or policy research and advocacy. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

EDUC 338X. Innovations in Education. 3-4 Units.

Each year students in this course explore a new design challenge related to teaching. This year we will focus on creating school models. We welcome graduate students from a wide range of disciples. Admission by application. Please see more information at http://dschool.stanford.edu.

EDUC 339. Advanced Topics in Quantitative Policy Analysis. 1-2 Unit.

For doctoral students. How to develop a researchable question and research design, identify data sources, construct conceptual frameworks, and interpret empirical results. Presentation by student participants and scholars in the field. May be repeated for credit.

EDUC 348X. Policy and Practice in Science Education. 3-4 Units.

Values and beliefs that dominate contemporary thinking about the role and practice of science education, what the distinctive features of science are, and the arguments for its value as part of compulsory education. Research on the conceptual and affective outcomes of formal science education, how the changing nature of contemporary society challenges current practice, and the rationale for an alternative pedagogy, curriculum and assessment.

EDUC 351A. Statistical Methods for Longitudinal Data. 2-3 Units.

Research designs and statistical procedures for time-ordered (repeated-measures) data. The analysis of longitudinal panel data is central to empirical research on learning, development, aging, and the effects of interventions. Topics include: measurement of change, growth curve models, analysis of durations including survival analysis, experimental and non-experimental group comparisons, reciprocal effects, stability. See http://web.stanford.edu/~rag/stat222/. Prerequisite: intermediate statistical methods.
Same as: STATS 222

EDUC 357. Science and Environmental Education in Informal Contexts. 3-4 Units.

There are ever-expanding opportunities to learn science in contexts outside the formal classroom, in settings such as zoos, museums, and science centers. How are issues around science and the environment presented in these contexts, how do people behave and learn in these contexts, and what messages do they take away? This course will cover the learning theories and empirical research that has been conducted in these settings. Case studies of nearby science centers will add an experiential dimension.

EDUC 364. Cognition and Learning. 3-4 Units.

Cognitive psychology is the study of human thought including topics including the nature of expertise, creativity, and memory. Emphasis is on learning. The role of cognitive psychology in helping people learn, and determining the most desirable type of learning and whether people have learned. Students design and conduct their own learning study.

EDUC 365. Social, Emotional, and Personality Development. 3 Units.

Limited to doctoral students in DAPS and those with a background in child and adolescent development. Developmental processes that account for psychological adaptation in social relationships, schools, and other interpersonal settings. Theoretical models of social, personality, and emotional development. Topics such as self-concept, empathy, motivation, aggression, and personality formation.

EDUC 373X. Teaching in the Humanities-Research into Adolescent Literacy. 3-5 Units.

Relatively little attention has been paid to the role of humanities courses in teaching both general and disciplinary skills in reading and writing. With the growth of small schools, more middle and high school teachers find themselves teaching 'Humanities' courses. This seminar will explore what it means to teach the humanities, with special attention to how such courses can develop disciplinary reading and writing skills. Course will investigate how we develop tools to assess teaching and learning in the humanities.

EDUC 374. Philanthropy and Civil Society. 1-3 Unit.

Cross-listed with Law (LAW 781), Political Science (POLISCI 334) and Sociology (SOC 374). Associated with the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society (PACS). Year-long workshop for doctoral students and advanced undergraduates writing senior theses on the nature of civil society or philanthropy. Focus is on pursuit of progressive research and writing contributing to the current scholarly knowledge of the nonprofit sector and philanthropy. Accomplished in a large part through peer review. Readings include recent scholarship in aforementioned fields. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 units.
Same as: POLISCI 334, SOC 374

EDUC 377B. Strategic Management of Nonprofits. 4 Units.

(Same as STRAMGT 368). Strategic, governance, and management issues facing nonprofit organizations and their leaders in the era of venture philanthropy and social entrepreneurship. Development and fundraising, investment management, performance management, and nonprofit finance. Case studies include smaller, social entrepreneurial and larger, more traditional organizations, including education, social service, environment, health care, religion, NGOs, and performing arts.

EDUC 378X. Seminar on Social Change Processes and Organizations. 3-4 Units.

Theories of social change and influence processes within and through organizations. Social change organizations. The interaction of philanthropic institutions and other social change organizations within civil society. Meso-level theories of change.

EDUC 386. Leadership and Administration in Higher Education. 2-4 Units.

Definitions of leadership and leadership roles within colleges and universities. Leadership models and organizational concepts. Case study analysis of the problems and challenges facing today's higher education administrators.

EDUC 387A. Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems. 1-5 Unit.

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: SOC 311A

EDUC 387C. Workshop: Comparative Studies of Educational and Political Systems. 1-5 Unit.

Analysis of quantitative and longitudinal data on national educational systems and political structures. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: SOC 311C

EDUC 388A. Language Policies and Practices. 2 Units.

For STEP teacher candidates seeking to meet requirements for the English Learner Authorization on their preliminary credential. Historical, political, and legal foundations of education programs for English learners. Theories of second language learning, and research on the effectiveness of bilingual education. Theory-based methods to facilitate and measure English learners' growth in language and literacy acquisition, and create environments which promote English language development and content area learning through specially designed academic instruction in English. (STEP).

EDUC 390X. Learning Analytics and Computational Modeling in Social Science. 3-4 Units.

Computational modeling and data-mining are dramatically changing the physical sciences, and more recently also the social and behavioral sciences. Traditional analysis techniques are insufficient to investigate complex dynamic social phenomena as social networks, online gaming, diffusion of innovation, opinion dynamics, classroom behavior, and other complex adaptive systems. In this course, we will learn about how modeling, network theory, and basic data-mining can support research in cognitive, and social sciences, in particular around issues of learning, cognitive development, and educational policy.
Same as: CS 424M

EDUC 397X. Math Mentoring: Working in the Zone with Learners. 1-2 Unit.

The course focuses on how the tutorial relationship can help students learn mathematics. The course will provide background theory and knowledge as well as provide practical approaches to tutoring, supports for targeting activities to students¿ needs, selection of materials and activities, and ways to assess the progress of the students and reflect on your own experience. Topics will include social theories of learning, teaching for understanding, and challenges of students who are English language learners. In addition to attending 4, two-hour workshop classes, 1 hour of tutoring is required each week. nnThe course will meet 4 times during the quarter for workshops and discussions following Friday tutoring sessions. Students will submit assignments on the Coursework site on weeks that the course does not meet. A 1 unit section of the course will run in Winter and Spring quarters.
Same as: EDUC 187X

EDUC 398X. Market-Based Education Reforms. 2 Units.

(Same as GSBGEN 577). This seminar course examines market-based education reforms and evidence on their impacts. Topics considered in depth will include public school choice, charter schools, vouchers, incentives for students and teachers, and accountability. We will pay special attention to the design and operation of education markets, the politics and legal challenges of market-based school reform, and methods for evaluating reform initiatives. The course will draw on cases both within the United States and internationally.

EDUC 399A. Designing Surveys. 1-2 Unit.

This workshop/course is designed for students who are designing a survey for use in a research project. The workshop content draws on relevant cognitive processing theories and research (on comprehension, retrieval, judgment, and reporting). In addition to some readings and a few lectures, this workshop is designed to be highly interactive and practical. By the end of the course students will have designed and pilot tested their survey instrument. Course may be repeated for credit.

EDUC 399X. Mixed Methods Research. 3 Units.

This advanced course will address the theory and practice of mixing inquiry methodologies in social inquiry. The course will cover: 1) selected roots of the contemporary interest in mixing methods, 2) conceptualizations of mixed methods design and analysis, and 3) challenges of mixed methods practice.

EDUC 401C. Data Analysis Examples Using R. 1 Unit.

We will do basic and intermediate level data analysis examples, like those that students will have seen in their courses, in R. nExamples include: descriptive statistics and plots, group comparisons, correlation and regression, categorical variables, multilevel data.nSee http://web.stanford.edu/~rag/ed401/.

EDUC 404X. Topics in Brazilian Education: Public Policy and Innovation for the 21st Century. 1-2 Unit.

The objective of this seminar is to provide students from different backgrounds an opportunity to learn about current issues and debates on Brazilian education. The seminar will cover topics on the history of Brazilian education; an overview of current school reforms at the federal level; educational assessments; education and economic growth; educational equity; teacher labor market; technology and education; early childhood; and higher education to Brazil.

EDUC 405X. Teaching the Humanities. 3 Units.

This course, designed for graduate students in the humanities and education, explores approaches to teaching the humanities at both the secondary and collegiate levels, with a focus on the teaching of text, and how the humanities can help students develop the ability to read and think critically. The course explores purposes and pedagogical approaches for teaching humanities through a variety of texts and perspectives. The course is designed as an opportunity for doctoral students in the Humanities both to enrich their own teaching, and to broaden their understanding of professional teaching opportunities, including community college and secondary school teaching.

EDUC 406X. Perspectives on Teacher Learning and Lesson Study. 2-4 Units.

Seminar. Based on peer collaboration, lesson study helps to create professional communities among teachers and support their learning. Research literature, teacher thinking and beliefs, teacher professional development, and conceptual frameworks.

EDUC 407X. Lytics Seminar. 1-4 Unit.

This course is a survey of research methods with applications in online learning. The methods covered are very interdisciplinary, including an introduction to machine learning, text/discourse analysis, causal modeling, and psychometrics. Broader question in research methodology are also covered, including how to formulate a good research question, when to use qualitative or quantitative methods, and the relative merits of theory-driven confirmatory vs. exploratory research. The goal of this course is to support researchers in the online learning space and other fields in their research endeavors.

EDUC 409X. Managing to Outcomes in Education and Other Sectors. 2 Units.

Whether as students, taxpayers, or philanthropists, we share an interest that schools, government agencies, and nonprofit organizations effectively achieve their intended outcomes. This course asks how stakeholders and managers can assess these institutions' performance and commitment to continuous improvement. This seemingly technocratic question is often the center of political controversy, as it is today in criticisms of the student assessments required by No Child Left Behind and of "value-added" assessments of teacher performance.nnEver mindful that performance management is a graveyard of good intentions, we will study the practical aspects of institutional change - including leadership, accountability, learning, and culture ?- that often account for the difference between success and failure. We start with the presumption that you can't manage what you can't measure, but managers can usually measure only proxies rather than ultimate outcomes. In addition to the inevitable slippage between the proxies and ultimate outcomes, there is a tension between using assessments for learning and improvement, on the one hand, and for accountability, incentives, and penalties, on the other. Moreover, people have incentives to "game" any performance evaluation system.nnWe will examine the challenges of managing to outcomes in various contexts, focusing particularly on students' and teachers' performance, but also including the performance of selected government agencies (e.g., police and welfare departments), nonprofit organizations, and foundations. We will focus on the interconnections among strategic planning, performance budgeting, and performance management. We will also look at experiments with new funding vehicles that depend on measuring outcomes, such as social impact bonds, conditional cash transfers, and pay for performance schemes in healthcare and other sectors.

EDUC 411X. Early Childhood Education. 1-4 Unit.

This course addresses a broad set of topics that have implications for developmentally appropriate and effective early childhood education. It begins with children's social, emotional and cognitive development and issues related to poverty, culture and language. We will also examine research evidence on effective instruction for young children, evaluations of preschool interventions, and several current policy debates.

EDUC 412X. Organization Studies Research Workshop. 1-2 Unit.

For graduate students whose research is rooted in organization theory. Participants to present and receive feedback on their work including paper drafts, proposals and dissertation chapter. Sources include recent scholarship. May be repeated for credit.

EDUC 421X. Powerful Ideas for Learning Sciences and Technology Design. 1-3 Unit.

This course is intended as a graduate level seminar that provides in-depth readings and discussions, Professor Roy Pea's professional reflections, and student essay-writing on topics examined in Dr. Pea's select publications and associated influential writings.

EDUC 425X. Advanced Topics in Research on Self and Stigma. 1-3 Unit.

This course focuses on the relevance of self, identity, and stigmatization to understanding and remedying social problems. A key focus will be on how interactions between the self-system and social systems (e.g. schools, workplaces, institutions) drive outcomes over time, including educational and economic inequality. More broadly, class discussion and readings will address a social psychological analysis of intervention and change.

EDUC 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

For advanced graduate students. Instructor consent required. (all areas).