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Residential Programs

Program Director: Warren Chiang 

Office: Sweet Hall, Garden Level

Residential Programs (ResProg) focuses on providing educational coherence for residential based programs, students and faculty.  Integrated Learning Environment  (ILE) and Summer Cohort Program are two primary areas that we integrate academic and residential experience. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture (ITALIC) and Structured Liberal Education (SLE) are two of the ILE programs that are academic year, immersive programs held in themed based dorms. Leland Scholars Program (LSP), is a four-week summer cohort intensive program also held in the residence. It facilitates the transition to college for incoming freshmen through carefully crafted activities, course work, discussions, and trips.

Structured Liberal Education

Director: Joshua Landy (French and Comparative Literature)

Associate Director: Greg Watkins

Lecturers: Michaela Hulstyn, Katerine Kretler, Jeremy Sabol, Ery Shin, Michael Thomas, Greg Watkins

Offices: Sweet Hall, Second Floor, and Florence Moore Hall
Mail Code: 94305-8581
Phone: (650) 725-4790
Email: sle-program@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://sle.stanford.edu

The Program in Structured Liberal Education (SLE) is a year-long residence-based great works course that satisfies several requirements at once: Thinking Matters, Writing and Rhetoric (both PWR1 and PWR2), and four of the Ways requirements. The curriculum includes works of philosophy, literature, art, and music from the ancient world to the present. The program is interdisciplinary in approach; it emphasizes intellectual rigor and individualized contact between faculty and students.

SLE has two fundamental purposes: to develop a student's ability to ask effective questions of texts, teachers, the culture, and themselves; and to develop intellectual skills in critical reading, expository writing, logical reasoning, and group discussion. SLE encourages students to live a life of ideas in an atmosphere that stresses critical thinking and a tolerance for ambiguity. Neither the instructors nor the curriculum provides ready-made answers to the questions being dealt with; rather, SLE encourages a sense of intellectual challenge, student initiative, and originality.

The residence hall is the setting for lectures and small group discussions. SLE enhances the classroom experience with other educational activities, including a weekly film series, writing tutorials, occasional special events and field trips, and a student-produced play each quarter.

Freshmen interested in enrolling in SLE should indicate this preference for their Thinking Matters assignment. SLE is designed as a three quarter sequence, and students are expected to make a commitment for the entire year (8 units each quarter).

SLE Courses Offered in 2016-17

Units
SLE 91Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 92Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 93Structured Liberal Education8
SLE 299Structured Liberal Education Capstone Seminar1

Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture

Faculty Director: Janice Ross (Theater and Performance Studies)

Associate Director: Kim Beil

Faculty: Nicholas Jenkins (English), Jean Ma (Art and Art History), Stephen Sano (Music), Janice Ross (Theater and Performance Studies), Ge Wang (Music)

Lecturer: James Steichen

Program in Writing and Rhetoric Lecturer: Aaron Montoya

Offices: Sweet Hall, Garden Level, and Stern Hall
Mail Code: 94305-7000
Phone: (650) 724-3163
Email: italic_ile@stanford.edu
Web Site: https://undergrad.stanford.edu/programs/residential-programs/italic/overview

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity. It fosters close exchanges along faculty, students and guest artists in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge – history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law – by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one’s perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring experience.

All lectures, sections, arts workshops and guest talks will happen in a cluster of on-site seminar and practice rooms dedicated to ITALIC. Through a series of close readings and analyses of canonical works of theatre, film, dance, music, the literary and visual arts as well as popular culture, freshmen live and learn together in Burbank House.

ITALIC satisfies the Thinking Matters requirement, PWR1, and between two and four Ways breadth requirements. ITALIC is designed as a three quarter sequence, and students are expected to make a commitment for the entire year (4 units in two quarters; 8 in the quarter with intensive writing). ITALIC writing sections are scheduled in the autumn and winter quarters.

ITALIC Courses Offered in 2016-17

Units
ITALIC 91Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture4
ITALIC 92Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture4
ITALIC 93Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture4
ITALIC 95WImmersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Writing Section4

Leland Scholars Program

Offices: Sweet Hall, Garden Level
Mail code: 94305-3092
Email: lelandscholars@stanford.edu
Web Site: http://lelandscholars.stanford.edu

In recognizing the need to prepare first year students for the academic, intellectual, social, and personal challenges they will face at Stanford, the Leland Scholars Program (LSP) facilitates the transition to college for incoming freshmen who may be the first in their family to attend college or attended under-resourced schools or communities.  Scholars will participate in a four-week residential program in the summer prior to arrival on campus.  This fully-funded program has a carefully crafted schedule of activities, coursework, discussions, and trips designed to support the transition to Stanford.  During the academic year, Leland Scholars will have access to additional advising and freshman seminars that sustain the community and reinforce the skills and strategies acquired during the program.

Immersion in the Arts Courses

ITALIC 91. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture. 4 Units.

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for freshmen. It's built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art. It also builds community. This yearlong experience fosters close exchanges among faculty, students, guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We¿ll trace the challenges that works of art have presented to history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century.. We'll look at ways arts can inform creative problem-solving, confront uncertainty and ambiguity, and experiment with different sets of rules. Through rigorous inquiry, ITALIC seeks to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.

ITALIC 92. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture. 4 Units.

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for freshmen. It's built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art. It also builds community. This yearlong experience fosters close exchanges among faculty, students, guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We¿ll trace the challenges that works of art have presented to history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century.. We'll look at ways arts can inform creative problem-solving, confront uncertainty and ambiguity, and experiment with different sets of rules. Through rigorous inquiry, ITALIC seeks to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.

ITALIC 93. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture. 4 Units.

ITALIC is an arts-minded, residence-based academic program for freshmen. It's built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art. It also builds community. This yearlong experience fosters close exchanges among faculty, students, guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We¿ll trace the challenges that works of art have presented to history, politics, and culture, particularly since the 19th century. We'll look at ways arts can inform creative problem-solving, confront uncertainty and ambiguity, and experiment with different sets of rules. Through rigorous inquiry, ITALIC seeks to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.

ITALIC 95W. Immersion in the Arts: Living in Culture, Writing Section. 4 Units.

ITALIC is a new residence-based program built around a series of big questions about the historical, critical and practical purposes of art and its unique capacities for intellectual creativity, communication, and expression. This year-long program fosters close exchanges among faculty, students and guest artists and scholars in class, over meals and during excursions to arts events. We trace the challenges that works of art have presented to categories of knowledge--history, politics, culture, science, medicine, law--by turning reality upside-down or inside-out, or just by altering one's perspective on the world. The arts become a model for engaging with problem-solving: uncertainty and ambiguity confront art makers and viewers all the time; artworks are experiments that work by different sets of rules. Students will begin to understand and use the arts to create new frameworks for exploring our (and others') experience.

Structured Liberal Education Courses

SLE 81. Public Service Program. 1 Unit.

This one-unit course is for participation in quarter-long service programs set up by the SLE program and conducted in consultation with the Haas Public Service Center. Available programs will vary by quarter. May be repeat for credit.

SLE 91. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Homer, Sappho, Greek tragedy, Plato, Aristotle, Zhuangzi, Confucius, the Heart Sutra, Hebrew Bible, New Testament, and the Aeneid.

SLE 92. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Augustine, the Qur'an, Dante, Rumi, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Las Casas, Descartes, Locke, Mill, Schleiermacher, and Flaubert.

SLE 93. Structured Liberal Education. 8 Units.

Focusing on great works of philosophy, religion, literature, painting, and film drawn largely from the Western tradition, the SLE curriculum places particular emphasis on artists and intellectuals who brought new ways of thinking and new ways of creating into the world, often overthrowing prior traditions in the process. These are the works that redefined beauty, challenged the authority of conventional wisdom, raised questions of continuing importance to us today, and¿for good or ill¿created the world we still live in. Texts may include: Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Du Bois, Eliot, Woolf, Kafka, Brecht, Vertov, Beauvoir, Sartre, Fanon, Gandhi, and Morrison.

SLE 98. Directed Reading. 1 Unit.

Directed reading for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

SLE 99. Directed Reading. 1 Unit.

Directed reading for undergraduate students. Consult faculty in area of interest for appropriate topics involving one of the research groups or other special projects. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.".

SLE 199. Teaching SLE. 1 Unit.

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SLE 299. Structured Liberal Education Capstone Seminar. 1 Unit.

Senior capstone project for students who were enrolled in SLE their freshman year.