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Nonacademic Regulations

Nondiscrimination Policy

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the University's programs and activities; Stanford also prohibits unlawful harassment including sexual harassment and sexual violence. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy: Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email). Stanford’s Title IX Coordinator, Catherine Criswell, has been designated to handle inquiries regarding sexual harassment and sexual violence: Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford, CA 94305-8230, (650) 497-4955 (voice), (650) 497-9257, titleix@stanford.edu.

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act)/Section 504 Grievance Procedure (Student)

For information more generally concerning policies and procedures for students with disabilities, see the Diversity & Access Office web site, or the ADA/Section 504 Compliance Officer, Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford CA, 94305-8230, (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email); see also the Office for Accessible Education (OAE) web site.

Policy

The following is the policy:

I.  Policy

Stanford University, in compliance with state and federal laws and regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA; as amended 2008) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Section 504), does not discriminate on the basis of disability in administration of its education-related programs and activities, and has an institutional commitment to provide equal educational opportunities for disabled students who are otherwise qualified.

Students who believe they have been subjected to unlawful discrimination on the basis of disability, or have been denied access to services or accommodations required by law, have the right to use this grievance procedure.

II.  Applicability

As a general proposition, the grievance procedure set forth below is applicable to undergraduate and graduate students of the University. In general, it is designed to address disputes concerning the following:

  1. Disagreements regarding a requested service, accommodation, or modification of a University practice or requirement;
  2. Inaccessibility of a program or activity;
  3. Harassment or discrimination on the basis of disability;
  4. Violation of privacy in the context of disability.

As a general proposition, this grievance procedure supplants the Student Academic Grievance Procedure and the Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure (both of which are set forth in this bulletin) for disability-related grievances. Questions of applicability will be decided by the Director of the Diversity and Access Office.

III. Compliance Officers

Stanford University's Compliance Officers are responsible for administering this grievance procedure as well as ensuring compliance with applicable laws. The Director of the Diversity and Access Office is the designated ADA / Section 504 Compliance Officer. That office is located in the Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford, CA 94305-8230, 650-725-0326 (Voice), 650-723-1216 (TTY), 650-723-1791 (Fax), email: disability.access@stanford.edu.

Additional Compliance Officers may be designated from time to time by the Provost from those faculty and staff members knowledgeable concerning disability issues and the legal mandates of state and federal disability statutes.

IV. Informal Resolution

Prior to initiating the formal complaint procedure set forth below, the student should, in general, first discuss the matter orally or in writing with the individual(s) most directly responsible. If no resolution results, or if direct contact is inappropriate under the circumstances, the student should then consult with the Compliance Officer at the Diversity and Access Office who will attempt to facilitate a resolution. (The informal resolution process may involve consultation with the Associate Vice Provost and Dean of Educational Resource Centers.)

If the Compliance Officer is not successful in quickly achieving a satisfactory resolution (that is, generally within seven calendar days), the Compliance Officer will inform the student of his or her efforts and the student's right to file a formal complaint.

V. Formal Complaint

If the procedure set forth above for informal resolution does not yield a successful resolution, then the student may file a formal complaint in the following manner:

  1. When to File Complaint: Complaints must be filed as soon as possible, but in no event later than 10 days after the end of the quarter in which the concern arose.
  2. What to File: a complaint must be in writing and include the following:
    1. The grievant's name, address, email address and phone number;
    2. A full description of the problem;
    3. A description of what efforts have been made to resolve the issue informally;
    4. A statement of the remedy requested.
  3. Where to File Complaint: the complaint is to be filed with the Compliance Officer at the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford CA 94305-8230, 650-725-0326 (Voice), 650-723-1216 (TTY), 650-723-1791 (Fax), email: disability.access@stanford.edu.
  4. Notice of Receipt: upon receipt of the complaint, the Compliance Officer reviews the complaint for timeliness and appropriateness for this grievance procedure, and provides the grievant with written notice acknowledging its receipt.
  5. Investigation: the Compliance Officer will promptly initiate an investigation and may refer the matter (or any part of it) to a grievance officer or other designee, who will look into and/or address the matter as the Compliance Officer directs. In undertaking the investigation, the Compliance Officer or grievance officer may interview, consult with, and/or request a written response to the issues raised in the grievance from any individual the grievance officer believes to have relevant information, including faculty, staff, and students.
  6. Representation: the grievant and the party against whom the grievance is directed each have the right to have a representative. The party shall indicate whether he or she is to be assisted by a representative and, if so, the name of that representative. For purposes of this procedure, an attorney is not an appropriate representative.
  7. Findings and Notification: upon completion of the investigation, the grievance officer will prepare and transmit to the student, and to the party against whom the grievance is directed, a final report containing a summary of the investigation, written findings, and a proposed disposition. This transmission will be expected within 45 calendar days of the filing of the formal complaint. The deadline may be extended by the Compliance Officer for good cause (including for reasons relating to breaks in the academic calendar), and will nearly always be extended during summers and the winter closure. The final report may also be provided, where appropriate, to any University officer whose authority will be needed to carry out the proposed disposition or to determine whether any personnel action is appropriate.
  8. Final Disposition: the disposition proposed by the Compliance Officer will be put into effect promptly. The grievant or any party against whom the grievance or the proposed disposition is directed may appeal. The appeal to the Provost (as set forth below) will not suspend the implementation of the disposition proposed by the grievance officer, except in those circumstances where the Provost decides that good cause exists making the suspension of implementation appropriate.

VI. Urgent Matters

Whenever the application of any of the time deadlines or procedures set forth in this grievance procedure creates a problem due to the nature of the complaint, the urgency of the matter, or the proximity of the upcoming event, the Compliance Officer will, at the request of the grievant, determine whether an appropriate expedited procedure can be fashioned.

VII. Remedies

Possible remedies under this grievance procedure include corrective steps, actions to reverse the effects of discrimination or to end harassment, and measures to provide a reasonable accommodation or proper ongoing treatment. As stated above, a copy of the Compliance Officer's report may, where appropriate, be sent to University officer(s) to determine whether any personnel action should be pursued.

VIII. Appeal

Within ten calendar days of the issuance of the final report, the grievant or the party against whom the grievance is directed may appeal to the Provost the grievance officer's determination.

An appeal is taken by filing a written request for review with the Compliance Officer at the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (Voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (Fax), email: disability.access@stanford.edu.

The written request for review must specify the particular substantive and/or procedural basis for the appeal, and must be made on grounds other than general dissatisfaction with the proposed disposition. Furthermore, the appeal must be directed only to issues raised in the formal complaint as filed or to procedural errors in the conduct of the grievance procedure itself, and not to new issues.

The Compliance Officer will forward the appeal to the Provost, and also provide copies to the other party or parties. If the grievance involves a decision that is being challenged, the review by the Provost or his or her designee usually will be limited to the following considerations:

  1. Were the proper facts and criteria brought to bear on the decision? Were improper or extraneous facts or criteria brought to bear that substantially affected the decision to the detriment of the grievant?
  2. Were there any procedural irregularities that substantially affected the outcome of the matter to the detriment of the grievant?
  3. Given the proper facts, criteria, and procedures, was the decision a reasonable one?

A copy of the Provost's written decision will be expected within 30 calendar days of the filing of the appeal and will be sent to the parties, the Compliance Officer and, if appropriate, to the University officer whose authority will be needed to carry out the disposition. The deadline may be extended by the Provost for good cause (including for reasons relating to breaks in the academic calendar), and will nearly always be extended during summers and the winter closure. The decision of the Provost on the appeal is final.

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972

It is the policy of Stanford University to comply with Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 and its regulations, which prohibit unlawful discrimination on the basis of sex. The Title IX Compliance Officer is Rosa Gonzalez, the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, who has been appointed to coordinate the University's efforts to comply with the law. Anyone who believes that Stanford is not in compliance with Title IX and its regulations should contact the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford, CA 94305-8230, (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email). (See also the following section for addressing Title IX Concerns relating to sexual harassment.)

Title IX Concerns Relating to Sexual Harassment and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013

Catherine Criswell has been appointed Stanford's Title IX Coordinator to respond to matters of sexual assault, relationship (dating) violence and stalking (prohibited conduct). The Title IX Coordinator serves as a resource to review allegations of prohibited conduct and may provide interim accommodations relating to housing, academics, or no-contact letters while a matter is being reviewed. When prohibited conduct has been confirmed by a preponderance of the evidence, the Title IX Coordinator will provide long term accommodations and services to students to address the effects of sexual harassment and sexual violence. The Title IX Student Policy provides the grievance procedure and appeal mechanism to review the University's actions relating to a Title IX concern involving Prohibited Conduct; see the Title IX web site for additional information. Additional resources are available the Sexual Assault Support and Resources web site. Ms. Criswell's contact information is titleix@stanford.edu; (650) 497-4955. See also Administrative Guide Memos 2.1.2 Recruiting and Hiring of Regular Staff, 1.7.1 Sexual Harassment, 1.7.2, Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships, and 1.7.3, Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault.

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

It is the policy of Stanford University to comply with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and its regulations, which prohibit unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin. The Title VI Compliance Officer is the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, who has been appointed to coordinate the University's efforts to comply with the law. Anyone who believes that Stanford is not in compliance with Title VI and its regulations should contact the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email). Grievance procedures to address complaints of discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin are set forth in the "Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure." See also Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.1 General Personnel Policies.

Grievances

A Stanford undergraduate or graduate student who believes that he or she has been subject to an improper decision on an academic matter may file a grievance pursuant to the Student Academic Grievance Procedure. For other types of grievances, students should review the section that follows on the Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure, and consult concerning applicable procedures with the Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email).

Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure

Policy

The following is the policy:

  1. Applicability

    1. It is perhaps inevitable in any university that some students may at times feel improperly treated, and that concerns about unfairness (including potential discrimination and harassment) may also at times arise.

      In this regard (and although this grievance procedure is not limited to concerns of discrimination), Stanford University's Nondiscrimination Policy provides in part: "Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the University's programs and activities; Stanford also prohibits unlawful harassment including sexual harassment and sexual violence. "

    2. At Stanford, there are a number of grievance procedures through which students can raise and seek redress for what they believe to be unfair, improper or discriminatory decisions, actions, or treatment. For example:

      1. If the matter involves an academic decision, the Student Academic Grievance Procedure may be the applicable procedure.
      2. If the matter involves a disability-related concern, the Student ADA/Section 504 Grievance Procedure may be applicable.
      3. If the matter involves a student-athlete and his or her sport, the Student-Athlete Grievance Procedure may be applicable.
    3. The purpose of the Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure is to provide a process for students to seek resolution of disputes and grievances that may not fall within the scope of one of the other grievance processes, including those which may arise in a student's capacity as a student-employee.

    4. As a general proposition, this procedure is available to undergraduates and graduate students at Stanford University. It is designed to address individual decisions or individual actions that affect the grievant personally in his or her capacity as a student, but it does not apply to matters proceeding through the Office of Judicial Affairs or through the Dean's leave policy. This is likewise not a grievance procedure to address the concerns of student groups. Similarly and as a general proposition, dissatisfaction with a departmental, school, or University policy or practice of broad or general application is not grounds for a grievance under this procedure; the Director of the Diversity and Access Office (hereafter "the Director") may, in his or her discretion, entertain such a grievance in exceptional circumstances, such as where (for example) the policy or practice is alleged to be contrary to law. In the same way, the Director may entertain a grievance under this procedure brought by an individual who is not an undergraduate or graduate student, in an appropriate case or as required by law.

    5. The Director is responsible for administering this Student Non-Academic Grievance Procedure.

      1. The Director may be contacted at: Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email), http://www.stanford.edu/dept/ocr.
      2. The Director in his or her sole discretion can decide whether to refer a grievance brought under this procedure to another grievance process. In cases involving allegations of sexual harassment in particular, the Director may wish to consult with the Director of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office as to the most appropriate way to proceed; see Section 5.d below. In cases involving student employment, the Director may wish to consult with the University's Department of Human Resources.
  2. Informal Resolution

    1. As a general proposition (and although particular circumstances may warrant an exception), the student should first discuss the problem and seek a solution with the individual(s) most directly involved.

    2. If no resolution results (or if circumstances make discussion inappropriate with the person most directly involved), the student should then consult with the individual at the next (higher) administrative level in the department, school, residence or University administrative unit. Serious efforts should be made to resolve the issue locally at an informal level without resort to a formal grievance; such efforts may continue even after the formal process is underway.

  3. Formal Grievance

    1. If informal means of resolution prove inadequate, the student should set forth in writing the substance of the complaint, the grounds for it and the evidence on which it is based, and the efforts taken to date to resolve the matter. It is at this stage that the complaint becomes a formal grievance.

    2. The grievance document should be submitted to the Director. A grievance should be filed in a timely fashion, i.e., normally no later than thirty days after of the end of the academic quarter in which the action that is the subject of the grievance occurred. Except in extraordinary circumstances, delay in filing a grievance will be grounds for rejection of that grievance.

    3. The Director will promptly initiate a review, which should normally be completed within sixty days. The Director may attempt to resolve the matter informally, and may refer the matter (or any part of it) to a grievance officer or other designee, who will look into and/or address the matter as the Director directs. The Director may also, in appropriate cases, remand the matter to the appropriate administrator (including to the administrative level at which the grievance arose) for further consideration.

    4. In undertaking this review, either the Director, his or her designee, or the grievance officer may request a response to the issues raised in the grievance from any individuals believed to have information the reviewer considers relevant, including faculty, staff and students.

    5. The Director (or his or her designee) will issue his or her decision in writing, and take steps to initiate such corrective action as is called for (if any). Conduct meriting discipline will be brought to the attention of the appropriate disciplinary process.

  4. Appeal

    1. If the student is dissatisfied with the disposition by the Director (or his or her designee), he or she may appeal to the Provost (Office of the President and Provost, Building 10, Stanford, CA 94305-2061; phone 650-725-4075; fax 650-725-1347). The appeal should be filed in writing with the Provost within ten days of the issuance of the decision by the Director (or his or her designee); a delay in filing the appeal may be grounds for rejection of that appeal.

    2. The Provost may attempt to resolve the matter informally, and may refer the matter (or any part of it) to a grievance appeal officer, who will review the matter at the Provost's direction. The Provost may also, in appropriate cases, remand the matter to the appropriate administrator (including to the administrative level at which the grievance arose) for further consideration.

    3. The Provost should normally complete his or her review of the appeal and issue his or her decision in writing within forty-five days. That decision is final.

  5. General Provisions

    1. Time Guidelines—The time frames set forth herein are guidelines. They may be extended by the Director or Provost, as applicable, in his or her discretion for good cause (including for reasons relating to breaks in the academic calendar), and will nearly always be extended during summers and the winter closure.

    2. Advisers—A student initiating or participating in a grievance under this procedure may be accompanied by an adviser in any discussion with the Director, the Provost or their designees, or a grievance or grievance appeal officer under this procedure; any adviser must be a current Stanford faculty, staff member or student.

    3. Ombuds—Students should be aware that the University Ombuds (http://www.stanford.edu/dept/ocr/ombuds) is available to discuss and advise on any matters of University concern and frequently help expedite resolution of such matters. Although it has no decision making authority, the Ombuds' Office has wide powers of inquiry.

    4. Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct and Sexual  Assault—For information and resources concerning sexual harassment, students should refer to the web page of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office at http://harass.stanford.edu. For information and resources concerning sexual assault and relationship abuse, students should refer to the web page of the Sexual Violence Advisory Board at http://www.stanford.edu/group/svab/help.shtml.

    5. No retaliation—Stanford University prohibits retaliation or reprisals against individuals based on their pursuit in good faith of a grievance under this procedure, or their participation in good faith in the grievance process.

    6. Standards for Review—If the grievance involves a decision that is being challenged, the review by the Director, as well as the review by the Provost on appeal, usually will be limited to the following considerations:

      1. Were the proper facts and criteria brought to bear on the decision? Were improper or extraneous facts or criteria brought to bear that substantially affected the decision to the detriment of the grievant?
      2. Were there any procedural irregularities that substantially affected the outcome of the matter to the detriment of the grievant?
      3. Given the proper facts, criteria, and procedures, was the decision one which a person in the position of the decision maker might reasonably have made?

Age Discrimination Act of 1975

The following is the policy:

  1. Policy

    It is the policy of Stanford University to comply with the Age Discrimination Act of 1975 and its regulations, which prohibit unlawful discrimination on the basis of age. The Age Discrimination Act Compliance Officer is the Director of the Diversity and Access Office ("the Director"), who has been appointed to coordinate the University's efforts to comply with the law. Anyone who believes that Stanford is not in compliance with the Age Discrimination Act and its regulations ("the Act") should contact the Director at the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1216 (TTY), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email).

  2. Grievance Procedure

    1. An individual who believes that Stanford is not acting in compliance with the Act and who wishes to file a grievance should set forth in writing the substance of his or her complaint, the grounds for it and the evidence on which it is based, and the efforts (if any) taken to date to resolve the matter. It is at this stage that the complaint becomes a formal grievance.

    2. The grievance document should be submitted to the Director. A grievance should be filed in a timely fashion, i.e., normally no later than thirty days after the end of the academic quarter in which the action that is the subject of the grievance occurred. Except in extraordinary circumstances, delay in filing a grievance will be grounds for rejection of that grievance.

    3. The Director will promptly initiate a review, which should normally be completed within sixty days. The Director may attempt to resolve the matter informally, and may refer the matter (or any part of it) to a grievance officer or other designee, who will look into and/or address the matter as the Director directs. The Director may also, in appropriate cases, remand the matter to the appropriate administrator (including to the administrative level at which the grievance arose) for further consideration.

    4. In undertaking this review, either the Director, his or her designee, or the grievance officer may request a response to the issues raised in the grievance from any individuals believed to have information the reviewer considers relevant, including faculty, staff and students.

    5. The Director (or his or her designee) will issue his or her decision in writing, and take steps to initiate such corrective action as is called for (if any).

  3. Appeal

    1. If the grievant is dissatisfied with the disposition by the Director (or his or her designee), he or she may appeal to the Provost (Office of the President and Provost, Building 10, Stanford, CA 94305-2061; phone 650-725-4075; fax 650-725-1347). The appeal should be filed in writing with the Provost within ten days of the issuance of the decision by the Director (or his or her designee); a delay in filing the appeal may be grounds for rejection of that appeal.

    2. The Provost may attempt to resolve the matter informally, and may refer the matter (or any part of it) to a grievance appeal officer, who will review the matter at the Provost's direction. The Provost may also, in appropriate cases, remand the matter to the appropriate administrator (including to the administrative level at which the grievance arose) for further consideration.

    3. The Provost should normally complete his or her review of the appeal and issue his or her decision in writing within forty-five days. That decision is final.

  4. General Provisions

    1. Time Guidelines—The time frames set forth herein are guidelines. They may be extended by the Director or Provost, as applicable, in his or her discretion for good cause (including for reasons relating to breaks in the academic calendar), and will nearly always be extended during summers and the winter closure.

    2. No Retaliation—Stanford University prohibits retaliation or reprisals against individuals based on their pursuit in good faith of a grievance under this procedure, or their participation in good faith in the grievance process.

    3. Standards for Review—If the grievance involves a decision that is being challenged, the review by the Director, as well as the review by the Provost on appeal, usually will be limited to the following considerations:

      1. Were the proper facts and criteria brought to bear on the decision? Were improper or extraneous facts or criteria brought to bear that substantially affected the decision to the detriment of the grievant?

      2. Were there any procedural irregularities that substantially affected the outcome of the matter to the detriment of the grievant?

      3. Given the proper facts, criteria, and procedures, was the decision one which a person in the position of the decision maker might reasonably have made?

Ownership and Use of Stanford Name and Trademarks

Stanford registered marks, as well as other names, seals, logos, and other symbols and marks that are representative of Stanford, may be used solely with permission of Stanford. Merchandise bearing Stanford's names and marks, such as t-shirts, glassware, and notebooks, must be licensed. For complete text of the currently applicable policy, including the University officers authorized to grant permission to use the Stanford name and marks, see Administrative Guide Memo 1.5.4 Ownership and Use of Stanford Name and Trademarks.

Copyright

Copyright laws protect original works of authorship and give the owners of copyrights the exclusive right to do and to authorize others to do certain things in regard to a copyrighted work, including: make copies, distribute the work, display or perform the work publicly, and create derivative works. Copyright laws apply to nearly all forms of captured content, including traditional works like books, photographs, music, drama and sculpture. The laws also adapt to changes in technologies, and include in their scope modern forms of works like motion pictures, web sites, electronic media, software, multimedia works and some databases. Registration is not required to obtain a copyright, so if in doubt, assume a copyright applies.

Unless an exception to the copyright owner's exclusive rights applies, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner to copy, distribute, display or perform a copyrighted work in any medium for any purpose. Be especially mindful of copyright principles when using the Internet. Just because a work is posted on the Internet does not mean that the owner of the copyright has given you permission to use it. In general, do not post material onto the Internet without copyright clearance.

Stanford University Libraries have licenses with many publishers, which permit copying of materials in accordance with the educational, research or administrative functions of the University. In addition, there are four major exceptions to the copyright owner's exclusive rights, which (if applicable) permit limited use without permission. These are: the fair use exception, the library exception, the face-to-face teaching exception, and the distance-learning exception. For a more detailed explanation of these exceptions, the copyright laws and Stanford's copyright policies, please review the University's Copyright Reminder web site. It is each person's responsibility to be aware of and abide by copyright law; violation may result in civil or criminal liability, and constitutes grounds for University discipline, up to and including discharge, dismissal and expulsion.

Peer-to-Peer File Sharing

The use of file-sharing networks and software to download and share copyrighted works like software, music, movies, television programs, and books can violate copyright laws. Both the person who makes an illegal copy of a copyrighted work available and the person who receives or downloads an illegal copy have violated the law and Stanford policies. Many file-sharing programs have default settings that share copyrighted files, such as music and movies, through the Internet. Before enabling any of these programs students, faculty, or staff must read the fine print, make sure to understand the program itself, and only use such programs lawfully. Under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), copyright owners are entitled to notify Internet service providers, such as Stanford, that IP addresses linked to the Stanford network are sharing copies of music, movies, or other content without authorization. The law requires the University to respond to such complaints by eliminating access to the infringing materials. Stanford will disconnect students who fail to respond to a DMCA complaint promptly. Furthermore, the University also will suspend or terminate computer access to the Stanford network, including termination of the SUNet ID, to members of the community who continue to violate copyright laws. Finally, the University will take action through the student, employee, or faculty disciplinary processes if necessary. Beyond University consequences, copyright holders may file civil lawsuits against copyright infringers seeking extensive monetary damages. If compelled by a lawful subpoena, Stanford may be required to identify students, faculty, staff, or others who have violated copyright law. For more information about file-sharing, refer to Residential Computing's online resource, File-Sharing and Copyright Law web site.

Recording Lectures

Except with permission from the Office of Accessible Education or the instructor in question, students may not audio- or video-record lectures. Even with permission, students may only use such recordings for personal use; no posting or further distribution or use is permitted.

Domestic Partners

In October 1990, Stanford University adopted a domestic partners policy. This policy, which implements the University's nondiscrimination policy, makes services that have historically been available to married students available on an equal basis to students with same-sex or opposite-sex domestic partners. These services include access to student housing, a courtesy card that provides access to University facilities, and the ability to purchase medical care at Vaden Health Service. A domestic partnership is defined as an established long-term partnership with an exclusive mutual commitment in which the partners share the necessities of life and ongoing responsibility for their common welfare.

Sexual Harassment and Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships

For the complete text of the currently applicable version of this policy, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.4 Sexual Harassment and Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships. It is also available from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office homepage.

Summary

Stanford University strives to provide a place of work and study free of sexual harassment, intimidation or exploitation. Where sexual harassment is found to have occurred, the University will act to stop the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and discipline and/or take other appropriate action against those responsible.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

  1. In General

    1. Applicability and Sanctions for Policy Violations—This policy applies to all students, faculty and staff of Stanford University, as well as to others who participate in Stanford programs and activities. Its application includes Stanford programs and activities both on and off-campus, including overseas programs. Individuals who violate this policy are subject to discipline up to and including discharge, expulsion, and/or other appropriate sanction or action.

    2. Respect for Each Other—Stanford University strives to provide a place of work and study free of sexual harassment, intimidation or exploitation. It is expected that students, faculty, staff and other individuals covered by this policy will treat one another with respect.

    3. Prompt Attention—Reports of sexual harassment are taken seriously and will be dealt with promptly. The specific action taken in any particular case depends on the nature and gravity of the conduct reported, and may include intervention, mediation, investigation and the initiation of grievance and disciplinary processes as discussed more fully below. Where sexual harassment is found to have occurred, the University will act to stop the harassment, prevent its recurrence, and discipline and/or take other appropriate action against those responsible.

    4. Confidentiality—The University recognizes that confidentiality is important. Sexual harassment advisers and others responsible to implement this policy will respect the confidentiality and privacy of individuals reporting or accused of sexual harassment to the extent reasonably possible. Examples of situations where confidentiality cannot be maintained include circumstances when the University is required by law to disclose information (such as in response to legal process) and when disclosure is required by the University's outweighing interest in protecting the rights of others.

    5. Protection Against Retaliation—Retaliation and/or reprisals against an individual who in good faith reports or provides information in an investigation about behavior that may violate this policy are against the law and will not be tolerated. Intentionally making a false report or providing false information, however, is grounds for discipline.

    6. Relationship to Freedom of Expression—Stanford is committed to the principles of free inquiry and free expression. Vigorous discussion and debate are fundamental to the University, and this policy is not intended to stifle teaching methods or freedom of expression generally, nor will it be permitted to do so. Sexual harassment, however, is neither legally protected expression nor the proper exercise of academic freedom; it compromises the integrity of the University, its tradition of intellectual freedom and the trust placed in its members.

  2. What Is Sexual Harassment?

    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other visual, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when:

    1. It is implicitly or explicitly suggested that submission to or rejection of the conduct will be a factor in academic or employment decisions or evaluations, or permission to participate in a University activity; or

    2. The conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's academic or work performance or creating an intimidating or hostile academic, work or student living environment.

      Determining what constitutes sexual harassment depends upon the specific facts and the context in which the conduct occurs. Sexual harassment may take many forms—subtle and indirect, or blatant and overt. For example,

      1. It may be conduct toward an individual of the opposite sex or the same sex.

      2. It may occur between peers or between individuals in a hierarchical relationship.

      3. It may be aimed at coercing an individual to participate in an unwanted sexual relationship or it may have the effect of causing an individual to change behavior or work performance.

      4. It may consist of repeated actions or may even arise from a single incident if sufficiently egregious.

    3. The University's Policy on Sexual Assault (see Guide Memo 23.3, Sexual Assault) may also apply when sexual harassment involves physical contact.

  3.  What To Do About Sexual Harassment

    Individuals seeking further information are directed to the following resources:

    • The Sexual Harassment Policy Office (Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Room 208-209, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305-8230; (650) 723-1583; email: harass@stanford.edu for information, consultation, advice, or to lodge a complaint. Note that anonymous inquiries can be made to the SHPO by phone during business hours.

    • The Sexual Harassment Policy Office web page at http://harass.stanford.edu.

    • Any designated Sexual Harassment Adviser or resource person listed in 3.a or 5.a.

      The following are the primary methods for dealing with sexual harassment at Stanford. They are not required to be followed in any specific order. However, early informal methods are often effective in correcting questionable behavior.

    1. Consultation—Consultation about sexual harassment is available from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office, Sexual Harassment Advisers (including residence deans), human resources officers, employee relations specialists, counselors at Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) or the Help Center, chaplains at Memorial Church, ombudspersons and others. A current list of Sexual Harassment Advisers is available from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office and at http://harass.stanford.edu/SHadvisers.html. Consultation is available for anyone who wants to discuss issues related to sexual harassment, whether or not "harassment" actually has occurred, and whether the person seeking information is a complainant, a person who believes his or her own actions may be the subject of criticism (even if unwarranted), or a third party.

      Often there is a desire that a consultation be confidential or "off the record." This can usually be achieved when individuals discuss concerns about sexual harassment without identifying the other persons involved, and sometimes even without identifying themselves. Confidential consultations about sexual harassment also may be available from persons who, by law, have special professional status, such as:

      1. Counselors at Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), http://caps.stanford.edu

      2. Counselors at the Help Center, http://www.stanford.edu/dept/helpcenter

      3. Chaplains at Memorial Church

      4. The University Ombudsperson, http://www.stanford.edu/dept/ombuds

        In these latter cases, the level of confidentiality depends on what legal protections are held by the specific persons receiving the information and should be addressed with them before specific facts are disclosed. For more information see http://harass.stanford.edu/confidential.html.

        For further information on confidentiality, see Section 1(d) above.

    2. Direct Communication—An individual may act on concerns about sexual harassment directly, by addressing the other party in person or writing a letter describing the unwelcome behavior and its effect and stating that the behavior must stop. A Sexual Harassment Adviser can help the individual plan what to say or write, and likewise can counsel persons who receive such communications. Reprisals against an individual who in good faith initiates such a communication violate this policy.

    3. Third Party Intervention—Depending on the circumstances, third party intervention in the workplace, student residence or academic setting may be attempted. Third party intervenors may be the Sexual Harassment Advisers, human resources professionals, the ombudspersons, other faculty or staff, or sometimes mediators unrelated to the University.

      When third party intervention is used, typically the third party (or third parties) will meet privately with each of the persons involved, try to clarify their perceptions and attempt to develop a mutually acceptable understanding that can insure that the parties are comfortable with their future interactions. Other processes, such as a mediated discussion among the parties or with a supervisor, may also be explored in appropriate cases.

      Possible outcomes of third party intervention include explicit agreements about future conduct, changes in workplace assignments, substitution of one class for another, or other relief, where appropriate.

    4. Formal Grievance, Appeal, and Disciplinary Processes—Grievance, appeal, or disciplinary processes may be pursued as applicable.

      1. Grievances and Appeals—The applicable procedure depends on the circumstances and the status of the person bringing the charge and the person against whom the charge is brought. Generally, the process consists of the individual's submission of a written statement, a process of fact-finding or investigation by a University representative, followed by a decision and, in some cases, the possibility of one or more appeals, usually to Stanford administrative officers at higher levels. The relevant procedure (see below) should be read carefully, since the procedures vary considerably.

        If the identified University fact-finder or grievance officer has a conflict of interest, an alternate will be arranged, and the Director of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office or the Director of Employee and Labor Relations can help assure that this occurs.

        In most cases, grievances and appeals must be brought within a specified time after the action complained of. While informal resolution efforts will not automatically extend the time limits for filing a grievance or appeal, in appropriate circumstances the complainant and the other relevant parties may mutually agree in writing to extend the time for filing a grievance or appeal.

        A list of the established grievance and appeal procedures is located at http://hrweb.stanford.edu/elr/policies/list_grievance_procedures.html. Copies may also be obtained from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office, http://www.stanford.edu/group/SexHarass.

        Copies of the following may be obtained from Employee and Labor Relations, 651 Serra Street:

        1. "Solving Workplace Problems at Stanford: Understanding the Staff Dispute Resolution Policy" (also at http://hrweb.stanford. edu/forms/staffresolution.pdf.)

        2. "Solving Workplace Problems at Stanford: Information for Academic Staff – Librarians and Academic Staff – Research Associates"

        3. "The Dispute Resolution Process (A User's Guide)"

      2. Disciplinary Procedures—In appropriate cases, disciplinary procedures may be initiated. The applicable disciplinary procedure depends on the status of the individual whose conduct is in question. For example, faculty are subject to the Statement on Faculty Discipline, and students to the Fundamental Standard. For additional information related to student disciplinary procedures, see the Office of Community Standards.

        The individuals referenced in this section are available to discuss these options and differing methods for dealing with sexual harassment.

  4. Procedural Matters

    1. Investigations—If significant facts are contested, an investigation may be undertaken. The investigation will be conducted in a way that respects, to the extent possible, the privacy of all of the persons involved. In appropriate cases, professional investigators may be asked to assist in the investigation. The results of the investigation may be used in the third party intervention process or in a grievance or disciplinary action.

    2. Recordkeeping—The Sexual Harassment Policy Office will track reports of sexual harassment for statistical purposes and report at least annually to the University President concerning their number, nature and disposition.

      The Sexual Harassment Policy Office may keep confidential records of reports of sexual harassment and the actions taken in response to those reports, and use them for purposes such as to identify individuals or departments likely to benefit from training so that training priorities can be established. No identifying information will be retained in cases where the individual accused was not informed that there was a complaint.

    3. Indemnification and Costs—The question sometimes arises as to whether the University will defend and indemnify a Stanford employee accused of sexual harassment. California law provides, in part, "An employer shall indemnify [its] employee for all that the employee necessarily expends or loses in direct consequence of the discharge of his [or her] duties as such." The issue of indemnification depends on the facts and circumstances of each situation. Individuals who violate this policy, however, should be aware that they and/or their schools, institutes, or other units may be required to pay or contribute to any judgments, costs and expenses incurred as a result of behavior that is wrongful and/or contrary to the discharge of the employee's duties. In general, see Administrative Guide Memo 2.4.6 Indemnification.

  5. Resources for Dealing with Sexual Harassment

    1. Advice—Persons who have concerns about sexual harassment should contact the Sexual Harassment Policy Office, any Sexual Harassment Adviser at http://harass.stanford.edu/SHadvisers.html or one of the other individuals listed below. Reports should be made as soon as possible: the earlier the report, the easier it is to investigate and take appropriate remedial action. When reports are long delayed, the University will try to act to the extent it is reasonable to do so, but it may be impossible to achieve a satisfactory result after much time has passed.

      Likewise, anyone who receives a report or a grievance involving sexual harassment should promptly consult with the Sexual Harassment Policy Office or with a Sexual Harassment Adviser.

      There are a number of individuals specially trained and charged with specific responsibilities in the area of sexual harassment. In brief, they are:

      1. Sexual Harassment Advisers (http://harass.stanford.edu/SHadvisers.html) serve as resources to individuals who wish to discuss issues of sexual harassment, either because they have been harassed or because they want information about the University's policy and procedures. There is usually at least one Adviser assigned to each of the schools at the University and to each large work unit; most of the residence deans also have been appointed as Sexual Harassment Advisers. Advisers are also authorized to receive complaints.

      2. The Director of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office is responsible for the implementation of this policy. The Director's Office also provides advice and consultation to individuals when requested; receives complaints and coordinates their handling; supervises the other Advisers; encourages and assists prevention education for students, faculty and staff; keeps records showing the disposition of complaints; and generally coordinates matters arising under this policy. Because education and awareness are the best ways to prevent sexual harassment; developing awareness, education and training programs and publishing informational material are among the most important functions of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office (http://harass.stanford.edu).

      3. As stated above, individuals with concerns about sexual harassment may also discuss their concerns informally with psychological counselors (for example through CAPS or the HELP Center), chaplains (through the Memorial Chapel), or the University ombudsperson. For more information, see http://harass.stanford.edu/resources.html.

    2. External Reporting—Sexual harassment is prohibited by state and federal law. In addition to the internal resources described above, individuals may pursue complaints directly with the government agencies that deal with unlawful harassment and discrimination claims, e.g., the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) of the U.S. Department of Education, and the State of California Department of Fair Employment and Housing (DFEH). These agencies are listed in the Government section of the telephone book. A violation of this policy may exist even where the conduct in question does not violate the law.

  6. Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships

    1. In General—There are special risks in any sexual or romantic relationship between individuals in inherently unequal positions, and parties in such a relationship assume those risks. In the University context, such positions include (but are not limited to) teacher and student, supervisor and employee, senior faculty and junior faculty, mentor and trainee, adviser and advisee, teaching assistant and student, coach and athlete, and the individuals who supervise the day-to-day student living environment and student residents. Because of the potential for conflict of interest, exploitation, favoritism, and bias, such relationships may undermine the real or perceived integrity of the supervision and evaluation provided, and the trust inherent particularly in the teacher-student context. They may, moreover, be less consensual than the individual whose position confers power or authority believes. The relationship is likely to be perceived in different ways by each of the parties to it, especially in retrospect.

      Moreover, such relationships may harm or injure others in the academic or work environment. Relationships in which one party is in a position to review the work or influence the career of the other may provide grounds for complaint by third parties when that relationship gives undue access or advantage, restricts opportunities, or creates a perception of these problems. Furthermore, circumstances may change, and conduct that was previously welcome may become unwelcome. Even when both parties have consented at the outset to a romantic involvement, this past consent does not remove grounds for a charge based upon subsequent unwelcome conduct.

      Where such a relationship exists, the person in the position of greater authority or power will bear the primary burden of accountability, and must ensure that he or she—and this is particularly important for teachers—does not exercise any supervisory or evaluative function over the other person in the relationship. Where such recusal is required, the recusing party must also notify his or her supervisor, department chair or dean, so that such chair, dean or supervisor can exercise his or her responsibility to evaluate the adequacy of the alternative supervisory or evaluative arrangements to be put in place. Staff members may notify their local human resources officers. To reiterate, the responsibility for recusal and notification rests with the person in the position of greater authority or power. Failure to comply with these recusal and notification requirements is a violation of this policy, and therefore grounds for discipline. The University has the option to take any action necessary to insure compliance with the spirit of this recusal policy, including transferring either or both employees in order to minimize disruption of the work group. In those extraordinarily rare situations where it is programmatically infeasible to provide alternative supervision or evaluation, the cognizant Dean or Director must approve all evaluative and compensation actions.

    2. With Students—At a university, the role of the teacher is multi-faceted, including serving as intellectual guide, counselor, mentor and adviser; the teacher's influence and authority extend far beyond the classroom. Consequently and as a general proposition, the University believes that a sexual or romantic relationship between a teacher and a student, even where consensual and whether or not the student would otherwise be subject to supervision or evaluation by the teacher, is inconsistent with the proper role of the teacher, and should be avoided. The University therefore very strongly discourages such relationships.

  7. Policy Review and Evaluation—This policy went into effect on October 6, 1993, and was amended on November 30, 1995, and on May 30, 2002. It is subject to periodic review, and any comments or suggestions should be forwarded to the Director of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office.

Resources

The following is a summary of resources concerning sexual harassment available to members of the Stanford Community:

A brochure containing the policy, a list of current sexual harassment advisers, confidential resources, and other helpful information is available online at the Sexual Harassment Policy Office web site, and in printed form from the Sexual Harassment Policy Office at Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Room 208-209, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 94305-8230; (650) 723-1583; email: harass@stanford.edu. Copies of the University policy on sexual assault, which complements this sexual harassment policy, as well as all other documents mentioned in this section, are also available at the Sexual Harassment Policy Office.

All faculty, staff, and students who have questions regarding this policy and its enforcement can consult with a Sexual Harassment Adviser or can be directed to the local Personnel Officer or Regional Human Resources Manager. Faculty members should contact their dean or department chair, and students should contact the Director of the Sexual Harassment Policy Office or the Dean of Student Affairs.

Sexual Harassment Policy Office—telephone: (650) 723-1583; email: harass@stanford.edu.

Director: Laraine Zappert (Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences)

Assistant Director: Nanette Andrews

Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault

The University's Policy on Sexual Misconduct and Sexual Assault is published in complete form in the Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.4 Sexual Harassment and Consensual Sexual or Romantic Relationships.

Summary

The following summarizes the policy on Sexual Assault and provides information on resources available to members of the Stanford community.

Policy

Under Title IX, sexual violence (sexual misconduct and sexual assault) is a severe form of sexual harassment. Sexual misconduct and sexual assault are unacceptable and is not tolerated at Stanford University. All University employees (including student residence staff employees) have a duty to report claims of sexual misconduct or sexual assault to Catherine Criswell, Title IX Coordinator at (650) 497-4955 (voice), titleix@stanford.edu, https://titleix.stanford.edu/. For students, report claims to the Title IX Coordinator or the Office of Sexual Assault and Relationship Abuse (SARA) at (650) 725-1056 or saraoffice@stanford.edu.

The University urges an individual who has been subjected to sexual misconduct or sexual assault to make an official report. A report of the matter will be dealt with promptly. Confidentiality will be maintained to the extent possible.

The University is committed to providing information regarding on- and off-campus services and resources to all parties involved.

Students, faculty and staff found to be in violation of this policy will be subject to discipline up to and including termination, expulsion or other appropriate institutional sanctions; affiliates and program participants may be removed from University programs and/or prevented from returning to campus.

A comprehensive web site dedicated to sexual violence awareness, prevention and support can be found at Office of Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse Education & Response (SARA). The site contains a list of resources and describes reporting options.

Definitions

What is Sexual Misconduct?

Sexual misconduct is the commission of an unwanted sexual act, whether by an acquaintance or by a stranger, that occurs without indication of consent.

What is Sexual Assault?

Sexual assault is the actual, attempted or threatened unwanted sexual act, whether by an acquaintance or by a stranger, accomplished (1) against a person’s will by means of force (express or implied), violence, duress, menace, fear or fraud, or (2) when a person is incapacitated or unaware of the nature of the act, due to unconsciousness, sleep and/or intoxicating substances.

What is Consent?

Consent is informed, freely given, and mutually understood. Consent requires an affirmative act or statement by each participant. If coercion, intimidation, threats and/or physical force are used, there is no consent. If a person is mentally or physically incapacitated or impaired so that the person cannot understand the fact, nature or extent of the sexual situation, there is no consent; this includes conditions due to alcohol or drug consumption or being asleep or unconscious. Whether one has taken advantage of a position of influence over another may be a factor in determining consent.

Notification

With the consent of the victim, allegations of sexual assault received by University offices or personnel shall be communicated promptly to the Department of Public Safety, 711 Serra Street, telephone 9-911 for emergency response or (650) 723-9633 during normal business hours.

Emergency Services Available to Victims

Victims of sexual assault are urged to seek immediate attention from emergency police, medical, and counseling services. On the Stanford campus and in the immediate vicinity, the following provide 24-hour response and will arrange for police assistance, medical assistance, emotional support services, and advocacy and support:

  • "911" Emergency Network: dial 9-911 from University phones or 911 from outside phones

  • Santa Clara Valley Medical Center, 751 South Bascom Avenue, San Jose, telephone (408) 885-5000

  • YWCA Stanford Hotline, for students, telephone (650) 725-9955

  • Stanford Hospital and Clinics, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, telephone (650) 723-5111

  • Residence and Graduate Life Deans, page through 723-8222, extension 25085

Non-Emergency Resources

Office of Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse Education & Response (SARA) (725-1056) provides comprehensive and consistent response to incidents of sexual and relationship violence to the campus community. SARA provides case consultation to students and staff, case management for reported assaults and information and referrals to services on and off campus. The office also assists with educational outreach and training to increase awareness, sensitivity, and community accountability in the prevention of these acts. Online information is available at the Sexual Assault & Relationship Abuse Education & Response (SARA) web site.

Additional resources for students are available at Vaden Health Service at (650) 723-3785, including short-term counseling, referral to long-term therapy, follow-up pregnancy testing, and testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases. Additional services for faculty and staff are available at the University's HELP Center, Galvez House (723-4577), including general counseling, information, support, and referral. The University ombuds (723-3682) is available to all in the Stanford community for general counseling, advice, and advocacy. Chrstine Criswell, Title IX Coordinator, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford CA, 94305-8230, (650) 497-4955, (650) 497-9257, titleix@stanford.eduhttps://titleix.stanford.edu/, is available to assist students to address the effects of sexual harassment and sexual violence

Confidentiality of Information

The University will make reasonable and appropriate efforts to preserve an individual's privacy and protect the confidentiality of information. However, because of laws relating to reporting and other state and federal laws, the University cannot guarantee confidentiality to those who report incidents of sexual violence except where those reports are privileged communications with those in legally protected roles (set forth below). The professional being consulted should, if possible, make these limits clear before any disclosure of facts.

An individual can speak confidentially with certain individuals in legally protected roles. They include sexual assault counselors such as those at the YWCA Sexual Assault Center at Stanford, the Help Center, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and clergy. Exceptions to maintaining confidentiality are set by law; for example, physicians and nurses who treat any physical injury sustained during a sexual assault are required to report it to law enforcement. In addition, physicians, nurses, psychologists, psychiatrists, teachers and social workers must report a sexual assault committed against a person under age 18.

Information shared with other individuals is not legally protected from being disclosed. Considerations with respect to a complainant’s request for confidentiality include factors such as the University’s ability to respond effectively, to prevent further harassment or to ensure the safety of the University community. For example, an advisor, the Dean of Student Life, a Residence Dean or a Resident Assistant may need to inform other individuals to protect their safety or rights, in fairness to the persons involved, or in response to legal requirements. As required by law, all disclosures to any University employee of an on-campus sexual assault must be reported for statistical purposes only (without personal identifiers) to the Stanford University Department of Public Safety, which has the responsibility for tabulating and annually publishing sexual assault and other crime statistics. Such reports are for statistical purposes and do not include individual identities.

State law permits law enforcement authorities to keep confidential the identity of a person officially reporting a sexual assault. The Stanford University Department of Public Safety policy is to maintain such confidentiality. However, if the District Attorney files a criminal charge, confidentiality might not be maintained.

If a complaint is filed with the Office of Judicial Affairs then the accused student must be provided with the name of the alleged victim and witnesses, if applicable. However, accommodations can be made to protect the victim’s privacy, as described on the website for the Office of Judicial Affairs.

Information about Options

The University offices responding to allegations of sexual misconduct or sexual assault will inform affected individuals, at a minimum, of the options of: criminal prosecution, civil prosecution, the disciplinary process, the appropriate Title IX grievance procedure, alternative housing assignments, and academic assistance alternatives.

Political Activities

For the complete text of the currently applicable version of this policy, see Administrative Guide Memo 1.5.1 Political Activities.

Summary

The following summarizes the policy on Political Actvities:

Stanford University, as a charitable entity, is subject to federal, state, and local laws and regulations regarding political activities: campaign activities, lobbying, and the giving of gifts to public officials.

While all members of the University community are naturally free to express their political opinions and engage in political activities to whatever extent they wish, it is very important that they do so only in their individual capacities and avoid even the appearance that they are speaking or acting for the University in political matters.

In the limited circumstances where individuals must speak or act on behalf of the University in the political arena, they must do so in accordance with the provisions of this Guide Memo.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

  1. Summary of Legal Requirements and Restrictions

    1. Campaign Activities: contributions of money, goods, or services to candidates for political office and in support of or opposition to ballot measure campaigns are subject to a wide variety of political laws. Depending on the jurisdiction and the campaign, political contributions may be prohibited or limited and, in nearly all cases, are subject to a complicated series of disclosure rules. Because of the University's tax-exempt status, the University is legally prohibited from endorsing candidates for political office or making any contribution of money, goods, or services to candidates. It is important, therefore, that no person inadvertently cause the University to make such a contribution.

    2. Lobbying: lobbying can generally be described as any attempt to influence the action of any legislative body (for example, Congress, state legislatures, county boards, city councils, and their staffs) or any federal, state, or local government agency. Laws regulating lobbying exist at the federal, state, and local levels but can differ widely in scope, depending on the jurisdiction. Some laws, for example, only regulate lobbying of the legislative branch. Others, however, also cover lobbying of administrative agencies and officers in the executive branch (for example, lobbying for federally-funded grants). To one degree or another, however, most lobbying laws require registration and reporting by individuals engaged in attempts to influence governmental action.

      Tax-exempt organizations are permitted to lobby, and the University engages in lobbying on a limited number of issues, mostly those affecting education, research, and related activities. There is usually some threshold of time or money spent on lobbying that triggers registration and reporting requirements. Regardless of thresholds, however, no University employee—other than the following individuals, on matters under their jurisdiction—may lobby on behalf of the University without specific authorization:

      • President

      • Provost

      • Deans of the Seven Schools

      • Vice Provost and Dean of Research

      • Vice President for Business Affairs and Chief Financial Officer

      • Executive Director of Human Resources

      • Director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

      • Director of the Hoover Institution

      • General Counsel

      • Vice President for Public Affairs

        The Vice Provost and Dean of Research may grant permission to faculty members to lobby on behalf of the University for specific purposes. The Director of Government and Community Relations may grant permission to staff members to lobby on behalf of the University for specific purposes. All lobbying on behalf of the University should be coordinated with the Director of Government and Community Relations.

    3. Giving of Gifts to Public Officials and Staff: almost all jurisdictions have strict rules on the extent to which gifts and honoraria may be given to public officials (both elected and non-elected officials and, often, staff). In some cases gifts and honoraria are prohibited; in others they are limited; and in most cases they are subject to detailed disclosure. In addition, in some jurisdictions such as California, gifts to both state and local public officials can result in a public official's disqualification from participation in any governmental action affecting the interests of the donor. Meals, travel, and entertainment are the most common types of gifts, but gift rules can also apply in cases where public officials attend a reception or receive tickets to sporting or other events.

      As a non-profit organization, the University generally does not give gifts to public officials and, in those limited cases where it does give such gifts, it must do so in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations. Therefore, any University employee who, on behalf of the University, wishes to make a gift to a public official must receive prior approval from the Director of Government and Community Relations before making such a gift.

    4. Reporting of Political Activities: the University must report most of its political activities above certain thresholds. Therefore, any University employee engaging in such activities on behalf of the University should carefully review the remainder of this Guide Memo and should discuss the relevant activities in advance with the Director of Government and Community Relations.

  2. Prohibited and Restricted Political Activities

    1. In General:

      1. No person may, on behalf of the University, engage in any political activity in support of or opposition to any candidate for elective public office (including giving or receiving funds or endorsements), nor shall any University resources be used for such purpose.

      2. No person may, on behalf of the University, lobby (or use University resources to lobby) any federal, state, or local legislative or administrative official or staff member unless specifically authorized to do so. Any lobbying activity, even when authorized, must be conducted in compliance with this Guide Memo, other applicable University policies, and applicable law.

      3. No person may, on behalf of the University, give a gift (or use any University resources to give a gift) to any federal, state, or local official or staff member, except in compliance with this Guide Memo, other applicable University policies, and applicable law.

      4. No person supporting candidates for public office or engaging in other political activities may use University space or facilities or receive University support, except in the limited ways described in section 3A, below.

      5. No person may use for lobbying activities federally-funded contract or grant money received by the University.

        Even the foregoing activities that are only restricted, rather than prohibited, may be subject to limitations imposed by law. Therefore, any person engaging in the activity, or contemplating doing so, should consult with the Director of Government and Community Relations.

    2. Guidelines for Avoiding Prohibited Partisan Political Activities: the following guidelines should assist in preventing the involvement or apparent involvement of the University in political activities in support of or opposition to any candidate for elective public office, that is, partisan political activities. Except in the limited circumstances set forth in section 3.b., below:

      1. Use of Name and Seal: neither the name nor seal of the University or of any of its schools, departments, or institutions should be used on letters or other materials intended for partisan political purposes.

      2. Use of Address and Telephones: no University office should be used as a return mailing address for partisan political mailings, and telephone service that is paid by the University, likewise, should not be used for partisan political purposes. (Obviously, a student's dormitory room and telephone service that are personal to the student may be used for these purposes.)

      3. Use of Title: the University title of a faculty or staff member or other person should be used only for identification and should be accompanied by a statement that the person is speaking as an individual and not as a representative of the University.

      4. Use of Services and Equipment: University services, such as Interdepartmental Mail; equipment, such as duplicating machines, computers, and telephones; and supplies should not be used for partisan political purposes.

      5. Use of Personnel: no University employee may, as part of his or her job, be requested to perform tasks in any way related to partisan political purposes.

  3. Permissible Activities

    1. In General: as noted above, the federal, state, and local laws which limit the partisan political activities that can take place in University facilities and with University support in no way inhibit the expression of personal political views by any individual in the University community. Nor do they forbid faculty, students, or staff from joining with others in support of candidates for office or in furtherance of political causes. There is no restriction on discussion of political issues or teaching of political techniques. Academic endeavors which address public policy issues are in no way affected.

      Because the University encourages freedom of expression, political activities which do not reasonably imply University involvement or identification may be undertaken so long as regular University procedures are followed for use of facilities. Examples of permissible activities are:

      1. Use of areas, such as White Plaza, for tables, speeches, and similar activities.

      2. Use of auditoriums for speeches by political candidates, but subject to rules of the Internal Revenue Service, the Federal Election Commission, and the California Fair Political Practices Commission, and other applicable laws. Arrangements must be made with University Events and Services. (See also Guide Memo 82.1, Public Events, for more information.)

        To reiterate, because tax and political compliance laws impose restrictions, and even prohibitions, on certain political activities and on the use of buildings and equipment at a non-profit institution such as the University, any such activities must be in compliance with these legal requirements. Individuals taking political positions for themselves or groups with which they are associated, but not as representatives of the University, should clearly indicate, by words and actions, that their positions are not those of the University and are not being taken in an official capacity on behalf of the University.

    2. Limited University Political Activities: limited activities relating to specific federal, state, or local legislation or ballot initiatives are permissible where (1) the subject matter is directly related to core interests of the University's activities; (2) the President has determined that the University should take a position; and (3) the individuals who speak or write on the University's behalf are specifically authorized to do so.

  4. Responsibility for Interpretation: the Director of Government and Community Relations, in consultation with the General Counsel, is the administrative officer responsible for interpretation and application of the above guidelines. Questions on whether planned student activities are consistent with the University's obligations should be directed to the Dean of Students, who will consult with the Director of Government and Community Relations and/or the General Counsel. All other questions on whether planned activities are consistent with the University's obligations should be addressed directly to the Director of Government and Community Relations or the General Counsel.

Campus Disruptions

The University's policy on campus disruption applies to students, faculty, and staff. It is published in its complete form on the Office of the General Counsel web site.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

Because the rights of free speech and peaceable assembly are fundamental to the democratic process, Stanford firmly supports the rights of all members of the University community to express their views or to protest against actions and opinions with which they disagree.

All members of the University also share a concurrent obligation to maintain on the campus an atmosphere conducive to scholarly pursuits, to preserve the dignity and seriousness of University ceremonies and public exercises, and to respect the rights of all individuals.

The following regulations are intended to reconcile these objectives.

It is a violation of University policy for a member of the faculty, staff, or student body to:

  1. prevent or disrupt the effective carrying out of a University function or approved activity, such as lectures, meetings, interviews, ceremonies, the conduct of University business in a University office, and public events.

  2. obstruct the legitimate movement of any person about the campus or in any University building or facility.

Members of the faculty, staff, and student body have an obligation to leave a University building or facility when asked to do so in the furtherance of the above sections by a member of the University community acting in an official role and identifying himself or herself as such; members of the faculty, staff, or student body also have an obligation to identify themselves, when requested to do so by such a member of the University community who has reasonable grounds to believe that the person(s) has violated section (1) or (2) of this policy and who has so informed the person(s).

The policy has been applied to the following actions: refusal to leave a building  which has been declared closed; obstructing the passage into  or out of buildings  by  sitting  in  front  of doorways; preventing University  employees from entering their workplace; preventing members of a class from hearing a lecture or taking  an examination, or preventing the instructor from  giving  a lecture, by means of shouts, interruptions,  or chants; refusing  to leave a closed meeting when unauthorized  to attend; and intruding  upon or refusing to leave a private interview.

It  should be understood that while  the above are examples of extraordinarily  disruptive  behavior, the application  of the Policy also takes situational  factors into  consideration. Thus, for  example, conduct appropriate at a political  rally  might  constitute a violation  of the Policy on Campus Disruption  if  it occurred within  a classroom.

Students found responsible for violating the Fundamental Standard in connection with this policy are subject to University discipline.

Use of the Main Quadrangle and Memorial Court

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

The Main Quadrangle and Memorial Court are part of Stanford University's academic preserve due to their locations at the heart of the campus. To protect and enhance their historic status, University policy limits activities primarily to established or traditional ceremonies and events.

To schedule an event, approval must be obtained in advance from the Office of Stanford Events (see below). Unscheduled events, protests, or activities are prohibited.

Requests for waivers to this policy must be submitted in advance and in writing to the Office of Stanford Events. Exceptions may be granted only in extraordinary cases.

Resources

The following is a summary of resources available:

For instructions on use of the Main Quadrangle/Memorial Court, contact the Office of Special Events and Protocol (OSEP) at (650) 724-1387, or at the OSEP web site.

Note: White Plaza is made available to Stanford students, faculty, and staff for events other than scheduled "established or traditional ceremonies and events" including those that may involve amplified sound. For further information on the use of such other venues, students should contact Student Activities and Leadership (SAL) at (650) 723-2733, or at the SAL web site. Faculty and staff should contact the Office of Special Events and Protocol (OSEP).

Oval Policy

The Oval is considered to be the initial and official visual entrance to the Stanford University campus. Given this historic and aesthetic status, it is in the best interests of the University community and visiting members of the public to maintain its open and pristine space, to help preserve its natural beauty and environmental integrity. The Oval also presents the formal academic image of the University, leading directly to departments, classrooms and other academic space, and faculty and graduate student offices, and thus is subject to the University's Noise Policy.

The University prohibits formal or informal events of any kind to take place in the Oval. Gatherings of Stanford students, faculty, and staff such as demonstrations, rallies, or dances may take place in White Plaza, which can be reserved through the Office of Student Activities. Weddings also are not allowed in the Oval but are in certain circumstances allowed in Memorial Church (refer to Memorial Church wedding ceremony guidelines).

The Oval is considered a pedestrian zone and appropriate use of its space includes walking, running, reading, relaxing, and other limited recreational use of the lawn area (such as quiet, very small picnics and Frisbee), unless or until such use damages or otherwise harms the property.

Cooking food or use of any grill/barbecue or open flame is strictly prohibited. Fireworks or the use of other incendiary devices represent a safety hazard to the area and are therefore prohibited. Amplified sound from items such as boom boxes, musical instruments, or the use of bullhorns or amplified speakers is also prohibited. Only authorized Stanford service vehicles are permitted inside the Oval areas.

As the official entrance to the University, the Oval offers public access to general parking spaces in the marked areas surrounding the outer perimeter of the Oval; drivers are expected to obey all traffic signs and limitations. Buses are subject to additional restrictions.

For further information regarding this policy, contact the Executive Director of Special Events and Protocol, 724-1387 or see the Office of Special Events & Protocol web site.

Noise and Amplified Sound

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

Stanford is not only an academic institution but a residential community as well. It is the responsibility of all faculty, students, and staff to moderate noise especially during an event or activity held on campus. Supporting the mission of the University and respecting those who are studying, researching, or otherwise carrying out academic-related activities is a Stanford priority. The campus must require a conducive atmosphere to ensure these endeavors are accomplished and supported. Disturbing noise in or around a residence or other campus buildings which infringe on the rights of other residents or members of the University community is considered a violation of this policy. As part of the event planning process, the event sponsor must obtain all appropriate approvals regarding the use of amplified sound during an event or activity.

Resources

Information regarding whether and how the use of amplified sound is permitted is available from the following sources, which must be consulted for prior approval:

  1. The Office of Student Activities: phone: 723-2733, or see http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/sal/policies/noise

  2. Registrar's Scheduling Office: email reg-events@stanford.edu, or see http://studentaffairs.stanford.edu/registrar/faculty/events.

  3. Office of Special Events and Protocol (OSEP) at (650) 724-1387, or see http://stanfordevents.stanford.edu.

Prohibition of the Possession of Dangerous Weapons on Campus

The University's policy prohibiting weapons on campus is published in its complete form on the Office of Community Standards web site.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

Except for authorized academic purposes, the knowing possession by any student on any Stanford campus of the following is prohibited: firearms, explosives, ammunition, or any instrument or weapon of the kind commonly known as blackjack, slingshot, billy club, sandclub, sandbag, or metal knuckles.

Notwithstanding the paragraph above, a student who is a resident of a Stanford campus may store a weapon on such campus if both of the following conditions are met:

  1. The student has complied with all state and federal regulations regarding the use and possession of said weapon, or, in the case of a foreign campus, with the laws of the country in which the campus is located.

  2. The student stores such weapons with the Stanford Department of Public Safety (SDPS) or, in the case of a foreign campus, in a facility provided by the director of such campus.

Students may remove their weapons from storage only in accordance with regulations established by the SDPS or by the director of the foreign campus at which the weapon is stored. A student who is a resident of a Stanford campus may bring any of the above weapons on campus for purposes of storage only if the student has previously notified the SDPS of the intention to do so, but in no event more than six hours after arrival on the campus. When the student removes the weapon from storage, it must be taken off campus as soon as is practicable, but in no event more than one hour after such removal.

The term "Stanford campus" shall include all the lands and facilities of Leland Stanford Junior University, whether owned or leased, and whether located in the United States or abroad.

Student Alcohol Policy

This document clarifies the University's expectations and approach related to the use of alcohol by students. The University's Controlled Substances and Alcohol Policy is also applicable. The full text is contained in the Controlled Substance and Alcohol policy.

Preamble

The Fundamental Standard has set the standard of conduct for students at Stanford since 1896. It states: "Students at Stanford are expected to show both within and without the University such respect for order, morality, personal honor and the rights of others as is demanded of good citizens." Implicit in the Standard is the understanding that students are responsible for making their own decisions and accepting the consequences of those decisions.

The University is committed to the health, safety and well-being of each member of the Stanford community. In order to further student learning, development and success and to promote the University's academic mission, Stanford fosters an environment of personal and collective responsibility and respectful citizenship. This means that all members of the university community—students, faculty and staff—have a role in safeguarding a healthy learning environment free of the consequences of alcohol misuse. The University also strives to create a culture that supports students who do not use alcohol and students who use alcohol in a safe, legal and responsible fashion.

Legal Background

Members of the Stanford community are expected to abide by all federal, state and local laws, including those governing alcohol consumption and distribution. Under California law, it is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to purchase alcohol or to possess alcohol in a public space. It is also illegal for anyone to furnish alcohol to an individual under the age of 21. Other state laws governing the use of alcohol are listed below.

While it is not the responsibility of most Stanford officials to enforce state law, it is the responsibility of the University's Department of Public Safety, and accordingly they enforce all state alcohol laws when they encounter violations. All community members should understand the law and, as individuals, ensure that they themselves do not violate it.

In addition, it is the responsibility of all community members to ensure that the University does not, through their actions, violate the law. Accordingly, official University functions, including events held by registered student groups, are not allowed to provide alcohol to those under 21, and no University funds may be used to purchase alcohol for that purpose. Violations of this requirement can result in both criminal prosecution and University administrative action, including dismissal from the University.

Responsible Alcohol Use

Stanford students are expected to behave responsibly, both in the classroom and outside, both on campus and off. In particular, the University does not tolerate reckless drinking and its consequent harmful behaviors. The University is especially concerned about the misuse of distilled alcohol products ("hard alcohol"), and the dangers that arise from that misuse.

All students should understand the physical and behavioral effects of alcohol misuse, and should avoid such misuse themselves. In addition, they are expected to do their part to ensure the safety of fellow students whom they perceive to be engaged in reckless drinking behavior or to be suffering from its consequences.

The University provides educational resources to assure that students understand the effects of alcohol misuse and know how to respond when they perceive others to be engaged in dangerous behavior.

Reckless drinking and encouraging reckless drinking are violations of University policy, and may be subject to disciplinary action. Extreme or repeated violations may result in dismissal from the University.

More generally, students are expected to make legal, healthy, responsible choices concerning their personal use of alcohol and the University supports them in this endeavor through education and other resources. The University sponsors activities and programs focused on students who choose not to drink or to drink lightly, as well as resources and services to assist students who need help for themselves or others related to alcohol use.

Authority, Application, and Enforcement

Responsibility for application of the Student Alcohol Policy resides with the Vice Provost for Student Affairs. The Office of Alcohol Policy and Education reports to the Vice Provost for Student Affairs and is expected to coordinate and implement alcohol programs. (The University's Controlled Substances and Alcohol Policy is also applicable. The full text is contained at the Controlled Substances and Alcohol web site.

The Stanford University Department of Public Safety enforces federal, state and local laws among students, other community members, guests and visitors.

Alcohol Policy Violations

The Office of Alcohol Policy and Education will work with the following offices to address violations of the University's alcohol policy as determined by the specifics of each situation.

Violations may be referred to the Office of Judicial Affairs (for individual students) and the Organization Conduct Board (for student groups). The Dean of Student Life may take action as well in certain circumstances.

Getting Help: Resources Available to Students

Students have access to a variety of University resources.

Additional University Regulations

Other restrictions apply to particular circumstances

  • Frosh Housing—Alcoholic beverages are prohibited at all-frosh house events in common area spaces.

  • University Funds and the Purchase of Alcohol—No University funds or funds collected by the University may be used in a way that violates the alcohol policy. In student residences, house funds (funds collected by Student Financial Services or other University offices) may not be used to buy alcohol. Any decision to use student-collected funds to buy alcohol must be made lawfully, thoughtfully, fairly and in a way that respects the views of all students. Students must not be required to contribute to the purchase of alcohol.

  • Dining Hall—Students may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages in Stanford Dining Halls during meal times and food service. University Dining staff can deny admission, access or meal service to anyone who is believed to be intoxicated by the Dining Management staff.

  • White Plaza—Alcoholic beverages in White Plaza are prohibited.

  • End of Quarter Period and Finals Week—No registered parties (with or without alcohol) can occur during the End of the Quarter Period (dead week) or Finals Week.

  • Athletic Facilities—No alcohol is permitted inside Stanford athletic facilities public spaces during athletic events.

  • Stanford Conferences and University Facilities—The University requires that event sponsors and student groups wishing to offer alcoholic beverages at their programs and events operate within state and local laws as provided by the Department of Alcohol and Beverage Control (ABC). Alcohol service is not allowed in classrooms.

  • Admit Weekend—Stanford students are prohibited from providing, serving or in anyway making alcohol available to any prospective frosh (ProFro). All student groups/organizations and residences may host only alcohol-free parties or events during Admit Weekend. This specifically means that no alcohol is to be present, served or consumed at any student group/organization and/or dorm function during Admit Weekend.

  • New Student Orientation (NSO) Period—At no time should any Stanford student provide, serve or in any way make alcohol available to any new, incoming undergraduate student (freshman or transfer). All undergraduate student groups/organizations and residences will host only alcohol-free parties or events during Orientation. This specifically means that no alcohol is to be present, served, or consumed at any student group/organization and/or dorm function during NSO.

California State Laws

Students should be familiar with California laws governing the consumption of alcohol. The following summarizes those laws most relevant to individuals.

  • It is illegal for persons under the age of 21 to possess an alcoholic beverage in any public place or any place open to the public (CA Business and Professions Code 25662).

  • Any person who furnishes, gives or sells any alcoholic beverage to someone under the age of 21 is guilty of a misdemeanor (CA Business and Professions Code 25658(a)).

  • Any person under the age of 21 who attempts to purchase an alcoholic beverage is guilty of an infraction (CA Business and Professions Code 25658.5).

  • Any person under the influence of alcohol in a public place and unable to exercise care for one's own safety or that of others is guilty of a misdemeanor (CA Penal Code 647(f)).

  • It is illegal for persons to operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicants or with a blood alcohol level of .08% or higher (CA Vehicle Code Section 23152). NOTE: A golf cart is a motor vehicle.

  • It is unlawful for a person under the age of 21 years who has 0.05 percent or more, by weight, of alcohol in his or her blood to drive a vehicle (CA Vehicle Code Section 23140(a)).

  • It is illegal for a person under the age of 21 to drive a vehicle when he or she has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .01% or higher (CA Vehicle Code Section 23136).

  • It is a misdemeanor to ride a bicycle under the influence of alcohol, drugs or both (CA Vehicle Code Section 21200.5).

  • It is an infraction to possess an open container of an alcoholic beverage while in a motor vehicle (CA Vehicle Code Section 23223).

  • It is an infraction for an owner or driver of a motor vehicle to allow an open container of alcohol in the passenger area (CA Vehicle Code Section 23225).

Hazing Policy

Hazing is not permitted at Stanford University. No individual, recognized student organization, club, team, or any other Stanford-affiliated student group is permitted to plan, engage in, or condone hazing, on or off the Stanford campus.

Definition of Hazing at Stanford University

Hazing includes any activity done in connection with a student organization, regardless of whether the organization is officially recognized at Stanford, that causes or is reasonably likely to cause another student to suffer bodily danger, physical harm, or significant personal degradation or humiliation, even if no bodily danger, physical harm, or significant degradation or humiliation in fact results. Hazing might occur during initiation or pre-initiation into a student organization, but is not limited to these time frames. Any individual who plans or intentionally assists in hazing activity has engaged in hazing, regardless of whether that individual is present when the hazing activity occurs.

Consequences of a Violation

Stanford University expects its students to conduct themselves in socially responsible and respectful ways. Thus, participation in hazing, either as an individual or as part of any student group, may result in serious individual and organizational consequences including, but not limited to: disciplinary action up to and including expulsion; permanent loss of organizational recognition; and loss of eligibility to remain a member of any club, team, or other Stanford-affiliated student group. Consent, implied or expressed, is not a defense to any complaint or charge alleging a hazing violation.

A number of University offices may take institutional action, including: the Organizational Conduct Board; Judicial Affairs; or other University offices, such as the Vice Provost for Student Affairs or the Department of Athletics.

Applications

Stanford's hazing policy is distinct from and broader than California Penal Code section 245.6, which prohibits: "any method of initiation or preinitiation into a student organization or student body, whether or not the organization or body is officially recognized by an educational institution, which is likely to cause serious bodily injury to any former, current, or prospective student of any school, community college, college, university or other educational institution in this state." A violation of Penal Code Section 245.6 that does not result in serious bodily injury is punishable as a misdemeanor, while a violation that results in death or injury is punishable as a felony or a misdemeanor.

Nothing in this hazing policy prevents Stanford from taking institutional action against hazing activity that falls outside the narrower definition of Penal Code section 245.6.

Stanford's hazing policy is not intended to prohibit student recruitment or new or continuing member activities that are positive and educational in nature, designed to instill a group ethos or unity. Its intent is to deter those behaviors that cause or are likely to cause danger, harm or humiliation to another student.

Stanford's hazing policy is not intended to apply to customary athletic events or other similar institutionally-approved contests or competitions.

Questions should be directed to the Office of Student Activities, (650) 723-2733.

Smoke-Free Environment

The University's policy on a smoke-free environment is published in its complete form in the Administrative Guide Memo 2.2.6 Smoke-Free Environment.

Applicability—This policy applies to all academic and administrative units of Stanford University, including the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, and all campus student housing. This policy does not supersede more restrictive policies which may be in force in compliance with federal, state, or local laws or ordinances.

Note also that the School of Medicine has adopted a more restrictive policy; seethe Tobacco-free Campus Policy.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

  1. Policy

    It is the policy of Stanford University that the smoking of tobacco products in enclosed buildings and facilities and during indoor or outdoor events (and the selling of tobacco products) on the campus is prohibited.

  2. Guidelines

    1. Smoking-Prohibited Areas—Specifically, smoking is prohibited in classrooms and offices, all enclosed buildings and facilities, in covered walkways, in University vehicles, during indoor and outdoor athletic events, and during other University sponsored or designated indoor or outdoor events.

      1. Ashtrays will not be provided in any enclosed University building or facility.

      2. "Smoking Prohibited" signs will be posted.

    2. Outdoor Smoking Areas—Smoking is permitted in outdoor areas, except during organized events. Outdoor smoking areas should be located far enough away from doorways, open windows, covered walkways, and ventilation systems to prevent smoke from entering enclosed buildings and facilities. To accommodate faculty, staff, and students who smoke, Vice Presidents, Vice Provosts, and Deans may designate certain areas of existing courtyards and patios as smoking areas in which case ashtrays must be provided. Costs associated with providing designated smoking areas and ashtrays will be absorbed by the specific academic or administrative unit(s).

  3. Enforcement—This policy relies on the consideration and cooperation of smokers and non-smokers. It is the responsibility of all members of the University community to observe and follow this policy and its guidelines.

    1. Smoking Cessation Information—Smoking cessation programs are available for faculty and staff through the Center for Research in Disease Prevention, and the Health Improvement Program (HIP). Students may contact the Health Promotion Program (HPP) through the Student Health Center for smoking cessation information or programs.

    2. Repeated Violations—Faculty, staff, and students repeatedly violating this policy may be subject to appropriate action to correct any violation(s) and prevent future occurrences.

  4. Implementation and Distribution—Copies of this policy will be disseminated by the Manager of HR Policy/Staff and Labor Relations and the Vice Provost for Student Affairs to all faculty, staff, and students, and to all new members of the University community.

Visitor Policy/University Statement on Privacy

Stanford University has an interest in ensuring that the privacy of its students, faculty, and staff is respected, and that no activities interfere with education, research, or residential life.

The University is private property; however, some areas of the campus typically are open to visitors. These areas include White Plaza, public eating areas (such as those at Tresidder Union), outdoor touring areas, and locations to which the public has been invited by advertised notice (such as for public educational, cultural, or athletic events). Even in these locations, visitors must not interfere with the privacy of students, faculty, and staff, or with educational, research, and residential activities. The University may revoke at any time permission to be present in these, or any other areas. Visitors should not be in academic or residential areas unless they have been invited for appropriate business or social purposes by the responsible faculty member, student, or staff member.

No commercial activity, including taking photos or similar audio or visual recordings that are sold to others or otherwise used for commercial purposes, may occur on the campus without the University's permission. Requests for permission should be submitted to the Director of University Communications or, as appropriate, the Dean of Students, the Department of Athletics, or the Office of Public Events. Recognized student groups and official units of the University will be granted such permission so long as they do not violate privacy or property interests of others; so long as any sale of their products is predominantly on campus to students, faculty, and staff; and so long as they comply with applicable University policies and procedures.

Violaters of this policy may be subject to criminal and/or civil liability, as well as University disciplinary action.

Computer and Network Usage

For a complete text of the currently applicable version of this policy, see Administrative Guide Memo 6.2.1 Computer and Network Usage Policy.

Policy

The following is quoted from the policy:

Users of Stanford network and computer resources have a responsibility not to abuse the network and resources. This policy provides guidelines for the appropriate and inappropriate use of information technologies.

Summary

The following summarizes the policy on Computer and Network Usage:

In particular, the policy provides that users of University information resources must respect software copyrights and licenses, respect the integrity of computer-based information resources, refrain from seeking to gain or permitting others to gain unauthorized access, including by sharing passwords, and respect the rights of other computer users.

This policy covers appropriate use of computers, networks, and information contained therein. As to political, personal and commercial use, the University is a non-profit, tax-exempt organization and, as such, is subject to specific federal, state, and local laws regarding sources of income, political activities, use of property, and similar matters. It also is a contractor with government and other entities, and thus must assure proper use of property under its control and allocation of overhead and similar costs. For these reasons, University information resources must not be used for partisan political activities where prohibited by federal, state, or other applicable laws, and may be used for other political activities only when in compliance with federal, state, and other laws, and in compliance with applicable University policies. Similarly, University information resources should not be used for personal activities not related to appropriate University functions, except in a purely incidental manner. In addition, University information resources should not be used for commercial purposes, except in a purely incidental manner or except as permitted under other written policies of the University or with the written approval of a University officer having the authority to give such approval. Any such commercial use should be properly related to University activities, take into account proper cost allocations for government and other overhead determinations, and provide for appropriate reimbursement to the University for taxes and other costs the University may incur by reason of the commercial use. Users also are reminded that the .edu domain on the Internet has rules restricting or prohibiting commercial use, and thus activities not appropriately within the .edu domain and which otherwise are permissible within the University computing resources should use one or more other domains, as appropriate.

The University's Information Security Officer is authorized in appropriate circumstances to inspect or monitor private data (including email), such as when there is a reasonable cause to suspect improper use of computer or network resources.

For further information on the topic of peer-to-peer file sharing, see the section above on Copyright.

Protection of Sensitive Data

Stanford University maintains sensitive non-public data protected by laws and agreements, including Social Security numbers, financial information, health information, and student records. It is incumbent on every member of the Stanford community with access to such data to be familiar with and abide by Stanford's data classifications requirements provided at the Data Classification, Access, Transmittal and Storage web site. Members of the Stanford community should also familiarize themselves with applicable laws and University policies on privacy as provided by the University, including Administrative Guide Memos 6.3.1 Information Security, 6.4.1 Identification and Authentication Systems, 6.6.1 Information Security Incident Response, and 3.4.2 Card and Payment Account Acceptance and Processing. For information on best practices for securing mobile computing devices, see the Guidelines for Securing Mobile Computing Devices web site.

Campus Safety and Criminal Statistics

Stanford University complies with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Crime Statistics Act. A copy of Stanford's policies and statistics under this act are posted on the Department of Public Safety web site. A paper copy can be obtained by calling the Stanford Department of Public Safety at (650) 723-9633.