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PUBLPOL 101. Politics and Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 201

PUBLPOL 103C. Justice. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Same as: ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 307

PUBLPOL 103D. Ethics and Politics of Public Service. 3-5 Units.

Ethical and political questions in public service work, including volunteering, service learning, humanitarian assistance, and public service professions such as medicine and teaching. Motives and outcomes in service work. Connections between service work and justice. Is mandatory service an oxymoron? History of public service in the U.S. Issues in crosscultural service work. Integration with the Haas Center for Public Service to connect service activities and public service aspirations with academic experiences at Stanford.
Same as: CSRE 178, ETHICSOC 133, HUMBIO 178, PHIL 175A, PHIL 275A, POLISCI 133, URBANST 122

PUBLPOL 103E. Ethics on the Edge Public Policy Core Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar-style course will explore additional foundational readings on organizational ethics (business, non-profit, and governmental organizations) and policy ethics. Themes will include, among others: race and police brutality incidents; national security (including cyber threats); the Iran nuclear agreement; Brexit; non-profit organizations in the policy and US landscape; sexual harassment networks; and various corporate matters. Organizing themes include, among others: ethics of leadership; ethics of persuasion and compromise; influence of bias in organizational and policy ethics; ethics of social movements; discrepancies between discourse and action; emotion and ethics; and interpreting and explaining ethics. In addition, the course will offer training in a wide variety of skills for effective communication of ethics for policy purposes (developing succinct arguments, presentations, website discourse, commenting in meetings and conferences, interviews, statement of personal views, interacting with the media and social media, and mapping complex ethical analysis). Most of the assignments allow students flexibility to explore topics of their choice. The objective is to engage actively and improve skills in a supportive environment. A short, analytically rigorous final paper in lieu of final exam. Attendance required. Grading will be based on short assignments, class participation, and the short final paper. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. This three-credit seminar accompanies PUBLPOL 134 Ethics on the Edge but can also be taken as a stand-alone course. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements and students taking the course for Ways credit must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: PUBLPOL 203E

PUBLPOL 103F. Ethics of Truth in a Post-Truth World. 3 Units.

This course will explore changing notions of truth in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are blurring the boundaries of humanity and boring through traditional notions of nation states, institutions, and human identity. We will ask one over-arching question: does truth matter anymore? If so, why and how? If not, why not? Either way, how does truth relate to ethical decision-making by individuals and institutions and to an ethical society? Five themes will organize our exploration of more specific topics: honesty; identity; memory; authenticity and integrity; and religious truth. Examples of topics to be explored include, among others: fake news; President Trump's campaign strategy and presidency; Syrian refugees and the Rohingyas; University history (Rhodes, Georgetown slavery, Yale Calhoun College...); new questions in gender and racial identity; Chinese beautifying app Meitu and other social media "truth modifiers"; the sharing economy; the impact of compromised truth on history; and Brexit. Scotty McClennan will explore truth through major literary characters and the impact of religion on truth. We will consider how we determine and verify the truth; how we "do" truth; the role of truth in ethical decision-making; the importance of truth to effective ethical policy; and the relationship of the truth to a life well lived. An analytically rigorous short final paper in lieu of exam. This three-credit seminar may be taken as a stand-alone course or may accompany PUBLPOL 134 Ethics on the Edge. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. Enrollment limited to 15 or upon consent of instructor. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements and students taking the course for Ways credit must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: PUBLPOL 203F

PUBLPOL 104. Economic Policy Analysis. 4-5 Units.

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: ECON 150, PUBLPOL 204

PUBLPOL 105. Empirical Methods in Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

Methods of empirical analysis and applications in public policy. Emphasis on causal inference and program evaluation. Public policy applications include health, education, and labor. Assignments include hands-on data analysis, evaluation of existing literature, and a final research project. Objective is to obtain tools to 1) critically evaluate evidence used to make policy decisions and 2) perform empirical analysis to answer questions in public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102B. Enrollment is limited to Public Policy students. Public Policy students must take the course for a letter grade.
Same as: PUBLPOL 205

PUBLPOL 106. Law and Economics. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the role of law in promoting well-being (happiness). Law, among its other functions, can serve as a mechanism to harmonize private incentives with cooperative gains, to maintain an equitable division of those gains, and to deter "cheating" and dystopia. Law is thus essential to civilization. Economic analysis of law focuses on the welfare-enhancing incentive effects of law and its enforcement and on law's role in reducing the risks of cooperation, achieved by fixing expectations of what courts or the state will do in various futures. Prerequisite: ECON 51 or PUBLPOL 51.
Same as: ECON 154, PUBLPOL 206

PUBLPOL 107. Public Finance and Fiscal Policy. 5 Units.

What role should and does government play in the economy? What are the effects of government spending, borrowing, and taxation on efficiency, equity and economic stability and growth? The course covers economic, historical and statistical analyses and current policy debates in the U.S. and around the world. Policy topics: Fiscal crises, budget deficits, the national debt and intergenerational equity; tax systems and tax reform; social security and healthcare programs and reforms; transfers to the poor; public goods and externalities; fiscal federalism; public investment and cost-benefit analysis; and the political economy of government decision-making. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51), ECON 52 (can be taken concurrently).
Same as: ECON 141

PUBLPOL 111. Leadership Challenges. 4-5 Units.

This course will examine the responsibilities and challenges for those who occupy leadership roles in professional, business, non-profit, and academic settings. Topics will include characteristics and styles of leadership, organizational dynamics, forms of influence, decision making, diversity, social change, and ethical responsibilities. Class sessions will include visitors who have occupied prominent leadership roles. Readings will include excerpts of relevant research, problems, exercises, and case studies. Requirements will include class participation and short written weekly reflection papers (2 to 3 pages) on the assigned readings. The class will be capped at 50 students.
Same as: ETHICSOC 111

PUBLPOL 115. Practical Training. 1-5 Unit.

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.

PUBLPOL 118. Disasters, Decisions, Development in Sustainable Urban Systems. 3-5 Units.

CEE 224X of the CEE 224XYZ SUS Project series is joining forces with D3: Disasters, Decisions, Development to offer D3+SUS, which will connect principles of sustainable urban systems with the challenge of increasing resilience in the San Francisco Bay Area. The project-based learning course is designed to align with the Resilient By Design | Bay Area Challenge (http://www.resilientbayarea.org/); students will learn the basic concepts of resilience and tools of risk analysis while applying those mindsets and toolsets to a collective research product delivered to the RBD community. Students who take D3+SUS are encouraged to continue on to CEE 224Y and CEE 224Z, in which teams will be paired with local partners and will develop interventions to improve the resilience of local communities. For more information, visit http://sus.stanford.edu/courses.
Same as: ESS 118, ESS 218, GEOPHYS 118X, GEOPHYS 218X, GS 118, GS 218, POLISCI 224A

PUBLPOL 121L. Racial-Ethnic Politics in US. 5 Units.

This course examines various issues surrounding the role of race and ethnicity in the American political system. Specifically, this course will evaluate the development of racial group solidarity and the influence of race on public opinion, political behavior, the media, and in the criminal justice system. We will also examine the politics surrounding the Multiracial Movement and the development of racial identity and political attitudes in the 21st century. POLISCI 150A, STATS 60 or ECON 1 is strongly recommended.
Same as: CSRE 121L, POLISCI 121L

PUBLPOL 122. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response. 4-5 Units.

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Same as: BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 222

PUBLPOL 123. Thinking About War. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to the ideas, important writers, and policy decisions about warfare. Topics include: what causes wars, great strategists of warfare, whether nuclear weapons require different strategy than conventional war, fostering innovation, what creates stable peace, and what warfare feels like to those who fight it. Each class session is organized around a question; first half of each session will explore concepts, second half will apply them in a historical case or policy decision.
Same as: PUBLPOL 223

PUBLPOL 124. American Political Institutions in Uncertain Times. 5 Units.

This course examines how the rules that govern elections and the policy process determine political outcomes. It explores the historical forces that have shaped American political institutions, contemporary challenges to governing, and prospects for change. Topics covered include partisan polarization and legislative gridlock, the politicization of the courts, electoral institutions and voting rights, the expansion of presidential power, campaign finance and lobbying, representational biases among elected officials, and the role of political institutions in maintaining the rule of law. Throughout, emphasis will be placed on the strategic interactions between Congress, the presidency, and the courts and the importance of informal norms and political culture.
Same as: POLISCI 120C

PUBLPOL 126B. Curricular Public Policies for the Recognition of Afro-Brazilians and Indigenous Population. 3-4 Units.

Recently two laws in Brazil (10639/2003 and 13465/2008), which came about due to intense pressure from Black and Indigenous social movements throughout the 20th century, have introduced changes in public education curriculum policies. These new curriculum policies mandate that the study of Afro-Brazilian, African, and Indigenous histories and cultures must be taught at all educational levels including at the elementary, secondary, and post-secondary levels. As part of this mandate, educators are now directed to incorporate considerations of ethnic-racial diversity in relation to people's thinking and experiences. These policies aim to fight racism as well as other forms of discrimination, and moreover, encourage the building of more equitable pedagogies. This course will discuss past and current policies and practices in Brazilian education from the point of view of different social projects organized by Indigenous Peoples, Afro-Brazilians, Asian-Brazilians, as well as Euro-Brazilians. It will also focus on Latin American efforts to promote equity in education, as well as to articulate different points of view, and reinforce and build epistemologies that support the decolonization of thinking, behaviors, research and policies. As part of this process, the course will study the experiences of people demanding these new public policies in terms of the extent to which they were able to influence institutional structures and to establish particular policy reforms. The course will also analyze theoretical frameworks employed by opponents of these movements to resist policies that might challenge their privileged place in society. In doing this, the course will offer theoretical and methodological avenues to promote research that can counter hegemonic curricular policies and pedagogical practices. The course will be fully participatory and oriented towards generating ongoing conversations and discussion about the various issues that arose in Brazil in relation to these two recent laws. To meet these goals, we will do a close reading of relevant scholarly works, paying particular attention to their theoretical frameworks, research designs, and findings.
Same as: AFRICAAM 126B, CSRE 126B, EDUC 136B, EDUC 236B

PUBLPOL 129. Conversations on the Indian Economy. 1 Unit.

This course is intended to give students the opportunity to engage with Stanford faculty, across the University's different schools, who undertake research related to the modern Indian economy, including professors from the Humanities and Sciences, Engineering, GSB and schools of medicine, as well as from different research centers across the University. In addition, the course will feature conversations with several members of the Silicon Valley Community, as well as from India. The format is intended to promote discussion and debate, and to provide students an opportunity to learn about new developments and initiatives regarding India. Class meetings will be in the form of round-table interactions and exchanges.

PUBLPOL 132. The Politics of Policy Making. 3 Units.

Public policymaking in the United States is part of a political process that can take years or even decades to play out. A familiarity with the politics of policymaking is key to understanding why some reform attempts are successful while others are not. This course will give students a behind-the-scenes look at how policy actually gets made. Students will gain exposure to the theory and literature behind policy formulation, and engage in debates over historical and contemporary efforts at reform.
Same as: PUBLPOL 232

PUBLPOL 133. Political Power in American Cities. 5 Units.

The major actors, institutions, processes, and policies of sub-state government in the U.S., emphasizing city general-purpose governments through a comparative examination of historical and contemporary politics. Issues related to federalism, representation, voting, race, poverty, housing, and finances.
Same as: AMSTUD 121Z, POLISCI 121, URBANST 111

PUBLPOL 134. Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 7020) The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); designer genetics; social media ethics (e.g. Facebook and Russia and on-line sex trafficking); free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); artificial intelligence; Brexit; corporate and financial sector scandals (Epi pen pricing, hedge funds, Wells Fargo, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. should NGOs engage with ISIS). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. There will be a limited numbers of openings above the set enrollment limit of 40 students. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. The course offers credit toward Ethics in Society, Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with PUBLPOL 103E or PUBLPOL 103F), and Science, Technology and Society majors and satisfies the undergraduate Ways of Thinking requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: ETHICSOC 234R, PUBLPOL 234

PUBLPOL 135. Regional Politics and Decision Making in Silicon Valley and the Greater Bay Area. 4 Units.

Dynamics of regional leadership and decision making in Silicon Valley, a complex region composed of 40 cities and four counties without any overarching framework for governance. Formal and informal institutions shaping outcomes in the region. Case studies include transportation, workforce development, housing and land use, and climate change.

PUBLPOL 136. The Sharing Economy. 3 Units.

The rapid growth of the sharing economy, sometimes also called the peer to peer economy, is made possible by the ubiquity of smart phones, inefficiency of ownership, and measures designed to create and measure trust among participants. The course will explore not only the rapid rise of certain companies but also the shadow side of commercialized relationships. We will examine the economics and development consequences of the sharing economy, primarily with an urban focus, along an emphasis on the design of platforms and markets, ownership, the nature of work, environmental degradation and inequality.
Same as: URBANST 136

PUBLPOL 137. Innovations in Microcredit and Development Finance. 3 Units.

The role of innovative financial institutions in supporting economic development, the alleviation of rural and urban poverty, and gender equity. Analysis of the strengths and limits of commercial banks, public development banks, credit unions, and microcredit organizations both in the U.S. and internationally. Readings include academic journal articles, formal case studies, evaluations, and annual reports. Priority to students who have taken any portion of the social innovation series: URBANST 131, 132, or 133. Recommended: ECON 1A or 1B.
Same as: URBANST 137

PUBLPOL 14. Navigating Financial Crises in the Modern Global Economy. 1 Unit.

What causes financial crises? What are the keys to anticipating, preventing, and managing disruptions in the global financial system? This course prepares students to navigate future episodes as policymakers, finance professionals, and citizens by going inside the practical decisions made in an unfolding crisis, from the U.S. government and IMF to the boardroom and trading floor. Students will learn warning signs of distress; market structures that govern crisis dynamics; strategic interactions among the key actors; and lessons learned for creating a more resilient system. Concepts will be applied to real-world experiences in emerging market crises, the U.S. housing and global financial crisis, and the European sovereign crisis, as well as prospective risks from China's financial system and unwinding of extraordinary central bank stimulus.
Same as: ECON 14

PUBLPOL 143. Finance and Society for non-MBAs. 4 Units.

The financial system is meant to help people, businesses, and governments fund, invest, and manage risks, but it is rife with conflicts of interests and may allow people with more information and control to harm those with less of both. In this interdisciplinary course we explore the forces that shape the financial system and how individuals and society can benefit most from this system without being unnecessarily harmed and endangered. Topics include the basic principles of investment, the role and ¿dark side¿ of debt, corporations and their governance, banks and other financial institutions, why effective financial regulations are essential yet often fail, and political and ethical issues in finance. The approach will be rigorous and analytical but not overly technical mathematically. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Same as: ECON 143, MS&E 147, POLISCI 127A

PUBLPOL 144. Giving 2.0: Philanthropy by Design. 4 Units.

Seminar and practicum. Students drive an actual $10,000 philanthropic process and design their own social change strategy. Topics: strategic planning, nonprofit assessment and site visits, innovative social change models, and leadership development. Speakers include philanthropic leaders and social entrepreneurs. Class activities: group grant assessments and selection, creative problem solving, and decision-making simulations. Individual project: Social Impact Strategic Plan. Must attend first class; limited enrollment. Recommended: PUBPOL 183.

PUBLPOL 146. Policy, Politics, and the Presidency: Understanding the 2016 Campaign from Start to Finish. 2 Units.

(Same as LAW 7057). In 2016, Americans will once again go to the polls to select a new president. But what will actually happen behind-the-scenes between now and then is largely a mystery to most. This course will introduce students to the nuts-and-bolts of a presidential campaign. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to running for the presidency -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature high-profile guest speakers who have served in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Students, guests, and faculty will also participate in discussions on how these topics will relate to the 2016 presidential contest, which will begin in earnest over the course of the quarter.
Same as: COMM 153A, COMM 253A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 246

PUBLPOL 147. Ending Poverty with Technology. 5 Units.

There are growing worries that new technologies may eliminate work, increase inequality, and create a large dependent class subsisting on transfers. But can technology instead be turned against itself and used to end poverty? This class explores the sources of domestic poverty and then examines how new technologies might be developed to eliminate poverty completely. We first survey existing poverty-reducing products and then attempt to imagine new products that might end poverty by equalizing access to information, reducing transaction costs, or equalizing access to training. In a follow-up class in the spring quarter, students who choose to continue will select the most promising ideas, continue to develop them, and begin the design task within Stanford¿s new Poverty and Technology Lab.
Same as: SOC 157

PUBLPOL 148. Ending Poverty with Technology: A Practicum.. 5 Units.

Will robots, automation, and technology eliminate work and create a large poverty-sticken dependent class? Or will they eliminate poverty, free us from the tyranny of work, and usher in a new society defined by leisure and creative pursuits? This two-quarter class is dedicated to exploring new theories about poverty while at the same time incubating applied technology solutions. The first quarter is devoted to examining the theory of technology-based solutions to poverty, and the second quarter is devoted to planning a viable technology-based product that will reduce poverty. This product may then be built in a follow-up Using Tech for Good (Computer Science 50) class in the first quarter of 2018 (but class participants are not required to take that follow-up class). The course is premised on the view that innovative solutions to poverty will be based on new conversations and an authentic collaboration between Silicon Valley and leaders from education, government, and low-income communities.
Same as: SOC 158

PUBLPOL 154. Politics and Policy in California. 5 Units.

State politics and policy making, including the roles of the legislature, legislative leadership, governor, special interests, campaign finance, advocacy groups, ballot initiatives, state and federal laws, media, and research organizations. Case studies involving budgets, education, pensions, health care, political reform, environmental reforms, water, transportation and more. Evaluation of political actions, both inside and outside of government, that can affect California policy and social outcomes. Meetings with elected officials, policymakers, and advocates in class and during a day-long field trip to Sacramento.

PUBLPOL 156. Health Care Policy and Reform. 5 Units.

Focuses on healthcare policy at the national, state, and local levels. Includes sessions on international models, health insurance, the evolution of healthcare policy in the U.S., key U.S. healthcare topics (Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Medicare, Medicaid, public employee retiree health care), the role of technology, reform proposals (single payer, national health care, consumer-based systems, regulated markets, state and local reform efforts), efficiency/cost drivers and prospects for future policy. The course includes sessions on effective memo writing and presentation of policy proposals.

PUBLPOL 157. Political Data Science. 5 Units.

Introduction to methods of research design and data analysis used in quantitative political research. Topics covered include hypothesis testing, linear regression, experimental and observational approaches to causal inference, effective data visualization, and working with big data. These topics will be introduced using data sets from American politics, international relations, and comparative politics. The course begins with an intensive introduction to the R programming language used throughout the course. Satisfies quantitative methods requirement for the Political Science Research Honors Track. Prerequisites: Stat 60 or instructor consent.
Same as: POLISCI 155

PUBLPOL 158. Housing & Community Development--Policy and Practice. 3 Units.

How federal, state and local governments have worked with private and nonprofit sector actors in creating housing, as well as downtown, waterfront and neighborhood development. Legal and financial mechanisms, tax policy, reuse of historic structures, affordable shelter.
Same as: URBANST 168

PUBLPOL 167. How To Be a Politician. 2 Units.

Do you want to run for political office one day? This course will give you a full toolkit for winning elections. It will help students think about their personal narrative, how to present themselves to the electorate, and the issues and messages that should underpin their future campaign. It will also provide students with a practical understanding of how to build a campaign apparatus, fundraise effectively, and develop a winning strategy. The class will be highly interactive giving each student the chance to hone their candidacy, and there will be opportunities to work on debate skills, speech giving, and media performance. We will look at campaigns from across the world, as well as invite politicians and political consultants to speak to us. This class is designed for any student who has dreamed of running for office: be it locally or becoming President.
Same as: PUBLPOL 267

PUBLPOL 168. Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change. 4 Units.

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. This class is associated with a study trip to India during spring break. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Same as: PUBLPOL 268, SOC 168, SOC 268

PUBLPOL 174. The Urban Economy. 4 Units.

Applies the principles of economic analysis to historical and contemporary urban and regional development issues and policies. Explores themes of urban economic geography, location decision-making by firms and individuals, urban land and housing markets, and local government finance. Critically evaluates historical and contemporary government policies regulating urban land use, housing, employment development, and transportation. Prerequisite: Econ 1A or permission of instructor.
Same as: URBANST 173

PUBLPOL 178. The Science and Practice of Effective Advocacy. 3-5 Units.

How can purposeful collective action change government policy, business practices and cultural norms? This course will teach students about the components of successful change campaigns and help them develop the practical skills to carry them out. The concepts taught will be relevant to both issue advocacy and electoral campaigns, and be evidence-based, drawing on lessons from social psychology, political science, communications, community organizing and the sociology of social movements. The course will meet twice-a-week for 90 minutes, and class time will combine engaged learning exercises, discussions and lectures. There will be a midterm and final. Students will be able to take the course for 3 or 5 units. Students who take the course for 5 units will participate in an advocacy project with an outside organization during the quarter, attend a related section meeting and write reflections.
Same as: URBANST 178

PUBLPOL 190. Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation. 3 Units.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and others; past and present Western museum practices and guidelines relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of indigenous cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. Each week students will brainstorm actionable ideas for amending/supplementing current frameworks in order to give force to the cultural rights enumerated in UNDRIP. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, quizzes, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by experts. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent).
Same as: ARTHIST 190A, ARTHIST 490A, PUBLPOL 290

PUBLPOL 197. Junior Honors Seminar. 5 Units.

Primarily for students who expect to write an honors thesis. Weekly sessions go through the process of selecting a research question, finding relevant bibliography, writing a literature review, introduction, and study design, culminating in the write-up of an honors thesis proposal (prospectus) and the oral presentation of each student's research project. Students also select an adviser and outline a program of study for their senior year. Enrollment limited to 15.
Same as: ECON 198

PUBLPOL 198. Directed Readings in Public Policy. 1-5 Unit.

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PUBLPOL 199. Senior Research. 1-15 Unit.

May be repeated for credit.

PUBLPOL 19Q. Measuring the Performance of Governments in the U.S.. 3 Units.

Spending by federal, state, and local governments accounts for about one-third of U.S. GDP and governments employ more than one-in-seven workers in the U.S. For most U.S. residents, government is represented by a complicated web of federal, state, and local policies. There is an increasingly contentious debate about the proper role of the government and regarding the impact of specific government policies. This debate is rarely grounded in a common set of facts. In this seminar, we will explore how each level of government interacts with U.S. residents through government services, public programs, taxes, and regulations. We will examine financial results for different levels of government while considering the net effects of government intervention on the health and economic well-being of individuals and families. Particular attention will be paid to certain sectors (e.g. education, health care, etc.) and to certain groups (e.g. those in poverty, the elderly, etc.). Along the way we will accumulate a set of metrics to assess the performance of each level of government while highlighting the formidable challenges of such an exercise. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
Same as: ECON 19Q

PUBLPOL 200A. Senior Practicum. 5 Units.

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.

PUBLPOL 200B. Senior Practicum. 5 Units.

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.

PUBLPOL 200C. Senior Practicum. 5 Units.

Small student teams conduct policy analyses requested by government and nonprofit organizations. With guidance from the instructor and client organization, each team researches a real-world problem and devises implementable policy recommendations to help address it. The project culminates in a professional report and presentation to the client organization. Prerequisites: core courses in Public Policy or consent of instructor.

PUBLPOL 200H. Senior Honors Seminar. 3 Units.

Honors students conduct original research for oral presentations and a paper on their policy-related Honors thesis topic. The course is designed to help students make progress on their theses and improve their analytical, research, and communication skills.

PUBLPOL 201. Politics and Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

American political institutions (the Presidency, Congress, and the Court) and political processes (the formation of political attitudes and voting) have for some time now been criticized as inadequate to the task of making modern public policy. Against the backdrop of American culture and political history we examine how public policy has been and is being made. We use theories from Political Science and Economics to assess the state of the American system and the policy making process. We use case studies and lectures to analyze contemporary issues including environmental policy, taxes and spending , gun control , economic growth and inequality and mobility. In some of these issue areas we use comparative data from other countries to see how the U.S. is doing relative to other countries. In addition to class room lecture and discussion, student groups are formed to analyze policy issues of relevance to them. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: AMSTUD 123X, POLISCI 102, PUBLPOL 101

PUBLPOL 203E. Ethics on the Edge Public Policy Core Seminar. 3 Units.

This seminar-style course will explore additional foundational readings on organizational ethics (business, non-profit, and governmental organizations) and policy ethics. Themes will include, among others: race and police brutality incidents; national security (including cyber threats); the Iran nuclear agreement; Brexit; non-profit organizations in the policy and US landscape; sexual harassment networks; and various corporate matters. Organizing themes include, among others: ethics of leadership; ethics of persuasion and compromise; influence of bias in organizational and policy ethics; ethics of social movements; discrepancies between discourse and action; emotion and ethics; and interpreting and explaining ethics. In addition, the course will offer training in a wide variety of skills for effective communication of ethics for policy purposes (developing succinct arguments, presentations, website discourse, commenting in meetings and conferences, interviews, statement of personal views, interacting with the media and social media, and mapping complex ethical analysis). Most of the assignments allow students flexibility to explore topics of their choice. The objective is to engage actively and improve skills in a supportive environment. A short, analytically rigorous final paper in lieu of final exam. Attendance required. Grading will be based on short assignments, class participation, and the short final paper. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. This three-credit seminar accompanies PUBLPOL 134 Ethics on the Edge but can also be taken as a stand-alone course. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements and students taking the course for Ways credit must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: PUBLPOL 103E

PUBLPOL 203F. Ethics of Truth in a Post-Truth World. 3 Units.

This course will explore changing notions of truth in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are blurring the boundaries of humanity and boring through traditional notions of nation states, institutions, and human identity. We will ask one over-arching question: does truth matter anymore? If so, why and how? If not, why not? Either way, how does truth relate to ethical decision-making by individuals and institutions and to an ethical society? Five themes will organize our exploration of more specific topics: honesty; identity; memory; authenticity and integrity; and religious truth. Examples of topics to be explored include, among others: fake news; President Trump's campaign strategy and presidency; Syrian refugees and the Rohingyas; University history (Rhodes, Georgetown slavery, Yale Calhoun College...); new questions in gender and racial identity; Chinese beautifying app Meitu and other social media "truth modifiers"; the sharing economy; the impact of compromised truth on history; and Brexit. Scotty McClennan will explore truth through major literary characters and the impact of religion on truth. We will consider how we determine and verify the truth; how we "do" truth; the role of truth in ethical decision-making; the importance of truth to effective ethical policy; and the relationship of the truth to a life well lived. An analytically rigorous short final paper in lieu of exam. This three-credit seminar may be taken as a stand-alone course or may accompany PUBLPOL 134 Ethics on the Edge. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. Enrollment limited to 15 or upon consent of instructor. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements and students taking the course for Ways credit must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: PUBLPOL 103F

PUBLPOL 204. Economic Policy Analysis. 4-5 Units.

The relationship between microeconomic analysis and public policy making. How economic policy analysis is done and why political leaders regard it as useful but not definitive in making policy decisions. Economic rationales for policy interventions, methods of policy evaluation and the role of benefit-cost analysis, economic models of politics and their application to policy making, and the relationship of income distribution to policy choice. Theoretical foundations of policy making and analysis, and applications to program adoption and implementation. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and ECON 102B. Undergraduate Public Policy students are required to take this class for a letter grade and enroll in this class for five units.
Same as: ECON 150, PUBLPOL 104

PUBLPOL 205. Empirical Methods in Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

Methods of empirical analysis and applications in public policy. Emphasis on causal inference and program evaluation. Public policy applications include health, education, and labor. Assignments include hands-on data analysis, evaluation of existing literature, and a final research project. Objective is to obtain tools to 1) critically evaluate evidence used to make policy decisions and 2) perform empirical analysis to answer questions in public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 102B. Enrollment is limited to Public Policy students. Public Policy students must take the course for a letter grade.
Same as: PUBLPOL 105

PUBLPOL 206. Law and Economics. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the role of law in promoting well-being (happiness). Law, among its other functions, can serve as a mechanism to harmonize private incentives with cooperative gains, to maintain an equitable division of those gains, and to deter "cheating" and dystopia. Law is thus essential to civilization. Economic analysis of law focuses on the welfare-enhancing incentive effects of law and its enforcement and on law's role in reducing the risks of cooperation, achieved by fixing expectations of what courts or the state will do in various futures. Prerequisite: ECON 51 or PUBLPOL 51.
Same as: ECON 154, PUBLPOL 106

PUBLPOL 221. Sentencing, Corrections, and Criminal Justice Policy. 3 Units.

This introductory course will familiarize students with the history, structure, and performance of America's sentencing and corrections system. Sentencing is the process by which criminal sanctions are imposed in individual cases following criminal convictions. Corrections deals with the implementation and evaluation of criminal sentences after they are handed down. In fact, the two subject areas are inseparable. The course will examine sentencing and corrections from global and historical views, from theoretical and policy perspectives, and with close attention to many problem-specific areas. We will explore sentencing theories and their application, the nature, scope and function of corrections, the impact of mass incarceration on crime and communities, the effectiveness of rehabilitation, the relationship between sanctions and crime, and the consequences of prisoner reentry. These topics will be considered as they play out in current political and policy debates. Guest lectures may include presentations by legal professionals, victims, offenders, and correctional leaders. We also plan to visit a correctional facility. This course is open to 1Ls, 2Ls, and 3Ls in the Law School. Special Instructions: Grades will be based on class participation, and either: (1) three reflection papers of 5 to 7 pages each, or (2) a longer research paper. After the term begins, students accepted into the course can transfer from section (01) into section (02) which meets the research (R) requirement, with consent of the instructor. Elements used in grading: Class participation, reflection papers or research paper. Cross-listed with Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity (CSRE 221) and open to Juniors and Seniors, Law (LAW 621), Public Policy (PUBLPOL 221).
Same as: CSRE 221

PUBLPOL 222. Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response. 4-5 Units.

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Same as: BIOE 122, EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122

PUBLPOL 223. Thinking About War. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to the ideas, important writers, and policy decisions about warfare. Topics include: what causes wars, great strategists of warfare, whether nuclear weapons require different strategy than conventional war, fostering innovation, what creates stable peace, and what warfare feels like to those who fight it. Each class session is organized around a question; first half of each session will explore concepts, second half will apply them in a historical case or policy decision.
Same as: PUBLPOL 123

PUBLPOL 225. Place-Making Policies. 5 Units.

This reading and research seminar considers the numerous ways that governments conduct social policy by shaping and remaking geographic places. Representative topics include: housing aid programs, exclusionary zoning, controls on internal migration and place of residence, cars and their place in cities, and the politics of western water projects. Students will conduct original field research on the consequences of these policies for economic, social, and political outcomes. Prerequisites: None.
Same as: POLISCI 220, URBANST 170

PUBLPOL 231. Health Law: Finance and Insurance. 3 Units.

(SAME AS LAW 3001, MGTECON 331) This course provides the legal, institutional, and economic background necessary to understand the financing and production of health services in the U.S. We will discuss the Affordable Care Act , health insurance (Medicare and Medicaid, employer-sponsored insurance, the uninsured), the approval process and IP protection for pharmaceuticals, and antitrust policy. We may discuss obesity and wellness, regulation of fraud and abuse, and medical malpractice. The syllabus for this course can be found at https://syllabus.stanford.edu. Elements used in grading: Participation, attendance, class presentation, and final exam.
Same as: HRP 391

PUBLPOL 232. The Politics of Policy Making. 3 Units.

Public policymaking in the United States is part of a political process that can take years or even decades to play out. A familiarity with the politics of policymaking is key to understanding why some reform attempts are successful while others are not. This course will give students a behind-the-scenes look at how policy actually gets made. Students will gain exposure to the theory and literature behind policy formulation, and engage in debates over historical and contemporary efforts at reform.
Same as: PUBLPOL 132

PUBLPOL 234. Ethics on the Edge: Business, Non-Profit Organizations, Government, and Individuals. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 7020) The objective of the course is to explore the increasing ethical challenges in a world in which technology, global risks, and societal developments are accelerating faster than our understanding can keep pace. We will unravel the factors contributing to the seemingly pervasive failure of ethics today among organizations and leaders across all sectors: business, government and non-profit. A framework for ethical decision-making underpins the course. The relationship between ethics and culture, global risks (poverty, cyber-terrorism, climate change, etc.) leadership, law and policy will inform discussion. Prominent guest speakers will attend certain sessions interactively. A broad range of international case studies might include: the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar; civilian space travel (Elon Musk's Mars plans); designer genetics; social media ethics (e.g. Facebook and Russia and on-line sex trafficking); free speech on University campuses (and Gawker type cases); artificial intelligence; Brexit; corporate and financial sector scandals (Epi pen pricing, hedge funds, Wells Fargo, Volkswagen emissions testing manipulation); and non-profit sector ethics challenges (e.g. should NGOs engage with ISIS). Final project in lieu of exam on a topic of student's choice. Attendance required. Class participation important (with multiple opportunities to earn participation credit beyond speaking in class). Strong emphasis on rigorous analysis, critical thinking and testing ideas in real-world contexts. There will be a limited numbers of openings above the set enrollment limit of 40 students. Students wishing to take the course who are unable to sign up within the enrollment limit should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud at susanl1@stanford.edu. The course offers credit toward Ethics in Society, Public Policy core requirements (if taken in combination with PUBLPOL 103E or PUBLPOL 103F), and Science, Technology and Society majors and satisfies the undergraduate Ways of Thinking requirement. The course is open to undergraduate and graduate students. Undergraduates will not be at a disadvantage. Everyone will be challenged. Distinguished Career Institute Fellows are welcome and should contact Dr. Susan Liautaud directly at susanl1@stanford.edu. *Public Policy majors taking the course to complete the core requirements must obtain a letter grade. Other students may take the course for a letter grade or C/NC.
Same as: ETHICSOC 234R, PUBLPOL 134

PUBLPOL 238. Wise Interventions. 4 Units.

Classic and contemporary psychological interventions; the role of psychological factors in social reforms for social problems involving healthcare, the workplace, education, intergroup, relations, and the law. Topics include theories of intervention, the role of laboratory research, evaluation, and social policy.
Same as: PSYCH 138, PSYCH 238

PUBLPOL 242. Design Thinking for Public Policy Innovators. 3 Units.

What happens when new technology is developed so quickly that society isn¿t sure if it poses an opportunity or a danger? How should we regulate it when there are real risks but also real potential for societal benefit¿both of which are hard to measure? These kinds of dilemmas are arising now in bioengineering, information technology, and beyond. The scientific and policy communities are trying to address these issues, but the clash of cultures between a fast-moving innovation mindset and a risk-averse safety and security mindset affects how this work progresses. In this experimental class, you will explore how design thinking can be used to reinvent a policy ecosystem by focusing on the challenge policymakers face in trying to establish new rules and/or standards that they hope a wide variety of constituent groups will accept and follow and will keep pace with future innovations. This is a new approach to a critical problem ¿ you must be willing to dig into unknown territory. If you¿re looking for a survey course in design methods, this class is not for you. Limited enrollment. Admission by application. See http://dschool.stanford.edu/classes.

PUBLPOL 245. Does Google Need a Foreign Policy? Private Corporations & International Security in the Digital Age. 4 Units.

Facebook has more users than any nation has citizens. Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks more often with Chinese President Xi Jinping than President Trump does. Google's revenues exceed the GDPs of more than half the world's countries. Cybersecurity companies produce weapons that once only foreign governments wielded. These and other technology companies are increasingly caught in the maw of global politics whether it's entering challenging new foreign markets, developing platforms that enable millions of people around the world to organize for both noble and nefarious aims, or developing products that can become tools of intelligence agencies worldwide for surveillance, counterintelligence, and information warfare. In several respects, tech companies wield more power than governments. We examine the changing role of corporations in international politics, the role of the state, and critical challenges that large technology companies face today in particular. We discuss contending perspectives about key issues with guest lectures by industry and US government leaders as well as simulations of foreign policy crises from the board room to the White House Situation Room. No background in political science or computer science is required. Admission based on application. Instructor consent required. See course notes for details.
Same as: IPS 245

PUBLPOL 246. Policy, Politics, and the Presidency: Understanding the 2016 Campaign from Start to Finish. 2 Units.

(Same as LAW 7057). In 2016, Americans will once again go to the polls to select a new president. But what will actually happen behind-the-scenes between now and then is largely a mystery to most. This course will introduce students to the nuts-and-bolts of a presidential campaign. Each week, we will explore a different topic related to running for the presidency -- policy formation, communications, grassroots strategy, digital outreach, campaign finance -- and feature high-profile guest speakers who have served in senior roles on both Democratic and Republican campaigns. Students, guests, and faculty will also participate in discussions on how these topics will relate to the 2016 presidential contest, which will begin in earnest over the course of the quarter.
Same as: COMM 153A, COMM 253A, POLISCI 72, PUBLPOL 146

PUBLPOL 247. The Politics of Inequality. 5 Units.

This course is about the distribution of power in contemporary democratic societies, and especially in the US: who governs? Is there a ``power elite,'' whose preferences dominate public policy making? Or, does policy reflect a wide range of interests? What is the relationship between income and power? What are the political consequences of increasing income inequality? How do income differences across racial and ethnic groups affect the quality of their representation? What are effective remedies for unequal influence? Finally, which institutions move democratic practice furthest towards full democratic equality? This course will address these questions, focusing first on local distributions of power, and then considering the implications of inequality in state and national politics. nStudents will have the opportunity to study income inequality using income and labor force surveys in a mid-term assignment. Then, in a final paper, students will conduct an empirical examination of the implications of income inequality for American democracy.
Same as: POLISCI 147P, SOC 178

PUBLPOL 267. How To Be a Politician. 2 Units.

Do you want to run for political office one day? This course will give you a full toolkit for winning elections. It will help students think about their personal narrative, how to present themselves to the electorate, and the issues and messages that should underpin their future campaign. It will also provide students with a practical understanding of how to build a campaign apparatus, fundraise effectively, and develop a winning strategy. The class will be highly interactive giving each student the chance to hone their candidacy, and there will be opportunities to work on debate skills, speech giving, and media performance. We will look at campaigns from across the world, as well as invite politicians and political consultants to speak to us. This class is designed for any student who has dreamed of running for office: be it locally or becoming President.
Same as: PUBLPOL 167

PUBLPOL 268. Global Organizations: The Matrix of Change. 4 Units.

We derive analytical tools from the social sciences in studying a variety of organizations given their strategies, and in particular, when their strategies change. Focus is on how to design effective organizations and projects within and across institutional settings. This class is associated with a study trip to India during spring break. Recommended: FINANCE 377, MS&E 180, SOC 160, ECON 149, or MGTECON 330.
Same as: PUBLPOL 168, SOC 168, SOC 268

PUBLPOL 290. Indigenous Cultural Heritage: Protection, Practice, Repatriation. 3 Units.

This interdisciplinary seminar explores pressing questions relating to the protection, practice and repatriation of the cultural heritage of Indigenous peoples from North America and beyond. Using an innovative combination of in-class lectures and videos of interviews with renowned experts, including Indigenous leaders, scholars, artists and performers and museum professionals from around the world, this seminar will explore and problematize, among other subjects: the impact of colonialism, urbanization and other political, legal, economic, religious and cultural forces on understandings and definitions of "indigenous" and "cultural heritage"; the development of international law relating to Indigenous peoples¿ cultural rights; international, domestic, and tribal heritage protection and repatriation laws/initiatives including the 2007 United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), the 1990 US Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA), and others; past and present Western museum practices and guidelines relating to display, preservation, provenance research and repatriation of indigenous cultural material; the meaning of repatriation to Indigenous peoples and other stakeholders; and resolving repatriation disputes, including by alternative dispute resolution (ADR) processes. While case studies will relate primarily to Indigenous peoples of North America, comparisons will be drawn with the situation of Indigenous peoples in other regions, such as Oceania and Russia. Each week students will brainstorm actionable ideas for amending/supplementing current frameworks in order to give force to the cultural rights enumerated in UNDRIP. The overall seminar experience will involve discussions of lectures and video content, assigned readings, quizzes, a class visit to the Cantor Center Native Americas collection, and visits to our classroom by experts. Elements used in grading: class participation, attendance and a final project (one-day take-home exam; or research paper or film project with instructor's consent).
Same as: ARTHIST 190A, ARTHIST 490A, PUBLPOL 190

PUBLPOL 298. Directed Readings in Public Policy. 1-5 Unit.

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PUBLPOL 301A. Microeconomics for Policy. 4-5 Units.

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for the ECON 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take ECON 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Same as: IPS 204A, PUBLPOL 51

PUBLPOL 301B. Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers. 4-5 Units.

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Same as: IPS 204B

PUBLPOL 302A. Introduction to American Law. 3-5 Units.

For undergraduates. The structure of the American legal system including the courts; American legal culture; the legal profession and its social role; the scope and reach of the legal system; the background and impact of legal regulation; criminal justice; civil rights and civil liberties; and the relationship between the American legal system and American society in general.
Same as: AMSTUD 179, POLISCI 122

PUBLPOL 302B. Economic Analysis of Law. 3 Units.

(Same as LAW 7502.) This course will provide a broad overview of the scholarly field known as "law and economics." The focus will be on how legal rules and institutions can correct market failures. We will discuss the economic function of contracts and, when contracts fail or are not feasible, the role of legal remedies to resolve disputes. We will also discuss at some length the choice between encouraging private parties to initiate legal actions to correct externalities and governmental actors, such as regulatory authorities. Extensive attention will be given to the economics of litigation, and to how private incentives to bring lawsuits differs from the social value of litigation. The economic motive to commit crimes, and the optimal governmental response to crime, will be studied in depth. Specific topics within the preceding broad themes include: the Coase Theorem; the tradeoff between the certainty and severity of punishment; the choice between ex ante and ex post sanctions; negligence versus strict liability; property rules; remedies for breach of contract; and the American rule versus the English rule for allocating litigation costs. Because this course is taught jointly with Law 7502 in the Law School, it will not be mathematically oriented; there are no prerequisites to take the course.

PUBLPOL 303D. Applied Econometrics for Public Policy. 4-5 Units.

This course aims to present the theory and practice of empirical research in economics with particular emphasis on topics relating to public policy questions. We will start with basic regression analysis and introduce the statistical software STATA. The course will put a substantial amount of effort on work with STATA in analyzing actual data sets, reproducing and criticizing results in scientific research and learning the actual practice of econometrics. We will focus on the identification of causal effects and the various econometric techniques available to learn about causality. While this is primarily a methodology module, most examples and applications will be drawn from the area of public policy. The final will be a 3-5 hour take-home exam. Prerequisite: ECON 102A.

PUBLPOL 304A. The Ethics and Politics of Collective Action. 3-4 Units.

Collective action problems arise when actions that are individually rational give rise to results that are collectively irrational. Scholars have used such a framework to shed light on various political phenomena such as revolutions, civil disobedience, voting, climate change, and the funding of social services. We examine their findings and probe the theoretical foundations of their approach. What does this way of thinking about politics bring into focus, and what does it leave out? What role do institutions play in resolving collective action problems? And what if the required institutions are absent? Can we, as individuals, be required to cooperate even if we expect that others may not play their part? Readings drawn from philosophy, political science, economics, and sociology.
Same as: ETHICSOC 180M, PHIL 73, POLISCI 131A

PUBLPOL 305B. Public Policy and Social Psychology: Implications and Applications. 4 Units.

Theories, insights, and concerns of social psychology relevant to how people perceive issues, events, and each other, and links between beliefs and individual and collective behavior will be discussed with reference to a range of public policy issues including education, public health, income and wealth inequalities, and climate change, Specific topics include: situationist and subjectivist traditions of applied and theoretical social psychology; social comparison, dissonance, and attribution theories; stereotyping and stereotype threat, and sources of intergroup conflict and misunderstanding; challenges to universality assumptions regarding human motivation, emotion, and perception of self and others; also the general problem of producing individual and collective changes in norms and behavior.
Same as: IPS 207B, PSYCH 216

PUBLPOL 306. Writing and Rhetoric for Policy Audiences. 4 Units.

This course offers hands-on learning of effective writing and presentation techniques for audiences that include policy makers, decision stakeholders, interest groups, the media, and the public. Class time will be spent learning lessons in rhetoric, analyzing multiple written genres (memo, op-ed, report, media communications), participating in peer review, and practicing presentation strategies (elevator pitch, press conference, media interview, board meeting, formal presentation). Course texts include sample memos, op-eds, and white papers, as well as rhetoric handouts and videos. Students will draft, revise, and submit writing for policy audiences in the compilation of a final portfolio. Students will also produce oral and multimedia arguments, individually and in teams. Students will be responsible for timely peer review and short presentations on course materials. Enrollment limited. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

PUBLPOL 307. Justice. 4-5 Units.

Focus is on the ideal of a just society, and the place of liberty and equality in it, in light of contemporary theories of justice and political controversies. Topics include financing schools and elections, regulating markets, discriminating against people with disabilities, and enforcing sexual morality. Counts as Writing in the Major for PoliSci majors.
Same as: ETHICSOC 171, PHIL 171, POLISCI 103, POLISCI 336S, PUBLPOL 103C

PUBLPOL 308. Political Analysis for Public Policymakers. 4 Units.

Policymakers in the United States, whether elected or unelected, operate in a governmental system where politics pervades nearly every element of their daily activity. This course provides students with both the theory and real-world examples they need to understand and evaluate the impact of politics, political institutions, and the political process on policymaking. Readings will include selections from the public policy, political science, legal, and economics literatures.

PUBLPOL 309. Practicum. 1-10 Unit.

Applied policy exercises in various fields. Multidisciplinary student teams apply skills to a contemporary problem in a major policy exercise with a public sector client such as a government agency. Problem analysis, interaction with the client and experts, and presentations. Emphasis is on effective written and oral communication to lay audiences of recommendations based on policy analysis.

PUBLPOL 309X. Public Policy Research Project. 1-10 Unit.

Supervised research internship. Individual students perform policy research for outside client, applying analytical skills from core curriculum. Requires permission of program director.

PUBLPOL 310. Master of Arts Thesis. 1-5 Unit.

Restricted to students writing a master's thesis in Public Policy. May be repeated for credit.

PUBLPOL 311. Public Policy Colloquium. 1 Unit.

Weekly colloquia speaker series required for M.P.P. and M.A. in Public Policy students. Themes vary each quarter. Open only to Public Policy graduate students; permission number required to enroll.

PUBLPOL 315. Practical Training. 1-5 Unit.

Qualified Public Policy students obtain employment in a relevant research or industrial activity to enhance their professional experience consistent with their degree programs. Prior to enrolling students must get internship approved by the Public Policy Program. At the start of the quarter, students must submit a one page statement showing the relevance of the employment to the degree program along with an offer letter. At the end of the quarter, a three page final report must be supplied documenting work done and relevance to degree program. Meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. May be repeated for credit.

PUBLPOL 316. Global Education Policy & Organization. 3-5 Units.

Education policy, politics, and development. Topics include: politics, interests, institutions, policy, and civil society; how schools and school systems operate as political systems; how policy making occurs in educational systems; and theories of development.
Same as: EDUC 306B

PUBLPOL 317. Comparing Institutional Forms: Public, Private, and Nonprofit. 4 Units.

For students interested in the nonprofit sector, those in the joint Business and Education program, and for Public Policy MA students. The focus is on the missions, functions, and capabilities of nonprofit, public, and private organizations, and the managerial challenges inherent in the different sectors. Focus is on sectors with significant competition among institutional forms, including health care, social services, the arts, and education. Sources include scholarly articles, cases, and historical materials.
Same as: EDUC 377, GSBGEN 346, SOC 377

PUBLPOL 319. Legislation. 3 Units.

(Same as Law 7048) Lawyers work in a legal system largely defined by statutes, and constantly shaped by the application of legislative power. This course is about statutes and the legislative institutions that create them. It discusses some of the key laws governing access to legislative power and the procedures that culminate in the production of statutes in the legislature. The course is divided into two parts. The first part will focus on the acquisition of legislative power. Key topics include bribery laws, lobbying and indirect influence on legislative activity, and campaign finance regulations. The second part will focus on the exercise of legislative power. Through a number of public policy case studies, students will better understand the organization of the U.S. Congress, the ways in which power is exercised in that institution, and the intersection between politics, the law, and policymaking. Elements used in grading: Class participation and final exam.

PUBLPOL 342. Energy Efficiency: Technology, Policy, and Investment. 1-2 Unit.

Provides students with a basic understanding of the technologies, policies, and investments behind energy efficiency. Explores each of these dimensions, and their interplay, through structured lectures and expert perspectives from leading professionals and practitioners. The seminar covers the following energy efficiency topics: fundamental concepts; history and achievements; role of policy and new policy frameworks; investment, strategy and finance; evolving digital/analytical and platform tools; international development; low income programs; relationship between efficiency and climate change; energy efficiency and the changing grid; and new entrants and business models. Limited to 30 students. Prerequisites required.
Same as: MS&E 442

PUBLPOL 347D. Rebooting Government with Design Thinking. 3-4 Units.

Students apply tools of human-centered design to issues of government performance. Small project teams work with NGO and government partners (in the U.S. and abroad) on concrete design challenges focused on issues such as how to deliver services more effectively and ensure that citizens¿ voices are heard. Students identify needs, generate concepts, create prototypes, and test their appropriateness. Taught through the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (http://dschool.stanford.edu). Enrollment limited. Application required. Prerequisites: consent of instructor(s).
Same as: POLISCI 347D

PUBLPOL 353A. Science and Technology Policy. 4-5 Units.

U.S. policies for science, technology, and innovation; political institutions that create and carry out these policies; government programs that support scientific research and the development and use of new technologies; political controversies surrounding some science and technologies and the regulation of research and technology; international aspects of science and technology; the roles of scientists, engineers, and physicians in creating and implementing policy; and opportunities to do policy work in government and other organizations. Assignments: analyzing the politics of particular executive and legislative proposals, assessing options for trying to reach specific policy objectives, and preparing mock memos and testimony. This course is designed primarily for graduate students in science, engineering, and medicine who want to learn more about science and technology policy and how it is made. Public Policy 353A is a "gateway course" - an introduction - both for students pursuing a joint degree or co-terminal degree in Public Policy and for other graduate students interested in S&T policy or possible careers in the policy world. Junior and senior undergraduate students are also welcome to enroll.

PUBLPOL 354. Economics of Innovation. 5 Units.

The role of innovation and technological change in long run economic growth and the sources of innovation in science, technology, and commercialization. Founding of new industries and new markets. Commercialization of new technologies. Incentives and organization of science. Entrepreneurship. Openness and proprietary/controlled innovation. Selected public policies toward invention and innovation. The industrial revolution, the shifting international location of innovation, and the information revolution. Focus of the second half of the course is on the newest research on the newest industries. Prerequisites: ECON 51 (Public Policy majors may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for ECON 51) and ECON 102B.
Same as: ECON 113

PUBLPOL 364. The Future of Finance. 2 Units.

(Same as Law 1038) If you are interested in a career in finance or that touches finance (computational science, economics, public policy, legal, regulatory, corporate, other), this course will give you a useful perspective. We will take on hot topics in the current landscape of global financial markets such as how the world has evolved post-financial crisis, how it is being disrupted by FinTech, RegTech, artificial intelligence, crowd financing, blockchain, machine learning & robotics (to name a few), how it is being challenged by IoT, cyber, financial warfare & crypto currency risks (to name a few) and how it is seizing new opportunities in fast-growing areas such as ETFs, new instruments/payment platforms, robo advising, big data & algorithmic trading (to name a few). The course will include guest-lecturer perspectives on how sweeping changes are transforming business models and where the greatest opportunities exist for students entering or touching the world of finance today including existing, new and disruptive players. While derivatives and other quantitative concepts will be handled in a non-technical way, some knowledge of finance and the capital markets is presumed. Elements used in grading: Class Participation, Attendance, Final Paper. Consent Application: To apply for this course, students must complete and email to the instructors the Consent Application Form, which is available on the Public Policy Program's website at https://publicpolicy.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate/forms. See Consent Application Form for submission deadline.
Same as: ECON 152, ECON 252, STATS 238

PUBLPOL 51. Microeconomics for Policy. 4-5 Units.

Microeconomic concepts relevant to decision making. Topics include: competitive market clearing, price discrimination; general equilibrium; risk aversion and sharing, capital market theory, Nash equilibrium; welfare analysis; public choice; externalities and public goods; hidden information and market signaling; moral hazard and incentives; auction theory; game theory; oligopoly; reputation and credibility. Undergraduate Public Policy students may take PUBLPOL 51 as a substitute for the ECON 51 major requirement. Economics majors still need to take ECON 51. Prerequisites: ECON 50 and MATH 51 or equiv.
Same as: IPS 204A, PUBLPOL 301A

PUBLPOL 55N. Public Policy and Personal Finance. 3 Units.

The seminar will provide an introduction and discussion of the impact of public policy on personal finance. Voters regularly rate the economy as one of the most important factors shaping their political views and most of those opinions are focused on their individual bottom lines. In this course we will discuss the rationale for different public policies and how they affect personal financial situations. We will explore personal finance issues such as taxes, loans, charity, insurance, and pensions. Using the context of (hypothetical) personal finance positions, we will discuss the public policy implications of various proposals and how they affect different groups of people, for example: the implications of differential tax rates for different types of income, the promotion of home ownership in the U.S., and policies to care for our aging population. While economic policy will be the focus of much of the course, we will also examine some of the implications of social policies on personal finance as well. There will be weekly readings and several short policy-related writing assignments.
Same as: ECON 25N

PUBLPOL 73. Energy Policy in California. 1 Unit.

This seminar will provide an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures. The course will cover three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of California's 21st century energy systems. Presentations will include experts from the California Energy Commission, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Air Resources Board, the California Independent System Operator, the California Legislature, and the Governor's office. This class is required for all Stanford Energy Internships in California and Colorado (SEIC) fellowship awardees and is open to other interested undergraduate and graduate students with instructor preapproval. May be repeated for credit. This class will be held on three Saturdays during spring quarter, exact class dates to be announced in March 2018. Interested students should contact Mary Boyer at mary2@stanford.edu.
Same as: CEE 263G, POLISCI 73

PUBLPOL 74. Public Service Internship Preparation. 1 Unit.

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Same as: ARTSINST 40, EARTHSYS 9, EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, URBANST 101

PUBLPOL 78N. Economic Policies of the Presidential Candidates. 3 Units.

In nearly all polls, American voters rank the economy as one of their most important concerns. In the presidential election, much of the debate for voters will be on questions of economic policy. In this course, we will delve deeply into economic policy issues to understand options for government intervention and possible outcomes. We will combine economic analysis with political science methodology to understand efficient and implementable policy proposals.nnSpecific areas of interest will be taxation, budget, entitlement programs, economic regulation and competition policy, trade, demography, income inequality, and monetary policy. The course will incorporate other timely and salient policy issues as they arise during the course of the campaign. n nStudents will be expected to write a short paper and make an oral presentation to the class. A wide range of topics will be acceptable, including those directly related to campaign issues as well as other long-term economic issues facing the country.
Same as: ECON 78N

PUBLPOL 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

Instructor and program consent required prior to enrollment.

PUBLPOL 85. Environmentalism in California. 1 Unit.

Alternative Spring Break: With climate change posed to be one of the most pressing issues of the 21st Century, environmental preservation is emerging at a top priority. In addition to the federal government, state and local governments regulate the environment. In this course, we will learn about what environmental policy looks like in at the state level in California. Since the Golden State has an ambitious environmental preservation plan, there will be a lot of content. To make this class more manageable, we will be focusing on two areas specifically: water and energy. Finally, we will spend that last few weeks of the course learning about environmental justice, and specifically, how climate change impacts Indigenous communities in California and how the state is mitigating the impact. All major backgrounds are welcome.

PUBLPOL 95S. Protest in Modern China. 5 Units.

How has protest impacted the history of China? In this course, we study the history of state-citizen confrontation from the fall of the Qing Dynasty in 1911 to the Occupy Central movement in 2014. We seek to understand the politics of civic engagement in China today as part of politicized, global conversation about human rights, democracy, and revolution. We will examine a wide range of primary sources, explore archival offerings on campus, and hone critical reading and analytical writing skills.
Same as: HISTORY 95S