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ITALIAN 101. Italy: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly. 3 Units.

Renowned for its rich cultural tradition, Italy is also one of the most problematic nations in Europe. This course explores the contradictions at the heart of Italy by examining how art and literature provide a unique perspective onto modern Italian history. We will focus on key phenomena that contribute both positively and negatively to the complex "spirit" of Italy, such as the presence of the past, political realism and idealism, revolution, corruption, decadence, war, immigration, and crises of all kinds. Through the study of historical and literary texts, films, and news media, the course seeks to understand Italy's current place in Europe and its future trajectory by looking to its past as a point of comparison. Taught in English.

ITALIAN 127. Inventing Italian Literature: Dante, Boccaccio, Petrarca. 4 Units.

This course examines the origins of Italian literature in the late Middle Ages. We will read selections from Dante's Vita Nuova and Inferno; Petrarca's Canzoniere; and Boccaccio's Decameron. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.

ITALIAN 128. The Italian Renaissance and the Path to Modernity. 4 Units.

The literature, art, and history of the Renaissance and beyond. Readings from the 15th through 18th centuries include Moderata Fonte, Machiavelli, Ariosto, Tasso, Galileo, and Goldoni. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent (2 years of Italian).

ITALIAN 129. Modern Italian Culture. 4 Units.

This course examines the fate of Italian culture since 1800. We will study major examples of Italian literature, art, and cinema from the modern period in relation to their historical context. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 22A or equivalent.

ITALIAN 138. The Politics of Love in 20th-Century Italy. 3-5 Units.

Italy is often associated with love and passion, both in its literary and cinematic representations as well as in the tourism industry, promising visitors unprecedented opportunities for romance and excitement.nHow has this conception of Italy emerged and developed? Does it still hold us captive today? How has the idea of a "romantic Italy" shifted over the years, as Italian society itself has undergone significant transformations?nWe will explore these questions through literature (both poetry and prose), philosophy, history, and film. Topics will include sexuality, love, gender, marriage, and divorce, and the way they have been debated in modern Italian society and politics. The course will be taught in English and the materials will be discussed in translation.

ITALIAN 143. Favorite Italian Films. 2 Units.

In this course we will view and discuss 9 beloved & critically acclaimed Italian films, primarily from the 1980's and 90's, including "Cinema paradiso," "Il postino," "Mediterraneo," and "La vita e bella." This course is especially intended for returnees from the Florence program who want to maintain and develop their spoken Italian. A film screening time will be scheduled during the first week of class. Taught in Italian. Prerequisites: ITALLANG 21 or equivalent (4 quarters of Italian).

ITALIAN 152. Boccaccio's Decameron: The Ethics of Storytelling. 3-5 Units.

This course involves an in-depth study of Boccaccio's Decameron in the context of medieval theories of poetry and interpretation. The goal is to understand more fully the relationship between literature and lived experience implied by Boccaccio's fictions. We will address key critical issues and theoretical approaches related to the text. Taught in English translation, there will be an optional supplementary Italian discussion section during weeks 2-9.
Same as: ITALIAN 352

ITALIAN 155. The Mafia in Society, Film, and Fiction. 4 Units.

The mafia has become a global problem through its infiltration of international business, and its model of organized crime has spread all over the world from its origins in Sicily. At the same time, film and fiction remain fascinated by a romantic, heroic vision of the mafia. Compares both Italian and American fantasies of the Mafia to its history and impact on Italian and global culture. Taught in English.

ITALIAN 175. CAPITALS: How Cities Shape Cultures, States, and People. 3-5 Units.

This course takes students on a trip to eight capital cities, at different moments in time: Renaissance Florence, Golden Age Madrid, Colonial Mexico City, Enlightenment and Romantic Paris, Existential and Revolutionary St. Petersburg, Roaring Berlin, Modernist Vienna, and bustling Buenos Aires. While exploring each place in a particular historical moment, we will also consider the relations between culture, power, and social life. How does the cultural life of a country intersect with the political activity of a capital? How do large cities shape our everyday experience, our aesthetic preferences, and our sense of history? Why do some cities become cultural capitals? Primary materials for this course will consist of literary, visual, sociological, and historical documents (in translation); authors we will read include Boccaccio, Lope de Vega, Sor Juana, Montesquieu, Baudelaire, Dostoyevsky, Irmgard Keun, Freud, and Borges. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a minimum of 3 Units and a Letter Grade.
Same as: COMPLIT 100, DLCL 100, FRENCH 175, GERMAN 175, HISTORY 206E, ILAC 175, URBANST 153

ITALIAN 181. Philosophy and Literature. 5 Units.

Required gateway course for Philosophical and Literary Thought; crosslisted in departments sponsoring the Philosophy and Literature track. Majors should register in their home department; non-majors may register in any sponsoring department. Introduction to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature, with particular focus on the question of value: what, if anything, does engagement with literary works do for our lives? Issues include aesthetic self-fashioning, the paradox of tragedy, the paradox of caring, the truth-value of fiction, metaphor, authorship, irony, make-believe, expression, edification, clarification, and training. Readings are drawn from literature and film, philosophical theories of art, and stylistically interesting works of philosophy. Authors may include Sophocles, Chaucer, Dickinson, Proust, Woolf, Borges, Beckett, Kundera, Charlie Kaufman; Barthes, Foucault, Nussbaum, Walton, Nehamas; Plato, Montaigne, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Taught in English.
Same as: CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181

ITALIAN 199. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

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ITALIAN 216. Michelangelo Architect. 5 Units.

The architecture of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564), "Father and Master of all the Arts," redefined the possibilities of architectural expression for generations. This course considers his civic, ecclesiastic, and palatial works. It proceeds from his beginnings in Medicean Florence to his fulfillment in Papal Rome. It examines the anxiety of influence following his death and his enduring legacy in modernism. Topics include: Michelangelo's debt to Classical and Early Renaissance prototypes; his transformation of the canon; the iterative sketch as disegno; architecture and the body; the queering of architectural language; sketch, scale, and materiality; Modernism and Michelangelo. The historiography of Michelangelo has predominantly favored studies in painting and sculpture. Our focus on architecture encourages students to test new ideas and alternative approaches to his work.
Same as: ARTHIST 416A, CEE 33A

ITALIAN 228. Science, technology and society and the humanities in the face of the looming disaster. 3-5 Units.

How STS and the Humanities can together help think out the looming catastrophes that put the future of humankind in jeopardy.
Same as: FRENCH 228, POLISCI 233F

ITALIAN 232B. Heretics, Prostitutes and Merchants: The Venetian Empire. 5 Units.

Between 1200-1600, Venice created a powerful empire at the boundary between East and West that controlled much of the Mediterranean, with a merchant society that allowed social groups, religions, and ethnicities to coexist. Topics include the features of Venetian society, the relationship between center and periphery, order and disorder, orthodoxy and heresy, the role of politics, art, and culture in the Venetian Renaissance, and the empire's decline as a political power and reinvention as a tourist site and living museum.
Same as: HISTORY 232B

ITALIAN 235E. Dante's "Inferno". 3-5 Units.

Intensive reading of Dante's "Inferno" (the first canticle of his three canticle poem The Divine Comedy). Main objective: to learn how to read the Inferno in detail and in depth, which entails both close textual analysis as well as a systematic reconstruction of the Christian doctrines that subtend the poem. The other main objective is to understand how Dante's civic and political identity as a Florentine, and especially his exile from Florence, determined his literary career and turned him into the author of the poem. Special emphasis on Dante's moral world view and his representation of character. Taught in English. nNOTE: Enrollment requires Professor Harrison's approval. Please contact him directly at harrison@stanford.edu.
Same as: COMPLIT 235E

ITALIAN 236E. Dante's "Purgatorio" and "Paradiso". 4-5 Units.

Reading the second and third canticles of Dante's <em>Divine Comedy.</em> Prerequisite: students must have read Dante's <em>Inferno</em> in a course or on their own. Taught in English. Recommended: reading knowledge of Italian.
Same as: COMPLIT 236E

ITALIAN 261. War and Peace: Writings by and about Veterans in the 20th and 21st Centuries. 2-5 Units.

Since the aftermath of World War One, and with increasing urgency in contemporary America, stories about and by veterans are assigned a double role: that of exposing the horror of war yet also defending the possibility of a just war, and that of healing both veterans themselves and the society they return to. Key questions for this course are: Given the current practice of using writing and the hero¿s journey as a model for healing veterans and making their voices heard in our culture, can we look back to post-World-War-One culture and see if writing fulfills a similar function? And given how many post-World-War-One veterans became famous writers, how do we assess the interplay between literature, poetry, memoir, journalism, personal letters, photo accounts? Is there a connection between artistic innovation and the capacity to heal?.
Same as: FRENCH 261, FRENCH 361, ITALIAN 361

ITALIAN 272. Body Doubles: From the Fantastic Short Story to Science-Fiction. 2-5 Units.

How do we imagine our bodies through language, at times almost completely refashioning a physical double, be it idealized or abject? How do such body doubles intersect with our sense of self, defining or redefining sexual identity, spiritual aspirations, illness and recovery, and the senses themselves, as our window into reality? This course focuses on short stories from the late 19th- and early 20th-century fantastic genre, and science fiction stories from the following turn of the century, 100 years later: in these revealing instances, body doubles often seem to acquire a will of their own, overwhelming normal physical identity.
Same as: FRENCH 272, FRENCH 372, ITALIAN 372

ITALIAN 312. Feminist Activists. 3-5 Units.

Is it true that European, and Italian, feminism is more cultural and artistic, whereas American feminists foreground political and economic issues? How can we understand the connections and disjunctions between activism and literature in both contexts, and in the history of feminism from the early twentieth centuty to the present? How do these different strands of feminism come together today in global thinking? We will read both feminist fiction and theory to discuss these questions; authors include Aleramo, Woolf, Banti, McCarthy, Bulter, and Cavarero.

ITALIAN 315. Italian Film, Fashion, and Design, 1950-1968. 3-5 Units.

In a close analysis of films by Fellini, Antonioni, Rossellini, Pasolini, and Bertolucci, we will explore the various contradictions that fueled the Italian cultural imagination in the 50s and 60s: minimalism and multiplicity, male and female, industrial and archaic, comic and tragic, wealth and poverty. Special emphasis placed on fashion, design, and modernist art. Taught in English, with the option of an additional discussion section in Italian. Occasional screenings Monday evenings at 7pm.

ITALIAN 325. Petrarch & Petrarchism: Fragments of the Self. 3-5 Units.

In this course we will examine Francis Petrarch's book of Italian lyric poems, Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, and its reception in early modern France, England, and Spain. Readings from Petrarch's epistolary and ethical writings will contextualize historically and intellectually the aesthetics and ethics of the fragment in his poetry. With this foundation, we will investigate the long-lasting impact of Petrarch's work on Renaissance poetry and humanism, with attention to both the literary and the material aspects of its reception. Taught in English.

ITALIAN 327. Giambattista Vico & Claude Lévi-Strauss. 3-5 Units.

An intensive reading of Vico's New Science with special emphasis on Vico's theory of anthropogenesis, myth, and the poetic origins of human consciousness. Vico's thought will be placed in relation to Lévi-Strauss's theories of myth and so-called "primitive thought". Readings include Vico's New Science and Lévi-Strauss's "The Structural Study of Myth", and the first chapters of his book The Savage Mind. Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 230, FRENCH 330

ITALIAN 346. Body over Mind. 3-5 Units.

How does modern fiction, aided by modern philosophy, give the lie to Descartes' famous "I think therefore I am"? And how does writing convey the desire for a different, perhaps stronger, integration of mind and body? Does the body speak a particular truth that we must learn to hear, that the mind is not always connected to? How do modern metaphors for the mind-body connection shape our experience? These questions will be explored via the works of major French and Italian writers and thinkers, including Pirandello, Calvino, Camus, Houellebecq, Sartre, and Agamben.
Same as: FRENCH 246, FRENCH 346

ITALIAN 352. Boccaccio's Decameron: The Ethics of Storytelling. 3-5 Units.

This course involves an in-depth study of Boccaccio's Decameron in the context of medieval theories of poetry and interpretation. The goal is to understand more fully the relationship between literature and lived experience implied by Boccaccio's fictions. We will address key critical issues and theoretical approaches related to the text. Taught in English translation, there will be an optional supplementary Italian discussion section during weeks 2-9.
Same as: ITALIAN 152

ITALIAN 361. War and Peace: Writings by and about Veterans in the 20th and 21st Centuries. 2-5 Units.

Since the aftermath of World War One, and with increasing urgency in contemporary America, stories about and by veterans are assigned a double role: that of exposing the horror of war yet also defending the possibility of a just war, and that of healing both veterans themselves and the society they return to. Key questions for this course are: Given the current practice of using writing and the hero¿s journey as a model for healing veterans and making their voices heard in our culture, can we look back to post-World-War-One culture and see if writing fulfills a similar function? And given how many post-World-War-One veterans became famous writers, how do we assess the interplay between literature, poetry, memoir, journalism, personal letters, photo accounts? Is there a connection between artistic innovation and the capacity to heal?.
Same as: FRENCH 261, FRENCH 361, ITALIAN 261

ITALIAN 369. Introduction to the Profession of Literary Studies. 1-2 Unit.

A survey of how literary theory and other methods have been made institutional since the nineteenth century. The readings and conversation are designed for entering Ph.D. students in the national literature departments and comparative literature.
Same as: COMPLIT 369, DLCL 369, FRENCH 369, GERMAN 369

ITALIAN 372. Body Doubles: From the Fantastic Short Story to Science-Fiction. 2-5 Units.

How do we imagine our bodies through language, at times almost completely refashioning a physical double, be it idealized or abject? How do such body doubles intersect with our sense of self, defining or redefining sexual identity, spiritual aspirations, illness and recovery, and the senses themselves, as our window into reality? This course focuses on short stories from the late 19th- and early 20th-century fantastic genre, and science fiction stories from the following turn of the century, 100 years later: in these revealing instances, body doubles often seem to acquire a will of their own, overwhelming normal physical identity.
Same as: FRENCH 272, FRENCH 372, ITALIAN 272

ITALIAN 395. Philosophical Reading Group. 1 Unit.

Discussion of one contemporary or historical text from the Western philosophical tradition per quarter in a group of faculty and graduate students. For admission of new participants, a conversation with H. U. Gumbrecht is required. May be repeated for credit. Taught in English.
Same as: COMPLIT 359A, FRENCH 395

ITALIAN 398. Intensive Reading in French/Italian. 10 Units.

Enrollment is limited to French/Italian Ph.D. students. Course is designed for French/Italian Ph.D. students to prepare for department milestone exams.
Same as: FRENCH 398

ITALIAN 399. Individual Work. 1-12 Unit.

Repeatable for Credit.

ITALIAN 75N. Narrative Medicine and Near-Death Experiences. 3 Units.

Even if many of us don't fully believe in an afterlife, we remain fascinated by visions of it. This course focuses on Near-Death Experiences and the stories around them, investigating them from the many perspectives pertinent to the growing field of narrative medicine: medical, neurological, cognitive, psychological, sociological, literary, and filmic. The goal is not to understand whether the stories are veridical but what they do for us, as individuals, and as a culture, and in particular how they seek to reshape the patient-doctor relationship. Materials will span the 20th century and come into the present. Taught in English.
Same as: FRENCH 75N

ITALIAN 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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