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FEMGEN 100X. Grassroots Community Organizing: Building Power for Collective Liberation. 3-5 Units.

Taught by long-time community organizer, Beatriz Herrera. This course explores the theory, practice and history of grassroots community organizing as a method for developing community power to promoting social justice. We will develop skills for 1-on-1 relational meetings, media messaging, fundraising strategies, power structure analysis, and strategies organizing across racial/ethnic difference. And we will contextualize these through the theories and practices developed in the racial, gender, queer, environmental, immigrant, housing and economic justice movements to better understand how organizing has been used to engage communities in the process of social change. Through this class, students will gain the hard skills and analytical tools needed to successfully organize campaigns and movements that work to address complex systems of power, privilege, and oppression. As a Community-Engaged Learning course, students will work directly with community organizations on campaigns to address community needs, deepen their knowledge of theory and history through hands-on practice, and develop a critical analysis of inequality at the structural and interpersonal levels. Placements with community organizations are limited. Enrollment will be determined on the first day through a simple application process. Students will have the option to continue the course for a second quarter in the Winter, where they will execute a campaign either on campus or in collaboration with their community partner.
Same as: AFRICAAM 100, CSRE 100, URBANST 108

FEMGEN 101. Introduction to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 4-5 Units.

Introduction to interdisciplinary approaches to gender, sexuality, queer, trans and feminist studies. Topics include the emergence of sexuality studies in the academy, social justice and new subjects, science and technology, art and activism, history, film and memory, the documentation and performance of difference, and relevant socio-economic and political formations such as work and the family. Students learn to think critically about race, gender, and sexuality from local and global perspectives.
Same as: AMSTUD 107, CSRE 108, TAPS 108

FEMGEN 102. Art and Social Criticism. 5 Units.

Visual artists have long been in the forefront of social criticism in America. Since the 1960s, various visual strategies have helped emergent progressive political movements articulate and represent complex social issues. Which artists and particular art works/projects have become key anchors for discourses on racism, sexism, economic and social inequality, immigrant rights and climate change? We will learn about a spectrum of political art designed to raise social awareness, spark social change and rouse protest. The Art Workers Coalition¿s agit-prop opposing the Vietnam War and ACT-UP¿s emblematic signs and symbols during the AIDS/HIV crisis of the 1980s galvanized a generation into action. Works such as Judy Chicago¿s The Dinner Party (1979), Fred Wilson¿s Mining the Museum (1992), and Glenn Ligon¿s paintings appropriating fragments from African-American literature all raised awareness by excavating historical evidence of the long legacy resisting marginalization. For three decades feminist artists Barbara Kruger and the Guerilla Girls have combined institutional critique and direct address into a provocative form of criticality. Recent art for social justice is reaching ever broadening publics by redrawing the role of artist and audience exemplified by the democratization of poster making and internet campaigns of Occupy and the Movement for Black Lives. We will also consider the collective aesthetic activisms in the Post-Occupy era including Global Ultra Luxury Faction, Climate Justice art projects, and the visual culture of Trump era mass protests. Why are each of these examples successful as influential and enduring markers of social criticism? What have these socially responsive practices contributed to our understanding of American history?.
Same as: AFRICAAM 102B, AMSTUD 102, ARTHIST 162B, CSRE 102A

FEMGEN 103. Feminist and Queer Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines. 2-5 Units.

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 279A or FEMGEN 203) This course is an opportunity to explore the difference feminist and queer perspectives make in creative arts, humanities, and social science research.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for WAYS credit. The 2 unit option is for graduate students only.
Same as: FEMGEN 203, PHIL 179A, PHIL 279A

FEMGEN 103S. Gender in Native American Societies. 5 Units.

Seminar examines the impact of colonialism on gender roles & gender relations in American Indian communities beginning with the 17th century to the present. Topics include demographic changes; social, political & economic transformations associated with biological & spiritual assaults; the dynamism & diversity of native societies. Sources include history, ethnography, biography, autobiography, the novel & film.
Same as: CSRE 103S, NATIVEAM 103S

FEMGEN 104A. Junior Seminar and Practicum. 1 Unit.

Preference to and required of Feminist Studies majors; others require consent of instuctor. Feminist experiential learning projects related to critical studies in gender and sexuality. Identifying goals, grant proposal writing, and negotiating ethical issues in feminist praxis. Developing the relationship between potential projects and their academic focus in the major.

FEMGEN 104B. Senior Seminar and Practicum. 2 Units.

Required for Feminist Studies majors. Non-majors enrolled with consent of instructor. Students develop oral reports on their practicum and its relationship to their academic work, submit a report draft and revised written analysis of the practicum, and discuss applications of feminist scholarship. May be repeated once for credit.

FEMGEN 105. Honors Work. 1-15 Unit.

(Staff).

FEMGEN 105P. FGSS Honors Preparation Seminar. 1 Unit.

This 2 unit course will provide students the opportunity to explore possible honors topics, project design, advisor options, and university resources including grants, libraries, and faculty. nOver the 10 weeks, students will review related research, potential methodologies, explore creative genres, and consider summer research and preparation. Students will use their findings to write a proposal to submit to the honors program as well as a proposal to submit to UAR for undergraduate funding. After completing the proposal, students will have more clear next steps for their honors projects, including summer research needs, spring course selection as it relates to their topic, and building advisor relationships.

FEMGEN 107A. Ripped from the Headlines: Current Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Issues and Questions. 1-2 Unit.

Discussion of current issues and questions related to Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.

FEMGEN 107C. You're Majoring in What?! Why Feminism is Still Relevant. 1-2 Unit.

Stanford Feminist Study alum and community activists will join this weekly seminar to share how studying feminism has helped them professionally. Together speakers and students will explore answers to questions such as: ¿Why study feminism, sexuality, or gender studies?¿ ¿Why is feminism still relevant?¿.

FEMGEN 107G. Sisterhood, Brotherhood, & Gender Identity: The Histories, Stories, and Constructs of Greek Life. 1 Unit.

In this course, we will explore the history, the development, the critiques and praise of sororities and fraternities. We¿ll pay particular attention to how gender and sexuality are framed in those discussions¿ones by outsiders as well as ones by insiders. How do Greek organizations present their activities and goals? What values and roles do they highlight during recruitment? Who joins them? What expectations are there for participants? What are the perceived benefits that come with joining? What does it mean to be a ¿fraternity brother¿ or a ¿sorority sister¿ in modern Greek organizations? How are sorority women and fraternity men discussed by outsiders? How do the stereotypes of Greek life impact perceptions of individuals as well as particular sororities and fraternities? To consider these questions, we¿ll look at historical documents and analyze how groups described themselves as they were establishing; we¿ll also analyze recent documents (websites, books, etc.) to consider current ways organizations describe themselves, their activities, and their values. We¿ll use both to consider how the messages created by and about Greek organizations shape public perceptions as well as individuals¿ experiences of gender and sexuality identity.

FEMGEN 107M. College Culture & Masculinity. 1-2 Unit.

Students in this course will interrogate masculinity and its impacts on culture broadly, with a focus on college campuses. Some questions considered will include: How do structures and expectations of masculinity impact sexual assault and response to sexual assault? Where on campus do we see pressure to perform masculinity? What expectations do some campus communities, such as athletics and Greek life, have of their members to perform and maintain masculinity? How are male identifying individuals expected to behave in communities shaped by masculinity? What spaces are there for gender non-conforming folks in communities shaped by masculinity? How do structures of masculinity impact expectations of femininity and femme in these spaces and others?.

FEMGEN 107S. Barbie Girls vs Sea Monsters: Gender, Sexuality, & Identity in American Culture. 1-2 Unit.

Incoming students bring widely varying experiences of intimate relationships, whether romantic, familial, platonic, or sexual. This course provides students an opportunity to examine sexuality as a broad concept encompassing a dimension of our humanity and its surrounding cultural systems, impacting how we relate with one another: our experience of sex, gender, intimacy, and worldview. Activities, readings, and discussions will prompt students to reflect on society constructs sex, gender, and intimacy. Themes will include intersectional feminism and codes of masculinity, concepts and practicalities of affirmative consent in straight and LGBTQIA contexts, gender and sexual identity spectrums, and the lived experience of dating, romance, and relationships.

FEMGEN 108. Internship in Feminist Studies. 1-5 Unit.

Supervised field, community, or lab experience in law offices, medical research and labs, social service agencies, legislative and other public offices, or local and national organizations that address issues related to gender and/or sexuality. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Majors may not receive 108 credit for their required practicum, as they are to sign up for FEMGEN 104 A & B instead. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units.

FEMGEN 108B. Gender in the Arab and Middle Eastern City. 5 Units.

What are the components of gendered experience in the city, and how are these shaped by history and culture? How do meanings attributed to Islam and the Middle East obscure the specificity of women¿s and men¿s lives in Muslim-majority cities? This course explores gender norms and gendered experience in the major cities of Arab-majority countries, Iran and Turkey. Assigned historical and sociological readings contextualize feminism in these countries. Established and recent anthropological publications address modernity, mobility, reproduction, consumption, and social movements within urban contexts. Students will engage with some of the key figures shaping debates about gender, class, and Islam in countries of the region typically referenced as North Africa and the Middle East (MENA). They will also evaluate regional media addressing concerns about gender in light of the historical content of the course and related political concepts.
Same as: ANTHRO 108B, URBANST 108B

FEMGEN 109. Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports. 3-5 Units.

In 1972, Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports." But what would it take to get more women's sports featured on ESPN or more female athletes on the cover of Sports Illustrated? And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports? This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses.
Same as: FEMGEN 209

FEMGEN 10A. BAY AREA DOMESTIC WORKERS: RIGHTS: A GRASSROOTS CAMPAIGN FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE. 1 Unit.

In this Alternative Spring Break course and trip, we will examine how ournsociety and institutions allow for and perpetuate the exploitation andnoppression of domestic workers. Historically, domestic workers have largelynbeen excluded from basic labor protections. We cannot think criticallynabout the issues domestic workers face without considering the rolesngender, race and ethnicity, immigration status, and language play in thenindustry. We will use a conceptual framework based on citizenship andnreproductive labor theory to address themes in the context of Bay Areanmigrant women of color who are vehemently campaigning for equal labornrights. Through collaborations with domestic worker organizations based innSan Francisco and Oakland, ASB participants will learn how this movementnseeks to transform the domestic work industry through multilingual andnmulticultural alliances.

FEMGEN 110J. Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature. 3-4 Units.

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Same as: FEMGEN 210J, JAPAN 110, JAPAN 210

FEMGEN 110X. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 110, COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 310X

FEMGEN 111. Reproductive Politics in the United States and Abroad. 3-5 Units.

Course description: This course examines the issues and debates surrounding women's reproduction in the United States and beyond. It pays special attention to how knowledge and technology travel across national/cultural borders and how women's reproductive functions are deeply connected to international politics and events abroad. Topics include: birth control, population control, abortion, sex education, sex trafficking, genetic counseling, assisted reproductive technologies, midwifery, breastfeeding, menstruation, and reproductive hazards.
Same as: AMSTUD 111

FEMGEN 112. "When We Dead Awaken": Breakthroughs in Conceptions of the Gendered Self in Literature and the Arts. 4-5 Units.

Remarkable breakthroughs In conceptions of the gendered self are everywhere evident in literature and the arts, beginning primarily with the Early Modern world and continuing into today. Many of these works inhere in innovations in literary and artistic forms in order to capture and even evoke the strong cognitive, or psychological, dimension of such ¿awakenings.¿ The reader, or viewer, is often challenged to adapt her or his mind to new forms of thought, such as John Donne¿s seventeenth century creation of the Dramatic Monologue, a form popular with modern writers, which requires the reader¿s cognitive ¿presence¿ in order to fill out the dramatic scene. In so doing, the reader often supplies the presence of the female voice and thereby enters into her self-consciousness and inner thoughts. Adrienne Rich, for example, specifically ¿rewrites¿ one of Donne¿s major poems from the female perspective. This can be, in Rich¿s words, an ¿awakening¿ for the active reader, as he or she assumes that often-unspoken female perspective. The course will also explore male conceptions of the self and how such conceptions are often grounded in cultural attitudes imposed on male subjects, which can contribute to gender-bias toward women, a subject often neglected in exploring gendered attitudes, but which is now gaining more study, for example, in Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello.¿ Readings from recent developments in the neurosciences and cognitive studies will be included in our study of artistic forms and how such forms can activate particular mindsets. Writers and artists will include Shakespeare, Michelangelo, John Donne, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, June Wayne, and Edward Albee¿s 1960¿s play, ¿Who¿s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?¿.
Same as: ENGLISH 182J, FEMGEN 212

FEMGEN 113. Transgender Studies. 3-4 Units.

Transgender and gender-expansive identities are the subject of growing attention and (often sensationalist) interest in the media as well as in the healthcare field, yet there exists a dearth of legitimate academic courses, research and writing that reflect and explore gender identity and expression as a fluid spectrum rather than a fixed binary. This course will address transgender and gender expansive identities from historical, medical, literary, developmental and sociopolitical perspectives.
Same as: FEMGEN 213

FEMGEN 114. Sexual Diversity and Health. 1 Unit.

Explores multiple aspects of sexual diversity and health, including: kink/BDSM, polyamory, trans* sexuality, asexuality, high-risk sex, inter-sex-tionality, questioning gender and sexual binaries, and more. The format includes a one-day conference featuring a variety of expert speakers covering different aspects of sexual diversity and health, followed by a debriefing and discussion session to integrate what has been heard and learned.
Same as: FEMGEN 214

FEMGEN 115. Queer Reading and Queer Writing in Early Modern England. 5 Units.

Considers the possibility of identifying queer reading and writing practices in early modern England as well the theoretical and historical obstacles such a project necessarily encounters. Focus on the role which Renaissance discourses of desire continue to play in our negotiations of homo/erotic subjectivity, identity politics, and sexual and gender difference. Study of Renaissance queerness in relation to the classical tradition on the one hand and the contemporary discourses of religion, law, and politics on the other. Readings include plays, poems, and prose narratives as well as letters, pamphlets, and ephemeral literature. Both major and minor authors will be represented.

FEMGEN 116. Narrating Queer Trauma. 4-5 Units.

Psychiatrist Dori Laub has argued that the process of narrating trauma is essential to the healing process. Not only is telling the story important, but it is also crucial to have someone else bear witness to the narrative. But how do people even begin to narrate stories of violence and pain, and how do we become good listeners? How are these stories told and heard in the specific context of queer world making? This course will explore narratives of trauma in queer lives through literature, film, media, and performance in conjunction with trauma theory and psychoanalysis. We will pay specific attention to questions of community, healing, violence, and affect at the intersections of queerness and race, sex, disability, class, gender, and nationality.
Same as: FEMGEN 216X

FEMGEN 117. Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Gender. 2-3 Units.

This course investigates how culture, and diversity, including gender, shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. We first examine the characteristics of engineering cultures -- what are the interactions, symbols and ideas, and practices that define engineering? We then investigate how gender and other markers of diverse identities are interdependent and culturally constructed, how gender and other kinds of diversity are experienced in engineering cultures, and how these experiences have consequence for engineering innovation and the engineering profession. Finally, we analyze examples of cultural change in engineering and implications for engineering knowledge and practice. The course involves weekly presentations by distinguished scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and exercises around one's own experiences in and related to engineering. Those taking the course for 3 units will also complete a research-based project, and must take the course for a letter grade to meet the undergraduate WAY-ED requirement.
Same as: ENGR 117, FEMGEN 217

FEMGEN 117Q. Queer Arts: Remembering and Imagining Social Change. 4-5 Units.

This interdisciplinary fine arts course is designed to examine the nature of artistic imagination, sources of creativity and the way this work helps shape social change. We will consider the relationship among muses, mentors and models for queer artists engaged in such fields as visual art, music, theatre, film, creative writing and dance. Exploring various cultures, lands and times, we will study the relationship between memory and vision in serious art. We will ask questions about the role of the artist in the academy and the broader social responsibility of the artist. We will locate some of the similarities and differences among artists, engage with different disciplines, and discover what we can learn from one another. This seminar requires the strong voices of all participants. To encourage students to take their ideas and questions beyond the classroom, we will be attending art events (performances, exhibits, readings) individually and in groups.nnThe learning goals include a serious exploration of individual students¿ creativity, a more nuanced appreciation of diverse arts and a stronger understanding of the multifaceted nature of gender, race and class. Students will develop their abilities to write well-argued papers. They will stretch their imaginations in the written and oral assignments. And they will grow more confident as public speakers and seminar participants.
Same as: CSRE 117Q

FEMGEN 118. Transgender Cultural Studies. 4-5 Units.

In the United States, we seem to be in a ¿transgender moment,¿ or we¿ve reached what Time magazine has called the ¿transgender tipping point.¿ In this course, we will explore what this cultural moment means for the representation of transgender, nonbinary, and gender non-conforming people. We will look historically and globally at differences in representation in order to better understand our current cultural moment. We will explore multiple genres, formats, and authorial points of view to critically think through how and by whom trans stories are told. How do interlocking systems of oppression continue to dictate and drive trans representation and narrative; how do trans authors and artists push back against these systems to (re)construct their own narrative and image? Through a critical engagement with film, memoir, graphic narrative, poetry, and fiction created by and/or about trans* people, this course will engage students with an instersectional approach to trans identity and representation in concert with racial identity, sexuality, disability, socio-economic status, age, gender, and citizenship.

FEMGEN 11SI. Protecting your Bubble: Self Defense Strategies for College Students. 1 Unit.

This course will offer self defense training for students, with a focus on mental and physical defense, primarily against sexual assault. The course will focus on an "empowerment" method of self defense, seeking to provide tools and build confidence in students for a variety of situations. Students will participate in group discussions on the topic of sexual assault on college campuses, as well as physical and mental self defense tactics both to build confidence in any situation, prevent assault, and to employ in dangerous situations.

FEMGEN 121. Intro to Queer Studies. 4-5 Units.

This course provides an interdisciplinary grounding in historical and theoretical foundations of queer culture and theory. A critical interrogation of sex, gender, sexuality, pleasure, and embodiment will provide students with a framework for producing their own queer cultural critique. We will explore LGBTQ history alongside contemporary queer issues in popular culture, health, science, government policy, and politics. This course will also address the intersections of sexuality and gender with race, class, ability, age, nationality, and religion. Students will engage with multiple disciplinary approaches that have both shaped queer studies and have been shaped by queer methodology.

FEMGEN 123. Sex and Love in Modern U.S. Society. 3 Units.

Social influences on private intimate relations involving romantic love and sexuality. Topics include the sexual revolution, contraception, dating, hook-ups, cohabitation, sexual orientation, and changing cultural meanings of marriage, gender, and romantic love.
Same as: SOC 123, SOC 223

FEMGEN 124. Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine. 1 Unit.

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Same as: FEMGEN 224, SOMGEN 257

FEMGEN 126D. Victorian Sex. 5 Units.

How can we make sense of a culture of extraordinary sexual repression that nevertheless seemed fully preoccupied with sex? Examination of the depictions of sex in Victorian literary and cultural texts. Authors include: Collins, Braddon, the Brownings, Swinburne, Stoker and Wilde.

FEMGEN 129. Critical Issues in International Women's Health. 4 Units.

Facilitated discussion about women's lives, from childhood through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. Economic, social, and human rights factors, and the importance of women's capacities to have good health and manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Emphasis is on life or death issues of women's health that depend on women's capacity to exercise their human rghts including maternal mortality, violence, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, and sex trafficking. Organizations addressing these issues. A requirement of this class is participation in public blogs. Prerequisites: Human Biology core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 129

FEMGEN 12SI. Beyond the Athlete: Intersection of Diversity, Storytelling, and Athletics. 1-2 Unit.

This course explores the interaction of one¿s identities within the context of athletics. With an emphasis on the importance of self-awareness and storytelling, we will navigate how all identities intersect and affect the privilege we receive within current society. We will specifically look at how race, ethnicity, sexual orientations, religion, socioeconomic status, mental health, and disabilities interact with the sphere of athletics. ¿Beyond the Athlete: Intersection of Storytelling, Diversity, and Athletics¿ will help students find their voice and use it for positive social change within their communities.

FEMGEN 13. Stanford Anti-Violence Educator Training. 2 Units.

The Stanford Anti-Violence Educators (SAVE) Program seeks to cultivate a more resilient, supportive, and safe Stanford culture by engaging students in peer-to-peer dialogues about sexuality and consent, equipping them with skills to better relate with others. In this class, you will develop the knowledge and skill to facilitate peer education workshops with a variety of groups on campus throughout the year, including the required frosh curriculum. We will engage in conversations about sexuality, gender, identity, boundaries, and communication. We will examine social discourses, campus norms, systems of oppression, as well as explore new ways for the community to engage itself on these topics. The class will offer the structure and guidance to 1) gain in-depth knowledge of SAVE curricula content, 2) facilitate with presence, authenticity, and connection, and 3) increase self-efficacy as a leader for cultural change.

FEMGEN 130. Sex and Gender in Judaism and Christianity. 3 Units.

What role do Jewish and Christian traditions play in shaping understandings of gender differences? Is gender always imagined as dual, male and female? This course explores the variety of ways in which Jewish and Christian traditions - often in conversation with and against each other - have shaped gender identities and sexual politics. We will explore the central role that issues around marriage and reproduction played in this conversation. Perhaps surprisingly, early Jews and Christian also espoused deep interest in writing about 'eunuchs' and 'androgynes,' as they thought about Jewish and Christian ways of being a man or a woman. We will examine the variety of these early conversations, and the contemporary Jewish and Christian discussions of feminist, queer, trans- and intersex based on them.
Same as: JEWISHST 120, RELIGST 130

FEMGEN 130S. Sex and the Novel. 5 Units.

How do novels represent sexual life? This course reads texts from the eighteenth century to the present day, and considers how novelists represent the discombobulating effects of desire in fictional prose. Authors may include: S. Richardson, N. Hawthorne, J. Austen, E. Brontë, G. Gissing, H. James, D.H. Lawrence, J. Joyce, V. Nabokov, J. Baldwin, A. Hollinghurst and Z. Smith.
Same as: ENGLISH 130

FEMGEN 131. Introduction to Queer Theory. 3-5 Units.

What can Queer Theory help us do and undo? Emerging at the intersections of feminist theory, queer activism, and critical race studies in the 1990's, Queer Theory has become a dynamic interdisciplinary field that informs a wide range of cultural and artistic practices. This course will introduce students to the development of queer theory as well as core concepts and controversies in the field. While considering theoretical frames for thinking gender, sexuality, and sex, we will explore the possibilities--and limitations--of queer theory with a focus on doing and undoing identity, knowledge, and power.

FEMGEN 132. Intersectional Feminism. 4 Units.

This course is focused on the feminist concept of intersectionality. As a mode of Black feminist thought, lived activist practice, and interdisciplinary research methodology, intersectionality allows us to think about overlapping forms of identity and the interlocking power structures that produce systematic oppression and discrimination. We will examine the origins and development of intersectional feminism and consider its far-reaching impact in social justice work and contemporary activist movements. As we learn the language, methods, and critiques of intersectionality, we will cover issues related to rights, ethics, privilege, and globalization while discussing social difference on micro- and macro-levels.

FEMGEN 133. Transgender Performance and Performativity. 4 Units.

This course examines theater, performance art, dance, and embodied practice by transgender artists. Students will learn the history and politics of transgender performance while considering the creative processes and formal aesthetics trans artists use to make art. We will analyze creative work in conversation with critical and theoretical texts from the fields of performance studies, art history, and queer studies.

FEMGEN 134. The Marriage Plot. 5 Units.

The centrality of the marriage plot in the development of the British novel beginning in the 18th century with Samuel Richardson's Pamela and ending with Woolf's modernist novel Mrs. Dalloway. The relationship between novelistic plotting and the development of female characters into marriageable women. What is the relationship between the novel and feminine subjectivity? What aspects of marriage make it work as a plotting device? What kinds of marriages do marriage plots allow? Is the development of women's political agency related to their prominence in the novel form?.
Same as: ENGLISH 134

FEMGEN 135. Body Politics. 1-2 Unit.

This weekly course facilitates conversations on issues of the body across a wide spectrum of contemporary experiences, controversies, and contexts. Informed by gender studies, critical race theory, and feminist theory, we will explore current events related to racialized violence, size liberation, reproductive rights, HIV criminalization, rape culture, disability, transgender rights, and health and fitness.

FEMGEN 138. Men's Violence Against Women in Literature: A Critical and Social Analysis. 3-5 Units.

Literature, as a social and cultural product of its time, can inform and deepen our understanding of oppression. Using literature as a vehicle, this course will explore the impact of and responses to men's violence against women. Students will critically assess how the author has portrayed the topic of sexual assault and relationship abuse, how the characters and/or author exhibits victim blaming, and, if the characters were living today, would current policies adequately hold the perpetrator responsible, provide safety and justice for the survivor, and challenge rape culture. In dialogue with theoretical texts, we will analyze the literary representations of patriarchy that inform societal acceptance of gender-based violence, identify the historical prevalence of victim blaming and impunity in these works, and assess the implications on policy making at the individual, community and political level. Students will critically examine literature including Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Ubervilles, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Louise Erdrich's The Round House and Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys. There is an optional service-learning component.
Same as: FEMGEN 238

FEMGEN 139. Rereading Judaism in Light of Feminism. 4 Units.

During the past three decades, Jewish feminists have asked new questions of traditional rabbinic texts, Jewish law, history, and religious life and thought. Analysis of the legal and narrative texts, rituals, theology, and community to better understand contemporary Jewish life as influenced by feminism.
Same as: JEWISHST 139

FEMGEN 13N. Women Making Music. 3 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Women's musical activities across times and cultures; how ideas about gender influence the creation, performance, and perception of music.
Same as: MUSIC 14N

FEMGEN 140A. Destroying Dichotomies: Exploring Multiple Sex, Gender, and Sexual Identities. 3-5 Units.

This course is designed to broaden the student's awareness of the human experience by introducing scholarly debates about sex, gender and sexual identities and expressions. We will consider the socially constructed nature of sex, gender and sexuality and examine the history and community of those who identify as intersexual, transgender, homosexual, bisexual, asexual, pansexual and/or queer through texts, discussion, films, and class presentations.

FEMGEN 140D. LGBT/Queer Life in the United States. 4-5 Units.

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Same as: FEMGEN 240D, HISTORY 257C

FEMGEN 140H. New Citizenship: Grassroots Movements for Social Justice in the U.S.. 5 Units.

Focus is on the contributions of immigrants and communities of color to the meaning of citizenship in the U.S. Citizenship, more than only a legal status, is a dynamic cultural field in which people claim equal rights while demanding respect for differences. Academic studies of citizenship examined in dialogue with the theory and practice of activists and movements. Engagement with immigrant organizing and community-based research is a central emphasis.
Same as: ANTHRO 169A, CHILATST 168, CSRE 168

FEMGEN 141. Intersectionality and Social Movements: Gender, Race, Sexuality and Collective Organizing. 4 Units.

This course explores U.S. social movements from an intersectional perspective. How is social movement emergence related to participants¿ identities and experiences with inequality? How are the dynamics, targets and tactics of mobilized participants related to race, class, gender, age and/or sexuality? How have social movement scholars addressed the intersectional nature of identity and community? Readings include empirical and theoretical social movement texts, and discussion topics include feminist and civil rights movements, queer/LGBT movements, Occupy Wall Street and Black Lives Matter.
Same as: CSRE 141X

FEMGEN 142. Sociology of Gender. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender.".
Same as: FEMGEN 242, SOC 142, SOC 242

FEMGEN 143. One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault. 3-5 Units.

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past three years, the issue of campus sexual assault has exploded into the public discourse. While definitive figures are difficult to obtain due to the necessarily private nature of these events, several recent studies estimate that between 20-25% of college women (and a potentially higher proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as around 5-10% of male students) experience sexual assault. People of color, LGBT students, disabled individuals and other vulnerable groups are at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of July 2017. At the same time, this heightened response has led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. The election of President Trump has now created significant uncertainty about how this issue will be handled by the Department of Education going forward. The Trump Administration took the extraordinary step this September of rolling back all of the Obama Administration guidance on this subject. Meanwhile Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue, though there are several bipartisan bills under consideration. This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault on college campuses. We will learn background about sexual violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, lobbyists, filmmakers, journalists, and policymakers. The subject matter of this course is sensitive and students are expected to treat the material with sensitivity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them. This course was previously a Sophomore College Class that is now being offered as a regular quarter-length course. Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here feminist.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms or email rmeisels@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Cross-listed with Law 7065. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignment, Final Paper or Project.
Same as: SOC 188

FEMGEN 144F. Female Modernists: Women Writers in Paris Between the Wars. 5 Units.

The course will focus on expatriate women writers - American and British - who lived and wrote in Paris between the wars. Among them: Edith Wharton, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, H.D., Djuna Barnes, Margaret Anderson, Janet Flanner, Natalie Barney, Kay Boyle, Mina Loy, Romaine Brooks, Mary Butts, Radclyffe Hall, Colette, and Jean Rhys. A central theme will be Paris as a lure and inspiration for bohemian female modernists, and the various alternative and emancipatory literary communities they created.

FEMGEN 144G. Pop Feminism: Unrest and Unease in the Contemporary Feminist Moment. 3-5 Units.

This course examines feminist reaction/expression/ to and in German and American pop culture. We will examine a feminist approach using a variety of different media, including film, music videos, and literature. We will consider the intersections of race and gender constructions, as well as the cultural aspects of each iteration of "pop." The course will be taught in English, but German-speaking students are encouraged to read in the original. nNote: This course contains sexually explicit content.
Same as: CSRE 144G, GERMAN 144

FEMGEN 144X. Transforming Self and Systems: Crossing Borders of Race, Nation, Gender, Sexuality, and Class. 5 Units.

Exploration of crossing borders within ourselves, and between us and them, based on a belief that understanding the self leads to understanding others. How personal identity struggles have meaning beyond the individual, how self healing can lead to community healing, how the personal is political, and how artistic self expression based in self understanding can address social issues. The tensions of victimization and agency, contemplation and action, humanities and science, embracing knowledge that comes from the heart as well as the mind. Studies are founded in synergistic consciousness as movement toward meaning, balance, connectedness, and wholeness. Engaging these questions through group process, journaling, reading, drama, creative writing, and storytelling. Study is academic and self-reflective, with an emphasis on developing and presenting creative works in various media that express identity development across borders.
Same as: ASNAMST 144, CSRE 144

FEMGEN 145. Culture Wars: Art and Social Conflict in the USA, 1890-1950. 4 Units.

This course examines social conflicts and political controversies in American culture through the lens of visual art and photography. We consider how visual images both reflect and participate in the social and political life of the nation and how the terms of citizenship have been represented¿and, at times, contested¿by artists throughout the first half of the 20th century. The class explores the relation between American art and the body politic by focusing on issues of poverty, war, censorship, consumerism, class identity, and racial division.
Same as: AMSTUD 145M, ARTHIST 145, ARTHIST 345

FEMGEN 149. Gender Violence: Critical Race, Feminist, and Queer Perspectives. 5 Units.

This course examines the problem of domestic violence, sexual violence, and other forms of gender violence using critical race, legal, feminist, and queer theory. Readings reflect an interdisciplinary approach to understanding gender violence as it is understood in U.S. law, history, culture, and politics. We will explore foundational theories for why gender violence persists as well as its relationship to structural power along axes of race, gender, class, sexuality, and nation. This course will also consider feminist anti-violence social movements and debates within legal and philosophical approaches to gender violence.

FEMGEN 150. Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China. 3-5 Units.

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Same as: CHINA 115, CHINA 215, FEMGEN 250

FEMGEN 150A. Minaret and Mahallah: Women and Islam in Central Asia. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to women's culture and art in Muslim countries of Central Asia. Women, bearers of family rites and folklore, are the key figures in transmission of traditional culture and guardians of folk Islam. Women helped to keep the continuity of Islamic education in Central Asia during the harsh times of Communist dominance. The whole wealth of women's oral tradition will be demonstrated and examined to the extent possible. The course will make broad use of audio-visual materials.
Same as: ANTHRO 150A, REES 250A

FEMGEN 150J. Queer Poetry in America. 3-5 Units.

Some poets are known for portraying alternative sexualities in their poetry. Others seem to cover sexuality up. Can we use a poem to determine whether a poet is gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or questioning? Or do some poets simply defy categorization? What makes a poem queer? Is poetry somehow more or less queer than other literary forms? Even if we can answer these questions, what would they tell us about literature in general? This course will investigate such topics and more by tracking queer poetry in twentieth-century America. We'll start with nineteenth-century figures Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, then move on to Gertrude Stein, Hart Crane, Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, Elizabeth Bishop, Allen Ginsberg, Frank O'Hara, and others. We'll ask what their poetry meant in their own times, as well as what it means to us in our present era of expanding civil rights and changing sexual attitudes.
Same as: AMSTUD 150J, ENGLISH 150J

FEMGEN 152. 'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World. 5 Units.

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.
Same as: FEMGEN 252

FEMGEN 153Q. Creating the Gendered Story. 4-5 Units.

Exploration of novels, stories, memoirs and micro-narratives in which gender plays a major role. The texts are by writers of varied genders and sexual orientations as well as varied class, racial and national backgrounds. Written assignments present a mixture of academic and creative options.

FEMGEN 154. Black Feminist Theory. 5 Units.

This course will examine black feminist theoretical traditions, marking black women's analytic interventions into sexual and pleasure politics, reproduction, citizenship, power, violence, agency, art, representation, and questions of the body. Exploring concepts like intersectionality, matrices of violence, the politics of respectability, womanism, and other contours of a black feminist liberation politic, we will look to black feminist scholars, activists, and artists from the 19th century to today.
Same as: AFRICAAM 154

FEMGEN 154E. Black Feminist Epistemology and Analytics. 5 Units.

Building from the foundational canon of black feminist theory and praxis, this seminar will explore more recent advances in black feminist epistemologies and modes of analysis. Students will engage black feminist conceptions of the human and the self; love and relationality in precarious conditions; speculative queer, sexual, and body politics; aesthetics and cultural theory; and contemporary proposals for radical freedom and social transformation. We will consider how black feminist theory not only engages, builds on, critiques, and transforms other schools of thought, but also produces its own systems of reason and interpretation.
Same as: AFRICAAM 139

FEMGEN 155. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 255, SOC 155, SOC 255

FEMGEN 156. Happiness, Well-Being, Gender. 1-3 Unit.

Exploring the meaning and attainment of psychological well-being and happiness, this course will address gender differences in well-being and approaches that can be used by all individuals to improve their state of happiness and well-being. Course literature will be drawn primarily from social, clinical, and positive psychology, but will be drawn from other disciplines as well. Students will actively engage with course material by critiquing studies, discussing research, and applying methods for improving well-being to their daily lives.
Same as: PSYCH 129

FEMGEN 156H. Women and Medicine in US History: Women as Patients, Healers and Doctors. 5 Units.

Women's bodies in sickness and health, and encounters with lay and professional healers from the 18th century to the present. Historical consttruction of thought about women's bodies and physical limitations; sexuality; birth control and abortion; childbirth; adulthood; and menopause and aging. Women as healers, including midwives, lay physicians, the medical profession, and nursing.
Same as: AMSTUD 156H, HISTORY 156G

FEMGEN 156X. Language and Gender. 3-5 Units.

The role of language in the construction of gender, the maintenance of the gender order, and social change. Field projects explore hypotheses about the interaction of language and gender. No knowledge of linguistics required.
Same as: LINGUIST 156

FEMGEN 157. Language as Political Tool: Feminist and LGBTQ Movements and Impacts. 3-5 Units.

How does a social or political movement gain traction? For example, how did 20th-century movements of the disenfranchised, such as the Civil Rights movement, LGBTQ movements, or feminist movements, gain a voice and eventually enact change? In the mediascape of today, where everyone with access to a computer could have a voice, how does a movement change the national conversation? How do written and verbal choices of the movements impact their success and outreach to supporters? In this course, students will write and revise their own arguments in order to best understand the rhetorical potential in these movements¿ choices and to consider how those rhetorical moves are incorporated into political discourse. We'll examine the role of rhetoric, the use of argument to persuade, in social movements working toward social justice, party platforms, and public policy.
Same as: AMSTUD 157X, FEMGEN 257

FEMGEN 157P. Solidarity and Racial Justice. 4-5 Units.

Is multiracial solidarity necessary to overcome oppression that disproportionately affects certain communities of color? What is frontline leadership and what role should people play if they are not part of frontline communities? In this course we will critically examine practices of solidarity and allyship in movements for collective liberation. Through analysis of historical and contemporary movements, as well as participation in movement work, we will see how movements have built multiracial solidarity to address issues that are important to the liberation of all. We will also see how racial justice intersects with other identities and issues. This course is for students that want to learn how to practice solidarity, whether to be better allies or to work more effectively with allies. There will be a community engaged learning option for this course. Students who choose to participate in this option will either work with Stanford's DGen Office or a community organization that is explicitly devoted to multiracial movement-building.
Same as: AFRICAAM 157P, AMSTUD 157P, CSRE 157P

FEMGEN 158. Black Queer Theory. 5 Units.

This course takes a multifaceted approach to black queer theory, not only taking up black theories of gender and queer sexuality, but queer theoretical interrogations of blackness and race. The course will also examine some of the important ways that black queer theory reads and is intersected with issues like affect, epistemology, space and geography, power and subjectivity, religion, economy, the body, and the law, asking questions like: How have scholars critiqued the very language of queer and the ways it works as a signifier of white marginality? What are the different spaces we can find queer black relationality, eroticism, and kinship? How do we negotiate issues like trans*misogyny or tensions around gender and sexuality in the context of race? Throughout the course, students will become versed in foundational and emerging black queer theory as we engage scholars like Sharon Holland, Cathy Cohen, Hortense Spillers, Marlon B. Ross, Aliyyah Abdur-Rahman, Barbara Smith, Roderick Ferguson, Robert Reid-Pharr, E. Patrick Johnson, and many others. Students will also gain practice applying black queer theory as an interpretive lens for contemporary social issues and cultural production including film, music, art, and performance.
Same as: AFRICAAM 158

FEMGEN 159. James Baldwin & Twentieth Century Literature. 5 Units.

Black, gay and gifted, Baldwin was hailed as a "spokesman for the race", although he personally, and controversially, eschewed titles and classifications of all kinds. This course examines his classic novels and essays as well his exciting work across many lesser-examined domains - poetry, music, theatre, sermon, photo-text, children's literature, public media, comedy and artistic collaboration. Placing his work in context with other writers of the 20C (Faulkner, Wright,Morrison) and capitalizing on a resurgence of interest in the writer (NYC just dedicated a year of celebration of Baldwin and there are 2 new journals dedicated to study of Baldwin), the course seeks to capture the power and influence of Baldwin's work during the Civil Rights era as well as his relevance in the "post-race" transnational 21st century, when his prescient questioning of the boundaries of race, sex, love, leadership and country assume new urgency.
Same as: AFRICAAM 159, ENGLISH 159

FEMGEN 160. Performance and History: Rethinking the Ballerina. 4 Units.

The ballerina occupies a unique place in popular imagination as an object of over-determined femininity as well as an emblem of extreme physical accomplishment for the female dancer. This seminar is designed as an investigation into histories of the ballerina as an iconographic symbol and cultural reference point for challenges to political and gender ideals. Through readings, videos, discussions and viewings of live performances this class investigates pivotal works, artists and eras in the global histories of ballet from its origins as a symbol of patronage and power in the 15th century through to its radical experiments as a site of cultural obedience and disobedience in the 20th and 21st centuries.
Same as: DANCE 160, TAPS 160, TAPS 260

FEMGEN 160M. Introduction to Representations of the Middle East in Dance, Performance, & Popular Culture. 3-4 Units.

This course will introduce students to the ways in which the Middle East has been represented and performed by/in the 'West' through dance, performance, and popular culture in both historical and contemporary contexts. A brief look through today's media sources exposes a wide range of racialized and gendered representations of the Middle East that shape the way the world imagines the Middle East to be. As postcolonial theorist Edward Said explains, the framework we call Orientalism establishes the ontological character of the Orient and the Oriental as inherently `Other'. Starting with 19th century colonialism and continuing into the post-9/11 era, this course will trace the Western production, circulation, and consumption of representations of the Middle East as 'Other' in relation to global geopolitics. We will further examine dance forms produced in mid-twentieth century Iran and Egypt, with particular attention to nation-state building and constructions of gender. Finally, we will examine artistic productions and practices from the Middle East and Middle Eastern diasporic communities that respond to colonialism, war, displacement, secularism, and Euro-American Empire. Using dance studies, postcolonial feminist, and critical race theoretical frameworks, we will consider the gender, racial, political, and cultural implications of selected performance works and practices in order to analyze how bodies produce meaning in dance, performance art, theater, film, photography, and new media. Students will engage in multiple modes of learning; the course will include lectures, engaged group discussions, viewing of live and recorded performance, embodied participation in dance practice, student oral presentations, and a variety of writing exercises. Course assignments will culminate in a final research project related to class themes and methods.
Same as: CSRE 160M, DANCE 160M, TAPS 160M

FEMGEN 161. The Politics of Sex: Work, Family, and Citizenship in Modern American Women's History. 3-5 Units.

This course explores the transition from Victorian to modern American womanhood by asking how Native, European, African, Mexican, and Asian American women navigated the changing sexual, economic, and political landscapes of the twentieth century. Through secondary readings, primary sources, films, music, and literature we explore the opportunities and boundaries on groups of women in the context of historical events that included immigration, urbanization, wartime, depression, the Cold War, as well as recurrent feminist and conservative political movements.
Same as: AMSTUD 161, CSRE 162, HISTORY 61, HISTORY 161

FEMGEN 161D. Introduction to Dance Studies: Dancing Across Stages, Clubs, Screens, and Borders. 3-4 Units.

This introduction to dance studies course explores dance practice and performance as means for producing cultural meaning. Through theoretical and historical texts and viewing live and recorded dance, we will develop tools for analyzing dance and understanding its place in social, cultural, and political structures. This uses dance and choreography as a lens to more deeply understand a wide range of identity and cultural formations, such as gender, race, sexuality, (dis)ability, (trans)nationality, and empire. We will analyze dancing bodies that move across stages, dance clubs, film screens, and border zones. We will examine dance from diverse locales and time periods including ballet, modern and contemporary dance, contact improvisation, folkloric dance, burlesque, street dance, queer club dance, drag performance, music videos, TV dance competitions, and intermedia/new media performance. In addition to providing theoretical and methodological grounding in dance studies, this course develops performance analysis skills and hones the ability to write critically and skillfully about dance. No previous experience in dance is necessary to successfully complete the course.
Same as: CSRE 61, DANCE 161D, TAPS 161D

FEMGEN 163. Queer America. 4 Units.

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Same as: AMSTUD 163, ARTHIST 163

FEMGEN 164L. Introduction to American Theater: Queer Lives from Cushman to Kushner. 4 Units.

This course introduces students to classics in American Theater from the nineteenth-century to the present. We will learn how to read and critique plays, to conduct research about actors, directors, and how to think about problems in theater history. The course includes some scene work. More specifically, we will address questions such as: how does the American theater intersect with "queer lives" on and off the stage? How can we understand theories of acting and performance in relation to concepts about the performance of gender/race/class/ and sexuality as they have been and are rehearsed in great American plays such as A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE, SUDDENLY LAST SUMMER, INTIMATE APPAREL, ANGELS IN AMERICA, A CHORUS LINE. WICKED and more.

FEMGEN 166. The Divine Feminine in India. 4 Units.

What happens when God is a woman? Is the Goddess a feminist? The Goddess, in her numerous incarnations, is foundational to much of Indian religiosity, whether Hindu, Buddhist, or even Jain¿and in turn, without her story, much of the theology and practice of these religions remains incomprehensible. This course examines the principal expressions of the theology and ritual worship of the Goddess in Indian history, from the Vedas to the Hindu Epics, to Indian philosophy, tantric ritual practice and modern global and new age movements in order to understand how the gendering of divinity affects theological speculation, religious experience, and embodied religious identity.
Same as: RELIGST 166

FEMGEN 168. Writing for the Stage and Screen. 4 Units.

This is a script analysis and film criticism course from the vantage point of the scriptwriter -- both playwrights and screenplay writers. We will do comparative analysis of films that were adapted from plays and use published plays and/or student-authored plays to write original script adaptations. Students will also develop short video films based on a segment of such adaptations.May be repeated for credit.

FEMGEN 17. Gender and Power in Ancient Greece. 4 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGEN 17.) Introduction to the sex-gender system of ancient Greece, with comparative material from modern America. How myths, religious rituals, athletics, politics and theater reinforced gender stereotypes and sometimes undermined them. Skills: finding clues, identifying patterns and making connections amongst the components of a strange and beautiful culture very different from our own. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.

FEMGEN 176. Feminism and Contemporary Art. 4 Units.

(Same as ARTHIST 176) The impact of second wave feminism on art making and art historical practice in the 70s, and its reiteration and transformation in contemporary feminist work. Topics: sexism and art history, feminist studio programs in the 70s, essentialism and self-representation, themes of domesticity, the body in feminist art making, bad girls, the exclusion of women of color and lesbians from the art historical mainstream, notions of performativity.
Same as: ARTHIST 176, ARTHIST 376

FEMGEN 177. Dramatic Writing: The Fundamentals. 4 Units.

Course introduces students to the basic elements of playwriting and creative experimentation for the stage. Topics include: character development, conflict and plot construction, staging and setting, and play structure. Script analysis of works by contemporary playwrights may include: Marsha Norman, Patrick Shanley, August Wilson, Suzan-Lori Parks, Paula Vogel, Octavio Solis and others. Table readings of one-act length work required by quarter's end.
Same as: CSRE 177, TAPS 177, TAPS 277

FEMGEN 179C. Chroniclers of Desire: Creative Non-Fiction Writing Workshop. 3-5 Units.

This course emphasizes the study and practice of personal memoir writing and literary journalism. The class will explore those writings that contain a public and private story, navigating an intimate and institutional world. Student writers will serve as public chroniclers whose subjective point of view and experience attempt to provide a truth greater than what ¿the facts¿ can offer.
Same as: CSRE 179C, CSRE 279C, TAPS 279C

FEMGEN 180. Gender Relations in Islam. 4 Units.

This course investigates the ways in which gender identities and relationships between men and women have been articulated, constructed, and refashioned throughout the Muslim world. Starting with problematizing the fixed notions of gender and sexuality, we map the attitudes toward these notions through visiting a diverse array of sources from the Qur¿an, Sunna, and legal documents to historical and anthropological case studies, literature, and film from South East Asia to Europe and North America. We examine the notions of femininity and masculinity in the Qur¿an, family laws, and attitudes toward homosexuality and transgendered populations. We read examples of ambiguous use of language with regards to gender and sexuality in Persian poetry and mystical traditions. We study the dynamic relationship between Islam and Feminism in the Muslim world. Finally, we witness the implications of these attitudes in our case studies and stories, from a divorce court in Iran to a wedding in Sudan.
Same as: RELIGST 180

FEMGEN 180A. Sex and Power. 5 Units.

From hook-up culture to pornography and sex work and even Beyoncé's latest album, "Lemonade," our struggles with consent, betrayal, and violence evince collective confusions about the relationship between sex and power in our societies. A quick Google search for news articles on the topic reveals that we must communally brace ourselves, usually through a Public Service Announcement pun, Let's Talk About Sex, and then a warning, Talking about sex can be hard. Cultural and social analyses can help us un-brace ourselves and get closer to meaningfully, and respectfully, talking about how cultural difference and social hierarchies fuel, and our fueled by, ideologies about sex and sexuality. This course examines sex as a nexus of socio-cultural, economic, and political relations of power for individuals and groups across local and global and national and transnational boundaries. And because a lot of the difficulties in talking about sex entail difficulties about ¿seeing¿ sex, this class relies on visual culture and documentary filmmaking alongside ethnographies and theoretical scholarship.
Same as: ANTHRO 180A

FEMGEN 181A. Gender in the Middle East: Iran, Turkey, and Egypt. 4 Units.

This course explores the construction of gender in the Middle East. Drawing on the historical, sociological and anthropological research in the region, the course aims to question the stereotypes about the subordination of Muslim women and to offer students a systematic reading and analytical discussion of the political, economic and cultural structures that inform gender relations and practices in the region. The course starts with an examination of early Islam and religious sources with regard to women¿s status, then moves on to nationalist and modernization movements in the 19th and 20th centuries, and finally explores women¿s and men¿s lives in contemporary Egypt, Turkey and Iran. In this framework, we will pay special attention to Islamist mobilizations, family and sexual relations, as well as women's changing livelihoods and labor.
Same as: ANTHRO 181A

FEMGEN 183. Re- Imagining American Borders. 5 Units.

How novelists, filmmakers, and poets perceive racial, ethnic, gender, sexual orientation, and class borders in the context of a current volatile national discussion about the place of Americans both here and in the world. How Anna Deavere Smith, Sherman Alexie, Shailja Patel or Ta-Nehisi Coates consider redrawing such lines so that center and margin, or self and other, do not remain fixed and divided. How linguistic borderlines within multilingual literature by Caribbean, Arab, and Asian Americans function. Can Anzaldúa's 1986 conception of borderlands be constructed through the matrix of language, dreams, music, and cultural memories in these recent American narratives? Course includes creatively examining one's own identity.
Same as: AMSTUD 183, CSRE 183

FEMGEN 188Q. Imagining Women: Writers in Print and in Person. 4-5 Units.

Gender roles, gender relations and sexual identity explored in contemporary literature and conversation with guest authors. Weekly meetings designated for book discussion and meeting with authors. Interest in writing and a curiosity about diverse women's lives would be helpful to students. Students will use such tools as close reading, research, analysis and imagination. Seminar requires strong voice of all participants. Oral presentations, discussion papers, final projects.
Same as: CSRE 188Q

FEMGEN 191Q. Writing Women's Lives. 2 Units.

Creative writing through dialogue focusing on prose about the lives of women in different cultures and generations. Novels, short stories, and micro-narrative including fiction and memoir. Students produce work using research, memory, imagination, and metaphor.

FEMGEN 192. Women in French Cinema: 1958-. 3-5 Units.

Women as objects and subjects of the voyeuristic gaze inherent to cinema. The myth of the feminine idol in French films in historical and cultural context since the New Wave until now. The mythology of stars as the imaginary vehicle that helped France to change from traditional society to modern, culturally mixed nation. The evolution of female characters, roles, actresses, directors in the film industry. Filmmakers include Vadim, Truffaut, Varda, Godard, Ozon, Colline Serreau, Tonie Marshall, Maïwen. Discussion in English; films in French with English subtitles. 3 units, 4 units or 5 units.nNOTE: FILMSTUD students must take this course for 3 units only.
Same as: FILMSTUD 112, FRENCH 192

FEMGEN 193. Late Imperial China. 5 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 93. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 193.) A survey of Chinese history from the 11th century to the collapse of the imperial state in 1911. Topics include absolutism, gentry society, popular culture, gender and sexuality, steppe nomads, the Jesuits in China, peasant rebellion, ethnic conflict, opium, and the impact of Western imperialism.
Same as: CHINA 183, HISTORY 193

FEMGEN 193G. Psychological Well-Being on Campus: A Focus on Gender and Sexual Identities. 1 Unit.

This course examines mental health and psychological well-being across the spectrum of gender and sexual identities. It addresses the unique challenges that face LGBTQ-identified students, and provides tools for supporting peers as they navigate these challenges. Discussion topics include current conceptualizations of gender identity and sexual orientation, including sexual and gender fluidity; the intersection of queer identities with multiple identities such as ethnic/racial identify and faith/spirituality; unpacking stereotypes; queer relationships and sexuality, coming out and disclosure, and mental health issues.
Same as: EDUC 193G

FEMGEN 195. Directed Reading. 1-15 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. (Staff).

FEMGEN 195X. Research in Feminist, Gender, & Sexuality Studies. 1-5 Unit.

Independent research conducted under faculty or graduate student supervision. May be taken for a maximum of 3 quarters of credit.

FEMGEN 199A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Participants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of Instructor.

FEMGEN 199B. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Particippants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FEMGEN 199C. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Honors Workshop. 2-3 Units.

Required of seniors in the Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies honors program. Particippants share ongoing work on their honors theses. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

FEMGEN 199X. Preparation for Senior Thesis. 2-3 Units.

This course is designed for juniors (majors, minors, and those seeking Interdisciplinary Honors in CSRE or FGSS) who intend to write a senior thesis in one of the CSRE Family of Programs or FGSS Interdisciplinary Honors. The course offers resources and strategies for putting together a significant and original senior thesis. Topics to be covered include: getting funding; finding an advisor; navigating the institutional review board; formulating an appropriate question; and finding the right data/medium/texts.
Same as: CSRE 199

FEMGEN 203. Feminist and Queer Theories and Methods Across the Disciplines. 2-5 Units.

(Graduate Students register for PHIL 279A or FEMGEN 203) This course is an opportunity to explore the difference feminist and queer perspectives make in creative arts, humanities, and social science research.nPrerequisites: Feminist Studies 101 or equivalent with consent of instructor.nNOTE: This course must be taken for a letter grade and a minimum of 3 units to be eligible for WAYS credit. The 2 unit option is for graduate students only.
Same as: FEMGEN 103, PHIL 179A, PHIL 279A

FEMGEN 205. Songs of Love and War: Gender, Crusade, Politics. 3-5 Units.

Analysis of medieval love, satirical and Crusade lyrics of the trouabdours. Study of deictic address, corporeal subjectivity, the female voice, love debates, and the body as a figure of political conflict. Course readings include medieval treatises on lyric and modern translations of the troubadour tradition. Works by Ovid, Bernart de Ventadorn, Bertran de Born, La Comtessa de Dia, Thibaut de Champagne, Raimon Vidal, Dante, and Pound. Taught in English. Course includes a lab component for creation of multi-media translation projects: trobar. stanford.edu.
Same as: FRENCH 205

FEMGEN 206. Global Medical Issues Affecting Women. 1 Unit.

This course probes the principal issues affecting women and girls medically around the world. Through interactive discussions, guest lectures, case studies, and academic readings, students become acquainted with the most critical challenges to women¿s health globally, and use selected analytical tools to assess how these may be addressed efficiently, cost-effectively, and sustainably. Topics include women¿s cancer, birth control, infertility, female genital mutilation, midwifery, obstetric fistula, breastfeeding, violence against women, and women's representation in biomedical research. The aim is to cultivate in students a nuanced appreciation of women¿s unique needs, roles, and challenges in the contemporary global health landscape.
Same as: SOMGEN 206

FEMGEN 208B. Women Activists' Response to War. 4-5 Units.

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Same as: HISTORY 208B, HISTORY 308B

FEMGEN 209. Looking Back, Moving Forward: Raising Critical Awareness in Gender and Sports. 3-5 Units.

In 1972, Title IX legislation opened up a vast range of opportunities for women in sports. Since then, women's sports have continued to grow yet the fight for recognition and equality persists. Simply put, men's sports are more popular than women's--so much so, in fact, that people often make the hierarchical distinction between "sports" and "women's sports." But what would it take to get more women's sports featured on ESPN or more female athletes on the cover of Sports Illustrated? And, given the well-documented corruption at the highest levels of men's sports, should such an ascent in popularity be the goal for women's sports? This course will map out and respond to the multifaceted issues that emerge when women enter the sports world. Throughout the quarter, we will explore the fight for gender equality in sports through historical, cultural, and rhetorical lenses.
Same as: FEMGEN 109

FEMGEN 210J. Romance, Desire, and Sexuality in Modern Japanese Literature. 3-4 Units.

This class is structured around three motifs: love suicide (as a romantic ideal), female desire, and same-sex sexuality. Over the course of the quarter we will look at how these motifs are treated in the art and entertainment from three different moments of Japanese history: the Edo period (1615-1868), the modern period (1920-65), and the contemporary period (1965-present). We will start by focusing on the most traditional representations of these topics. Subsequently, we will consider how later artists and entertainers revisited the conventional treatments of these motifs, informing them with new meanings and social significance. We will devote particular attention to how this material comments upon issues of gender, sexuality, and human relationships in the context of Japan. Informing our perspective will be feminist and queer theories of reading and interpretation.
Same as: FEMGEN 110J, JAPAN 110, JAPAN 210

FEMGEN 212. "When We Dead Awaken": Breakthroughs in Conceptions of the Gendered Self in Literature and the Arts. 4-5 Units.

Remarkable breakthroughs In conceptions of the gendered self are everywhere evident in literature and the arts, beginning primarily with the Early Modern world and continuing into today. Many of these works inhere in innovations in literary and artistic forms in order to capture and even evoke the strong cognitive, or psychological, dimension of such ¿awakenings.¿ The reader, or viewer, is often challenged to adapt her or his mind to new forms of thought, such as John Donne¿s seventeenth century creation of the Dramatic Monologue, a form popular with modern writers, which requires the reader¿s cognitive ¿presence¿ in order to fill out the dramatic scene. In so doing, the reader often supplies the presence of the female voice and thereby enters into her self-consciousness and inner thoughts. Adrienne Rich, for example, specifically ¿rewrites¿ one of Donne¿s major poems from the female perspective. This can be, in Rich¿s words, an ¿awakening¿ for the active reader, as he or she assumes that often-unspoken female perspective. The course will also explore male conceptions of the self and how such conceptions are often grounded in cultural attitudes imposed on male subjects, which can contribute to gender-bias toward women, a subject often neglected in exploring gendered attitudes, but which is now gaining more study, for example, in Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello.¿ Readings from recent developments in the neurosciences and cognitive studies will be included in our study of artistic forms and how such forms can activate particular mindsets. Writers and artists will include Shakespeare, Michelangelo, John Donne, Virginia Woolf, Adrienne Rich, Gertrude Stein, Picasso, June Wayne, and Edward Albee¿s 1960¿s play, ¿Who¿s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?¿.
Same as: ENGLISH 182J, FEMGEN 112

FEMGEN 213. Transgender Studies. 3-4 Units.

Transgender and gender-expansive identities are the subject of growing attention and (often sensationalist) interest in the media as well as in the healthcare field, yet there exists a dearth of legitimate academic courses, research and writing that reflect and explore gender identity and expression as a fluid spectrum rather than a fixed binary. This course will address transgender and gender expansive identities from historical, medical, literary, developmental and sociopolitical perspectives.
Same as: FEMGEN 113

FEMGEN 214. Sexual Diversity and Health. 1 Unit.

Explores multiple aspects of sexual diversity and health, including: kink/BDSM, polyamory, trans* sexuality, asexuality, high-risk sex, inter-sex-tionality, questioning gender and sexual binaries, and more. The format includes a one-day conference featuring a variety of expert speakers covering different aspects of sexual diversity and health, followed by a debriefing and discussion session to integrate what has been heard and learned.
Same as: FEMGEN 114

FEMGEN 216. Women and the Book: Scribes, Artists, and Readers from Late Antiquity through the Fourteenth Century. 4-5 Units.

This course examines the cultural worlds of medieval women through particular attention to the books that they owned, commissioned, and created. Beginning with the earliest Christian centuries, the course proceeds chronologically, charting women¿s book ownership, scribal and artistic activity, and patronage from Late Antiquity through the fourteenth century. In addition to examining specific manuscripts (in facsimile, or digitally), we will consider ancillary questions to do with women¿s authorship, education and literacy, reading patterns, devotional practices, and visual traditions and representation.
Same as: ARTHIST 206H, HISTORY 216, HISTORY 316

FEMGEN 216X. Narrating Queer Trauma. 4-5 Units.

Psychiatrist Dori Laub has argued that the process of narrating trauma is essential to the healing process. Not only is telling the story important, but it is also crucial to have someone else bear witness to the narrative. But how do people even begin to narrate stories of violence and pain, and how do we become good listeners? How are these stories told and heard in the specific context of queer world making? This course will explore narratives of trauma in queer lives through literature, film, media, and performance in conjunction with trauma theory and psychoanalysis. We will pay specific attention to questions of community, healing, violence, and affect at the intersections of queerness and race, sex, disability, class, gender, and nationality.
Same as: FEMGEN 116

FEMGEN 217. Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Gender. 2-3 Units.

This course investigates how culture, and diversity, including gender, shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. We first examine the characteristics of engineering cultures -- what are the interactions, symbols and ideas, and practices that define engineering? We then investigate how gender and other markers of diverse identities are interdependent and culturally constructed, how gender and other kinds of diversity are experienced in engineering cultures, and how these experiences have consequence for engineering innovation and the engineering profession. Finally, we analyze examples of cultural change in engineering and implications for engineering knowledge and practice. The course involves weekly presentations by distinguished scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and exercises around one's own experiences in and related to engineering. Those taking the course for 3 units will also complete a research-based project, and must take the course for a letter grade to meet the undergraduate WAY-ED requirement.
Same as: ENGR 117, FEMGEN 117

FEMGEN 21S. StoryCraft: On Relationships. 2 Units.

This class prepares students to tell their stories in front of the audience for Beyond Sex Ed: Intimacy & Relationships in Spring 2018. Do we need love? And if so, what does it look like? In this class, students will learn about relationships from the inside-out: through an examination and telling of their lived experiences. We will explore various perspectives on intimacy and relationships that illuminate different aspects of our lives, and then dive into our own stories to discover the many facets of intimacy. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection.
Same as: TAPS 21S

FEMGEN 221B. The 'Woman Question' in Modern Russia. 5 Units.

Russian radicals believed that the status of women provided the measure of freedom in a society and argued for the extension of rights to women as a basic principle of social progress. The social status and cultural representations of Russian women from the mid-19th century to the present. The arguments and actions of those who fought for women's emancipation in the 19th century, theories and policies of the Bolsheviks, and the reality of women's lives under them. How the status of women today reflects on the measure of freedom in post-Communist Russia.
Same as: HISTORY 221B

FEMGEN 223X. The Politics of Gender in the United States. 5 Units.

Gender is one of the most recognizable and important identities in daily life. Yet it has been paid scant attention by political scientists in terms of its role on access to political power, opinion formation, group identity politics, election outcomes, and political representation. This class provides a survey of the literature on gender in American politics. We begin with the interdisciplinary research on the social construction of gender to understand what gender is and is not. Throughout the course we will use these theories to analyze and critique the approaches of quantitative research on gender politics.
Same as: POLISCI 223

FEMGEN 224. Challenging Sex and Gender Dichotomies in Medicine. 1 Unit.

Explores and challenges the traditional physiological bases for distinguishing human males from females, as well as the psychosocial factors that play a role in experiencing and expressing gender and sexuality. Topics include the influence of sociocultural (gender) norms and behaviors on human biology, the interactions of sex and gender on medical outcomes, the importance of understanding the spectrum of sex, gender, and sexuality in clinical practice.
Same as: FEMGEN 124, SOMGEN 257

FEMGEN 230. Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines. 2 Units.

(Same as FEMGEN 230). Focus is on development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, from childhood (pediatric) to older ages (geriatric), with consideration of gender identity, sexual orientation, sociocultural (predominantly U.S., not global) and religious values, and selected medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, e.g. spinal cord injury, etc. with discussion of sexual taboos and unusual sexual practices that you might encounter in a general medical setting.
Same as: CHPR 230, FEMGEN 230X, SOMGEN 230

FEMGEN 230X. Sexual Function and Diversity in Medical Disciplines. 2 Units.

(Same as FEMGEN 230). Focus is on development of personal and professional skills to interact with people across the diverse range of human sexuality, from childhood (pediatric) to older ages (geriatric), with consideration of gender identity, sexual orientation, sociocultural (predominantly U.S., not global) and religious values, and selected medical issues (e.g. hormonal therapy, disabilities, e.g. spinal cord injury, etc. with discussion of sexual taboos and unusual sexual practices that you might encounter in a general medical setting.
Same as: CHPR 230, FEMGEN 230, SOMGEN 230

FEMGEN 237. Health and Medical Impact of Sexual Assault across the Lifecourse. 1-3 Unit.

An overview of the acute and chronic physical and psychological health impact of sexual abuse through the perspective of survivors of childhood, adolescent, young and middle adult, and elder abuse, including special populations such as pregnant women, military and veterans, prison inmates, individuals with mental or physical impairments. Also addresses: race/ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other demographic and societal factors, including issues specific to college culture. Professionals with expertise in sexual assault present behavioral and prevention efforts such as bystander intervention training, medical screening, counseling and other interventions to manage the emotional trauma of abuse. Undergraduates must enroll for 3 units. Medical and graduate students may enroll for 1 to 3 units.
Same as: SOMGEN 237

FEMGEN 238. Men's Violence Against Women in Literature: A Critical and Social Analysis. 3-5 Units.

Literature, as a social and cultural product of its time, can inform and deepen our understanding of oppression. Using literature as a vehicle, this course will explore the impact of and responses to men's violence against women. Students will critically assess how the author has portrayed the topic of sexual assault and relationship abuse, how the characters and/or author exhibits victim blaming, and, if the characters were living today, would current policies adequately hold the perpetrator responsible, provide safety and justice for the survivor, and challenge rape culture. In dialogue with theoretical texts, we will analyze the literary representations of patriarchy that inform societal acceptance of gender-based violence, identify the historical prevalence of victim blaming and impunity in these works, and assess the implications on policy making at the individual, community and political level. Students will critically examine literature including Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Ubervilles, Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God, Louise Erdrich's The Round House and Joyce Carol Oates' We Were the Mulvaneys. There is an optional service-learning component.
Same as: FEMGEN 138

FEMGEN 24. Sexuality, Gender, and Religion. 2 Units.

From ancient times to the present, religious texts, authority figures, adherents, and critics have had a great deal to say about sexuality and gender, with powerful impacts in personal, social and political spheres. Today these debates are more wide ranging and public than ever. In this lecture and discussion series, distinguished scholars from within and beyond Stanford will consider how sexuality and gender become ¿religious¿ in Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, and Buddhism.
Same as: RELIGST 24

FEMGEN 240D. LGBT/Queer Life in the United States. 4-5 Units.

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Same as: FEMGEN 140D, HISTORY 257C

FEMGEN 241. Sex and Gender in Human Physiology and Disease. 2-3 Units.

(HumBio students must enroll in HUMBIO 140.) Chromosomal, hormonal and environmental influences that lead to male and female reproductive systems and neuroendocrine regulation and intersex variants. Masculinizing and feminizing effects of endogenous and exogenous sex hormones and other factors, in particular gender, on the musculoskeletal, neurological, cardiovascular, immunological and other systems and tissues, e.g. adipose, skin, etc. over the lifecourse, from conception to puberty, through reproductive phases (including changes during the menstrual cycle up to and beyond menopause in women, and with aging in both sexes). Transgender health issues. Guest lecturers. Prerequisite: Human Biology core or equivalent, or consent of instructor. HUMBIO students must enroll for 3 units.
Same as: HUMBIO 140, MED 240

FEMGEN 241W. Eighteenth-Century Women Writers. 5 Units.

The course will deal with a number of eighteenth-century English women writers--primarily novelists, but also poets, critics and playwrights. Authors to be studied in depth will include both relatively well-known writers such as Behn and Wollstonecraft, and lesser-known authors such as Sarah Scott, Elizabeth Inchbald and Anna Seward. Considerable attention will be paid to recent feminist scholarship on eighteenth-century women's writing, generic issues and the question of a "women's literary tradition," the material conditions of female authorship in the period, and the history of the eighteenth-century literary marketplace.
Same as: ENGLISH 241

FEMGEN 242. Sociology of Gender. 3 Units.

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the sociological conceptualization of gender. Through the sociological lens, gender is not an individual attribute or a role, but rather a system of social practices that constructs two different categories of people men and women and organizes social interaction and inequality around this difference. First we will explore what ¿gender¿ is according to sociologists and the current state of gender inequality in the labor market, at home, and at school. We will then investigate how gender structures our everyday lives through the individual, interactional, and institutional levels. Finally, we will discuss avenues for reducing gender inequality. Throughout the course, we will prioritize reading, evaluating, and questioning sociological theory and research on gender.".
Same as: FEMGEN 142, SOC 142, SOC 242

FEMGEN 24N. Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos. 3 Units.

(Formerly CLASSGEN 24N.) Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Same as: CLASSICS 16N

FEMGEN 250. Sex, Gender, and Power in Modern China. 3-5 Units.

Investigates how sex, gender, and power are entwined in the Chinese experience of modernity. Topics include anti-footbinding campaigns, free love/free sex, women's mobilization in revolution and war, the new Marriage Law of 1950, Mao's iron girls, postsocialist celebrations of sensuality, and emergent queer politics. Readings range from feminist theory to China-focused historiography, ethnography, memoir, biography, fiction, essay, and film. All course materials are in English.
Same as: CHINA 115, CHINA 215, FEMGEN 150

FEMGEN 250J. Baldwin and Hansberry: The Myriad Meanings of Love. 4 Units.

This course looks at major dramatic works by James Baldwin and Lorraine Hansberry. Both of these queer black writers had prophetic things to say about the world-historical significance of major dramas on the 20th Century including civil rights, revolution, gender, colonialism, racism, sexism, war, nationalism and as well as aesthetics and politics.
Same as: AFRICAAM 250J, AMSTUD 250J, CSRE 250J, TAPS 250J

FEMGEN 252. 'Tis all in pieces: Space and Gender on the Threshold of the Modern World. 5 Units.

These dramatic words, spoken by the British poet John Donne, signal the onset of the Early Modern world and the profound reconfigurations of space and related structures of thought, including conceptions of the self and the encoding of gender roles. We will explore the vibrant Early Modern world in the context of space and representations of gender, sexuality, and race as manifest in unprecedented literary and artistic forms, such as Shakespeare¿s ¿Othello,¿ Marlowe¿s ¿Doctor Faustus,,¿ the poetry of John Donne, the art of Michelangelo and Caravaggio as well as key historical and cultural texts. And we will visit the Cantor Arts Center (on campus) for a guided tour and lecture on art and perspective. We also will read and discuss selected texts from the modern world, such as Samuel Beckett¿s ¿Waiting for Godot¿ and poetry and commentary by Adrienne Rich, to study both changes and continuities with the Early Modern period. We will consider the vital cognitive role of the reader or viewer in the formation of particular instances of artistic form, including recent---and highly thought-provoking---material from the neurosciences and cognitive studies.nnNote: Instructor will consider changes in meeting times/days to accommodate student schedules if feasible. Please send request to: hbrooks@stanford.edu.
Same as: FEMGEN 152

FEMGEN 255. The Changing American Family. 4 Units.

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Same as: FEMGEN 155, SOC 155, SOC 255

FEMGEN 256. Current Topics and Controversies in Women's Health. 2-3 Units.

Interdisciplinary. Focus is primarily on the U.S., with selected global women's health topics. Topics include: leading causes of morbidity and mortality across the life course; reproductive (e.g. gynecologic & obstetric) health issues; sexual function; importance of lifestyle (e.g. diet, exercise, weight control), including eating disorders; mental health; sexual and relationship abuse; issues for special populations. In-class Student Debates on key controversies in women's health. Guest lecturers. HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 125 for 3 units. PhD minor in FGSS, enroll in FEMGEN 256 for 2 - 3 units and for a letter grade. Med students enroll in OBGYN 256 for 2 units. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Same as: HUMBIO 125, OBGYN 256

FEMGEN 257. Language as Political Tool: Feminist and LGBTQ Movements and Impacts. 3-5 Units.

How does a social or political movement gain traction? For example, how did 20th-century movements of the disenfranchised, such as the Civil Rights movement, LGBTQ movements, or feminist movements, gain a voice and eventually enact change? In the mediascape of today, where everyone with access to a computer could have a voice, how does a movement change the national conversation? How do written and verbal choices of the movements impact their success and outreach to supporters? In this course, students will write and revise their own arguments in order to best understand the rhetorical potential in these movements¿ choices and to consider how those rhetorical moves are incorporated into political discourse. We'll examine the role of rhetoric, the use of argument to persuade, in social movements working toward social justice, party platforms, and public policy.
Same as: AMSTUD 157X, FEMGEN 157

FEMGEN 258X. Black Feminist Theater and Theory. 4 Units.

From the rave reviews garnered by Angelina Weld Grimke's lynching play, Rachel to recent work by Lynn Nottage on Rwanda, black women playwrights have addressed key issues in modern culture and politics. We will analyze and perform work written by black women in the U.S., Britain and the Caribbean in the 20th and 21st centuries. Topics include: sexuality, surrealism, colonialism, freedom, violence, colorism, love, history, community and more. Playwrights include: Angelina Grimke, Lorriane Hansberry, Winsome Pinnock, Adrienne Kennedy, Suzan- Lori Parks, Ntzoke Shange, Pearl Cleage, Sarah Jones, Anna DeVeare Smith, Alice Childress, Lydia Diamond and Zora Neale Hurston.).
Same as: AFRICAAM 258, CSRE 258, TAPS 258

FEMGEN 260. Disability, Gender, and Identity: Women's Personal Experiences. 5 Units.

This course explores visible and invisible disabilities, focusing on issues of gender and identity in the personal experiences of women. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, the diversity of disability experiences, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and social and political aspects. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of assistance. The readings draw from the disability studies literature and emphasize women's personal narratives in sociological perspective. Note: Instructor Consent Required.
Same as: AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 360

FEMGEN 260X. Journeys in Women's Health and Sex and Gender in Medicine. 1 Unit.

Sponsored by the Stanford WSDM Center. Course focuses on health research on women and sex differences in medicine, acknowledges the "wisdom" of research and education on sex (e.g. chromosomes, gonads, gonadal hormones) and gender (sociocultural) factors influencing health. Brings alumni to share their professional journeys in the world of Women and Sex Differences in Medicine. Meets Women's Health Scholarly Concentration Requirement.
Same as: INDE 260

FEMGEN 261. Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the contribution of personal narratives to knowledge in the field of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. Each week, students do extensive readings of exemplary personal narratives that have contributed in substance and method to the field and that have opened up new areas of inquiry. These narratives deal especially with issues of individual and group identity; gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic diversity; and disability. Students select a topic of special interest to them to focus their readings and guide individual research during the quarter. The approach of the course is feminist, ethnographic, and welcoming of a variety of approaches to personal narrative. Instructor consent required; students apply at the first class meeting.
Same as: AMSTUD 261, FEMGEN 361

FEMGEN 262. Sex and the Early Church. 4 Units.

Sex and the Early Church examines the ways first- through sixth-century Christians addressed questions regarding human sexuality. We will pay particular attention to the relationship between sexuality and issues of gender, culture, power, and resistance. We will read a Roman gynecological manual, an ancient dating guide, the world's first harlequin romance novels, ancient pornography, early Christian martyrdom accounts, stories of female and male saints, instructions for how to best battle demons, visionary accounts, and monastic rules. These will be supplemented by modern scholarship in classics, early Christian studies, gender studies, queer studies, and the history of sexuality. The purpose of our exploration is not simply to better understand ancient views of gender and sexuality. Rather, this investigation of a society whose sexual system often seems so surprising aims to denaturalize many of our own assumptions concerning gender and sexuality. In the process, we will also examine the ways these first centuries of what eventually became the world's largest religious tradition has profoundly affected the sexual norms of our own time. The seminar assumes no prior knowledge of Judaism, Christianity, the bible, or ancient history.
Same as: RELIGST 262, RELIGST 362

FEMGEN 287G. A Woman's Life: 20th- (and 21st-) Century Memoirs by Women. 5 Units.

Why do women write memoirs? Why has the memoir form become such a popular genre for American female authors? What do such books reveal, More broadly, about the condition of women in Contemporary Society? We will approach these questions by reading autobiographical works by some if not all of the following writers: Gertrude Stein, Joan Didion, Kathryn Harris, Audre Lorde, Patti Smith, Lucy Grealy, Michelle Tea, Jeannette Walls, Carrie Fisher, and Alison Bechdel.
Same as: ENGLISH 287G

FEMGEN 28N. Queer Lives in Music. 3 Units.

Queer Lives in Music examines music by queer musicians in genres including punk, opera, rock, symphony, musical theater, folk, and jazz. We will study lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer composers, performers, and listeners, to learn how queer people have expressed individual identity and built communities through music. We will learn how sexual stigma, taboo, oppression, and resistance have impacted musical creativity and music history. Class is designed for students interested in music, social history, cultural studies, and gender/sexuality studies.
Same as: MUSIC 28N

FEMGEN 293E. Female Divinities in China. 4-5 Units.

This course examines the fundamental role of powerful goddesses in Chinese religion. It covers the entire range of imperial history and down to the present. It will look at, among other questions, what roles goddesses played in the spirit world, how this is related to the roles of human women, and why a civilization that excluded women from the public sphere granted them a dominant place, in the religious sphere. It is based entirely on readings in English.
Same as: HISTORY 293E, HISTORY 393E, RELIGST 257X, RELIGST 357X

FEMGEN 297. Gender and Education in Global and Comparative Perspectives. 4 Units.

Theories and perspectives from the social sciences relevant to the role of education in changing, modifying, or reproducing structures of gender differentiation and hierarchy. Cross-national research on the status of girls and women and the role of development organizations and processes.
Same as: EDUC 197, SOC 134

FEMGEN 299. Graduate Workshop: Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 1-3 Unit.

Theory, methods, and research in feminist, gender, and sexuality studies, through presentations of ongoing work by students, faculty, and guest speakers, and discussion of recent literature and controversies, feminist pedagogy and career development issues. Restricted to doctoral students. Repeatable for credit. Required for PhD Minors in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (3 quarters min.).

FEMGEN 310X. Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality.
Same as: COMPLIT 110, COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X

FEMGEN 313. Performance and Performativity. 1-4 Unit.

Performance theory through topics including: affect/trauma, embodiment, empathy, theatricality/performativity, specularity/visibility, liveness/disappearance, belonging/abjection, and utopias and dystopias. Readings from Schechner, Phelan, Austin, Butler, Conquergood, Roach, Schneider, Silverman, Caruth, Fanon, Moten, Anzaldúa, Agamben, Freud, and Lacan. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENGLISH 313, TAPS 313

FEMGEN 314. Performing Identities. 4 Units.

This course examines claims and counter-claims of identity, a heated political and cultural concept over the past few decades. We will consider the ways in which theories of performance have offered generative discursive frameworks for the study of identities, variously shaped by vectors of race, gender, sexuality, religion, class, nation, ethnicity, among others. How is identity as a social category different from identity as a unique and personal attribute of selfhood? Throughout the course we will focus on the inter-locking ways in which certain dimensions of identity become salient at particular historical conjunctures. In addition, we will consider the complex discourses of identity within transnational and historical frameworks. Readings include Robin Bernstein, Ann Pellegrini, Tavia Nyong¿o, Jose Munoz, Michael Taussig, Wendy Brown, Talal Asad, Jasbir Puar, among others.
Same as: TAPS 314

FEMGEN 360. Disability, Gender, and Identity: Women's Personal Experiences. 5 Units.

This course explores visible and invisible disabilities, focusing on issues of gender and identity in the personal experiences of women. The course emphasizes psychological as well as physical health, the diversity of disability experiences, self-labeling, caretaking, stigma and passing, and social and political aspects. Disabilities covered include blindness, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, arthritis, emotional and learning disabilities, and conditions requiring wheelchairs and other forms of assistance. The readings draw from the disability studies literature and emphasize women's personal narratives in sociological perspective. Note: Instructor Consent Required.
Same as: AMSTUD 260, FEMGEN 260

FEMGEN 361. Personal Narratives in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. 4-5 Units.

This course explores the contribution of personal narratives to knowledge in the field of feminist, gender, and sexuality studies. Each week, students do extensive readings of exemplary personal narratives that have contributed in substance and method to the field and that have opened up new areas of inquiry. These narratives deal especially with issues of individual and group identity; gender, sexuality, racial and ethnic diversity; and disability. Students select a topic of special interest to them to focus their readings and guide individual research during the quarter. The approach of the course is feminist, ethnographic, and welcoming of a variety of approaches to personal narrative. Instructor consent required; students apply at the first class meeting.
Same as: AMSTUD 261, FEMGEN 261

FEMGEN 363D. Feminist Theory: Thinking Through/With/About the Gendered Body. 5 Units.

Organized around a series of case studies, this graduate feminist theory course will consider issues related to the complex relationship between sex, gender, sexuality, biological reproduction, violence, and social power. It is a core course for the PhD minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. Enrollment is limited to PhD-level students.

FEMGEN 36N. Gay Autobiography. 4 Units.

Preference to freshmen. Gender, identity, and solidarity as represented in nine autobiographies: Isherwood, Ackerley, Duberman, Monette, Louganis, Barbin, Cammermeyer, Gingrich, and Lorde. To what degree do these writers view sexual orientation as a defining feature of their selves? Is there a difference between the way men and women view identity? What politics follow from these writers' experiences?.
Same as: HISTORY 36N

FEMGEN 37S. Love and Lust in the French Empire, 1830-1962. 5 Units.

Can we write the history of private life? Throughout this course, we will try out different historical approaches to the history of intimate matters in the French Empire. Beyond a more complete understanding of what colonialism was like, studying the intimate draws attention to the societal norms and anxieties of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Patriarchy, racism, and classism the power structures inherent in colonialism¿produce fruitful sites for prying into intimate matters. To that end, we will probe a wide variety of primary sources, including novels, films, paintings, letters, diaries, travel accounts produced by male and female Europeans, Africans, Arabs, and East Asians. Topics covered through these sources include, colonial masculinity and femininity; divorce; homosexuality; prostitution; and sexual violence. We will transcend racial and class divides, and cover a diverse geography including, France, North and West Africa, and Vietnam.
Same as: FRENCH 157, HISTORY 37S

FEMGEN 395. Graduate Independent Study. 1-15 Unit.

Students pursue a special subject of investigation under supervision of an affiliated faculty member. May be repeated for credit.

FEMGEN 395J. Gender and Sexuality in Chinese History. 4-5 Units.

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Same as: CHINGEN 395, HISTORY 395J

FEMGEN 3B. Transhistory: Gender Diversity from Medieval to Modern. 1-3 Unit.

This series of six lectures explores the history of gender crossings and transgressions, broadly defined. Several Stanford faculty members and one visitor will present historical interpretations of how and why individuals crossed gender boundaries in the past, as well as how different societies have reacted to gender crossing. The topics range from medieval to modern times and across geographic regions, including Europe, China, South Asia and the Americas.
Same as: HISTORY 3B

FEMGEN 3E. Michelle Obama in American Culture. 1 Unit.

Never before has the United States had a First Lady like Michelle Obama. During her eight years in the White House, Michelle Obama transformed traditional meanings of womanhood, marriage, motherhood, and style and created new possibilities for what it means to be strong and what it means to be beautiful. No First Lady has ever been so scrutinized but also so beloved: from her J. Crew dresses to her Let's Move campaign, from her vegetable gardens to her chiseled arms, and from her powerful speeches to her casual and always authentic personality. This class examines the impact on American culture of the most popular First Lady in American history.
Same as: AFRICAAM 3E, AMSTUD 3E, CSRE 3E, HISTORY 3E

FEMGEN 434. Gender and Performance. 5 Units.

This seminar seeks to investigate relationships between performance, gender, and the body politic through a discussion of embodiment, body cultures, queerness, desire, representation. Through a weekly engagement with film texts from across the world as well as theoretical perspectives on gender and performance in various geo-political contexts, we will explore the intersections of gender with race, class, national discourse, and performance traditions. The seminar is conceived to be interdisciplinary and participants are encouraged to introduce and work with texts from other disciplines, including visual arts, theatre, dance, literature etc. No prior engagement with film studies is required. Screening times may range from 90 to 180 minutes.
Same as: FILMSTUD 434, MUSIC 434, TAPS 344A

FEMGEN 444. Graduate Research Seminar: Gender in Science, Medicine, and Engineering. 5 Units.

Theory and practice of gender in STEM. 1. "Fix the Numbers of Women" focuses on increasing women's participation; 2. "Fix the Institutions" promotes gender equality in careers through structural change in research organizations; 3. "Fix the Knowledge" or "gendered innovations" stimulates excellence in science and technology by integrating gender analysis into research. Seminar explores harnessing the creative power of gender analysis to enhance knowledge and spark innovation.
Same as: HISTORY 444

FEMGEN 461A. Graduate Research Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, the Family, and Sexuality. 4-5 Units.

Instructor consent required for non-History graduate students. Seminar introduces graduate students to current issues and methods in the history of women, gender, the family, and sexuality in the United States. After an initial period of working on secondary and primary source bibliographies, and some discussion of secondary readings, each student will choose a topic for an original research paper (20-30 pages) based on primary sources. Each student will complete a first draft of the paper by late May and a revised paper by the end of Spring Quarter.
Same as: HISTORY 461A

FEMGEN 461B. Graduate Research Seminar on the History of Women, Gender, the Family, and Sexuality Part II. 4-5 Units.

Prerequisite: 461A.nnInstructor consent required for non-History graduate students.
Same as: HISTORY 461B

FEMGEN 466. Queer America. 5 Units.

This class explores queer art, photography and politics in the United States since 1930. Our approach will be grounded in close attention to the history and visual representation of sexual minorities in particular historical moments and social contexts. We will consider the cultural and political effects of World War II, the Cold War, the civil rights movement, psychedelics, hippie culture and sexual liberation, lesbian separatism, the AIDS crisis, and marriage equality.
Same as: ARTHIST 466

FEMGEN 50Q. Life and Death of Words. 4 Units.

In this course, we explore the world of words: their creation, evolution, borrowing, change, and death. Words are the key to understanding the culture and ideas of a people, and by tracing the biographies of words we are able to discern how the world was, is, and might be perceived and described. We trace how words are formed, and how they change in pronunciation, spelling, meaning, and usage over time. How does a word get into the dictionary? What do words reveal about status, class, region, and race? How is the language of men and women critiqued differently within our society? How does slang evolve? How do languages become endangered or die, and what is lost when they do? We will visit the Facebook Content Strategy Team and learn more about the role words play in shaping our online experiences. Together, the class will collect Stanford language and redesign the digital dictionary of the future. Trigger Warning: Some of the subject matter of this course is sensitive and may cause offense. Please consider this prior to enrolling in the course.
Same as: CSRE 50Q, ENGLISH 50Q, LINGUIST 50Q, NATIVEAM 50Q

FEMGEN 52N. Spoken Sexuality: Language and the Social Construction of Sexuality. 3 Units.

The many ways language is used in the construction of sexuality and sexual identity. How language is used as a resource for performing and perceiving sexual identity. Drawing on linguistic analyses of pronunciation, word choice, and grammar, questions such as: Is there a gay accent? Why isn't there a lesbian accent? How do transgendered people modify their linguistic behavior when transitioning? How are unmarked (heterosexual) identities linguistically constructed? Sexuality as an issue of identity, as well as of desire. Iconic relations between elements of language such as breathy voice quality and high pitch, and aspects of desire such as arousal and excitement. How language encodes ideologies about sexuality; how language is used to talk about sexuality in public discourses about gay marriage and bullying, as well as in personal narratives of coming out. How language encodes dominant ideologies about sexuality, evident in labels for sexual minorities as well as terminology for sex acts. Discussions of readings, explorations of how sexuality is portrayed in popular media, and analyses of primary data. Final research paper on a topic of student choice.
Same as: LINGUIST 52N

FEMGEN 54N. African American Women's Lives. 3 Units.

This course encourages students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences, which often have been placed on the periphery of American history and American life.
Same as: AFRICAAM 54N, AMSTUD 54N, CSRE 54N, HISTORY 54N

FEMGEN 54Q. African American Women's Lives. 3-4 Units.

Preference to sophomores. African American women have been placed on the periphery of many historical documents. This course will encourage students to think critically about historical sources and to use creative and rigorous historical methods to recover African American women¿s experiences. Drawing largely on primary sources such as letters, personal journals, literature and film, this course explores the everyday lives of African American women in 19th- and 20th-century America. We will begin in our present moment with a discussion of Michelle Obama and then we will look back on the lives and times of a wide range of African American women including: Charlotte Forten Grimké, a 19th-century reformer and teacher; Nella Larsen, a Harlem Renaissance novelist; Josephine Baker, the expatriate entertainer and singer; and Ida B. Wells and Ella Baker, two luminaries of civil rights activism. We will examine the struggles of African American women to define their own lives and improve the social, economic, political and cultural conditions of black communities. Topics will include women¿s enslavement and freedom, kinship and family relations, institution and community building, violence, labor and leisure, changing gender roles, consumer and beauty culture, social activism, and the politics of sexuality.
Same as: AFRICAAM 54Q, AMSTUD 54Q, HISTORY 54Q

FEMGEN 63N. The Feminist Critique: The History and Politics of Gender Equality. 3-4 Units.

This course explores the long history of ideas about gender and equality. Each week we read, dissect, compare, and critique a set of primary historical documents (political and literary) from around the world, moving from the 15th century to the present. We tease out changing arguments about education, the body, sexuality, violence, labor, politics, and the very meaning of gender, and we place feminist critics within national and global political contexts.
Same as: AMSTUD 63N, CSRE 63N, HISTORY 63N

FEMGEN 86Q. Love as a Force for Social Justice. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Biological, psychological, religious, social and cultural perspectives on the concept of agape love. How love is conceptualized across cultures; agape love as the basis of many religions; different kinds of love; the biology of love; love in action for social justice; the languages of love, including art, literature, music, and poetry. Emphasis is on blog writing, participation, and oral presentation.
Same as: HUMBIO 86Q

FEMGEN 93. Late Imperial China. 3 Units.

(Same as HISTORY 193. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 193.) A survey of Chinese history from the 11th century to the collapse of the imperial state in 1911. Topics include absolutism, gentry society, popular culture, gender and sexuality, steppe nomads, the Jesuits in China, peasant rebellion, ethnic conflict, opium, and the impact of Western imperialism.
Same as: CHINA 93, HISTORY 93

FEMGEN 94H. Introduction to Disability Studies and Disability Rights. 4 Units.

Disability Studies is a relatively new interdisciplinary academic field that examines disability as a social, cultural and political phenomenon. This is an introductory course to the field of disability studies and it aims to investigate the complex concept of disability through a variety of prisms and disciplines including social psychology, the humanities, legal studies and media studies. This course also focuses on the multiple connections between the study of disability and other identities including class, race, ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation, and also includes a comparative look at how disability is treated across cultures. Some of the topics covered in the class are disability and the family, the history of the disability rights movement, the development of disability identity and its intersectionality, antidiscrimination law, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, bioethical dilemmas pertaining to disability and more.
Same as: ETHICSOC 104X, HUMRTS 104, SOC 186

FEMGEN 97. Bow Down: Queer Hip-Hop Pedagogy. 3 Units.

Although Hip-Hop is frequently associated with homophobia, violence, sexism, and misogyny it continues to resonate with people the world over. By going beyond a surface level critique of Hip-Hop culture, this course explores the ways that queerness operates in and in conjunction with Hip-Hop culture. Topics covered include Hip-Hop and feminism, tensions between Hip-Hop and queerness, the role of commercialization of Hip-Hop in queer representation and inclusion with the culture, and how the intersections of Hip-Hop and queer theory can speak to issues of identity, power and privilege.

FEMGEN 99. Seeds of Change. 1 Unit.

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students¿ technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative¿s evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu *Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. See syllabus for adjusted course schedule and times.

FEMGEN 9SI. A Road to Diversity inclusion: Learning to Embrace the Intersection of Identities within Athletics. 1 Unit.

This course explores the interaction of one¿s identities within the context of athletics. With an emphasis on the importance of self-awareness and story telling, we will navigate how all identities intersect and affect the privilege we receive within current society. We will specifically look at how race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status, mental health, and disabilities interact with our identity as athletes. ¿A Road to Diversity Inclusion: Learning to Embrace the Intersection of Identities within Athletics¿ will help athletes find their voice and use it for positive social change within their communities.