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ENGR 10. Introduction to Engineering Analysis. 4 Units.

Integrated approach to the fundamental scientific principles that are the cornerstones of engineering analysis: conservation of mass, atomic species, charge, momentum, angular momentum, energy, production of entropy expressed in the form of balance equations on carefully defined systems, and incorporating simple physical models. Emphasis is on setting up analysis problems arising in engineering. Topics: simple analytical solutions, numerical solutions of linear algebraic equations, and laboratory experiences. Provides the foundation and tools for subsequent engineering courses. Prerequisite: AP Physics and AP Calculus or equivalent.

ENGR 100. Teaching Public Speaking. 3 Units.

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 102W. Writing for Engineers. 3 Units.

Intensive practicum focusing on effective communication of technical, scientific, and professional information in industry and academia. Best writing practices for varied audiences, purposes, and media. Group workshops and individual conferences with instructors. Designed for undergraduates.

ENGR 103. Public Speaking. 3 Units.

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Same as: ENGR 203

ENGR 105. Feedback Control Design. 3 Units.

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisite: EE 102B, CME 102 (MATH 53) or ME 161.

ENGR 110. Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110). 1-3 Unit.

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Same as: ENGR 210

ENGR 113A. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 213A

ENGR 113B. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 213B

ENGR 113C. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 213C

ENGR 113D. SOLAR DECATHLON 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 213D

ENGR 115. Design the Tech Challenge. 2 Units.

Students work with Tech Museum of San Jose staff to design the Tech Challenge, a yearly engineering competition for 6-12th grade students. Brainstorming, field trips to the museum, prototyping, coaching, and presentations to the Tech Challenge advisory board. See at http://techchallenge.thetech.org. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENGR 215

ENGR 117. Expanding Engineering Limits: Culture, Diversity, and Gender. 2-3 Units.

This course investigates how culture, and diversity, including gender, shape who becomes an engineer, what problems get solved, and the quality of designs, technology, and products. We first examine the characteristics of engineering cultures -- what are the interactions, symbols and ideas, and practices that define engineering? We then investigate how gender and other markers of diverse identities are interdependent and culturally constructed, how gender and other kinds of diversity are experienced in engineering cultures, and how these experiences have consequence for engineering innovation and the engineering profession. Finally, we analyze examples of cultural change in engineering and implications for engineering knowledge and practice. The course involves weekly presentations by distinguished scholars and engineers, readings, short writing assignments, small-group discussion, and exercises around one's own experiences in and related to engineering. Those taking the course for 3 units will also complete a research-based project, and must take the course for a letter grade to meet the undergraduate WAY-ED requirement.
Same as: FEMGEN 117, FEMGEN 217

ENGR 118. Cross-Cultural Design for Service. 3 Units.

Students spend the summer in China working collaboratively to use design thinking for a project in the countryside. Students learn and apply the principles of design innovation including user research, ideation, prototyping, storytelling and more in a cross cultural setting to design a product or service that will benefit Chinese villagers. Students should be prepared to work independently in a developing region of China, to deal with persistent ambiguity, and to work with a cross-cultural, diverse team of students on their projects. Applications for Summer 2012 were due in March.

ENGR 119. Community Engagement Preparation Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Same as: ENGR 219

ENGR 120. Fundamentals of Petroleum Engineering. 3 Units.

Lectures, problems, field trip. Engineering topics in petroleum recovery; origin, discovery, and development of oil and gas. Chemical, physical, and thermodynamic properties of oil and natural gas. Material balance equations and reserve estimates using volumetric calculations. Gas laws. Single phase and multiphase flow through porous media.
Same as: ENERGY 120

ENGR 130. Science, Technology, and Contemporary Society. 4-5 Units.

Key social, cultural, and values issues raised by contemporary scientific and technological developments; distinctive features of science and engineering as sociotechnical activities; major influences of scientific and technological developments on 20th-century society, including transformations and problems of work, leisure, human values, the fine arts, and international relations; ethical conflicts in scientific and engineering practice; and the social shaping and management of contemporary science and technology.

ENGR 131. Ethical Issues in Engineering. 4 Units.

Fundamental ethical responsibilities of engineers. Ethical responsibilities to society, employers, colleagues, and clients; ethics, cost-benefit-risk analysis, and safety; informed consent; ethical responsibilities of radical engineering design; the ethics of whistleblowing; ethical issues engineers face as expert witnesses, consultants, and managers; ethical issues in engineering research, design, testing, and manufacturing; ethical issues arising from engineering work in foreign countries; and ethical issues arising from the social, cultural, and environmental contexts of contemporary engineering work. Contemporary case studies. Enrollment strictly limited to 60. Students seeking a slot must attend and complete an application at the first class session.

ENGR 14. Intro to Solid Mechanics. 3 Units.

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in PHYSICS 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: PHYSICS 41.

ENGR 140A. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 3-4 Units.

First of three-part sequence for students selected to the Mayfield Fellows Program. Management and leadership within high technology startups, focusing on entrepreneurial skills related to product and market strategy, venture financing and cash flow management, team recruiting and organizational development, and the challenges of managing growth and handling adversity in emerging ventures. Other engineering faculty, founders, and venture capitalists participate as appropriate. Recommended: accounting or finance course (MS&E 140, ECON 90, or ENGR 60).

ENGR 140B. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 1-2 Unit.

Open to Mayfield Fellows only; taken during the summer internship at a technology startup. Students exchange experiences and continue the formal learning process. Activities journal. Credit given following quarter.

ENGR 140C. Leadership of Technology Ventures. 2-3 Units.

Open to Mayfield Fellows only. Capstone to the 140 sequence. Students, faculty, employers, and venture capitalists share recent internship experiences and analytical frameworks. Students develop living case studies and integrative project reports.

ENGR 145. Technology Entrepreneurship. 4 Units.

How do you create a successful start-up? What is entrepreneurial leadership in a large firm? What are the differences between an idea and true opportunity? How does an entrepreneur form a team and gather the resources necessary to create a great enterprise? Mentor-guided project focused on developing students' startup ideas, immersion in nuances of innovation and early stage entrepreneurship, case studies, research on the entrepreneurial process, and the opportunity to network with Silicon Valley's top entrepreneurs and venture capitalists. For undergraduates of all majors who seek to understand the formation and growth of high-impact start-ups in areas such as information, energy, medical and consumer technologies. No prerequisites. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 15. Dynamics. 3 Units.

The application of Newton's Laws to solve 2-D and 3-D static and dynamic problems, particle and rigid body dynamics, freebody diagrams, and equations of motion, with application to mechanical, biomechanical, and aerospace systems. Computer numerical solution and dynamic response. Prerequisites: Calculus (differentiation and integration) such as MATH 41; and ENGR 14 (statics and strength) or a mechanics course in physics such as PHYSICS 41.

ENGR 150. Data Challenge Lab. 3-5 Units.

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, data visualization, exploratory data analysis, and basic modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Limited enrollment; application required. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.

ENGR 154. Vector Calculus for Engineers. 5 Units.

Computation and visualization using MATLAB. Differential vector calculus: analytic geometry in space, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, gradient, unconstrained maxima and minima, Lagrange multipliers. Introduction to linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, methods of solution and applications. Integral vector calculus: multiple integrals in Cartesian, cylindrical, and spherical coordinates, line integrals, scalar potential, surface integrals, Green¿s, divergence, and Stokes¿ theorems. Examples and applications drawn from various engineering fields. Prerequisites: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegrees-nextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt), or MATH 19-21.
Same as: CME 100

ENGR 155A. Ordinary Differential Equations for Engineers. 5 Units.

Analytical and numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations arising in engineering applications: Solution of initial and boundary value problems, series solutions, Laplace transforms, and nonlinear equations; numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations, accuracy of numerical methods, linear stability theory, finite differences. Introduction to MATLAB programming as a basic tool kit for computations. Problems from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: 10 units of AP credit (Calc BC with 5, or Calc AB with 5 or placing out of the single variable math placement test: https://exploredegreesnextyear.stanford.edu/undergraduatedegreesandprograms/#aptextt),), or MATH 19-21. Recommended: CME100.
Same as: CME 102

ENGR 155B. Linear Algebra and Partial Differential Equations for Engineers. 5 Units.

Linear algebra: matrix operations, systems of algebraic equations, Gaussian elimination, undetermined and overdetermined systems, coupled systems of ordinary differential equations, eigensystem analysis, normal modes. Fourier series with applications, partial differential equations arising in science and engineering, analytical solutions of partial differential equations. Numerical methods for solution of partial differential equations: iterative techniques, stability and convergence, time advancement, implicit methods, von Neumann stability analysis. Examples and applications from various engineering fields. Prerequisite: CME 102/ENGR 155A.
Same as: CME 104

ENGR 155C. Introduction to Probability and Statistics for Engineers. 4 Units.

Probability: random variables, independence, and conditional probability; discrete and continuous distributions, moments, distributions of several random variables. Topics in mathematical statistics: random sampling, point estimation, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, non-parametric tests, regression and correlation analyses; applications in engineering, industrial manufacturing, medicine, biology, and other fields. Prerequisite: CME 100/ENGR154 or MATH 51 or 52.
Same as: CME 106

ENGR 159Q. Japanese Companies and Japanese Society. 3 Units.

Preference to sophomores. The structure of a Japanese company from the point of view of Japanese society. Visiting researchers from Japanese companies give presentations on their research enterprise. The Japanese research ethic. The home campus equivalent of a Kyoto SCTI course.
Same as: MATSCI 159Q

ENGR 192. Engineering Public Service Project. 1-2 Unit.

Volunteer work on a public service project with a technical engineering component. Project requires a faculty sponsor and a community partner such as a nonprofit organization, school, or individual. Required report. See http://soe.stanford.edu/publicservice. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 193. Discover Engineering: How to Aim High, Embrace Uncertainty, and Achieve Impact. 1 Unit.

This weekly seminar will provide students of all engineering majors with practical leadership skills training (e.g. how to network, advocate for yourself, assert influence) in order to make innovative and meaningful contributions in their fields. Career exploration and mentorship opportunities will be delivered through an inspiring line up of guest speakers and interactive activities, demonstrations and tours. May be repeat for credit.

ENGR 199. Special Studies in Engineering. 1-15 Unit.

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the section number corresponding to the particular faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 199W. Writing of Original Research for Engineers. 1-3 Unit.

Technical writing in science and engineering. Students produce a substantial document describing their research, methods, and results. Prerequisite: completion of freshman writing requirements; prior or concurrent in 2 units of research in the major department; and consent of instructor. WIM for BioMedical Computation.

ENGR 20. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. 4 Units.

Overview of chemical engineering through discussion and engineering analysis of physical and chemical processes. Topics: overall staged separations, material and energy balances, concepts of rate processes, energy and mass transport, and kinetics of chemical reactions. Applications of these concepts to areas of current technological importance: biotechnology, energy, production of chemicals, materials processing, and purification. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.
Same as: CHEMENG 20

ENGR 202C. Technical Writing. 3 Units.

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science. This offering for CEE SDC students only.

ENGR 202S. Directed Writing Projects. 1 Unit.

Individualized writing instruction for students working on writing projects such as dissertations, proposals, grant applications, honors or engineering theses, journal articles, conference papers, and teaching and research statements. Weekly one-on-one conferences with writing instructors from the Technical Communication Program. Students receive close attention to and detailed feedback on their writing. No prerequisite. Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit. This course may be repeated for credit.

ENGR 202W. Technical Writing. 3 Units.

How to write clear, concise, and well-ordered technical prose. Principles of editing for structure and style. Applications to a variety of genres in engineering and science.

ENGR 203. Public Speaking. 3 Units.

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Same as: ENGR 103

ENGR 205. Introduction to Control Design Techniques. 3 Units.

Review of root-locus and frequency response techniques for control system analysis and synthesis. State-space techniques for modeling, full-state feedback regulator design, pole placement, and observer design. Combined observer and regulator design. Lab experiments on computers connected to mechanical systems. Prerequisites: 105, MATH 103, 113. Recommended: Matlab.

ENGR 207A. Linear Control Systems I. 3 Units.

Introduction to control of discrete-time linear systems. State-space models. Controllability and observability. The linear quadratic regulator. Prerequisite: 105 or 205.

ENGR 207B. Linear Control Systems II. 3 Units.

Probabilistic methods for control and estimation. Statistical inference for discrete and continuous random variables. Linear estimation with Gaussian noise. The Kalman filter. Prerequisite: EE 263.

ENGR 209A. Analysis and Control of Nonlinear Systems. 3 Units.

Introduction to nonlinear phenomena: multiple equilibria, limit cycles, bifurcations, complex dynamical behavior. Planar dynamical systems, analysis using phase plane techniques. Describing functions. Lyapunov stability theory. SISO feedback linearization, sliding mode control. Design examples. Prerequisite: 205.

ENGR 21. Engineering of Systems. 3 Units.

A high-level look at techniques for analyzing and designing complex, multidisciplinary engineering systems, such as aircraft, spacecraft, automobiles, power plants, cellphones, robots, biomedical devices, and many others. The need for multi-level design, modeling and simulation approaches, computation-based design, and hardware and software-in-the-loop simulations will be demonstrated through a variety of examples and case studies. Several aspects of system engineering will be applied to the design of large-scale interacting systems and contrasted with subsystems such as hydraulic systems, electrical systems, and brake systems. The use of design-thinking, story-boarding, mockups, sensitivity analysis, simulation, team-based design, and the development of presentation skills will be fostered through several realistic examples in several fields of engineering.

ENGR 210. Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110). 1-3 Unit.

Seminar and student project course. Explores the medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, and individuals with disabilities. Field trips to local facilities, an assistive technology faire, and a film screening. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. 3 units for students (juniors, seniors, and graduate students preferred) who pursue a team-based assistive technology project with a community partner - enrollment limited to 24. 1 unit for seminar attendance only (CR/NC) or individual project (letter grade). Total enrollment limited to classroom capacity of 50. Projects can be continued as independent study in Spring Quarter. See http://engr110.stanford.edu/. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Same as: ENGR 110

ENGR 213. Solar Decathlon. 1-4 Unit.

Open to all engineering majors. Project studio for all work related to the Solar Decathlon 2013 competition. Each student will develop a personal work plan for the quarter with his or her advisor and perform multidisciplinary collaboration on designing systems for the home or pre-construction planning. Work may continue through the summer as a paid internship, as well as through the next academic year. For more information about the team and the competition, please visit solardecathlon.stanford.edu.

ENGR 213A. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 113A

ENGR 213B. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 113B

ENGR 213C. Solar Decathlon 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 113C

ENGR 213D. SOLAR DECATHLON 2015. 3 Units.

Open to all majors. Seminar / Lab format course facilitates the student-led administration, conception, development, and execution of the Solar Decathlon 2015 competition entry sponsored by the US Department of Energy. (http://www.solardecathlon.gov/) Students shall learn best practices in creating design teams to address multi-disciplinary design problems. Students shall work both as individuals and in teams across multiple Stanford SD2015 phases of project management, research, fundraising, design, engineering, contracting, construction administration, and competitive testing in Irvine CA.
Same as: ENGR 113D

ENGR 215. Design the Tech Challenge. 2 Units.

Students work with Tech Museum of San Jose staff to design the Tech Challenge, a yearly engineering competition for 6-12th grade students. Brainstorming, field trips to the museum, prototyping, coaching, and presentations to the Tech Challenge advisory board. See at http://techchallenge.thetech.org. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENGR 115

ENGR 219. Community Engagement Preparation Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar is designed for engineering students who have already committed to an experiential learning program working directly with a community partner on a project of mutual benefit. This seminar is targeted at students participating in the Summer Service Learning Program offered through Stanford¿s Global Engineering Program.
Same as: ENGR 119

ENGR 231. Transformative Design. 3 Units.

Too many alums are doing what they've always been told they're good at, and are living with regret and a sense that they're just resigned to doing this thing for the rest of their lives. Capabilities displaced their values as the primary decision driver in their lives. Our ultimate goal is to restore a sense of agency and passion into the lives of current Stanford students by creating the space to explore and experiment with the greatest design project possible: YOUR LIFE. We will turn d.school tools and mindsets onto the topic of our lives -- not in theory, but in reality -- and will prototype changes to make your life and career more fulfilling and rewarding. We will actively empathize and experiment in your life and work, so if you don't want to do that kind of self-examination, this class will not be a good fit for you.

ENGR 240. Introduction to Micro and Nano Electromechanical Systems. 3 Units.

Miniaturization technologies now have important roles in materials, mechanical, and biomedical engineering practice, in addition to being the foundation for information technology. This course will target an audience of first-year engineering graduate students and motivated senior-level undergraduates, with the goal of providing an introduction to M/NEMS fabrication techniques, selected device applications, and the design tradeoffs in developing systems. The course has no specific prerequisites, other than graduate or senior standing in engineering; otherwise, students will require permission of the instructors.

ENGR 241. Advanced Micro and Nano Fabrication Laboratory. 3 Units.

This project course focuses on developing processes for ExFab, a shared facility that supports flexible lithography, heterogeneous integration, and rapid micro prototyping. Team projects are approved by the instructor and are mentored by an ExFab staff member. Students will plan and execute experiments and document them in a final presentation and report, to be made available on the lab¿s Wiki for the benefit of the Stanford research community.

ENGR 243. LAW, TECHNOLOGY, AND LIBERTY. 2 Units.

New technologies from gene editing to networked computing have already transformed our economic and social structures and are increasingly changing what it means to be human. What role has law played in regulating and shaping these technologies? And what role can and should it play in the future? This seminar will consider these and related questions, focusing on new forms of networked production, the new landscape of security and scarcity, and the meaning of human nature and ecology in an era of rapid technological change. Readings will be drawn from a range of disciplines, including science and engineering, political economy, and law. The course will feature several guest speakers. There are no formal prerequisites in either engineering or law, but students should be committed to pursuing novel questions in an interdisciplinary context. The enrollment goal is to balance the class composition between law and non-law students. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. This course is cross-listed with the School of Engineering (TBA). May be repeat for credit.
Same as: BIOE 242

ENGR 245. The Lean LaunchPad: Getting Your Lean Startup Off the Ground. 3-4 Units.

Apply the "Lean Startup" principles; "business model canvas," "customer development" and "Agile Engineering" to prototype, test, and iterate your idea while discovering if you have a profitable business model. This is the class adopted by the NSF and NIH as the Innovation Corps. Apply and work in teams. Info sessions held in November and December. Team applications required in December. Proposals can be software, hardware, or service of any kind. Projects are experiential and require incrementally building the product while talking to customers/partners each week. See course website http://stanfordleanlaunchpad.weebly.com/. Prerequisite: interest and passion in exploring whether a technology idea can become a real company. Limited enrollment.

ENGR 250. Data Challenge Lab. 1-6 Unit.

In this lab, students develop the practical skills of data science by solving a series of increasingly difficult, real problems. Skills developed include: data manipulation, exploratory data analysis, data visualization, and predictive modeling. The data challenges each student undertakes are based upon their current skills. Students receive one-on-one coaching and see how expert practitioners solve the same challenges. Prerequisite: ENGR150. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.

ENGR 25B. Biotechnology. 3 Units.

Biology and chemistry fundamentals, genetic engineering, cell culture, protein production, pharmaceuticals, genomics, viruses, gene therapy, evolution, immunology, antibodies, vaccines, transgenic animals, cloning, stem cells, intellectual property, governmental regulations, and ethics. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and MATH 20 or equivalent courage.
Same as: CHEMENG 25B

ENGR 25E. Energy: Chemical Transformations for Production, Storage, and Use. 3 Units.

An introduction and overview to the challenges and opportunities of energy supply and consumption. Emphasis on energy technologies where chemistry and engineering play key roles. Review of energy fundamentals along with historical energy perspectives and current energy production technologies. In depth analysises of solar thermal systems, biofuels, photovoltaics and electrochemical devices (batteries and fuel cells). Prerequisites: high school chemistry or equivalent.
Same as: CHEMENG 25E

ENGR 280. From Play to Innovation. 2-4 Units.

Focus is on enhancing the innovation process with playfulness. The class will be project-based and team-centered. We will investigate the human "state of play" to reach an understanding of its principal attributes and how important it is to creative thinking. We will explore play behavior, its development, and its biological basis. We will then apply those principles through design thinking to promote innovation in the corporate world. Students will work with real-world partners on design projects with widespread application. This course requires an application. You can find the application here: dschool.stanford.edu/classes.

ENGR 281. d.media - Designing Media that Matters. 2-3 Units.

The combination of always-on smartphones, instant access to information and global social sharing is changing behavior and shifting cultural norms. How can we design digital experiences that make this change positive? Join the d.media team and find out! This course is project-based and hands-on. Three projects will explore visual design, interaction design and behavioral design all in the context of today's technology landscape and in service of a socially positive user experience. See http://dmedia.stanford.edu, Admission by application. See dschool.stanford.edu/classes for more information.

ENGR 290. Graduate Environment of Support. 1 Unit.

For course assistants (CAs) and tutors in the School of Engineering tutorial and learning program. Interactive training for effective academic assistance. Pedagogy, developing course material, tutoring, and advising. Sources include video, readings, projects, and role playing.

ENGR 295. Learning & Teaching of Science. 3 Units.

This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of the relevant research in cognitive psychology and science education and the ability to apply that knowledge to enhance their ability to learn and teach science, particularly at the undergraduate level. Course will involve readings, discussion, and application of the ideas through creation of learning activities. It is suitable for advanced undergraduates and graduate students with some science background.
Same as: EDUC 280, PHYSICS 295

ENGR 298. Seminar in Fluid Mechanics. 1 Unit.

Interdepartmental. Problems in all branches of fluid mechanics, with talks by visitors, faculty, and students. Graduate students may register for 1 unit, without letter grade; a letter grade is given for talks. May be repeated for credit.

ENGR 299. Special Studies in Engineering. 1-15 Unit.

Special studies, lab work, or reading under the direction of a faculty member. Often research experience opportunities exist in ongoing research projects. Students make arrangements with individual faculty and enroll in the corresponding section. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

ENGR 311A. Women's Perspectives. 1 Unit.

Master's and Ph.D. seminar series driven by student interests. Possible topics: time management, career choices, health and family, diversity, professional development, and personal values. Guest speakers from academia and industry, student presentations with an emphasis on group discussion. Graduate students share experiences and examine scientific research in these areas. May be repeated for credit.

ENGR 311B. Designing the Professional. 1 Unit.

Once I get my degree, how do I get a life? What do you want out of life after Stanford? Wondering how to weave together what fits, is doable, and will be truly meaningful? Join us for Designing the Professional. This course applies the innovation principles of design thinking to the "wicked problem" of designing your life and vocation in and beyond Stanford. We'll approach these lifelong questions with a structured framework set in a seminar where you can work out your ideas in conversation with your peers. Seminar open to all graduate students (PhD, Masters) and Postdocs in all 7 schools.

ENGR 311D. Portfolio to Professional: Supporting the Development of Digital Presence Through ePortfolios. 1 Unit.

This course guides graduate students in creating a professional ePortfolio and establishing an online presence. The course includes seminar-style presentations and discussions, opportunities for feedback with career mentors, classmates, alumni, employers, and other community members using think-aloud protocols and peer review approaches. Curriculum modules focus on strategies for telling your story in the digital environment, platform considerations, evidence and architecture, visual design and user experience. Open to all graduate students and majors.

ENGR 312. Science and Engineering Course Design. 2-3 Units.

For students interested in an academic career and who anticipate designing science or engineering courses at the undergraduate or graduate level. Goal is to apply research on science and engineering learning to the design of effective course materials. Topics include syllabus design, course content and format decisions, assessment planning and grading, and strategies for teaching improvement.
Same as: VPTL 312

ENGR 313. Topics in Engineering and Science Education. 1-2 Unit.

This seminar series focuses on topics related to teaching science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses based on education research. Each year focuses on a different topic related to STEM education. This course may be repeated for credit each year. This year we will explore problem-based learning in STEM courses, particularly focusing on design and evaluation of problem-based learning activities. The course will involve in-class discussions, small group activities, and guest lectures. Throughout the quarter, there will be several opportunities for directly practicing and applying STEM education strategies to specific teaching goals in your field.

ENGR 341. Micro/Nano Systems Design and Fabrication. 3-5 Units.

Laboratory course in micro and nano fabrication technology that combines lectures on theory and fundamentals with hands-on training in the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility. Prerequisite: ENGR 240 or equivalent.

ENGR 342. MEMS Laboratory II. 3-4 Units.

Emphasis is on tools and methodologies for designing and fabricating N/MEMS-based solutions. Student interdisciplinary teams collaborate to invent, develop, and integrate N/MEMS solutions. Design alternatives fabricated and tested with emphasis on manufacturability, assembly, test, and design. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: ENGR 341.

ENGR 350. Data Impact Lab. 1-6 Unit.

In this lab, multi-disciplinary teams of students tackle high-impact, unsolved problems for social sector partners. Teams receive mentorship and coaching from Stanford faculty, domain experts, and data science experts from industry. Sample projects include innovations for: poverty alleviation in the developing world, local government services, education, and healthcare. Limited enrollment; application required. May be repeated for credit. See http://datalab.stanford.edu for more information.

ENGR 391. Engineering Education and Online Learning. 3 Units.

A project based introduction to web-based learning design. In this course we will explore the evidence and theory behind principles of learning design and game design thinking. In addition to gaining a broad understanding of the emerging field of the science and engineering of learning, students will experiment with a variety of educational technologies, pedagogical techniques, game design principles, and assessment methods. Over the course of the quarter, interdisciplinary teams will create a prototype or a functioning piece of educational technology.
Same as: EDUC 391

ENGR 40. Introductory Electronics. 5 Units.

Not offered. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B.

ENGR 40A. Introductory Electronics. 3 Units.

First portion of the former ENGR 40, for students not pursuing degree in Electrical Engineering. Instruction to be completed in the first seven weeks of the quarter. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B. Overview of electronic circuits and applications. Electrical quantities and their measurement, including operation of the oscilloscope. Basic models of electronic components including resistors, capacitors, inductors, and the operational amplifier. Lab. Lab assignments. Enrollment limited to 300.

ENGR 40B. Introductory Electronics Part II. 2 Units.

Second portion of the former ENGR 40. Instruction to be completed in the final three weeks of the quarter. Students wishing to complete the equivalent of ENGR 40 should enroll in both ENGR 40A and ENGR 40B. Students cannot enroll in ENGR 40B without enrolling in ENGR 40A. Students choose one the following sections (1) Frequency response of linear circuits, including basic filters, using phasor analysis. (2) Digital hardware and software implementations of a robot car. Lab. Lab assignments. Co-requisite: ENGR 40A. Enrollment limited to 300.

ENGR 40M. An Intro to Making: What is EE. 3-5 Units.

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.

ENGR 42. Introduction to Electromagnetics and Its Applications. 5 Units.

Electricity and magnetism and its essential role in modern electrical engineering devices and systems, such as sensors, displays, DVD players, and optical communication systems. The topics that will be covered include electrostatics, magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations, one-dimensional wave equation, electromagnetic waves, transmission lines, and one-dimensional resonators. Pre-requisites: MATH 42 or MATH 51 or CME 100 or equivalent.
Same as: EE 42

ENGR 50. Introduction to Materials Science, Nanotechnology Emphasis. 4 Units.

The structure, bonding, and atomic arrangements in materials leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic and mechanical behavior, emphasizing nanotechnology, solid state devices, and advanced structural and composite materials.

ENGR 50E. Introduction to Materials Science, Energy Emphasis. 4 Units.

Materials structure, bonding and atomic arrangements leading to their properties and applications. Topics include electronic, thermal and mechanical behavior; emphasizing energy related materials and challenges.

ENGR 50M. Introduction to Materials Science, Biomaterials Emphasis. 4 Units.

Topics include: the relationship between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of man-made and natural materials; mechanical and thermodynamic behavior of surgical implants including alloys, ceramics, and polymers; and materials selection for biotechnology applications such as contact lenses, artificial joints, and cardiovascular stents. No prerequisite.

ENGR 60. Engineering Economics and Sustainability. 3 Units.

Engineering Economics is a subset of the field of economics that draws upon the logic of economics, but adds that analytical power of mathematics and statistics. The concepts developed in this course are broadly applicable to many professional and personal decisions, including making purchasing decisions, deciding between project alternatives, evaluating different processes, and balancing environmental and social costs against economic costs. The concepts taught in this course will be increasingly valuable as students climb the carrier ladder in private industry, a non-governmental organization, a public agency, or in founding their own startup. Eventually, the ability to make informed decisions that are based in fundamental analysis of alternatives is a part of every career. As such, this course is recommended for engineering and non-engineering students alike. This course is taught exclusively online in every quarter it is offered. (Prerequisites: MATH 19 or 20 or approved equivalent.).
Same as: CEE 146S

ENGR 62. Introduction to Optimization. 3-4 Units.

Formulation and computational analysis of linear, quadratic, and other convex optimization problems. Applications in machine learning, operations, marketing, finance, and economics. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51.
Same as: MS&E 111, MS&E 211

ENGR 62X. Introduction to Optimization (Accelerated). 3-4 Units.

Optimization theory and modeling. The role of prices, duality, optimality conditions, and algorithms in finding and recognizing solutions. Perspectives: problem formulation, analytical theory, computational methods, and recent applications in engineering, finance, and economics. Theories: finite dimensional derivatives, convexity, optimality, duality, and sensitivity. Methods: simplex and interior-point, gradient, Newton, and barrier. Prerequisite: CME 100 or MATH 51 or equivalent.
Same as: MS&E 111X, MS&E 211X

ENGR 70A. Programming Methodology. 3-5 Units.

Introduction to the engineering of computer applications emphasizing modern software engineering principles: object-oriented design, decomposition, encapsulation, abstraction, and testing. Emphasis is on good programming style and the built-in facilities of respective languages. No prior programming experience required. Summer quarter enrollment is limited. Alternative versions of CS106A are available which cover most of the same material but in different programming languages: Java [Fall, Win, Spr, or Sum qtr enroll in CS106A Section 1] Javascript [Fall qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 2] Python [Winter or Spring qtr enroll in CS 106A Section 3].
Same as: CS 106A

ENGR 70B. Programming Abstractions. 3-5 Units.

Abstraction and its relation to programming. Software engineering principles of data abstraction and modularity. Object-oriented programming, fundamental data structures (such as stacks, queues, sets) and data-directed design. Recursion and recursive data structures (linked lists, trees, graphs). Introduction to time and space complexity analysis. Uses the programming language C++ covering its basic facilities. Prerequisite: 106A or equivalent. Summer quarter enrollment is limited.
Same as: CS 106B

ENGR 70X. Programming Abstractions (Accelerated). 3-5 Units.

Intensive version of 106B for students with a strong programming background interested in a rigorous treatment of the topics at an accelerated pace. Additional advanced material and more challenging projects. Winter quarter assignments will be based in CS department research. Prerequisite: excellence in 106A or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Winter quarter enrollment limited to 30.
Same as: CS 106X

ENGR 80. Introduction to Bioengineering (Engineering Living Matter). 4 Units.

Students completing BIOE.80 should have a working understanding for how to approach the systematic engineering of living systems to benefit all people and the planet. Our main goals are (1) to help students learn ways of thinking about engineering living matter and (2) to empower students to explore the broader ramifications of engineering life. Specific concepts and skills covered include but are not limited to: capacities of natural life on Earth; scope of the existing human-directed bioeconomy; deconstructing complicated problems; reaction & diffusion systems; microbial human anatomy; conceptualizing the engineering of biology; how atoms can be organized to make molecules; how to print DNA from scratch; programming genetic sensors, logic, & actuators; biology beyond molecules (photons, electrons, etc.); what constraints limit what life can do?; what will be the major health challenges in 2030?; how does what we want shape bioengineering?; who should choose and realize various competing bioengineering futures?.
Same as: BIOE 80

ENGR 90. Environmental Science and Technology. 3 Units.

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Same as: CEE 70