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CEE 1. Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering. 1 Unit.

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to request enrollment/permission code.

CEE 100. Managing Sustainable Building Projects. 4 Units.

Managing the life cycle of buildings from the owner, designer, and contractor perspectives emphasizing sustainability goals; methods to define, communicate, coordinate, and manage multidisciplinary project objectives including scope, quality, life cycle cost and value, schedule, safety, energy, and social concerns; roles, responsibilities, and risks for project participants; virtual design and construction methods for product, organization, and process modeling; lifecycle assessment methods; individual writing assignment related to a real world project.

CEE 101A. Mechanics of Materials. 4 Units.

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.

CEE 101B. Mechanics of Fluids. 4 Units.

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. The Tuesday lectures, which are preparation for the labs, will start at 12:30pm. Lab experiments will illustrate conservation principles and flows of real fluids, analysis of errors and modeling of simple fluid systems. Students seeking to take this course without the laboratory will need to enroll in CEE 162A but must get permission first from the instructor. Prerequisites: E14, PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53), MATH 51.

CEE 101C. Geotechnical Engineering. 3-4 Units.

Introduction to the principles of soil mechanics. Soil classification, shear strength and stress-strain behavior of soils, consolidation theory, analysis and design of earth retaining structures, introduction to shallow and deep foundation design, slope stability. Lab projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 14. Recommended: 101A.

CEE 101D. Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 3 Units.

Computational and visualization methods in the design and analysis of civil and environmental engineering systems. Focus is on applications of MATLAB. How to develop a more lucid and better organized programming style.
Same as: CEE 201D

CEE 101S. Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab.. 3 Units.

Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.
Same as: CEE 201S

CEE 102. Legal Principles in Design, Construction, and Project Delivery. 3 Units.

Introduction to the key legal principles affecting design, construction and the delivery of infrastructure projects. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of law, including principles of contract, negligence, professional responsibility, intellectual property, land use and environmental law, then draws on these concepts to examine current and developing means of project delivery.

CEE 107A. Understanding Energy. 3-5 Units.

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Same as: CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103

CEE 107F. Understanding Energy -- Field Trips. 1 Unit.

This course is only for students who have already taken CEE 107A/207A/EARTHSYS 103 -- Understanding Energy. Please contact Kirsten Stasio (kstasio@stanford.edu) for instructor consent code.
Same as: CEE 207F, EARTHSYS 103F

CEE 107S. Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools. 3 Units.

Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.
Same as: CEE 207S

CEE 109. Creating a Green Student Workforce to Help Implement Stanford's Sustainability Vision. 2 Units.

Examination of program-based local actions that promote resource resource conservation and an educational environment for sustainability. Examination of building-level actions that contribute to conservation, lower utility costs, and generate understanding of sustainability consistent with Stanford's commitment to sustainability as a core value. Overview of operational sustainability including energy, water, buildings, waste, and food systems. Practical training to enable students to become sustainability coordinators for their dorms or academic units.
Same as: EARTHSYS 109, ENVRINST 109

CEE 10A. Introduction to Architecture. 2 Units.

This class introduces students to the discipline of architecture and to the fundamental question: What is an architect and how is architecture distinct from other arts and sciences? To answer this question, the class will focus on concepts important to the practice of architecture including: project conception, drawing, modeling, materials, structure, form, and professionalism. These terms will be investigated through short talks, site visits, historical precedent, in-class exercises, panel discussions and two on-campus case studies. No prior knowledge of architecture is required.

CEE 10B. Presentation Skills. 0 Units.

TBD.

CEE 112A. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

Building upon the concept of VDC Scorecard, CEE 112A/212A investigates in the management of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) programs and projects in the building industry. Interacting with experts and professionals in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and technology providers, students will learn from the industry applications of Building Information Modeling and its relationship with Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Design and Construction. Students will conduct case studies to evaluate the maturity of VDC planning, adoption, technology and performance in practice. Students taking 3 or 4 units will be paired up with independent research or case study projects on the industry applications of VDC. No prerequisite. See CEE112B/212B in the Winter Quarter and CEE 112C/212C in the Spring Quarter.

CEE 112B. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

CEE 112B/212B is a practicum on the Industry Applications on Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC and Building Information Modeling (BIM). Students can choose between one of the two project topics: [1] Industrialized Construction with Virtual Parts (No Prerequisite) or [2] Industry Benchmarking & Applications of the VDC Management Scorecard (Suggested Prerequisite: CEE 112A/212A).
Same as: CEE 212B

CEE 112C. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

Following the Autumn- and Winter-quarter course series, CEE 112C/212C is an industry-focused and project-based practicum that focuses on the industry applications of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will be paired up with industry-based VDC projects with public owners and private developers, such as GSA Public Buildings Service, the Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway, Optima, Walt Disney Imagineering, Microsoft facilities and/or other CIFE International members. Independently, students will conduct case studies and/or develop VDC and building information models (BIM) using off-the-shelf technologies for project analysis, collaboration, communication and optimization. Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC. Prerequisite: CEE 112A/212A, CEE 112B/212B, CEE 159C/259C, CEE 159D/259D, or Instructor's Approval.
Same as: CEE 212C

CEE 112D. Industry Applications of Virtual Design and Construction. 2-4 Units.

A continuation of the CEE 112/212 series, CEE 112D/212D is an industry-focused and project-based practicum that focuses on the industry applications of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will be paired up with industry-based VDC research or application opportunities with public owners and private developers, professional associations, and/or other member organizations of the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering at Stanford. Independently, students will conduct case studies, research activities, and/or develop VDC and building information models (BIM) using off-the-shelf technologies for project analysis, collaboration, communication and optimization. Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC. Prerequisite: CEE110/210, CEE 112C/212C, CEE 122B/222B, or Instructor's Approval.
Same as: CEE 212D

CEE 113. Patterns of Sustainability. 1-4 Unit.

This seminar examines the interrelated sustainability of the natural, built and social environments of places in which we live. Several BOSP centers and the home Stanford campus will hold this 1-2 unit seminar simultaneously and collaborate with a shared curriculum, assignments, web conference and a Wiki. The goal of the collaborative arrangement is to expose, share, compare and contrast views of sustainability in different parts of the world. We will look at and assess aspects of sustainability of the places we are living from a theoretical perspective from the literature, from observations and interviews in the countries in which we study.
Same as: CEE 213

CEE 120A. Building Information Modeling Workshop. 2-4 Units.

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Same as: CEE 220A

CEE 120B. Building Information Modeling Workshop. 2-4 Units.

This course builds upon the Building Information Model concepts introduced in 120A/220A and illustrates how BIM modeling tools are used to design, analyze, and model building systems including structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection. Course covers the physical principles, design criteria, and design strategies for each system and explores processes and tools for modeling those systems and analyzing their performance.nTopics include: building envelopes, access systems, structural systems modeling and analysis, mechanical / HVAC systems, plumbing and fire protection systems, electrical systems, and systems integration/coordination.
Same as: CEE 220B

CEE 120C. Parametric Design and Optimization. 2-4 Units.

This course explores tools and techniques for computational design and parametric modeling as a foundation for design optimization. Class sessions will introduce several parametric design modeling platforms and scripting environments that enable rapid generation of 3D models and enable rapid evaluation of parametrically-driven design alternatives.nnTopics to be featured include:n-Principles of parametric design vs. direct modelingn-Design exploration using parametric modeling platforms (Revit/FormIt, Rhino)n-Visual scripting languages and environments (Dynamo, Grasshopper, DesignScript)n-Single- and multi-dimensional optimization techniques and guidance strategies.
Same as: CEE 220C

CEE 120S. Building Information Modeling Special Study. 2-4 Units.

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Same as: CEE 220S

CEE 122A. Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction. 2 Units.

Undergraduates serve as apprentices to graduate students in the AEC global project teams in CEE 222A. Apprentices participate in all activities of the AEC team, including the goals, objectives, constraints, tasks, and process of a crossdisciplinary global AEC teamwork in the concept development phase of a comprehensive building project. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Same as: A/E/C

CEE 122B. Computer Integrated A/E/C. 2 Units.

Undergraduates serve as apprentices to graduate students in the AEC global project teams in CEE 222B. Project activity focuses on modeling, simulation, life-cycle cost, and cost benefit analysis in the project development phase. Prerequisite: CEE 122A.

CEE 124. Sustainable Development Studio. 1-5 Unit.

(Graduate students register for 224A.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.

CEE 125. Defining Smart Cities: Visions of Urbanism for the 21st Century. 1-2 Unit.

In a rapidly urbanizing world, "the city" paves the way toward sustainability and social well-being. But what does it mean for a city to be smart? Does that also make it sustainable or resilient or livable? This seminar delves into current debates about urbanism through weekly talks by experts on topics such as big data, human-centered design, new urbanism, and natural capital. How urban spaces are shaped, for better or worse, by the complex interaction of cutting-edge technology, human societies, and the natural environment. The goal is to provoke vigorous discussion and to foster an understanding of cities that is at once technological, humanistic, and ecologically sound.
Same as: CEE 225, URBANST 174

CEE 126. International Urbanization Seminar: Cross-Cultural Collaboration for Sustainable Urban Development. 4-5 Units.

Comparative approach to sustainable cities, with focus on international practices and applicability to China. Tradeoffs regarding land use, infrastructure, energy and water, and the need to balance economic vitality, environmental quality, cultural heritage, and social equity. Student teams collaborate with Chinese faculty and students partners to support urban sustainability projects. Limited enrollment via application; see internationalurbanization.org for details. Prerequisites: consent of the instructor(s).
Same as: EARTHSYS 138, IPS 274, URBANST 145

CEE 126A. Stanford Sustainable Living Lab I. 1-3 Unit.

This course introduces students to the concepts of industrial ecology, sustainability science, and green thinking. The quarter-long focus of the course will be a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the sustainability of an on-campus system. Examples of such systems are an on-campus dormitory (e.g. Roble Hall), service provider (e.g. Axe and Palm Restaurant), or infrastructure system (e.g. campus water system). Students interested in the course as a seminar should elect for the 1 unit option. Students interested in the courswe to fulfill programmatic requirements should elect for the 3 unit option.

CEE 126B. Stanford Sustainable Living Lab II. 3 Units.

This course introduces students to the concepts of industrial ecology, sustainability science, and green thinking. The quarter-long focus of the course will be a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the sustainability of an on-campus system. Examples of such systems are an on-campus dormitory (e.g. Roble Hall), service provider (e.g. Axe and Palm Restaurant), or infrastructure system (e.g. campus water system). Students interested in the course as a seminar should elect for the 1 unit option. Students interested in the courswe to fulfill programmatic requirements should elect for the 3 unit option.

CEE 126C. Stanford Sustainable Living Lab III. 3 Units.

This course is a project-based, self-directed course focused on actual implementation of various proposed sustainability efforts tied to an on-campus system. Examples of such systems are an on-campus dormitory (e.g. Roble Hall), service provider (e.g. Axe and Palm Restaurant), or infrastructure system (e.g. campus water system). Students interested in CEE 126 do not need to have taken CEE 126A or 126B as a prerequisite.

CEE 126X. Hard Earth: Stanford Graduate-Student Talks Exploring Tough Environmental Dilemmas. 1 Unit.

Stanford's graduate students are a trove of knowledge -- and, just as important, curiosity -- about environmental sustainability. This seminar will feature talks by graduate students that explore the biggest, most bedeviling questions about environmental sustainability locally and around the world. The course will be structured as follows: every other week, we will hear hour-long graduate student talks about sustainability questions and their research, and on the off weeks, we will discuss the unanswered, debatable questions that relate to the previous week's talk.

CEE 126Y. Hard Earth: Stanford Graduate-Student Talks Exploring Tough Environmental Dilemmas. 1 Unit.

Stanford's graduate students are a trove of knowledge -- and, just as important, curiosity -- about environmental sustainability. This seminar will feature talks by graduate students that explore the biggest, most bedeviling questions about environmental sustainability locally and around the world. The course will be structured as follows: every other week, we will hear hour-long graduate student talks about sustainability questions and their research, and on the off weeks, we will discuss the unanswered, debatable questions that relate to the previous week's talk.

CEE 126Z. Hard Earth: Stanford Graduate-Student Talks Exploring Tough Environmental Dilemmas. 1 Unit.

Stanford's graduate students are a trove of knowledge -- and, just as important, curiosity -- about environmental sustainability. This seminar will feature talks by graduate students that explore the biggest, most bedeviling questions about environmental sustainability locally and around the world. The course will be structured as follows: every other week, we will hear hour-long graduate student talks about sustainability questions and their research, and on the off weeks, we will discuss the unanswered, debatable questions that relate to the previous week's talk.

CEE 129S. Climate Change Adaptation in the Coastal Built Environment. 1 Unit.

How will climate change impact coastal ports and harbors around the world? Leading experts discuss the latest science, policy, and engineering research on this important issue, including the necessary response to protect ports and harbors from significant sea-level rise and storm surge. Focus is on the built environment. Guest speakers. CEE 229/129 for research option. See www.groupspaces.com/seaports2100.
Same as: CEE 229S

CEE 130. Architectural Design: 3-D Modeling, Methodology, and Process. 5 Units.

Preference to Architectural Design majors; others by consent of instructor. Projects investigate conceptual approaches to the design of key architectural elements, such as wall and roof. Functional and structural considerations. Focus is on constructing 3-D models in a range of materials; 3-D computer modeling. Students keep a graphic account of the evolution of their design process. Final project entails design of a simple structure. Limited enrollment. Pre- or corequisite: CEE 31 or 31Q.

CEE 131A. Professional Practice: Mixed-Use Design in an Urban Setting. 4 Units.

The delivery of a successful building design program involves unique collaboration between architect and client. This course will endeavor to teach the skills necessary for a designer to identify, evaluate, conceptualize and fully document a complex mixed-use urban design. Students will complete the course with a detailed knowledge of the consultants, engineers and other professionals needed for a complete program. Course deliverables will include three short assignments and a final project consisting of basic schematic drawings for the selected project.nnGuest presenters will cover topics of interest. Lectures, discussions, in-class studio-work and an oral presentation.nPre-requisite: CEE 130.

CEE 131B. Financial Management of Sustainable Urban Systems. 3 Units.

Focus is on financial management of sustainable urban systems. The course will study different kinds of financial services available, the management of financial resources, and relationships to financial service providers. The course will also study how financial services and relationships to financial service providers can be used to accomplish construction management, energy, and architecture work in sustainable urban systems. The learning outcome is an understanding of how financial services can be used in development of sustainable urban systems. nnThe course work is structured so that there are three modules: 1) general knowledge of financial management, 2) in-depth application in construction management, energy, or architecture, and 3) comparison of similarities and differences in-between the in-depth applications. Students will focus on one of the in-depth applications in a group work, and present the result of this application to students that make other applications. A key learning aspect is the understanding of how finance is used in construction management, energy, and architecture work. Students should be able to show the value, financial viability, and risk management of sustainable urban system development in construction management, energy, and architecture. Students should be able to finance construction management, energy, and architecture work. nnReadings include applications of finance and management to construction management, energy, or architecture. Guest speakers include developers, financial managers at construction firms, managers at energy firms, construction managers.

CEE 131C. How Buildings are Made -- Materiality and Construction Methods. 4 Units.

This course will provide an introduction to the materials and methods used in building construction. A combination of in-class lectures, reading assignments, and building site visits will provide students with an awareness of construction materials and their use within building systems. All relevant building types and construction materials will be explored, including wood, steel, concrete and masonry. Building foundations and basic structural systems will be explained. Building envelope elements will be considered, with an analysis of various glass and glazing materials, cladding types, and roofing systems. Interior Floor, wall and ceiling finishes will be discussed. New and emerging building trends will also be examined, wuch as prefabricated and modular construction. Guest presenters, drawn from Bay Area consulting firms, will cover several topics of interest. Students will have an opportunity to experience real world material applications at local construction sites, and gain a thorough understanding of the construction process.

CEE 131D. Urban Design Studio. 5 Units.

The practical application of urban design theory. Projects focus on designing neighborhood and downtown regions to balance livability, revitalization, population growth, and historic preservation.
Same as: URBANST 171

CEE 131F. Activating Urban Spaces. 4 Units.

This course will look at how public urban spaces are structured with a particular eye to the involvement of art and artists, whether formally or informally, in shaping the built and social environment of the city. Throughout the course particular focus will consider the possibilities for engaging social justice outcomes through spatial intervention drawing on examples from around the world. Interventions in urban spaces enact local change by making art the language of civic engagement; in this way a mural or performance or reconceptualized public space can become a method to address issues of locally prioritized inequality. We will use Stanford University and the Bay Area as our local research sites, making trips into the field to analyze methods, approaches, and experiences of urban spaces in action as well as bringing experts who work in related fields into the classroom. Sites of study include parks, public art, and street festivals by looking at arts organizations, city projects, community groups, and individual artists. The class will operate as a hybrid seminar and collaborative studio workspace which supports students in using ethnographic, visual, mapping, historical, and participatory methods in developing projects that respond to a particular site of their choosing.
Same as: ARTSINST 182, URBANST 182

CEE 131Q. How to be Governed Otherwise: Art, Activism, and the City. 4 Units.

This course will introduce you to contemporary art¿s engagement with political activism. This introduction will focus on the city as, at once, a field and target of activism¿a field of public appearance, artistic intervention, and political action, as well as a target of claims to residence, livelihood, recognition, justice, and collectivity. We will pose activist politics, artistic intervention, and urban space as mutually imbricated, each shaping the possibilities, programs, and histories of the other¿a perspective that offers insights into the spatiality, materiality, and visuality of political identity, agency, and action. Over the quarter, we will study some of the many artistic interventions that are encompassed by urban activism, from informal and everyday practices to protest, resistance, and occupation. Comparative case studies will be drawn from a global context. You will investigate these case studies through both research on urban activism and activist practice; the seminar will therefore invite you to explore the militant possibilities of research, the research possibilities of activism, and the implications of each for the production of art.
Same as: ARTSINST 180Q, URBANST 180Q

CEE 132H. Responsive Structures. 2 Units.

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and experiential medium. We will examine the physical properties of a manufactured metal such as wire or mesh, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeat for credit. Total Completions Allowed: 3.
Same as: CEE 32H

CEE 132Q. Office of Metropolitan Architecture: Workshop of the New. 4-5 Units.

This seminar investigates all aspects of the work of the Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and its leader Rem Koolhaas. Topics for class research and inquiry include but are not be limited to: Koolhaas's early work at the Architectural Association and the founding of OMA, the publications of OMA and their style of presentation and theoretical foundations, the importance of AMO, and the architects who have left OMA and founded their own practices and how these differ from OMA. Each student completes an in-depth research paper and an in-class presentation.
Same as: ARTHIST 262

CEE 133F. Principles of Freehand Drawing. 3 Units.

Traditional methods of depicting shape, form, and surface are applied to the discipline of architectural drawing. Students develop abilities to observe visual phenomenon analytically and translate subjects onto a two-dimensional surface in a variety of media. Drawing techniques such as modeling form, shading, rendering materials, and articulating landscaping are explored. Linear perspective exercises provide a foundation for the construction of drawings to illustrate cohesive design proposals. Step-by-step constructions, quick freehand sketches from slides, and on-location studies.

CEE 133G. Architectural History & Drawing in Eastern Europe. 2 Units.

Students in this seminar will travel to Prague, Czech Republic and Krakow, Poland for a week of historical morning walks and discussions about architectural and urbanism in each city. Afternoon sketching sessions will focus attention on some of the locations visited earlier that day. Buildings, sites and monuments from the Middle Ages to the present will be assessed, questioned, and drawn. Short reading assignments and/or films provide a background for each day's examination of a section of these two cities. Possible day trips may include site visits to Auschwitz and the Wieliczka Salt Mine. Casual late afternoon excursions will complement themes of the course. Upon returning to Stanford, the seminar will meet four times to discuss observations and organize a small exhibition of the sketches made during the trip.

CEE 134B. Intermediate Arch Studio. 5 Units.

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Same as: CEE 234B

CEE 137B. Advanced Architecture Studio. 6 Units.

This course will focus on the topic of interdisciplinary collaboration and its role in the development of design concepts. Specifically, the integration of structural with architectural considerations to produce a unified urban, spatial, tectonic and structural proposition will be our field of investigation. This course is an architecture studio course where class time will be spent primarily in individual or group desk critiques and pin-up sessions. May be repeat for credit. Total completions allowed: 3. Additionally, there will be lectures, case study presentations and a field trip. Prerequisites: required: CEE 31 (or 31Q) Drawing, CEE 110 BIM and CEE 130 Design.
Same as: CEE 237B

CEE 139. Design Portfolio Methods. 4 Units.

Students present designs completed in other studio courses to communicate design intentions and other aspects of their work. Instruction in photography; preparation of a design portfolio; and short essays that characterize portfolio contents. Oral presentation workshops offered through the Center for Teaching and Learning. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: two Art or Architecture studio courses, or consent of instructor.
Same as: CEE 239

CEE 141A. Infrastructure Project Development. 3 Units.

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Same as: CEE 241A

CEE 141B. Infrastructure Project Delivery. 3 Units.

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Same as: CEE 241B

CEE 141C. Global Infrastructure Projects Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

Real infrastructure projects presented by industry guest speakers. Energy, transportation, water, public facilities and communications projects are featured. Course provides comparisons of project development and delivery approaches for mega-projects around the world. Alternative project delivery methods, the role of public and private sector, different project management strategies, and lessons learned. Field trips to local projects.
Same as: CEE 241C

CEE 144. Design and Innovation for the Circular Economy. 3 Units.

The last 150 years of our industrial evolution have been material and energy intensive. The linear model of production and consumption manufactures goods from raw materials, wells and uses them, and then discards the products as waste. Circular economy provides a framework for systems-level redesign. It builds on schools of thought including regenerative design, performance economy industrial ecology, blue economy, biomimicry, and cradle to cradle. This course introduces the concepts of the circular economy and applies them to case studies of consumer products, household goods, and fixed assets.n nStudents will conduct independent projects on circular economy. Students may work alone or in small teams under the guidance of the teaching team and various collaborators worldwide. Class is limited to 14 students. All disciplines are welcome. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.

CEE 146A. Engineering Economy. 3 Units.

Fundamentals of financial and economic analysis. Engineering Economy Principles. Interest rates, Present value, annual cash flow, internal rate of return, benefit-cost analysis. Economic Life, Life Cycle Costs. Replacement analysis. Project Selection - Mutually Exclusive Alternatives, Multiple Objective Criteria. Depreciation. Inflation and Taxes. Sensitivity and risk analysis. Uncertainty and Probability. Decision Trees. Capital Budgeting. For CEE 146A: enrollment is limited to juniors and seniors. Attendance to the first class is mandatory (for both CEE 146A and CEE 246A). Instructor consent is required. Students must please kindly email the instructor a short paragraph indicating if they are an undergrad or grad student, their current year (Frosh/Soph/Junior or Senior), their Department and Program, and their reason for taking the class.
Same as: CEE 246A

CEE 146E. SENSA Social Enterprise Seminar. 1 Unit.

Students meet with mentors to discuss and get feedback on SENSA labs social enterprise projects. Attendance at all seminars is required for credit.
Same as: CEE 246E

CEE 151. Negotiation. 3 Units.

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Coursework before March 18.
Same as: CEE 251, EARTH 251

CEE 155. Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE. 3-4 Units.

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Same as: CEE 255

CEE 156. Building Systems. 4 Units.

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Same as: CEE 256

CEE 161C. Natural Ventilation of Buildings. 3 Units.

An introduction to natural ventilation design, including an in-depth discussion of the fluid mechanics of natural ventilation, and a review of models and measurements of naturally ventilated buildings. Overview of the design process, from assessing feasibility to commissioning. Discussion of physical processes in natural ventilation, including buoyancy- and wind- driven flow, and important fluid mechanics and heat transfer concepts and equations. Steady flow characteristics of openings, steady and unsteady envelope models. Internal air motion, zonal models and stratification. CFD and its applications, scale modeling and full-scale measurements. Throughout the course the Y2E2 building natural ventilation system and temperature measurements will be used to illustrate the different concepts and methods.

CEE 161I. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation. 3 Units.

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Same as: CEE 261I, EARTHSYS 146A, EARTHSYS 246A, ESS 146A, ESS 246A, GEOPHYS 146A, GEOPHYS 246A

CEE 162A. Mechanics of Fluids. 3 Units.

Formerly CEE 101X. Course content is the same as CEE 101B but without the Tuesday lecture and lab component. Permission of the instructor is required first to enroll in CEE 162A. Prerequisites: E14, PHYSICS 41 (formerlyl 63) MATH 51.

CEE 162D. Introduction to Physical Oceanography. 4 Units.

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Same as: CEE 262D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148

CEE 162E. Rivers, Streams, and Canals. 3-4 Units.

Formerly CEE 161A/264A. Introduction to the movement of water through natural and engineered channels, streams, and rivers. Basic equations and theory (mass, momentum, and energy equations) for steady and unsteady descriptions of the flow. Application of theory to the design of flood- control and canal systems. Flow controls such as weirs and sluice gates; gradually varied flow; Saint-Venant equations and flood waves; and method of characteristics. Open channel flow laboratory experiments: controls such as weirs and gates, gradually varied flow, and waves. Limited enrollment in lab section. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A.
Same as: CEE 262E

CEE 162F. Coastal Engineering. 4 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the relevant processes that shape the coastline, including the hydrodynamical forcing and the resultant coastal morphology. it discusses the natural response of coastal systems to forcing by the environment (e.g. waves, tides, storms), discusses how these affect the sediment budget along the coast, and uses this to explain typical coastal features. Finally we consider different engineering solutions that are available to mitigate erosion, how they influence the system, and what their relative advantages and disadvantages are. Prereq: CEE 101B or equivalent.

CEE 162I. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation. 3 Units.

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 162D or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Same as: CEE 262I, EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, ESS 146B, ESS 246B

CEE 165C. Water Resources Management. 3 Units.

Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.
Same as: CEE 265C

CEE 166A. Watersheds and Wetlands. 4 Units.

Introduction to the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment and its role in creating and maintaining terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic habitat. Hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, snowmelt, infiltration, subsurface flow, runoff, and streamflow. Rivers and lakes, springs and swamps. Emphasis is on observation and measurement, data analysis, modeling, and prediction. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A or equivalent. (Freyberg).
Same as: CEE 266A

CEE 166B. Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts. 4 Units.

Sociotechnical systems associated with human use of water as a resource and the hazards posed by too much or too little water. Potable and non-potable water use and conservation. Irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, rural and urban water supply systems, storm water management, flood damage mitigation, and water law and institutions. Emphasis is on engineering design. Prerequisite: 166A or equivalent. (Freyberg).
Same as: CEE 266B

CEE 166D. Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips. 2 Units.

Introduction to water use and water hazards via weekly field trips to local and regional water resources facilities (dams, reservoirs, fish ladders and hatcheries, pumping plants, aqueducts, hydropower plants, and irrigation systems) and flood damage mitigation facilities (storm water detention ponds, channel modifications, flood control dams, and reservoirs). Each trip preceded by an orientation lecture.
Same as: CEE 266D

CEE 169. Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Design. 5 Units.

Application of fluid mechanics, hydrology, water resources, environmental sciences, and engineering economy fundamentals to the design of a system addressing a complex problem of water in the natural and constructed environment. Problem changes each year, generally drawn from a challenge confronting the University or a local community. Student teams prepare proposals, progress reports, oral presentations, and a final design report. Prerequisite: senior in Civil Engineering or Environmental Engineering; 166B.

CEE 171. Environmental Planning Methods. 3 Units.

Intended primarily for juniors and seniors; first year graduate students welcome. Course introduces key environmental policy design and implementation concepts and provides opportunities to work with a range of environmental planning methods. Environmental laws and regulations (e.g., US Clean Water Act and the US National Environmental Policy Act) are examined. Course demonstrates how firms have gone beyond regulatory compliance and introduced environmental sustainability issues into core business strategies. Course uses a simulated negotiation of a financial penalty between a student team representing the US EPA (and other government agencies) and a team representing a firm that is out of compliance with Clean Water Act regulations. Professionals with experience in such negotiations provide coaching for student teams. Prerequisites: MATH 51. Recommended: 70.

CEE 171F. New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability. 3 Units.

Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.
Same as: CEE 271F

CEE 172. Air Quality Management. 3 Units.

Quantitative introduction to the engineering methods used to study and seek solutions to current air quality problems. Topics: global atmospheric changes, urban sources of air pollution, indoor air quality problems, design and efficiencies of pollution control devices, and engineering strategies for managing air quality. Prerequisites: 70, MATH 51.

CEE 172A. Indoor Air Quality. 2-3 Units.

Factors affecting the levels of air pollutants in the built indoor environment. The influence of ventilation, office equipment, floor coverings, furnishings, cleaning practices, and human activities on air quality including carbon dioxide, VOCs, resuspended dust, and airborne molds and fungi. Limited enrollment, preference to CEE students. Prerequisites: MATH 42 or 21 and CEE 70, or equivalents.
Same as: CEE 278C

CEE 172S. Green House Gas Mitigation. 1-3 Unit.

This course will introduce the main concepts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions measurement and management, and it will explore the main mitigation options for reducing emissions or sequestering carbon dioxide. It will address technical aspects of GHG mitigation via energy efficiency and demand-side management, energy in high-technology industry, distributed power and co-generation, the role of renewable energy in GHG management, carbon sequestration in forestry, agriculture, and geological formations. The course explores policy options, carbon trading and business strategies for GHG mitigation.
Same as: CEE 272S

CEE 174A. Providing Safe Water for the Developing and Developed World. 3 Units.

This course will cover basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to provide and control water, and will introduce the basics of engineering design. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. The course should enable students to work competently in environmental engineering firms or on non-profit projects in the developing world such as Engineers without Borders. Pre-requisite: Chem31B/X.

CEE 174B. Wastewater Treatment: From Disposal to Resource Recovery. 3 Units.

This course builds upon CEE 174A, covering basic hydraulics and the fundamental processes used to treat wastewater. In addition to understanding the details behind the fundamental processes, students will learn to feel comfortable developing initial design criteria (30% designs) for fundamental processes. Students should also develop a feel for the typical values of water treatment parameters and the equipment involved. After covering conventional processes, the class addresses newer processes used to meet emerging treatment objectives, including nutrient removal, composting of biosolids and recycling of wastewater for beneficial uses, including potable reuse. Pre-requisites: CEE 174A.

CEE 175A. California Coast: Science, Policy, and Law. 3-4 Units.

This interdisciplinary course integrates the legal, scientific, and policy dimensions of how we characterize and manage resource use and allocation along the California coast. We will use this geographic setting as the vehicle for exploring more generally how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts and the role that scientific information and uncertainty play in the process. Our focus will be on the land-sea interface as we explore contemporary coastal land-use and marine resource decision-making, including coastal pollution, public health, ecosystem management; public access; private development; local community and state infrastructure; natural systems and significant threats; resource extraction; and conservation, mitigation and restoration. Students will learn the fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology of the coastal zone, tools for exploring data collected in the coastal ocean, and the institutional framework that shapes public and private decisions affecting coastal resources. There will be 3 to 4 written assignments addressing policy and science issues during the quarter, as well as a take-home final assignment. Special Instructions: In-class work and discussion is often done in interdisciplinary teams of students from the School of Law, the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities and Sciences, and the School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences. Students are expected to participate in class discussion and field trips. Elements used in grading: Participation, including class session and field trip attendance, writing and quantitative assignments. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 175A/275A), Earth Systems (EARTHSYS 175/275), Law (LAW514), and Public Policy (PUBLPOL 175/275). Open to graduate students and to advanced undergraduates with instructor consent.
Same as: CEE 275A, EARTHSYS 175, EARTHSYS 275, PUBLPOL 175, PUBLPOL 275

CEE 175P. Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs. 1 Unit.

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Same as: CEE 275P

CEE 175S. Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 2 Units.

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Same as: CEE 275S

CEE 176A. Energy Efficient Buildings. 3-4 Units.

Quantitative evaluation of technologies and techniques for reducing energy demand of residential-scale buildings. Heating and cooling load calculations, financial analysis, passive-solar design techniques, water heating systems, photovoltaic system sizing for net-zero-energy all-electric homes. Offered for 3 or 4 units; the 4-unit option includes a lab.

CEE 176B. Electric Power: Renewables and Efficiency. 3-4 Units.

This course introduces analysis, sizing and performance estimations (electrical and financial) of renewable energy systems on both sides of the electric meter with an emphasis on photovoltaics and wind-power systems. Basic electric power generation, transmission and distribution, as well as distributed generation will be introduced. Optional Laboratory section for a 4th unit of credit.

CEE 176C. Energy Storage Integration - Vehicles, Renewables, and the Grid. 3 Units.

This course will provide in-depth introduction to existing energy storage solutions being used on the electric grid and in vehicles with a primary focus on batteries and electrochemical storage. We will discuss the operating characteristics, cost and efficiency of these technologies and how tradeoff decisions can be made. Special attention will be given to system-level integration of new storage technologies, including chargers, inverters, battery management systems and controls, into the existing vehicle and grid infrastructure. Further investigations include issues relating to integration of electric vehicle charging with demand-side management, scheduled renewable energy absorption and local grid balancing. Class format involves regular guest lectures, required lab participation, and field trips to relevant sites. Enrollment is limited; if you are interested in taking the course, please fill out a brief questionnaire at http://goo.gl/forms/i3YH91Qx05 n Please contact jtaggart@stanford.edu with any questions regarding the application or course information.
Same as: CEE 276C

CEE 176G. Sustainability Design Thinking. 3 Units.

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Same as: CEE 276G

CEE 177. Aquatic Chemistry and Biology. 4 Units.

Introduction to chemical and biological processes in the aqueous environment. Basic aqueous equilibria; the structure, behavior, and fate of major classes of chemicals that dissolve in water; redox reactions; the biochemistry of aquatic microbial life; and biogeochemical processes that govern the fate of nutrients and metals in the environment and in engineered systems. Prerequisite: CHEM 31.

CEE 177L. Smart Cities & Communities. 2 Units.

The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.
Same as: CEE 277L

CEE 177M. Smart Cities & Communities II. 2 Units.

Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).
Same as: CEE 277M

CEE 177S. Design for a Sustainable World. 1-5 Unit.

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff).
Same as: CEE 277S

CEE 177X. Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering. 1-3 Unit.

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. Instructor consent required.
Same as: CEE 277X

CEE 178. Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Same as: CEE 276

CEE 179A. Water Chemistry Laboratory. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 273A.) Laboratory application of techniques for the analysis of natural and contaminated waters, emphasizing instrumental techniques.
Same as: CEE 273A

CEE 179C. Environmental Engineering Design. 5 Units.

Application of engineering fundamentals including environmental engineering, hydrology, and engineering economy to a design problem. Enrollment limited; preference to seniors in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

CEE 179F. Frontiers of Anaerobic Treatment. 1 Unit.

This seminar will present the latest findings on the operation and performance of ground-breaking anaerobic treatment processes for domestic wastewater. Specifically, this seminar will examine the performance of the Staged Anaerobic Fluidized-bed Membrane Bioreactor (SAF-MBR) using results from ongoing operations at the Codiga Resource Recover Center and from previous and parallel research efforts. The seminars will incorporate a description of the fundamentals of anaerobic treatment processes, a discussion of how the SAF-MBR process is different from typical anaerobic processes, and insights from operations along with implications for system design. Course work will include explorations of the costs, benefits, and market potential of this technology.
Same as: CEE 279F

CEE 179S. Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability. 1-2 Unit.

Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.
Same as: CEE 279S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S

CEE 180. Structural Analysis. 4 Units.

Analysis of beams, trusses, frames; method of indeterminate analysis by consistent displacement, least work, superposition equations, moment distribution. Introduction to matrix methods and computer methods of structural analysis. Prerequisite: 101A and ENGR 14.

CEE 181. Design of Steel Structures. 4 Units.

Concepts of the design of steel structures with a load and resistance factor design (LRFD) approach; types of loading; structural systems; design of tension members, compression members, beams, beam-columns, and connections; and design of trusses and frames. Prerequisite: 180.

CEE 182. Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures. 3-4 Units.

Properties of concrete and reinforcing steel; behavior of structural elements subject to bending moments, shear forces, torsion, axial loads, and combined actions; design of beams, slabs, columns and footings; strength design and serviceability requirements; design of simple structural systems for buildings. Prerequisite: 180.

CEE 183. Integrated Civil Engineering Design Project. 4 Units.

Studio format. Design concepts for civil engineering facilities from schematic design through construction, taking into account sustainable engineering issues. Design exercises culminating in the design of a civil engineering facility, emphasizing structural systems and materials and integration with architectural, construction and other project requirements. Prerequisites: CEE 180, 181, 182; CEE 120 (or equivalent background in BIM), civil engineering major; architectural design major with instructor consent.

CEE 195. Fundamentals of Structural Geology. 3 Units.

Techniques for mapping using GPS and differential geometry to characterize structures; dimensional analysis and scaling relations; kinematics of deformation and flow; measurement and analysis of stress; elastic deformation and properties of rock; brittle deformation including fracture and faulting; linear viscous flow including folding and magma dynamics; model development and methodology. Models of tectonic processes are constructed and solutions visualized using MATLAB. Prerequisites: GS 1, MATH 51.
Same as: GS 111

CEE 196. Engineering Geology and Global Change. 3 Units.

The application of geology and global change to the planning, design, and operation of engineering projects. Case histories taught in a seminar setting and field trips emphasize the impact of geology and global change on both individual engineering works and the built environment by considering Quaternary history and tectonics, anthropogenic sea level rise, active geologic processes, engineering properties of geologic deposits, site exploration, and professional ethics. Prerequisite: GS 1 or consent of instructor.
Same as: GS 115

CEE 198. Directed Reading or Special Studies in Civil Engineering. 1-4 Unit.

Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 199. Undergraduate Research in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1-4 Unit.

Written report or oral presentation required. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 199A. Special Projects in Architecture. 1-4 Unit.

Faculty-directed study or internship. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 199B. Directed Studies in Architecture. 1-4 Unit.

Projects may include studio-mentoring activities, directed reading and writing on topics in the history and theory of architectural design, or investigations into design methodologies.

CEE 199E. Outreach and Mentoring Program Development in CEE. 1-2 Unit.

Open to undergraduates who are declared majors in Civil Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Atmosphere/Energy, and Architectural Design. Will brainstorm and develop an innovative curriculum and engaging activities for CEE 10 (Intro. to the Civil & Environmental Engineering Professions).

CEE 199H. Undergraduate Honors Thesis. 2-3 Units.

For students who have declared the Civil Engineering B.S. honors major and have obtained approval of a topic for research under the guidance of a CEE faculty adviser. Letter grade only. Written thesis or oral presentation required.n (Staff).

CEE 199L. Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1-4 Unit.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

CEE 1A. Graphics Course. 2 Units.

This course, intended for students taking a design studio, will focus on presentation theories, skills and design approaches. Through readings and exercises, and ultimately the student's own work, students will develop skill and complexity in their graphic and verbal presentations.

CEE 200A. Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1 Unit.

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship.nn 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr.

CEE 200B. Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1 Unit.

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr.

CEE 200C. Teaching of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1 Unit.

Required of CEE Ph.D. students. Strategies for effective teaching and introduction to engineering pedagogy. Topics: problem solving techniques and learning styles, individual and group instruction, the role of TAs, balancing other demands, grading. Teaching exercises. Register for quarter of teaching assistantship. May be repeated for credit. 200A. Aut, 200B. Win, 200C. Spr.

CEE 201D. Computations in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 3 Units.

Computational and visualization methods in the design and analysis of civil and environmental engineering systems. Focus is on applications of MATLAB. How to develop a more lucid and better organized programming style.
Same as: CEE 101D

CEE 201S. Science & Engineering Problem-Solving with MatLab.. 3 Units.

Introduction to the application of MATLAB to an array of engineering systems. Emphasis on computational and visualization methods in the design, modeling and analysis of engineering problems.
Same as: CEE 101S

CEE 202. Construction Law and Claims. 3 Units.

Concepts include the preparation and analysis of construction claims, cost overrun and schedule delay analysis, general legal principles, contracts, integrated project delivery, public private partnerships and the resolution of construction disputes through ADR and litigation. Requires attendance of the ten weeks of Monday classes and the first five weeks of Wednesday classes.

CEE 203. Probabilistic Models in Civil Engineering. 3-4 Units.

Introduction to probability modeling and statistical analysis in civil engineering. Emphasis is on the practical issues of model selection, interpretation, and calibration. Application of common probability models used in civil engineering including Poisson processes and extreme value distributions. Parameter estimation. Linear regression.

CEE 204. Structural Reliability. 3-4 Units.

Procedures for evaluating the safety of structural components and systems. First-and second-order estimates of failure probabilities of engineered systems. Sensitivity of failure probabilities to assumed parameter values. Measures of the relative importance of random variables. Reliability of systems with multiple failure modes. Reliability updating. Simulation methods and variance reduction techniques. Prerequisite: 203 or equivalent.

CEE 205A. Structural Materials Testing and Simulation. 3-4 Units.

Hands-on laboratory experience with fabrication, computer simulation, and experimental testing of material and small-scale structural components. Comparison of innovative and traditional structural materials. Behavior and application of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete materials for new design, fiber-reinforced polymeric materials for structural retrofits and introduction to sustainable, bio-based composites. Prerequisites: basic course in reinforced concrete design CEE 182 or equivalent.

CEE 205B. Advanced Topics in Structural Concrete. 3 Units.

Concepts and application of strut and tie modeling including deep beams, design for torsion resistance, beam-column joints, bridge components, and post-tensioned anchor zones. Course project integrating computer simulation and physical experimentation of a structural concrete component. Prerequisites: CEE 285A or equivalent.

CEE 206. Decision Analysis for Civil and Environmental Engineers. 3 Units.

Current challenges in selecting an appropriate site, alternate design, or retrofit strategy based on environmental, economic, and social factors can be best addressed through applications of decision science. Basics of decision theory, including development of decision trees with discrete and continuous random variables, expected value decision making, utility theory value of information, and elementary multi-attribute decision making will be covered in the class. Examples will cover many areas of civil and environmental engineering problems. Prerequisite: CEE 203 or equivalent.

CEE 207A. Understanding Energy. 3-5 Units.

Energy is a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. At the same time, our energy system has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. For example, energy production and use is the number one source of greenhouse gas emissions. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system and think critically about how and why society has chosen particular energy resources. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change, sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD based on student schedules). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Ginnebaugh. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ Course was formerly called Energy Resources.nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107S.
Same as: CEE 107A, EARTHSYS 103

CEE 207F. Understanding Energy -- Field Trips. 1 Unit.

This course is only for students who have already taken CEE 107A/207A/EARTHSYS 103 -- Understanding Energy. Please contact Kirsten Stasio (kstasio@stanford.edu) for instructor consent code.
Same as: CEE 107F, EARTHSYS 103F

CEE 207S. Energy Resources: Fuels and Tools. 3 Units.

Energy is a vital part of our daily lives. This course examines where that energy comes from, and the advantages and disadvantages across different fuels. Contextual analysis of energy decisions for transportation and electricity generation around the world. Energy resources covered include oil, biomass, natural gas, nuclear, hydropower, wind, solar, geothermal, and emerging technologies. Prerequisites: Algebra. Note: may not be taken by students who have completed CEE 173A, CEE 207 or EARTHSYS 103.
Same as: CEE 107S

CEE 209A. Risk Quantification and Insurance. 2 Units.

Principles of risk management along with concepts of frequency and severity and various risk measures such as probabilities of exceeding given loss level, probabilities of insolvency, and expected value of shortfall will be introduced. Various risk handlingn techniques will be discussed with particular emphasis on insurance. Ability to express preferences between random future gains or losses, will be presented in the context of stochastic ordering of risks. Credibility theory and generalized linear models will be used for claims predictions. Prerequisites: CEE 203 or equivalent.

CEE 209B. Disaster Risk and International Development Seminar. 2 Units.

The human and economic impacts of natural disasters are ever increasing and disproportionately affecting lower-income countries. In act there is mounting evidence that these ever more frequent shocks threaten to reverse development progress in low-income countries. This seminar course will explore the theory and practice of disaster risk reduction in international development contexts. Weekly readings (and occasional guest lectures) will cover key issues in development theory, a history of "a risk society", participation, human-centered planning, ethics in engineering, and other topics. The seminar will be structured through weekly readings, brief writing responses and group discussion.

CEE 212A. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

Building upon the concept of the VDC Scorecard, CEE 112A/212A investigates in the management of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC) programs and projects in the building industry. Interacting with experts and professionals in real estate, architecture, engineering , construction and technology providers, students will learn from the industry applications of Building Information Modeling and its relationship with Integrated Project Delivery, Sustainable Design and Construction, and Virtual Design and Construction. Students will conduct case studies to evaluate the maturity of VDC planning, adoption, technology and performance in practice. Students taking 3 or 4 units will be paired up with independent research or case study projects on the industry applications of VDC. No prerequisite. See CEE 112B/212B in the Winter Quarter and CEE 112C/212C in the Spring Quarter.

CEE 212B. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

CEE 112B/212B is a practicum on the Industry Applications on Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC and Building Information Modeling (BIM). Students can choose between one of the two project topics: [1] Industrialized Construction with Virtual Parts (No Prerequisite) or [2] Industry Benchmarking & Applications of the VDC Management Scorecard (Suggested Prerequisite: CEE 112A/212A).
Same as: CEE 112B

CEE 212C. Industry Applications of Virtual Design & Construction. 2-4 Units.

Following the Autumn- and Winter-quarter course series, CEE 112C/212C is an industry-focused and project-based practicum that focuses on the industry applications of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will be paired up with industry-based VDC projects with public owners and private developers, such as GSA Public Buildings Service, the Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway, Optima, Walt Disney Imagineering, Microsoft facilities and/or other CIFE International members. Independently, students will conduct case studies and/or develop VDC and building information models (BIM) using off-the-shelf technologies for project analysis, collaboration, communication and optimization. Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC. Prerequisite: CEE 112A/212A, CEE 112B/212B, CEE 159C/259C, CEE 159D/259D, or Instructor's Approval.
Same as: CEE 112C

CEE 212D. Industry Applications of Virtual Design and Construction. 2-4 Units.

A continuation of the CEE 112/212 series, CEE 112D/212D is an industry-focused and project-based practicum that focuses on the industry applications of Virtual Design and Construction (VDC). Students will be paired up with industry-based VDC research or application opportunities with public owners and private developers, professional associations, and/or other member organizations of the Center for Integrated Facility Engineering at Stanford. Independently, students will conduct case studies, research activities, and/or develop VDC and building information models (BIM) using off-the-shelf technologies for project analysis, collaboration, communication and optimization. Students will gain insights and develop skills that are essential for academic research, internships or industry practice in VDC. Prerequisite: CEE110/210, CEE 112C/212C, CEE 122B/222B, or Instructor's Approval.
Same as: CEE 112D

CEE 213. Patterns of Sustainability. 1-4 Unit.

This seminar examines the interrelated sustainability of the natural, built and social environments of places in which we live. Several BOSP centers and the home Stanford campus will hold this 1-2 unit seminar simultaneously and collaborate with a shared curriculum, assignments, web conference and a Wiki. The goal of the collaborative arrangement is to expose, share, compare and contrast views of sustainability in different parts of the world. We will look at and assess aspects of sustainability of the places we are living from a theoretical perspective from the literature, from observations and interviews in the countries in which we study.
Same as: CEE 113

CEE 217. Renewable Energy Infrastructure. 2 Units.

Construction of renewable energy infrastructure: geothermal, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, biomass. Construction and engineering challenges and related issues and drivers for performance, cost, and environmental impact. Context of renewable energy infrastructure development including comparison of the types of renewable energy, key economic, environmental, and social contextual factors, applicability of a type of renewable energy given a context, related barriers and opportunities. Class project to plan a start-up for developing a type of energy infrastructure based on an engineering innovation.

CEE 220A. Building Information Modeling Workshop. 2-4 Units.

The foundational Building Information Modeling course introduces techniques for creating, managing, and applying of building information models in the building design and construction process. The course covers processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components and geometries to produce models used in architectural design, construction planning and documentation, rendering and visualization, simulation and analysis.
Same as: CEE 120A

CEE 220B. Building Information Modeling Workshop. 2-4 Units.

This course builds upon the Building Information Model concepts introduced in 120A/220A and illustrates how BIM modeling tools are used to design, analyze, and model building systems including structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection. Course covers the physical principles, design criteria, and design strategies for each system and explores processes and tools for modeling those systems and analyzing their performance.nTopics include: building envelopes, access systems, structural systems modeling and analysis, mechanical / HVAC systems, plumbing and fire protection systems, electrical systems, and systems integration/coordination.
Same as: CEE 120B

CEE 220C. Parametric Design and Optimization. 2-4 Units.

This course explores tools and techniques for computational design and parametric modeling as a foundation for design optimization. Class sessions will introduce several parametric design modeling platforms and scripting environments that enable rapid generation of 3D models and enable rapid evaluation of parametrically-driven design alternatives.nnTopics to be featured include:n-Principles of parametric design vs. direct modelingn-Design exploration using parametric modeling platforms (Revit/FormIt, Rhino)n-Visual scripting languages and environments (Dynamo, Grasshopper, DesignScript)n-Single- and multi-dimensional optimization techniques and guidance strategies.
Same as: CEE 120C

CEE 220S. Building Information Modeling Special Study. 2-4 Units.

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Same as: CEE 120S

CEE 221A. Planning Tools and Methods in the Power Sector. 3-4 Units.

This course covers the planning methods most commonly used in the power sector today. It covers both the fundamental methods used and their applications to electricity generation, transmission and distribution planning, integrated resource planning using both energy efficiency and renewable resources as well as utility finance and ratemaking. The methods covered will include forecasting (time series, regression and the use of markets), resource assessment (including energy efficiency and demand-side management) optimization (in power markets operation and in expansion planning) and the processes used in decision-making.

CEE 222A. Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) Global Teamwork. 3 Units.

AEC students engage in a crossdisciplinary, collaborative, geographically distributed, and multicultural project-based teamwork. AEC teams exercise their domain knowledge and information technologies in a multidisciplinary context focusing on the design and construction concept development phase of a comprehensive building project. Prerequisite: interview with Instructor in Autumn Quarter.

CEE 222B. Computer Integrated Architecture/Engineering/Construction (AEC) Global Teamwork. 2 Units.

Global AEC student teams continue their project activity focusing on the most challenging concept developed in 222A and chosen jointly with their client. Comprehensive team project focusing on design and construction, including: project development and documentation; detailing, 3D and 4D modeling, simulation, sustainable concepts, cost benefit analysis, and life-cycle cost analysis; and final project presentation of product and process. Prerequisite: CEE 222A.

CEE 223. Materials for Sustainable Urban Systems. 3 Units.

Students will learn to evaluate alternate materials and make a case for materials selection for given urban infrastructure projects considering the material's performance over time, life cycle impacts, and effect on humans. Limited enrollment. Pre-requisites: CEE 226, CEE 101A or equivalent.

CEE 223A. Cement-based Materials, Properties and Durability. 2 Units.

Students will develop an understanding of the chemical and physical processes of cement and concrete hydration, strength development, mechanical performance and durability. Students will learn how the properties of materials and admixture combine to create a wide range of cement-based materials used in the built environment. The course will address sustainable construction, including the use of alternative cements, admixtures, and aggregates. Students will apply the principles in this course to various aspects of civil and structural engineering, including innovative mix design specification and review, structural investigations and failure analysis, and cementitious materials research.

CEE 224A. Sustainable Development Studio. 1-5 Unit.

(Undergraduates, see 124.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.

CEE 224X. Sustainable Urban Systems Project. 2-5 Units.

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for a new SUS Program within CEE. Students work in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and garduate level) on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real-world urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders. Course structure consists primarily of independent project work with regular lab-based instruction & mentor reviews and occasional guest lectures and discussions. Students can enroll for variable units and variable quarters depending on the project. To enroll, students must view project descriptions and apply on http://sus.stanford.edu.

CEE 224Y. Sustainable Urban Systems Project. 2-5 Units.

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for a new SUS Program within CEE. Students work in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and garduate level) on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real-world urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders. Course structure consists primarily of independent project work with regular lab-based instruction & mentor reviews and occasional guest lectures and discussions. Students can enroll for variable units and variable quarters depending on the project. To enroll, students must view project descriptions and apply on http://sus.stanford.edu.

CEE 224Z. Sustainable Urban Systems Project. 2-5 Units.

Sustainable Urban Systems (SUS) Project is a project-based learning experience being piloted for a new SUS Program within CEE. Students work in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and garduate level) on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real-world urban setting. Multiple projects are offered throughout the academic year and may span multiple quarters. Students are expected to interact with professionals and community stakeholders. Course structure consists primarily of independent project work with regular lab-based instruction & mentor reviews and occasional guest lectures and discussions. Students can enroll for variable units and variable quarters depending on the project. To enroll, students must view project descriptions and apply on http://sus.stanford.edu.

CEE 225. Defining Smart Cities: Visions of Urbanism for the 21st Century. 1-2 Unit.

In a rapidly urbanizing world, "the city" paves the way toward sustainability and social well-being. But what does it mean for a city to be smart? Does that also make it sustainable or resilient or livable? This seminar delves into current debates about urbanism through weekly talks by experts on topics such as big data, human-centered design, new urbanism, and natural capital. How urban spaces are shaped, for better or worse, by the complex interaction of cutting-edge technology, human societies, and the natural environment. The goal is to provoke vigorous discussion and to foster an understanding of cities that is at once technological, humanistic, and ecologically sound.
Same as: CEE 125, URBANST 174

CEE 226. Life Cycle Assessment for Complex Systems. 3-4 Units.

Life cycle modeling of products, industrial processes, and infrastructure/building systems; material and energy balances for large interdependent systems; environmental accounting; and life cycle costing. These methods, based on ISO 14000 standards, are used to examine emerging technologies, such as biobased products, building materials, building integrated photovoltaics, and alternative design strategies, such as remanufacturing, dematerialization, LEED, and Design for Environment: DfE. Student teams complete a life cycle assessment of a product or system chosen from industry.

CEE 226E. Advanced Topics in Integrated, Energy-Efficient Building Design. 2-3 Units.

Innovative methods and systems for the integrated design and evaluation of energy efficient buildings. Guest practitioners and researchers in energy efficient buildings. Student initiated final project. Prerequisites: CEE 156 or CEE 256. All students are expected to participate in the group project assignments. Students taking the course for two units will not be required to complete in-class assignments or individual homework assignments.

CEE 227. Global Project Finance. 3-5 Units.

Public and private sources of finance for large, complex, capital-intensive projects in developed and developing countries. Benefits and disadvantages, major participants, risk sharing, and challenges of project finance in emerging markets. Financial, economic, political, cultural, and technological elements that affect project structures, processes, and outcomes. Case studies. Limited enrollment.

CEE 229S. Climate Change Adaptation in the Coastal Built Environment. 1 Unit.

How will climate change impact coastal ports and harbors around the world? Leading experts discuss the latest science, policy, and engineering research on this important issue, including the necessary response to protect ports and harbors from significant sea-level rise and storm surge. Focus is on the built environment. Guest speakers. CEE 229/129 for research option. See www.groupspaces.com/seaports2100.
Same as: CEE 129S

CEE 234B. Intermediate Arch Studio. 5 Units.

This studio offers students experience in working with a real site and a real client program to develop a community facility. Students will develop site analysis, review a program for development and ultimately design their own solutions that meet client and community goals. Sustainability, historic preservation, community needs and materials will all play a part in the development of students final project. Students will also gain an understanding of graphic conventions, verbal and presentation techniques. Course may be repeated for credit.
Same as: CEE 134B

CEE 237B. Advanced Architecture Studio. 6 Units.

This course will focus on the topic of interdisciplinary collaboration and its role in the development of design concepts. Specifically, the integration of structural with architectural considerations to produce a unified urban, spatial, tectonic and structural proposition will be our field of investigation. This course is an architecture studio course where class time will be spent primarily in individual or group desk critiques and pin-up sessions. May be repeat for credit. Total completions allowed: 3. Additionally, there will be lectures, case study presentations and a field trip. Prerequisites: required: CEE 31 (or 31Q) Drawing, CEE 110 BIM and CEE 130 Design.
Same as: CEE 137B

CEE 239. Design Portfolio Methods. 4 Units.

Students present designs completed in other studio courses to communicate design intentions and other aspects of their work. Instruction in photography; preparation of a design portfolio; and short essays that characterize portfolio contents. Oral presentation workshops offered through the Center for Teaching and Learning. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: two Art or Architecture studio courses, or consent of instructor.
Same as: CEE 139

CEE 241. Managing Fabrication and Construction. 4 Units.

Methods to manage the physical production of construction projects; design, analysis, and optimization of the fabricate-assemble process including performance metrics. Project management techniques and production system design including: push versus pull methods; master scheduling and look-ahead scheduling; scope, cost, and schedule control; earned value analysis; critical path method; location-based scheduling; 4D modeling; workflow; trade coordination; methods to understand uncertainty and reduce process variability; and supply chain systems including made-to-stock, engineered-to-order, and made-to-order. Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Recommended corequisite: 240.

CEE 241A. Infrastructure Project Development. 3 Units.

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities, and communications sectors. Analysis of the condition of the nation's infrastructure and how projects are planned and financed. Focus is on public works in the U.S. The role of public and private sectors through a step-by-step study of the project development process. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare project environmental impact statements.
Same as: CEE 141A

CEE 241B. Infrastructure Project Delivery. 3 Units.

Infrastructure is critical to the economy, global competitiveness and quality of life. Topics include energy, transportation, water, public facilities ,and communications sectors. Analysis of how projects are designed, constructed, operated, and maintained. Focus is on public works projects in the U.S. Alternative project delivery approaches and organizational strategies. Case studies of real infrastructure projects. Industry guest speakers. Student teams prepare finance/design/build/operate/maintain project proposals.
Same as: CEE 141B

CEE 241C. Global Infrastructure Projects Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

Real infrastructure projects presented by industry guest speakers. Energy, transportation, water, public facilities and communications projects are featured. Course provides comparisons of project development and delivery approaches for mega-projects around the world. Alternative project delivery methods, the role of public and private sector, different project management strategies, and lessons learned. Field trips to local projects.
Same as: CEE 141C

CEE 241P. Integrated Management of Fabrication and Construction. 3-4 Units.

Application of the fundamental fabrication and construction management concepts covered in CEE 241T to an actual project; integrated software environments; integration of scope, schedule, and cost information for scheduling, estimating, and progress control; scope management with BIM; off-site fabrication vs. on-site construction and supply chain coordination; group project; project permitting, potential for a joint project with CEE 242P. Prerequisites: CEE 210, CEE 241T.

CEE 241T. Fundamentals of Managing Fabrication and Construction. 2 Units.

Schedule representations including Gantt chart, critical path method (CPM), 4D modeling, and location-based schedules (LBS); activity definition; Product Breakdown Structure (PBS) and Work Breakdown Structure (WBS); consideration of resources constraints, variability, and types of materials in schedule definition; production systems including push, pull, and collaborative systems; project control including earned value analysis (EVA) and plan percent complete (PPC); schedule performance metrics. Class will be held during the first five weeks of Autumn Quarter only.

CEE 242. Organization Design for Projects and Companies. 3-4 Units.

Introduction to organizational behavior and organizational design for construction projects and companies. Class incorporates readings, individual, small group and large group case study assignments. Students use computer simulation to design real-world project organizations.

CEE 242P. Designing Project Organizations. 2 Units.

Sequel to CEE 242T. Course develops information-processing approach for designing project and project-based company organizations to deliver sustainable construction projects; includes design of organizations and work processes for integrated project delivery and public-private partnership concession project delivery. Term project applies computer-based organization simulation to optimize design of project organization for a participating company.

CEE 242T. Organizational Behavior and Design for Construction. 2 Units.

Introduction to organizational behavior and organizational design for Architecture, Engineering and Construction projects and companies. Class incorporates readings, individual and group case study assignments. Students use computer simulation to analyze project organizations and predict schedule, cost and quality risks. This class is a prerequisite for CEE 242P.

CEE 243. Intro to Urban Sys Engrg. 3 Units.

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary domain of urban systems engineering. It will provide you with a high-level understanding of the motivation for studying sustainable cities and urban systems, systems-based modeling approaches and the social actor theories embedded in the urban sustainability decision making process. Coursework will be comprised of three group mini-projects corresponding to course modules.

CEE 244. Accounting, Finance & Valuation for Engineers & Constructors. 2 Units.

Concepts of financial accounting and economics emphasizing the construction industry. Financial statements, accounting concepts, project accounting methods, and the nature of project costs. Case study of major construction contractor. Ownership structure, working capital, and the sources and uses of funds.

CEE 244A. Sustainable Banking Seminar. 1 Unit.

This seminar explores ideas for redesigning banks and the banking sector to achieve three goals: (1) keep the bank and its depositors safe, (2) keep the borrowers, communities, and societies affected by the bank's lending decisions safe, and (3) use bank transactions to improve the sustainability of natural ecosystems. Weekly speakers include bankers, bank regulators, and financial technology (fintech) innovators focused on sustainable banking.

CEE 245. Network Analysis for Urban Systems. 3 Units.

This course will introduce and develop the mathematical theory of networks, metrics of networks, static and dynamic network models and apply them to analysis of urban systems. Students are expected to have a strong background in calculus and linear algebra before taking this course and should be comfortable with the calculation and manipulation of matrices. Experience in a numerical scripting language (preferably Python, R or Matlab) is necessary for the final project. Coursework will consist of weekly graded problem sets pertaining to both theory of networks and applications to urban systems. There will be a final project where students will be required to apply network based methods to the analysis of real data of an urban system. (subject to change).

CEE 246. Entrepreneurship in Civil & Environmental Engineering. 3-4 Units.

CEE 246 is a team project-based course geared toward developing entrepreneurial businesses related to civil and environmental engineering. With support of industry mentors, students are guided through the process of identifying opportunities, developing business plans, and determining funding sources. The class culminates with presentations to industry experts and venture capitalists (VC) to mimic typical investor pitches. The goal is to provide students with the knowledge and network to realize their business idea.

CEE 246A. Engineering Economy Primer. 2 Units.

Satisfies the engineering economy prerequisite for 246 or 253. Application of engineering economy concepts and principles to the construction industry. Equivalence concept; interest formulas; value of money across time; present value, annual cash flow, internal rate of return and benefit-cost methods; retirement and replacement; depreciation; capital budgeting; and sensitivity and risk analysis.

CEE 246B. Real Estate Development and Finance. 3 Units.

Introduction to the Real Estate Development Process from conception, feasibility analysis, due diligence, entitlements, planning, financing, market analysis, contract negotiation, construction, marketing, asset management and disposition. Pro-forma and Financial modeling in Real Estate. Financing options for different types of Real Estate projects and products. Redevelopment projects. Affordable Housing. The class will combine lectures, case studies, field work (Group Project) and guest speakers. Recommended knowledge of spreadsheets. Enrollment limited to 40; no auditors. Instructor consent is required. Only Seniors or Grad students. Students must please kindly email the instructor a short paragraph indicating if they are an undergrad or grad student, their current year (Frosh/Soph/Junior or Senior), their Department and Program, and their reason for taking the class. Prerequisites: Engineering Economy or CEE 246A or similar.

CEE 246E. SENSA Social Enterprise Seminar. 1 Unit.

Students meet with mentors to discuss and get feedback on SENSA labs social enterprise projects. Attendance at all seminars is required for credit.
Same as: CEE 146E

CEE 246S. Real Estate Finance Seminar or Real Estate Career Development Seminar. 1 Unit.

Real Estate Development and Finance presented by industry guest speakers. Executives from different Real Estate companies will give an overview of their business and projects. (Residential, Retail, Commercial, Mixed Used, REITs, Redevelopment Projects, Affordable Housing, public and private real estate companies, real estate funds, etc.). Short Real Estate Case Studies will be given as homework. Two optional field trips.

CEE 247A. Network Governance. 3-4 Units.

This course aims at providing students with insights, concepts and skills needed to understand the dynamics of multi-actor interaction processes in uncertain and often highly politicized contexts and to be able to cope with technological and strategic uncertainties and risks including the unpredictable behavior of actors. They will develop knowledge, skills and competences about how to manage divergent and conflicting interests of different actors including principles of integrative negotiation, communication and mediation.

CEE 248. Introduction to Real Estate Development. 2 Units.

This course will offer students an introduction to Real Estate Development. Senior Principals from Sares Regis, a regional commercial and residential real estate development company, will cover topics on all aspects of the development process. Guest speakers from the fields of architecture and engineering, finance and marketing will participate in some of the classes. They will offer the students a window into the world of how houses, apartments, office buildings and public facilities are conceived of, brought through the design and approval process, financed, marketed and then sold and/or rented. There will be nine 1.5-hour lectures (robust class discussion encouraged). Throughout the quarter, the students will work on a group case study assignment about one local project that is currently being built or was recently completed. This assignment will be due in the form of a presentation during the final exam period. No prior knowledge of real estate is required. Classes commence on April 6th and complete on June 1st. Number of students is limited to 30. Undergraduates must apply by submitting a one-day page essay explaining their interest in taking the class to amabella@stanford.edu by March 1, 2017.

CEE 249. Labor and Industrial Relations: Negotiations, Strikes, and Dispute Resolution. 2 Units.

Labor/management negotiations, content of a labor agreement, strikes, dispute resolution, contemporary issues affecting labor and management, and union versus open shop competitiveness in the marketplace. Case studies; presentations by union leaders, legal experts, and contractor principals. Simulated negotiation session with union officials and role play in an arbitration hearing.

CEE 251. Negotiation. 3 Units.

Students learn to prepare for and conduct negotiations in a variety of arenas including getting a job, managing workplace conflict, negotiating transactions, and managing personal relationships. Interactive class. The internationally travelled instructor who has mediated cases in over 75 countries will require students to negotiate real life case studies and discuss their results in class. Application required before first day of class; students should enroll on Axess and complete the application on Coursework before March 18.
Same as: CEE 151, EARTH 251

CEE 252. Construction Methods for Concrete and Steel Structures. 3 Units.

Providing technical support for concrete and steel construction operations on buildings or infrastructure projects. Concrete materials, construction properties of fresh concrete. Resources and operations for batching, transporting, placing, finishing, and curing concrete. Design, fabrication, and use of formwork. Special operations and formwork systems. Detailing, fabricating, erecting, and connecting structural steel. Lifting equipment and lift planning. Welding processes, operations, and quality control. Readings, exercises and course projects.

CEE 252P. Construction Engineering Practicum. 3 Units.

Construction engineering is a series of technical activities to meet project objectives related to cost and schedule, safety, quality, and sustainability. These activities include: 1) designing temporary works and construction work processes; 2) providing the required temporary and permanent resources; and 3) integrating activities to consider construction during all project phases and between projects. The objectives of CEE252P are to learn about the technical fundamentals, resources, and field operations required to complete construction engineering activities and to develop a foundation for continued related learning. The course requires reviewing recorded presentations and other online resources, completing queries, participating in class sessions with guest speakers and in field trips, completing group exercises and projects, and preparing an individual final paper. The exercises, completed by all groups, include construction engineering activities for earthwork, concrete construction, and steel erection. Each group will also complete a project to analyze one of the following types of systems or facilities: building electrical systems, lighting systems, HVAC systems, control systems, solar photovoltaic power plant, solar thermal power plant, and wind turbine power plant.

CEE 252Q. Construction Engineering Fundamentals. 2 Units.

Construction engineering is a series of technical activities to meet project objectives related to cost and schedule, safety, quality, and sustainability. These activities include: 1) designing temporary works and construction work processes; 2) providing the required temporary and permanent resources; and 3) integrating activities to consider construction during all project phases and between projects. The objectives of CEE 252Q are to learn about the technical fundamentals, resources, and field operations required to complete construction engineering activities and to develop a foundation for continued related learning. The course requires reviewing recorded presentations and other online resources, completing queries, participating in class sessions with guest speakers and in field trips, and completing group exercises and projects. The exercises, completed by all of the student groups, include construction engineering activities for earthwork, concrete construction, and steel erection. Each group will also complete a project to analyze one of the following types of systems or facilities: building electrical systems, lighting systems, HVAC systems, control systems, solar photovoltaic power plant, and wind turbine power plant.

CEE 255. Introduction to Sensing Networks for CEE. 3-4 Units.

Introduce the design and implementation of sensor networks for monitoring the built and natural environment. Emphasis on the integration of modern sensor and communication technologies, signal processing and statistical models for network data analysis and interpretation to create practical deployments to enable sustainable systems, in areas such as energy, weather, transportation and buildings. Students will be involved in a practical project that may involve deploying a small sensor system, data models and analysis and signal processing. Limited enrollment.
Same as: CEE 155

CEE 256. Building Systems. 4 Units.

HVAC, lighting, and envelope systems for commercial and institutional buildings, with a focus on energy efficient design. Knowledge and skills required in the development of low-energy buildings that provide high quality environment for occupants.
Same as: CEE 156

CEE 258. Donald R. Watson Seminar in Construction Engineering and Management. 1 Unit.

Presentations from construction industry leaders. Discussions with speakers from various segments of industry regarding career options. Student groups interact with industry representatives after class.

CEE 258B. Donald R. Watson Seminar in Construction Engineering and Management. 1 Unit.

Weekly seminars and field trips focusing on technical aspects of concrete and steel construction. Submission of abstract and paper required.

CEE 259A. Construction Problems. 1-3 Unit.

Group-selected problems in construction techniques, equipment, or management; preparation of oral and written reports. Guest specialists from the construction industry. See 299 for individual studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in CEM program and consent of instructor.

CEE 259B. Construction Problems. 1-3 Unit.

Group-selected problems in construction techniques, equipment, or management; preparation of oral and written reports. Guest specialists from the construction industry. See 299 for individual studies. Prerequisites: graduate standing in CEM program and consent of instructor.

CEE 260A. Physical Hydrogeology. 4 Units.

(Formerly GES 230.) Theory of underground water occurrence and flow, analysis of field data and aquifer tests, geologic groundwater environments, solution of field problems, and groundwater modeling. Introduction to groundwater contaminant transport and unsaturated flow. Lab. Prerequisite: elementary calculus.
Same as: ESS 220

CEE 260B. Surface and Near-Surface Hydrologic Response. 3 Units.

Quantitative review of process-based hydrology and geomorphology. Introduction to finite-difference and finite-element methods of numerical analysis. Topics: biometeorology, unsaturated and saturated subsurface fluid flow, overland and open channel flow, and physically-based simulation of coupled surface and near-surface hydrologic response. Links hydrogeology, soil physics, and surface water hydrology.
Same as: GS 237

CEE 260C. Contaminant Hydrogeology and Reactive Transport. 4 Units.

Decades of industrial activity have released vast quantities of contaminants to groundwater, threatening water resources, ecosystems and human health. What processes control the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface? What remediation strategies are effective and what are the tradeoffs among them? How are these processes represented in models used for regulatory and decision-making purposes? This course will address these and related issues by focusing on the conceptual and quantitative treatment of advective-dispersive transport with reacting solutes, including modern methods of contaminant transport simulation. Some Matlab programming / program modification required. Prerequisite: Physical Hydrogeology ESS 220 / CEE 260A (Gorelick) or equivalent and college-level course work in chemistry.
Same as: ESS 221, GS 225

CEE 261A. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Fundamental Physics and Modeling. 3 Units.

An introduction to the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL), including measurements and simulations of ABL flows. Wind and flow, turbulent transport, buoyancy and virtual potential temperature, the diurnal cycle. Derivation of the governing equations, simplifications and assumptions. Turbulence kinetic energy and its budget, ABL stability, the Richardson number and teh Obukhov length. Analysis of boundary layer turbulence. Overview of field and wind tunnel measurement techniques, and of computational models from meso- to micro-scale. a Discussion of micro-scale applications, including pedestrian wind comfort, pollutant dispersion and wind loading, and an introduction to uncertainty quantification for ABL flows. Prerequisites: Knowledge of fluid mechanics.

CEE 261B. Physics of Wind Energy. 3 Units.

Formerly CEE 261. An introduction to the analysis and modeling of wind energy resources and their extraction. Topics include the physical origins of atmospheric winds; vertical profiles of wind speed and turbulence over land and sea; the wind energy spectrum and its modification by natural topography and built environments; theoretical limits on wind energy extraction by wind turbines and wind farms; modeling of wind turbine aerodynamics and wind farm performance. Final project will focus on development of a new wind energy technology concept. Prerequisites: CEE 262A or ME 351A.
Same as: ME 262

CEE 261I. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: The Atmospheric Circulation. 3 Units.

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the atmospheric circulation. Topics include the global energy balance, the greenhouse effect, the vertical and meridional structure of the atmosphere, dry and moist convection, the equations of motion for the atmosphere and ocean, including the effects of rotation, and the poleward transport of heat by the large-scale atmospheric circulation and storm systems. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME100 and PHYSICS 41.
Same as: CEE 161I, EARTHSYS 146A, EARTHSYS 246A, ESS 146A, ESS 246A, GEOPHYS 146A, GEOPHYS 246A

CEE 262A. Hydrodynamics. 3-4 Units.

The flow of incompressible viscous fluid; emphasis is on developing an understanding of fluid dynamics that can be applied to environmental flows. Topics: kinematics of fluid flow; equations of mass and momentum conservation (including density variations); some exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations; appropriate analysis of fluid flows including Stokes flows, potential flows, and laminar boundary layers; and an introduction to the effects of rotation and stratification through scaling analysis of fluid flows. Prerequisites: 101B or consent of instructor; and some knowledge of vector calculus and differential equations.

CEE 262B. Transport and Mixing in Surface Water Flows. 3-4 Units.

Application of fluid mechanics to problems of pollutant transport and mixing in the water environment. Mathematical models of advection, diffusion, and dispersion. Application of theory to problems of transport and mixing in rivers, estuaries, and lakes and reservoirs. Recommended: 262A and CME 102 (formerly ENGR 155A), or equivalents.

CEE 262C. Modeling Environmental Flows. 3 Units.

Introduction to numerical methods for modeling surface water flows in rivers, lakes, estuaries and the coastal ocean. Topics include stability and accuracy analysis, curvilinear and unstructured grids, implicit/explicit methods, transport and diffusion, shallow water equations, nonhydrostatic equations, Navier-Stokes solvers, turbulence modeling. Prerequisites: CEE262A, CME206, or equivalent.

CEE 262D. Introduction to Physical Oceanography. 4 Units.

Formerly CEE 164. The dynamic basis of oceanography. Topics: physical environment; conservation equations for salt, heat, and momentum; geostrophic flows; wind-driven flows; the Gulf Stream; equatorial dynamics and ENSO; thermohaline circulation of the deep oceans; and tides. Prerequisite: PHYSICS 41 (formerly 53).
Same as: CEE 162D, EARTHSYS 164, ESS 148

CEE 262E. Rivers, Streams, and Canals. 3-4 Units.

Formerly CEE 161A/264A. Introduction to the movement of water through natural and engineered channels, streams, and rivers. Basic equations and theory (mass, momentum, and energy equations) for steady and unsteady descriptions of the flow. Application of theory to the design of flood- control and canal systems. Flow controls such as weirs and sluice gates; gradually varied flow; Saint-Venant equations and flood waves; and method of characteristics. Open channel flow laboratory experiments: controls such as weirs and gates, gradually varied flow, and waves. Limited enrollment in lab section. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A.
Same as: CEE 162E

CEE 262F. Ocean Waves. 3 Units.

The fluid mechanics of surface gravity waves in the ocean of relevance to engineers and oceanographers. Topics include irrotational waves, wave dispersion, wave spectra, effects of bathymetry (shoaling), mass transport, effects of viscosity, and mean currents driven by radiation stresses. Prerequisite: CEE 262A or a graduate class in fluid mechanics.

CEE 262G. Sediment Transport Modeling. 3 Units.

Formerly CEE 264. Mechanics of sediment transport in rivers, estuaries and coastal oceans, with an emphasis on development of models and application of three-dimensional software tools. Topics include bottom boundary layers in steady and wave-driven flows, bedform dynamics, suspended and bedload transport, cohesive sediments. Prerequisites: CEE262A or consent of instructor.

CEE 262I. Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: the Ocean Circulation. 3 Units.

Introduction to the physics governing the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean and their control on climate with emphasis on the large-scale ocean circulation. This course will give an overview of the structure and dynamics of the major ocean current systems that contribute to the meridional overturning circulation, the transport of heat, salt, and biogeochemical tracers, and the regulation of climate. Topics include the tropical ocean circulation, the wind-driven gyres and western boundary currents, the thermohaline circulation, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation, atmosphere-ocean coupling, and climate variability. Prerequisites: EESS 146A or EESS 246A, or CEE 162D or CEE 262D, or consent of instructor.
Same as: CEE 162I, EARTHSYS 146B, EARTHSYS 246B, ESS 146B, ESS 246B

CEE 263A. Air Pollution Modeling. 3-4 Units.

The numerical modeling of urban, regional, and global air pollution focusing on gas chemistry and radiative transfer. Stratospheric, free-tropospheric, and urban chemistry. Methods for solving stiff systems of chemical ordinary differential, including the multistep implicit-explicit method, Gear's method with sparse-matrix techniques, and the family method. Numerical methods of solving radiative transfer, coagulation, condensation, and chemical equilibrium problems. Project involves developing a basic chemical ordinary differential equation solver. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.

CEE 263B. Numerical Weather Prediction. 3-4 Units.

Numerical weather prediction. Continuity equations for air and water vapor, the thermodynamic energy equation, and momentum equations derived for the atmosphere. Numerical methods of solving partial differential equations, including finite-difference, finite-element, semi-Lagrangian, and pseudospectral methods. Time-stepping schemes: the forward-Euler, backward-Euler, Crank-Nicolson, Heun, Matsuno, leapfrog, and Adams-Bashforth schemes. Boundary-layer turbulence parameterizations, soil moisture, and cloud modeling. Project developing a basic weather prediction model. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.

CEE 263C. Weather and Storms. 3 Units.

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Same as: CEE 63

CEE 263D. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions. 3 Units.

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci.
Same as: CEE 64

CEE 263G. Energy Policy in California. 1 Unit.

This seminar will provide an in-depth analysis of the role of California state agencies in driving energy policy development, technology innovation, and market structures. The course will cover three areas: 1) roles and responsibilities of key state agencies; 2) current and evolving energy and climate policies; and 3) development of California's 21st century energy systems. Presentations will include experts from the California Energy Commission, the California Public Utilities Commission, the California Air Resources Board, the California Independent System Operator, the California Legislature, and the Governor's office. This class is required for all Stanford Energy Internships in California (SEIC) fellowship awardees and is open to other interested undergraduate and graduate students. Class dates are: April 2nd (10am-2pm), April 30th (10am-1pm), and May 21st (10am-1pm). Lunch will be provided. May be repeat for credit. If interested you can fill out this webform: http://web.stanford.edu/~sburbank/Energy.fb.
Same as: POLISCI 73, PUBLPOL 73

CEE 263S. Atmosphere/Energy Seminar. 1 Unit.

Interdisciplinary seminar with talks by researchers and practitioners in the fields of atmospheric science and renewable energy engineering. Addresses the causes of climate, air pollution, and weather problems and methods of addressing these problems through renewable and efficient energy systems. May be repeated for credit.

CEE 265A. Sustainable Water Resources Development. 3 Units.

Alternative criteria for judging the sustainability of projects. Application of criteria to evaluate sustainability of water resources projects in several countries. Case studies illustrate the role of political, social, economic, and environmental factors in decision making. Influence of international aid agencies and NGOs on water projects. Evaluation of benefit-cost analysis and environmental impact assessment as techniques for enhancing the sustainability of future projects. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: graduate standing in Environmental and Water Studies, or consent of instructor.

CEE 265C. Water Resources Management. 3 Units.

Examination of the basic principles of surface and ground water resources management in the context of increasing water scarcity and uncertainty due to climate change and other factors. Specific topics include reservoir, river basin and aquifer management, conjunctive use of surface andn ground water, and treated wastewater reuse. Special emphasis is placed on demand management through conservation, increased water use efficiency and economic measures. Besides the technical aspects of water management, an overview of its legal and institutional framework is provided.
Same as: CEE 165C

CEE 265D. Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries. 1-3 Unit.

Economic, social, political, and technical aspects of sustainable water supply and sanitation service provision in developing countries. Service pricing, alternative institutional structures including privatization, and the role of consumer demand and community participation in the planning process. Environmental and public health considerations, and strategies for serving low-income households. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor, see jennadavis.stanford.edu for application.

CEE 266A. Watersheds and Wetlands. 4 Units.

Introduction to the occurrence and movement of water in the natural environment and its role in creating and maintaining terrestrial, wetland, and aquatic habitat. Hydrologic processes, including precipitation, evaporation, transpiration, snowmelt, infiltration, subsurface flow, runoff, and streamflow. Rivers and lakes, springs and swamps. Emphasis is on observation and measurement, data analysis, modeling, and prediction. Prerequisite: CEE 101B or CEE 162A or equivalent. (Freyberg).
Same as: CEE 166A

CEE 266B. Floods and Droughts, Dams and Aqueducts. 4 Units.

Sociotechnical systems associated with human use of water as a resource and the hazards posed by too much or too little water. Potable and non-potable water use and conservation. Irrigation, hydroelectric power generation, rural and urban water supply systems, storm water management, flood damage mitigation, and water law and institutions. Emphasis is on engineering design. Prerequisite: 166A or equivalent. (Freyberg).
Same as: CEE 166B

CEE 266D. Water Resources and Water Hazards Field Trips. 2 Units.

Introduction to water use and water hazards via weekly field trips to local and regional water resources facilities (dams, reservoirs, fish ladders and hatcheries, pumping plants, aqueducts, hydropower plants, and irrigation systems) and flood damage mitigation facilities (storm water detention ponds, channel modifications, flood control dams, and reservoirs). Each trip preceded by an orientation lecture.
Same as: CEE 166D

CEE 268. Groundwater Flow. 3-4 Units.

Flow and mass transport in porous media. Applications of potential flow theory and numerical modeling methods to practical groundwater problems: flow to and from wells, rivers, lakes, drainage ditches; flow through and under dams; streamline tracing; capture zones of wells; and mixing schemes for in-situ remediation. Prerequisites: calculus and introductory fluid mechanics.

CEE 269A. Environmental Engineering & Science Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research in environmental engineering and science by Civil & Environmental Engineering faculty.
Same as: CEE 279A

CEE 269B. Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research, practice and thinking in environmental engineering and science by visiting academics and practitioners.
Same as: CEE 279B

CEE 269C. Environmental Engineering and Science Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research, practice and thinking in environmental engineering and science by visiting academics and practitioners.
Same as: CEE 279C

CEE 270. Movement and Fate of Organic Contaminants in Waters. 3 Units.

Transport of chemical constituents in surface and groundwater including advection, dispersion, sorption, interphase mass transfer, and transformation; impacts on water quality. Emphasis is on physicochemical processes and the behavior of hazardous waste contaminants. Prerequisites: undergraduate chemistry and calculus. Recommended: 101B.

CEE 270B. Environmental Organic Reaction Chemistry. 2-3 Units.

With over 70,000 chemicals now in production worldwide, predicting their fate in the environment is a difficult task. The course focuses on developing two key skillls. First, students should develop the ability to derive mass balance equations used to quantify the fate of chemicals in the environment. With so many chemicals having been introduced in the past ~60 years, many of the key parameters needed for mass balance models have not been measured experimentally. The class builds on CEE 270, which developed methods of predicting equilibrium partitioning coefficients. For many situations involving reactions of target contaminants, equilibrium is not attained. The course develops methods of predicting the reactivity of chemicals based upon their chemical structures both qualitatively and quantitatively. natural reaction processes covered include acid-base speciation, nucleophilic substitution, oxidation/reduction reactions, and photochemical reactions. Key treatment ractions (ozone, UV treatment and advanced oxidation) are also covered. Prerequisites: CEE 270, CHEM 31B/X.

CEE 271A. Physical and Chemical Treatment Processes. 3 Units.

Physical and chemical unit operations for water treatment, emphasizing process combinations for drinking water supply. Application of the principles of chemistry, rate processes, fluid dynamics, and process engineering to define and solve water treatment problems by flocculation, sedimentation, filtration, disinfection, oxidation, aeration, and adsorption. Investigative paper on water supply and treatment. Prerequisites: CEE 101B (or CEE 162A); CEE 270. Recommended: 273.

CEE 271B. Environmental Biotechnology. 4 Units.

Stoichiometry, kinetics, and thermodynamics of microbial processes for the transformation of environmental contaminants. Design of dispersed growth and biofilm-based processes. Applications include treatment of municipal and industrial waste waters, detoxification of hazardous chemicals, and groundwater remediation. Prerequisites: 270; 177 or 274A or equivalents.

CEE 271D. Introduction to Wastewater Treatment Process Modeling. 2 Units.

The course will present a structured protocol for simulator application comprising project definition, data collection and reconciliation, model set-up, calibration and validation, and simulation and result interpretation. This course will include a series of guided simulation exercises evaluating resource consumption (e.g., electrical energy, natural gas, chemicals) and resource recovery (e.g., biogas, struvite, biosolids, recycled water) from a variety of treatment plant configurations. Coursework for all students will comprise guided simulation exercises begun in class. Students may elect to take the course for 2 units by completing a group project evaluating an assigned plant configuration and presenting the results before the class.

CEE 271F. New Indicators of Well-Being and Sustainability. 3 Units.

Explore new ways to better measure human development, comprehensive wealth and sustainability beyond standard economic indicators such as income and GDP. Examine how new indicators shape global, national and local policy worldwide. Well-being topics include health, happiness, trust, inequality and governance. Sustainability topics include sustainable development, environmental performance indicators, material flow analysis and decoupling, and inclusive wealth indicators. Students will build their own indicator of well-being and sustainability for a term paper.
Same as: CEE 171F

CEE 271M. Transport Phenomena: Momentum, heat and mass transport. 3 Units.

Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint of basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary layer theory. Prerequisites: fluid mechanics, ordinary differential equations.
Same as: CEE 371M

CEE 272. Coastal Contaminants. 3-4 Units.

Coastal pollution and its effects on ecosystems and human health. The sources, fate, and transport of human pathogens and nutrients. Background on coastal ecosystems and coastal transport phenomena including tides, waves, and cross shelf transport. Introduction to time series analysis with MATLAB. Undergraduates require consent of instructor.

CEE 272R. Modern Power Systems Engineering. 3 Units.

Focus is on Power Engineering from a systems point of view. Topics covered may include modeling of generation, transmission and distribution systems, load flow analysis, transient and steady-state stability analysis. Special emphasis given to modern market operations and dispatch, modeling intermittent controllable power sources, storage technologies, mechanisms for demand response, sensing the grid and the role of market mechanisms for deep integration. Course content may vary year to year.

CEE 272S. Green House Gas Mitigation. 1-3 Unit.

This course will introduce the main concepts of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions measurement and management, and it will explore the main mitigation options for reducing emissions or sequestering carbon dioxide. It will address technical aspects of GHG mitigation via energy efficiency and demand-side management, energy in high-technology industry, distributed power and co-generation, the role of renewable energy in GHG management, carbon sequestration in forestry, agriculture, and geological formations. The course explores policy options, carbon trading and business strategies for GHG mitigation.
Same as: CEE 172S

CEE 272T. SmartGrids and Advanced Power Systems Seminar. 1-2 Unit.

A series of seminar and lectures focused on power engineering. Renowned researchers from universities and national labs will deliver bi-weekly seminars on the state of the art of power system engineering. Seminar topics may include: power system analysis and simulation, control and stability, new market mechanisms, computation challenges and solutions, detection and estimation, and the role of communications in the grid. The instructors will cover relevant background materials in the in-between weeks. The seminars are planned to continue throughout the next academic year, so the course may be repeated for credit.
Same as: EE 292T

CEE 273. Aquatic Chemistry. 3 Units.

Chemical principles and their application to the analysis and solution of problems in aqueous geochemistry (temperatures near 25° C and atmospheric pressure). Emphasis is on natural water systems and the solution of specific chemical problems in water purification technology and water pollution control. Prerequisites: CHEM 31 and 33, or equivalents.

CEE 273A. Water Chemistry Laboratory. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 273A.) Laboratory application of techniques for the analysis of natural and contaminated waters, emphasizing instrumental techniques.
Same as: CEE 179A

CEE 273C. Environmental Engineering Applications of Membrane Technology. 3 Units.

Introduction to membrane technology and processes with applications in R&D, water/wastewater treatment, and renewable energy. Membrane separation principles, reverse osmosis, nanofiltration, membrane characterization techniques, mass transport phenomena, fouling processes, rejection of salts and trace organics, brine disposal system design, energy and cost considerations, and pre- and post-treatment procedures. Case studies in environmental sustainability issues related to full scale treatment engineering.

CEE 273D. Wastewater Treatment Process Simulators and Their Use for Emerging Technologies. 2 Units.

Process simulators are used widely for analysis and design of municipal and industrial wastewater treatment facilities. The current generation of simulators integrates biological, chemical, and physical process models that enable steady-state and dynamic "whole plant" simulation of liquid and solids treatment process performance. This course reinforces the concepts presented in CEE 271A, CEE 271B, and CEE 273 and shows how these concepts are applied to analyze and design treatment systems for BOD removal, energy recovery, phosphorus removal and recovery, and nitrogen removal using BioWin TM 4, a commercially-available software package. A process-specific model for anaerobic treatment of domestic wastewater will also be developed for the new Staged Anaerobic Fluidized Membrane Bioreactor (SAF-MBR) based on the International Water Association (IWA) Anaerobic Digester Model No. 1 (ADM1) and implemented using the simulation software Aquasim.

CEE 274A. Environmental Microbiology I. 3 Units.

Basics of microbiology and biochemistry. The biochemical and biophysical principles of biochemical reactions, energetics, and mechanisms of energy conservation. Diversity of microbial catabolism, flow of organic matter in nature: the carbon cycle, and biogeochemical cycles. Bacterial physiology, phylogeny, and the ecology of microbes in soil and marine sediments, bacterial adhesion, and biofilm formation. Microbes in the degradation of pollutants. Prerequisites: CHEM 33, 35, and BIOSCI 41, CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188), or equivalents.
Same as: CHEMENG 174, CHEMENG 274

CEE 274B. Microbial Bioenergy Systems. 3 Units.

Introduction to microbial metabolic pathways and to the pathway logic with a special focus on microbial bioenergy systems. The first part of the course emphasizes the metabolic and biochemical principles of pathways, whereas the second part is more specifically directed toward using this knowledge to understand existing systems and to design innovative microbial bioenergy systems for biofuel, biorefinery, and environmental applications. There also is an emphasis on the implications of rerouting of energy and reducing equivalents for the fitness and ecology of the organism. Prerequisites: CHEMENG 174 or 181 and organic chemistry, or equivalents.
Same as: CHEMENG 456

CEE 274D. Pathogens and Disinfection. 3 Units.

Introduction to epidemiology, major pathogens and infectious diseases, the immune system, movement and survival of pathogens in the environment, transfer of virulence and antibiotic resistance genes, and pathogen control, with an emphasis on public health engineering measures (disinfection). Prerequisite: 274A.

CEE 274P. Environmental Health Microbiology Lab. 3-4 Units.

Microbiology skills including culture-, microscope-, and molecular-based detection techniques. Focus is on standard and EPA-approved methods to enumerate and isolate organisms used to assess risk of enteric illnesses, such as coliforms, enterococci, and coliphage, in drinking and recreational waters including lakes, streams, and coastal waters. Student project to assess the microbial water quality of a natural water. Limited enrollment; priority to CEE graduate students. An application form must be filed and approved before admission to the class.

CEE 274S. Hopkins Microbiology Course. 3-12 Units.

(Formerly GES 274S.) Four-week, intensive. The interplay between molecular, physiological, ecological, evolutionary, and geochemical processes that constitute, cause, and maintain microbial diversity. How to isolate key microorganisms driving marine biological and geochemical diversity, interpret culture-independent molecular characterization of microbial species, and predict causes and consequences. Laboratory component: what constitutes physiological and metabolic microbial diversity; how evolutionary and ecological processes diversify individual cells into physiologically heterogeneous populations; and the principles of interactions between individuals, their population, and other biological entities in a dynamically changing microbial ecosystem. Prerequisites: CEE 274A and CEE 274B, or equivalents.
Same as: BIO 274S, BIOHOPK 274, ESS 253S

CEE 275A. California Coast: Science, Policy, and Law. 3-4 Units.

This interdisciplinary course integrates the legal, scientific, and policy dimensions of how we characterize and manage resource use and allocation along the California coast. We will use this geographic setting as the vehicle for exploring more generally how agencies, legislatures, and courts resolve resource-use conflicts and the role that scientific information and uncertainty play in the process. Our focus will be on the land-sea interface as we explore contemporary coastal land-use and marine resource decision-making, including coastal pollution, public health, ecosystem management; public access; private development; local community and state infrastructure; natural systems and significant threats; resource extraction; and conservation, mitigation and restoration. Students will learn the fundamental physics, chemistry, and biology of the coastal zone, tools for exploring data collected in the coastal ocean, and the institutional framework that shapes public and private decisions affecting coastal resources. There will be 3 to 4 written assignments addressing policy and science issues during the quarter, as well as a take-home final assignment. Special Instructions: In-class work and discussion is often done in interdisciplinary teams of students from the School of Law, the School of Engineering, the School of Humanities and Sciences, and the School of Earth, Energy, and Environmental Sciences. Students are expected to participate in class discussion and field trips. Elements used in grading: Participation, including class session and field trip attendance, writing and quantitative assignments. Cross-listed with Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE 175A/275A), Earth Systems (EARTHSYS 175/275), Law (LAW514), and Public Policy (PUBLPOL 175/275). Open to graduate students and to advanced undergraduates with instructor consent.
Same as: CEE 175A, EARTHSYS 175, EARTHSYS 275, PUBLPOL 175, PUBLPOL 275

CEE 275B. Process Design for Environmental Biotechnology. 3 Units.

Use of microbial bioreactors for degradation of contaminants and recovery of clean water, clean energy and/or green materials. Student teams design, operate, and analyze bioreactors and learn to write consulting style reports. Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: 271B.

CEE 275C. Water, Sanitation and Health. 1-4 Unit.

Students acquire basic knowledge to participate in a dialogue on water, sanitation and health issues in developing and developed countries. The focus is on enteric pathogenic pollutants. Material includes: Important pathogens, their modes of transmission and the diseases they cause, their fate and transport in the environment, and the means by which they are measured; statistical methods for processing and interpreting waterborne pollutant concentrations, and interpreting data from epidemiology studies; microbial source tracking; epidemiology and quantitative microbial risk assessment; reduction of pathogens in water and sludge; and non-experimental water, sanitation, and hygiene research. Several laboratory sessions will allow students to measure indicator bacteria and viruses using culture-based techniques and expose students to molecular methods for measuring health-relevant targets in water.

CEE 275K. The Practice of Environmental Consulting. 2 Units.

Class consists of eight interactive two-hour seminars with discussions, and will cover the evolution of the environmental consulting business, strategic choices and alternative business models for private and public firms, a review of the key operational issues in managing firm, organizational strategies, knowledge management and innovation, and ethical issues in providing professional services. Case studies will be used to illustrate key concepts. Selected reading materials drawn from the technical and business literature on the consulting business. Student groups will prepare and present an abbreviated business plan for an environmental based business. Enrollment limited to CEE MS and PHD students.

CEE 275P. Persuasive Communication for Environmental Scientists, Practitioners, and Entrepreneurs. 1 Unit.

Achieving environmental goals depends not only on innovative ideas and great science but also persuasive communication. What makes communication persuasive? The ability of the communicator to create value for his or her audience. This course will teach students how to: 1) focus on their audience and 2) create value for their audience using research-proven communication techniques. Students will master these techniques through oral and written exercises so that, after taking this course, they will speak and write more persuasively.
Same as: CEE 175P

CEE 275S. Environmental Entrepreneurship and Innovation. 2 Units.

Our current infrastructure for provision of critical services-clean water, energy, transportation, environmental protection; requires substantial upgrades. As a complement to the scientific and engineering innovations taking place in the environmental field, this course emphasizes the analysis of economic factors and value propositions that align value chain stakeholder interests.
Same as: CEE 175S

CEE 276. Introduction to Human Exposure Analysis. 3 Units.

(Graduate students register for 276.) Scientific and engineering issues involved in quantifying human exposure to toxic chemicals in the environment. Pollutant behavior, inhalation exposure, dermal exposure, and assessment tools. Overview of the complexities, uncertainties, and physical, chemical, and biological issues relevant to risk assessment. Lab projects. Recommended: MATH 51. Apply at first class for admission.
Same as: CEE 178

CEE 276C. Energy Storage Integration - Vehicles, Renewables, and the Grid. 3 Units.

This course will provide in-depth introduction to existing energy storage solutions being used on the electric grid and in vehicles with a primary focus on batteries and electrochemical storage. We will discuss the operating characteristics, cost and efficiency of these technologies and how tradeoff decisions can be made. Special attention will be given to system-level integration of new storage technologies, including chargers, inverters, battery management systems and controls, into the existing vehicle and grid infrastructure. Further investigations include issues relating to integration of electric vehicle charging with demand-side management, scheduled renewable energy absorption and local grid balancing. Class format involves regular guest lectures, required lab participation, and field trips to relevant sites. Enrollment is limited; if you are interested in taking the course, please fill out a brief questionnaire at http://goo.gl/forms/i3YH91Qx05 n Please contact jtaggart@stanford.edu with any questions regarding the application or course information.
Same as: CEE 176C

CEE 276G. Sustainability Design Thinking. 3 Units.

Application design thinking to make sustainability compelling, impactful and realizable. Analysis of contextual, functional and human-centered design thinking techniques to promote sustainable design of products and environments by holistically considering space, form, environment, energy, economics, and health. Includes Studio project work in prototyping, modeling, testing, and realizing sustainable design ideas.
Same as: CEE 176G

CEE 277D. Water, Health & Development in Africa. 1 Unit.

Graduate seminar focused on emerging research in the areas of water supply, sanitation, hygiene and health in developing countries. Limited enrollment; instructor permission required.

CEE 277F. Advanced Field Methods in Water, Health and Development. 1-10 Unit.

Field methods for assessing household stored water quality, hand contamination, behaviors, and knowledge related to water, sanitation and health. Limited enrollment. Instructor consent required.

CEE 277L. Smart Cities & Communities. 2 Units.

The role of information technology (IT) in enabling mankind to improve the operations and sustainability of cities and communities. Review of what a "smarter" city of community might be, the role of IT in enabling them to become "smarter" (including what IT cannot achieve). Case studies on water, transportation, resilience, and open data & citizen sensing.
Same as: CEE 177L

CEE 277M. Smart Cities & Communities II. 2 Units.

Exploration of the informatics toolkit (internet of things, cloud, analytics, systems of engagement) for creating 'smarter' cities and communities. Case studies on energy, buildings, urban design, public services, and food complement the systems addressed in CEE 177L (for CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M). Panel of experts will frame opportunities and challenges.nCo-requisite: concurrent registration in CEE 177L for (CEE 177M) and CEE 277L (for CEE 277M).
Same as: CEE 177M

CEE 277S. Design for a Sustainable World. 1-5 Unit.

Technology-based problems faced by developing communities worldwide. Student groups partner with organizations abroad to work on concept, feasibility, design, implementation, and evaluation phases of various projects. Past projects include a water and health initiative, a green school design, seismic safety, and medical device. Admission based on written application and interview. See http://esw.stanford.edu for application. (Staff).
Same as: CEE 177S

CEE 277X. Current Topics in Sustainable Engineering. 1-3 Unit.

This course is the first half of a two quarter, project-based design course that addresses the cultural, political, organizational, technical, and business issues at the heart of implementing sustainable engineering projects in the developing world. Students will be placed into one of three project teams and tackle a real-world design challenge in partnership with social entrepreneurs and NGOs. In CEE 177X/277X, students will gain the background skills and context necessary to effectively design engineering projects in developing nations. Instructor consent required.
Same as: CEE 177X

CEE 278A. Air Pollution Fundamentals. 3 Units.

The sources and health effects of gaseous and particulate air pollutants. The influence of meteorology on pollution: temperature profiles, stability classes, inversion layers, turbulence. Atmospheric diffusion equations, downwind dispersion of emissions from point and line sources. Removal of air pollutants via settling, diffusion, coagulation, precipitation, Mechanisms for ozone formation, in the troposphere versus in the stratosphere. Effects of airborne particle size and composition on light scattering/absorption, and on visual range. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or equivalent. Recommended: 101B, CHEM 31A, or equivalents.

CEE 278C. Indoor Air Quality. 2-3 Units.

Factors affecting the levels of air pollutants in the built indoor environment. The influence of ventilation, office equipment, floor coverings, furnishings, cleaning practices, and human activities on air quality including carbon dioxide, VOCs, resuspended dust, and airborne molds and fungi. Limited enrollment, preference to CEE students. Prerequisites: MATH 42 or 21 and CEE 70, or equivalents.
Same as: CEE 172A

CEE 279. Environmental Engineering Seminar. 1 Unit.

Current research, practice, and thinking in environmental engineering and science. Attendance at seminars is self-directed, the 20 hours of required seminar attendance may be accrued throughout the school year. Must prepare a publication synopsis, and maintain log of seminar attendance. See Aut Qtr CEE 279 syllabus for details on course requirements. Contact hildemann@stanford.edu to be added to Coursework website.

CEE 279A. Environmental Engineering & Science Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research in environmental engineering and science by Civil & Environmental Engineering faculty.
Same as: CEE 269A

CEE 279B. Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research, practice and thinking in environmental engineering and science by visiting academics and practitioners.
Same as: CEE 269B

CEE 279C. Environmental Engineering and Science Seminar. 1 Unit.

Presentations on current research, practice and thinking in environmental engineering and science by visiting academics and practitioners.
Same as: CEE 269C

CEE 279F. Frontiers of Anaerobic Treatment. 1 Unit.

This seminar will present the latest findings on the operation and performance of ground-breaking anaerobic treatment processes for domestic wastewater. Specifically, this seminar will examine the performance of the Staged Anaerobic Fluidized-bed Membrane Bioreactor (SAF-MBR) using results from ongoing operations at the Codiga Resource Recover Center and from previous and parallel research efforts. The seminars will incorporate a description of the fundamentals of anaerobic treatment processes, a discussion of how the SAF-MBR process is different from typical anaerobic processes, and insights from operations along with implications for system design. Course work will include explorations of the costs, benefits, and market potential of this technology.
Same as: CEE 179F

CEE 279S. Seminar: Issues in Environmental Science, Technology and Sustainability. 1-2 Unit.

Invited faculty, researchers and professionals share their insights and perspectives on a broad range of environmental and sustainability issues. Students critique seminar presentations and associated readings.
Same as: CEE 179S, EARTHSYS 179S, ESS 179S

CEE 279W. Innovation in Water Sector. 1 Unit.

A project class on the diffusion of ReNUWIt technologies into practice (David Sedlak is the overall course lead at UC Berkeley, Chris Higgins is the lead at Colorado School of Mines, and Dick Luthy is the lead at Stanford). Specifically, the class will examine the pathway through which ReNUWIt¿s engineered wetland technologies will be adopted by utilities and consultants beyond our current group of industrial partners. We will work together to prepare background information that will be used in a 2-day workshop involving ReNUWIt researchers, utility leaders and technical experts in early 2015.

CEE 280. Advanced Structural Analysis. 3-4 Units.

Theoretical development and computer implementation of direct stiffness method of structural analysis; virtual work principles; computation of element stiffness matrices and load vectors; direct assembly procedures; equation solution techniques. Analysis of two- and three-dimensional truss and frame structures, thermal loads, and substructuring and condensation techniques for large systems. Practical modeling techniques and programming assignments. Introduction to nonlinear analysis concepts. Prerequisites: elementary structural analysis and matrix algebra.

CEE 281. Mechanics and Finite Elements. 3 Units.

Fluid conduction and solid deformation; conservation laws: balance of mass and balance of momentum; generalized Darcy's law and Hooke's law in 3D; the use of tensors in mechanics; finite element formulation of boundary-value problems; variational equations and Galerkin approximations; basic shape functions, numerical integration, and assembly operations.

CEE 282. Nonlinear Structural Analysis. 3-4 Units.

Introduction to methods of geometric and material nonlinear analysis, emphasizing modeling approaches for framed structures. Large-displacement analysis, concentrated and distributed plasticity models, and nonlinear solution methods. Applications to frame stability and performance-based seismic design. Assignments emphasize computer implementation and applications. Prerequisites: 280 and an advanced course in structural behavior (e.g., 285A, 285B or equivalent).

CEE 283. Structural Dynamics. 3-4 Units.

Vibrations and dynamic response of simple structures under time dependent loads; dynamic analysis of single and multiple degrees of freedom systems; support motion; response spectra.

CEE 284. Finite Element Methods in Structural Dynamics. 3-4 Units.

Computational methods for structural dynamics analysis of discrete and continuous systems in free and forced vibration; finite element formulation; modal analysis; numerical methods; introduction to nonlinear dynamics; advanced topics. Prerequisites: 280, 283.

CEE 285A. Advanced Structural Concrete Behavior and Design. 3-4 Units.

Behavior and design of reinforced and prestressed concrete for building and bridge design. Topics will include flexural behavior, prestressed concrete design, and two-way slab design & analysis, among others.

CEE 285B. Advanced Structural Steel Behavior and Design. 3-4 Units.

Advanced topics in structural steel design. Topics include composite floor systems; bolted and welded connections; beam-column connections; innovative lateral load resisting systems. As part of this course students design a 15-story steel building. Prerequisite: basic course in structural steel design CEE181 or equivalent.

CEE 287. Earthquake Resistant Design and Construction. 3-4 Units.

Evaluation, design, and construction of structures in seismic regions. Factors influencing earthquake ground motions, design spectra, design of linear and nonlinear single- and multiple-degree-of-freedom-system structures, force-based and displacement-based design methods, capacity design, detailing and construction of steel and reinforced concrete structures, introduction to performance-based design, seismic isolation, and energy dissipation. Prerequisites: 283 and either 285A or 285B.

CEE 288. Introduction to Performance Based Earthquake Engineering. 3-4 Units.

Earthquake phenomena, faulting, ground motion, earthquake hazard formulation, effects of earthquakes on manmade structures, response spectra, Fourier spectra, soil effects on ground motion and structural damage, methods for structural damage evaluation, and formulation of the performance-based earthquake engineering problems. Prerequisites: 203, 283.

CEE 289. Random Vibrations. 3-4 Units.

Introduction to random processes. Correlation and power spectral density functions. Stochastic dynamic analysis of multi-degree-of-freedom structures subjected to stationary and non-stationary random excitations. Crossing rates, first-excursion probability, and distributions of peaks and extremes. Applications in earthquake, wind, and ocean engineering. Prerequisite: 203 or equivalent.

CEE 290. Structural Performance and Failures. 2 Units.

Basic concepts in the definition of satisfactory structural performance; key elements in structural performance; types of failures, ranging from reduced serviceability to total collapse; failure sources and their root cause allocation, emphasizing design/construction process failures; failure prevention mechanisms; illustration with real life examples.

CEE 291. Solid Mechanics. 3 Units.

Introduction to vectors and tensors; kinematics, deformation, forces, and stress concept of continua and structures; balance principles; aspects of objectivity; hyperelastic materials; thermodynamics of materials; variational principles; applications to structural engineering.

CEE 292. Computational Micromechanics. 3 Units.

Thermodynamics of general internal variable formulations of inelasticity; 1D and 3D material models at small strains (nonlinear elasticity, viscoelasticity, plasticity, damage); development of efficient algorithms and finite element implementations; micromechanical based crystal plasticity models; review of nonlinear continuum mechanics; micromechanical based finite deformation rubber elasticity models; introduction to homogenization methods and micro-macro transitions. Prerequisite: CEE 281 or equivalent.

CEE 293. Foundations and Earth Structures. 3 Units.

Types, characteristics, analysis, and design of shallow and deep foundations; rigid and flexible retaining walls; braced excavations; settlement of footings in sands and clays; slope stability analysis by method of slices including search algorithms for the critical slip surface. Prerequisite: 101C or equivalent.

CEE 294. Computational Poromechanics. 3 Units.

Continuum and finite element formulations of steady-state and transient fluid conduction problems on geomechanics; elliptic, parabolic, and hyperbolic systems; variational inequality and free-boundary problems; three-dimensional consolidation theory; undrained condition, mesh locking, B-bar and strain projection methods; finite element formulations of multiphase dynamic problems. Computing assignments. Prerequisite: CEE 281 or equivalent.

CEE 295. Plasticity Modeling and Computation. 3 Units.

Rate-independent elastoplasticity; classical plasticity models for metals and cohesive-frictional materials; cap plasticity models for porous materials; return-mapping algorithm; shear bands, faults, and other discontinuities; Lagrange multipliers, penalty and augmented Lagrangian methods for frictional contact; multiscale techniques: extended finite element and strong discontinuity methods; fault rupture dynamics with bulk plasticity. Prerequisite: CEE 281 or equivalent.

CEE 297M. Managing Critical Infrastructure. 2 Units.

Safe and effective performance of infrastructure systems is critical to our economy, quality of life and safety. This course will present topics associated with risk analysis and management of critical civil infrastructure systems, tolerable risk and community resilience. Methods of risk analysis including systems analysis, reliability analysis, expert elicitation and systems analysis for spatially distributed infrastructure systems will be presented. Aspects of seismic and flood risk analysis will also be discussed. Case histories and lessons learned from Hurricane Katrina, Tohoku earthquake, among others will be presented. The evolution of change in the risk management of civil infrastructure systems; how they are analyzed, designed and operated is discussed. Guest speakers. Student presentations. (Prerequisite: CEE 203 or equivalent).

CEE 297R. Structural Geology and Rock Mechanics. 4 Units.

Quantitative field and laboratory data integrated with solutions to boundary value problems of continuum mechanics to understand tectonic processes in Earth's crust that lead to the development of geological structures including folds, faults, fractures and fabrics. Topics include: techniques and tools for structural mapping¿ differential geometry to characterize structures¿ dimensional analysis and scaling relations¿ kinematics of deformation and flow¿ traction and stress analysis, conservation of mass and momentum in a deformable continuum¿ linear elastic deformation and elastic properties¿ brittle deformation including fracture and faulting¿ model development and methodology. Data sets analyzed using MATLAB. Prerequisites: GS 1, MATH 53, MATLAB or equivalent.
Same as: GEOPHYS 251, GS 215

CEE 298. Structural Engineering and Geomechanics Seminar. 1 Unit.

Recommended for all graduate students. Lectures on topics of current interest in professional practice and research.

CEE 299. Independent Study in Civil Engineering for CEE-MS Students. 1-5 Unit.

Directed study for CEE-MS students on subjects of mutual interest to students and faculty. Student must obtain faculty sponsor.

CEE 299L. Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1-4 Unit.

Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor.

CEE 299S. Independent Project in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1-4 Unit.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 29N. Managing Natural Disaster Risk. 3 Units.

Natural disasters arise from the interaction of natural processes, such as earthquakes or floods, with human development that suffers safety-related and economic losses. We cannot predict exactly when those disasters will occur, or prevent them entirely, but we have a number of engineering and policy options that can reduce the impacts of such events.

CEE 300. Thesis. 1-15 Unit.

Research by Engineer candidates.
Same as: Engineer Degree

CEE 301. The Energy Seminar. 1 Unit.

Interdisciplinary exploration of current energy challenges and opportunities, with talks by faculty, visitors, and students. May be repeated for credit.
Same as: ENERGY 301, MS&E 494

CEE 305. Damage and Failure Mechanics of Structural Systems. 3-4 Units.

Examine the mechanics and failure mechanisms of structural deterioration mechanisms and hazards. Overview of fracture mechanics concepts as a general basis for analyzing brittle failure modes in steel and concrete structures. Analysis and design theory for corrosion, fatigue, fire and other damage mechanisms in steel and concrete structures. New methods for mitigation of these failure modes and hazards will be introduced, including new construction materials, structural designs and protection methods.

CEE 306. Computational Fracture Mechanics. 3 Units.

Brief review continuum mechanics; energy principles of mechanics; introduction to fracture mechanics; constrained problems; advanced finite element concepts like mixed, assumed, and enhanced strain methods; computational fracture strategies like cohesive finite elements, embedded and extended finite element methods. Prerequisite: CEE 281 or equivalent.

CEE 307. Structural Design Optimization. 4 Units.

Introduction to optimization (design variables, objective functions, constraints, etc); Multi-objective concept; Pareto optimization; Solution of optimization problems using differential and variational calculus; Mathematical programming methods; Lagrange multipliers and mini-max problems; Penalty function methods; Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) optimality conditions; Sensitivity analysis (analytical, semi-analytical and numerical methods); Introduction to topology optimization; Optimization process in practice (many applications); Graphics statics. Rapid prototyping and 3D printing techniques; Prerequisite: CEE 280 or equivalent in advanced structural analysis, and Matlab programming. Recommended: CEE 281 or equivalent in finite element analysis.

CEE 308. Topics in Disaster Resilience Research. 1 Unit.

This seminar will explore past and current research on disaster risk and resilience, towards the development of new frontiers in resilience engineering science research. Designed for graduate students engaged in the topic of risk and resilience research, the seminar will be organized around weekly readings and discussion groups.

CEE 31. Accessing Architecture Through Drawing. 5 Units.

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.

CEE 316. Sustainable Built Environment Research. 3 Units.

Intended for early stage Ph.D. students in Sustainable Design and Construction (SDC). Covers dominant methodological approaches at the intersection of engineering, social management science and computer science. Overviews an array of methods available for research, focusing on methods commonly used in SDC. Publications using various methods will be analyzed, and journal review processes will be discussed. Major deliverable is research proposal using one or more of the methods discussed. Students will gain familiarity with the array of methods available for SDC research, know how to apply the methods in their own research area, and receive guidance on publishing their research in scientific journals.

CEE 31Q. Accessing Architecture Through Drawing. 5 Units.

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.

CEE 320. Integrated Facility Engineering. 1 Unit.

Individual and group presentations on goals, research, and state-of-practice of virtual design and construction in support of integrated facility engineering, including objectives for the application and further development of virtual design and construction technologies. May be repeated for credit.

CEE 322. Data Analytics for Urban Systems. 3 Units.

TBA.

CEE 323A. Infrastructure Finance and Governance. 1 Unit.

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.

CEE 323B. Infrastructure Finance and Governance. 1 Unit.

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters.

CEE 323C. Infrastructure Finance and Governance. 1 Unit.

Presentation and discussion of early stage or more mature research on a variety of topics related to financing, governance and sustainability of civil infrastructure projects by researchers associated with the Global Projects Center and visiting speakers. To obtain one unit of credit, students must attend and participate in all seminars, with up to two excused absences. Seminar meets weekly during Autumn, Winter and Spring Quarters.

CEE 324. Industrialized Construction. 1-2 Unit.

The course will present driving forces, comprehensive concepts, technologies, and managerial aspects of Industrialized Construction. Further a series of case studies of successful and failed industry implementations in Sweden, North America and Japan will be presented, showcasing process and technology platforms; use of renewable resources and other sustainable design and construction practices. The contrast between industrialized construction practices in Sweden, the U.S. and other countries is highlighted. Project-orientated vs. product-oriented approaches are essential, along with business models and strategies for industrialized construction companies and their opportunities for innovations. The course includes lectures, case studies, and course group-project assignments with leading companies in the industry.nnVisiting lecturer Dr Jerker Lessing, one of Sweden¿s leading experts on industrialized construction with more than 15 years of experience in this field, is giving this course. This is a unique opportunity to learn about this comprehensive, emerging construction concept. Dr Lessing¿s research at Lund University has pioneered the area of industrialized construction and established models and strategic perspectives that are widely adopted throughout academia and industry. Dr Lessing has published articles and books and he frequently lectures on the topic in Sweden and internationally. He is the Director and General manager of Research and Development at BoKlok, an industrialized house-building company which is a joint venture of the construction company SKANSKA and furniture giant IKEA.    n- Notes:nAttendance Mandatory. No Exam. Case and Problem Discussion. CR/NC and Auditing Not Allowed.nEligible for SDC Building & Infrastructure Development concentration area requirement.nNumber of students limited to 20; prerequisites: CEE100 or equivalent. To apply, please email resume to jlessing@stanford.edu and complete the following form: http://goo.gl/forms/guo17lfTcb.

CEE 328A. Multidisciplinary Design and Simulation of Building Envelopes. 3 Units.

Curtain walls are a manufactured product ubiquitous in the world of architecture and engineering that must meet structural, thermal, acoustic, environmental, and economic performance requirements. This course focuses on design strategies for building envelopes and explores new design approaches including parametric 3D modeling, simulation, and Multidsiciplinary Design Optimization (MDO) methods that leverage computation to augment human abilities to identify novel, high performing solutions. Prerequisite: CEE 220A or equivalent. Limited to 16 students.

CEE 32A. Psychology of Architecture. 3 Units.

This course argues that architecture often neglects the interdisciplinary investigation of our internal psychological experience and the way it impacts our creation of space. How does our inner life influence external design? How are we impacted emotionally, physically, psychologically by the spaces we inhabit day to day? How might we intentionally imbue personal and public spaces with specific emotions? This seminar serves as a call to action for students interested in approaching architecture with a holistic understanding of the emotional impact of space. Sample topics addressed will include: conscious vs. unconscious design; the ego of architecture; psycho-spatial perspectives; ideas of home; integral/holistic architecture; phenomenology of inner and outer spaces; exploring archetypal architecture; and translating emotion through environment.

CEE 32B. Design Theory. 4 Units.

This seminar focuses on the key themes, histories, and methods of architectural theory -- a form of architectural practice that establishes the aims and philosophies of architecture. Architectural theory is primarily written, but it also incorporates drawing, photography, film, and other media. nnOne of the distinctive features of modern and contemporary architecture is its pronounced use of theory to articulate its aims. One might argue that modern architecture is modern because of its incorporation of theory. This course focuses on those early-modern, modern, and late-modern writings that have been and remain entangled with contemporary architectural thought and design practice. nnRather than examine the development of modern architectural theory chronologically, it is explored architectural through thematic topics. These themes enable the student to understand how certain architectural theoretical concepts endure, are transformed, and can be furthered through his/her own explorations.

CEE 32D. Construction: The Writing of Architecture. 4 Units.

This seminar focuses on the construction of architectural writing. The class will analyze this idea through four topics: formal analysis, manifesto, translation, and preservation. The seminar is divided into two-week modules with each of these four concepts functioning as organizing principles. nnThe first week of each module will involve familiarizing the seminar with both the terms and rhetorical tactics of the given theme by reading and analyzing specific texts and completing a short written analysis (1-2 pages). The second week will expand upon this foundation and involve further analysis in addition to each student writing a short paper (3-4 pages) drawing on the examples discussed and their own experiences in the discipline. The goal of the seminar is for each student to be able to analyze how an architectural writing is constructed and to develop his/her skills in the construction of his/her own writing.

CEE 32F. Light, Color, and Space. 3 Units.

This course explores color and light as a medium for spatial perception. Through the introduction of color theory, color mixing, and light analyses, students will learn to see and use light and color fields as a way to shape experience. We will examine the work of a range of architects and artist who use light and color to expand the field of perception (i.e. Rothko, Turrell, Eliasson, Holl, Aalto).

CEE 32G. Architecture Since 1900. 4 Units.

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Same as: ARTHIST 142

CEE 32H. Responsive Structures. 2 Units.

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and experiential medium. We will examine the physical properties of a manufactured metal such as wire or mesh, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeat for credit. Total Completions Allowed: 3.
Same as: CEE 132H

CEE 32Q. Place: Making Space Now. 3 Units.

This seminar argues that architeccts are ultimately "placemakers," and questions what that means in the contemporary world. Part I investigates the meaning of the word "place." Additional background for understanding contemporary place making will include a critique of the history of modern place-making through an examination of modern form. Part II examines two traditional notions of place by scale: from "home" to "the city." What elements give these conceptions of space a sense of place? To answer this question, themes such as memory, mapping, and boundary, among others, will be investigated. part III presents challenges to the traditional notions of place discussed in Part II. Topics addressed include: What does it mean to be "out of place"? What sense of place does a nomad have, and how is this represented? What are the "non-places" and how can architects design for these spaces? Part IV addresses the need to re-conceptualize contemporary space. The role of digital and cyber technologies, the construction of locality in a global world, and the in-between places that result from a world in flux are topics discussed in this section of the seminar. nLearning goals: Specific goals include clsoe reading of texts, understanding of philosophical thinking and writing, argument under uncertainty, and developed concepts of place, space and architecture.

CEE 32R. American Architecture. 4 Units.

A historically based understanding of what defines American architecture. What makes American architecture American, beginning with indigenous structures of pre-Columbian America. Materials, structure, and form in the changing American context. How these ideas are being transformed in today's globalized world.
Same as: AMSTUD 143A, ARTHIST 143A, ARTHIST 343A

CEE 32S. The Situated Workplace and Public Life. 4 Units.

The modern workplace has undergone fundamental change and continues to evolve. The context of work in many industries is today being shaped substantially by changing workforce demographics, the pervasiveness of mobile and embedded information technologies, hyper-connected work models on a global scale, evolving notions of health and well being, etc. nnOur public realm is changing too. People are moving to cities in greater numbers than ever before posing both challenges and opportunities related to new levels of density, sustainable resource management, resilient infrastructures, as well as new forms of civic engagement at neighborhood levels, to name but a few. These changes at an urban scale impact how and where public life happens and how it interacts with new modalities at work.nnThis course will combine research, conceptual explorations, studio design work, seminars and guest lectures to explore the impact of the changing workplace on the morphology of the city by examining these bi-coastal seats of innovation. As the creative workplace continues to evolve, how will it engage the public realm within both well-established urban frameworks such as San Francisco and Boston, and emerging suburban contexts, such as Silicon Valley?nnThe course will join graduate students from the Northeastern University School of Architecture with students from the Stanford University Architectural Design program. Students will reside primarily at their prospective universities and will travel selectively for site research, team charettes and project reviews. Project sites on both coasts will be utilized for research and studio work. This is an opportunity for students from two top universities, both situated in the epicenters of workplace change, to explore and conduct valuable research on an issue that is changing their urban environments.

CEE 32T. Making and Remaking the Architect: Edward Durell Stone and Stanford. 4 Units.

How does an architect establish a career? How is an architect remembered? What makes a building significant and how should it be preserved, if at all? Fundamental questions about the practice and production of architecture will be examined in this seminar that focuses on the work of Edward Durell Stone (1902-78) and specifically on his work at Stanford and in Palo Alto. By 1955, Stone was so well established that he founded an office in Palo Alto to design the Stanford Medical Center (currently slated for destruction) and several other significant local public buildings, such as the Palo Alto Civic Center. Through site visits to his buildings, research in the Stanford archives, and interviews with architects who worked in his office (among other strategies), students will question how architecture produced in the immediate post-WWII period is thought about historically and how and when it should be preserved.

CEE 32U. California Modernism: The Web of Apprenticeship. 4 Units.

This course will study at the development of Modernism in pre and post WWII California. The class will investigate responses to climatic, technological, and cultural changes that were specific to the state but have now become an idealized tread. We will look at architects and landscape architects who apprenticed with significant design leaders and track how their involvement and explore resulted in changes in building technologies, and influenced the next generation of design thinking and experimentation. The investigations will occur through research, drawings and models, as well as site visits.

CEE 32V. Architectural Design Lecture Series Course. 1 Unit.

Seminar will be a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend thte lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates listed below.nApril 6: Nic Rader of Snohetta (http://snohetta.com)nApril 20: Mark Jensen (http://jensen-architects.com)nMay 4: Kevin Conger of CMG Landscape Architecture (http://www.cmgsite.com)nMay 18: Odile Decq (http://www.odiledecq.com)nJune 2: Gregg Pasquarelli of SHoP Architects. (http://www.shoparc.com) Gregg will be the Fourth Annual AD Program Graduation Speaker.

CEE 32W. Making Meaning: A Purposeful Life in Design. 3 Units.

As designers, how do we lead a life with meaning? What is a fuulfilling life in design and how do we develop personal and professional practices that support this aim? This experiential course will explore how to nourish a purposeful life amidst a culture that can value productivity over presence in the field, identifying "busyness" as a marker of personal worth. How do we bring depth to not only the design process but our individual and collective lives as well? Investigations will include: exploring personal passions, discovering meaningful work in design, understanding work/life/play balance, practicing self-reflection, integrating wellness, cultivating community, and practicing design with integrity. Our time in class will be enjoyed sharing meals, discourse, play, and reflections with both the class cohort and designers that lead lives or purpose and meaning.

CEE 361. Turbulence Modeling for Environmental Fluid Mechanics. 2-4 Units.

An introduction to turbulence and its modeling, including Reynolds-average and large-eddy simulation models. Derivation of closure approximations and models. Impact of numerical code truncation error on turbulence model value and accuracy. Discussion of typical models and their applications to turbulent flows in rivers, estuaries, the coastal ocean and the atmospheric boundary layer (e.g., wind turbines and weather models). Prerequisites: knowledge of hydrodynamics or atmosphere dynamics and the basics of transport and mixing in the environment; consent of instructor.

CEE 362. Numerical Modeling of Subsurface Processes. 3-4 Units.

Numerical modeling including: problem formulation, PDEs and weak formulations, and choice of boundary conditions; solution using the finite-element code COMSOL Multiphysics with a variety of solvers and pre- and postprocessing of data; and interpretation of results. Problems include: flow in saturated porous media with complex boundaries and heterogeneities; solute transport with common reaction models; effects of heterogeneity on dispersion, dilution, and mixing of solutes; variable-density flow and seawater intrusion; upscaling or coarsening of scale; and biofilm modeling. Enrollment limited to 5.

CEE 362G. Stochastic Inverse Modeling and Data Assimilation Methods. 3-4 Units.

Stochastic methods for the solution of inverse problems that are algebraically underdetermined or have solutions that are sensitive to data. Emphasis is on geostatistical methods that, in addition to using data, incorporate information about structure such as spatial continuity and smoothness. Methods for real-time processing of new data. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 363A. Mechanics of Stratified Flows. 3 Units.

The effects of density stratification on flows in the natural environment. Basic properties of linear internal waves in layered and continuous stratification. Flows established by internal waves. Internal hydraulics and gravity currents. Turbulence in stratified fluids. Prerequisites: 262A,B, CME 204.

CEE 363B. Chaos and Turbulence. 3 Units.

An overview of the statistical analysis of unsteady flows, with a focus on chaos and turbulence. Topics will include random variables and statistical analysis; self-similarity, scaling, and symmetries; the turbulent energy cascade and the Kolmogorov similarity hypotheses; intermittency, refined similarity, and multifractal analysis; mixing and transport in chaotic and turbulent flows; and an overview of the effects of additional conservation laws on flow statistics. Prerequisites: CEE 262A or ME 351A, or permission of instructor.

CEE 363F. Oceanic Fluid Dynamics. 3 Units.

Dynamics of rotating stratified fluids with application to oceanic flows. Topics include: inertia-gravity waves; geostrophic and cyclogeostrophic balance; vorticity and potential vorticity dynamics; quasi-geostrophic motions; planetary and topographic Rossby waves; inertial, symmetric, barotropic and baroclinic instability; Ekman layers; and the frictional spin-down of geostrophic flows. Prerequisite: CEE 262A or a graduate class in fluid mechanics.
Same as: ESS 363F

CEE 363G. Field Techniques in Coastal Oceanography. 3 Units.

This course focuses on the design and implementation of coastal oceanographic field studies from implementation through analysis. A wide range of field instrumentation and techniques, including AUVs and scientific diving is covered. Field studies. Data collection and analysis under instructor guidance.

CEE 363H. Topics in Stratified Turbulence. 2 Units.

An exploration of classical and current papers dealing with the behavior of turbulence in stratified environments. This is a seminar-style class where each student will be expected to make presentations and lead discussions during the course of the quarter. Enrollment is limited and is based on the consent of the instructor. Prerequisites -- graduate coursework in turbulence and stratified flows.

CEE 364F. Advanced Topics in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics. 2-3 Units.

A seminar-style class covering the classic papers on the theory of the large-scale ocean circulation. Topics include: wind-driven gyres, mesoscale eddies and geostrophic turbulence, eddy-driven recirculation gyres, homogenization of potential vorticity, the ventilated thermocline, subduction, and the abyssal circulation. Prerequisite: EESS 363F or CEE 363F. Recommended: EESS 246B.
Same as: ESS 364F

CEE 365A. Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology. 2-6 Units.

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 365B. Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology. 2-6 Units.

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 365C. Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology. 2-6 Units.

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 365D. Advanced Topics in Environmental Fluid Mechanics and Hydrology. 2-6 Units.

Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 370A. Environmental Research. 5-6 Units.

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 370B. Environmental Research. 5-6 Units.

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 370C. Environmental Research. 5-6 Units.

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 370D. Environmental Research. 3-6 Units.

Introductory research experience for first-year Ph.D. students in the Environmental Engineering and Science program. 15-18 hours/week on research over three quarters. 370A requires written literature survey on a research topic; 370B requires oral presentation on experimental techniques and research progress; 370C requires written or oral presentation of preliminary doctoral research proposal. Students must obtain a faculty sponsor.

CEE 371L. Helminthic Disease Monitoring and Control.. 5 Units.

Assessment will be based upon weekly written and/or oral reports, with a final written critical review due at the end of the quarter.

CEE 371M. Transport Phenomena: Momentum, heat and mass transport. 3 Units.

Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint of basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state; laminar and turbulent flow; boundary layer theory. Prerequisites: fluid mechanics, ordinary differential equations.
Same as: CEE 271M

CEE 374A. Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms. 1-6 Unit.

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.

CEE 374B. Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms. 1-6 Unit.

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.

CEE 374C. Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms. 1-6 Unit.

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.

CEE 374D. Introduction to Physiology of Microbes in Biofilms. 1-6 Unit.

Diversification of biofilm populations, control of gene expression in biofilm environments, and evolution of novel genetic traits in biofilms.

CEE 374S. Advanced Topics in Microbial Pollution. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 374T. Advanced Topics in Coastal Pollution. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 374U. Advanced Topics in Submarine Groundwater Discharge. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 374V. Advanced Topics in Microbial Source Tracking. 1-5 Unit.

May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 374W. Advanced Topics in Water, Health and Development. 1-18 Unit.

Advanced topics in water, health and development. Emphasis on low-and-middle-income countries. Class content varies according to interests of students. Instructor consent required.

CEE 374X. Advanced Topics in Multivariate Statistical Analysis. 1-6 Unit.

Analysis of experimental and non-experimental data using multivariate modeling approaches. May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required for enrollment.

CEE 375A. Water, Climate, and Health. 3 Units.

This course will review and discuss current litWater, Climate, and Healtherature on the water, climate, and human health nexus. We will review the climate-change projections from the most recent IPCC assessment and discuss their implications for water access and infectious disease, with an emphasis on low- and middle-income countries. Each student will write a research proposal t hat proposes novel research on the water, climate, and human health nexus. Course enrollment is capped. Permission to enroll must be obtained from the instructors through an application process.

CEE 377. Research Proposal Writing in Environmental Engineering and Science. 1-3 Unit.

For first- and second-year post-master's students preparing for thesis defense. Students develop progress reports and agency-style research proposals, and present a proposal in oral form. Prerequisite: consent of thesis adviser.

CEE 378D. Seminar of Statistical Analysis of Multidisciplinary Primary Data. 1-3 Unit.

Practical management and analysis techniques for primary data collected in multidisciplinary projects. Selection of appropriate statistical tests, interpretation of results, and effective communication of findings to lay audiences. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate techniques, including hypothesis testing, nonparametric statistics, regression analysis and matching. Use of SPSS statistical package. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

CEE 379. Introduction to PHD Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering. 1 Unit.

This seminar course will cover important topics for students considering a PhD in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Sessions will include presentations and discussions on career development, exploring research and adviser options, and the mechanics of PhD studies, including General Qualifying Exam requirements for all CEE PHD Students. In addition, CEE faculty will give presentations on their research. This seminar is required for CEE students considering a PHD or preparing to sit for the General Qualifying Exam in Civil and Environmental Engineering.

CEE 381. Advanced Engineering Informatics. 1-4 Unit.

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CEE 385. Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering. 3-4 Units.

Synthesis and application of approaches to performance-based design and assessment that recently have been developed or are under development. Emphasis is on quantitative decision making based on life-cycle considerations that incorporate direct losses, downtime losses, and collapse, and the associated uncertainties. Hazard analysis, response simulation, damage and loss estimation, collapse prediction. Case studies. Prerequisites: 282, 287, and 288.

CEE 398. Report on Civil Engineering Training. 1 Unit.

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors; meets the requirements for Curricular Practical Training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser as per I-Center procedures.

CEE 399. Advanced Engineering Problems. 1-10 Unit.

Individual graduate work under the direction of a faculty member on a subject of mutual interest. For Engineer Degree students and Pre-quals Doctoral students. Student must have faculty sponsor. May be repeated for credit.

CEE 400. Thesis. 1-15 Unit.

For students who have successfully completed the department general qualifying examination. Research and dissertation for the Ph.D. degree.
Same as: Ph.D. Degree

CEE 48N. Managing Complex, Global Projects. 3 Units.

This freshman seminar highlights the challenges the challenges associated with planning and executing complex and challenging global projects in private, governmental and nonprofit/NGO settings. Covers organization and project management theory, methods, and tools to optimize the design of work processes and organizations to enhance complex, global project outcomes. Student teams model and analyze the work process and organization of a real-world project team engaged in a challenging local or global project.

CEE 50N. Multi-Disciplinary Perspectives on a Large Urban Estuary: San Francisco Bay. 3 Units.

This course will be focused around San Francisco Bay, the largest estuary on the Pacific coasts of both North and South America as a model ecosystem for understanding the critical importance and complexity of estuaries. Despite its uniquely urban and industrial character, the Bay is of immense ecological value and encompasses over 90% of California's remaining coastal wetlands. Students will be exposed to the basics of estuarine biogeochemistry, microbiology, ecology, hydrodynamics, pollution, and ecosystem management/restoration issues through lectures, interactive discussions, and field trips. Knowledge of introductory biology and chemistry is recommended.
Same as: EARTHSYS 49N, ESS 49N

CEE 6. Physics of Cities. 3 Units.

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent.

CEE 63. Weather and Storms. 3 Units.

Daily and severe weather and global climate. Topics: structure and composition of the atmosphere, fog and cloud formation, rainfall, local winds, wind energy, global circulation, jet streams, high and low pressure systems, inversions, el Niño, la Niña, atmosphere/ocean interactions, fronts, cyclones, thunderstorms, lightning, tornadoes, hurricanes, pollutant transport, global climate and atmospheric optics.
Same as: CEE 263C

CEE 64. Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions. 3 Units.

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci.
Same as: CEE 263D

CEE 70. Environmental Science and Technology. 3 Units.

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Same as: ENGR 90

CEE 70N. Water, Public Health, and Engineering. 3 Units.

Preference to frosh. Linkages between water, wastewater and public health, with an emphasis on engineering interventions. Topics include the history of water and wastewater infrastructure development in the U.S. and Europe; evolution of epidemiological approaches for water-related health challenges; biological and chemical contaminants in water and wastewater and their management; and current trends and challenges in access to water and sanitation around the world. Identifying ways in which freshwater contributes to human health; exposure routes for water- and sanitation-illness. Classifying illnesses by pathogen type and their geographic distribution. Identifying the health and economic consequences of water- and sanitation-related illnesses; costs and benefits of curative and preventative interventions. Interpreting data related to epidemiological and environmental concepts. No previous experience in engineering is required.

CEE 73. Foundations of Water Science and Engineering. 3 Units.

No water, no life. Water shapes the earth. Its utilization, management, and control are critical concerns of all human societies. This class introduces basic scientific and engineering concepts and applies them to aquatic systems. We explore how water properties and processes act to sustain the planet and how human actions modify (for both good and ill) our water world.

CEE 801. TGR Project. 0 Units.

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Same as: Engineer Degree

CEE 802. TGR Dissertation. 0 Units.

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Same as: PhD degree

CEE 80N. Influences on Structural Design. 3 Units.

In this seminar, students will be introduced to the history of modern bridges, buildings and other large-scale structures. Classes will include presentations on transformations in structural design inspired by the development of new materials, increased understanding of hazardous overloads and awareness of environmental impacts. Basic principles of structural engineering and how to calculate material efficiency and structural safety of structural forms will be taught using case studies. The course will include a field trip to a Bay Area large-scale structure, hands-on experience building a tower and computational modeling of bridges, and a paper and presentation on a structure or structural form of interest to the student. The goal of this course is for students to develop an understanding and appreciation of modern structures, influences that have led to new forms, and the impact of structural design on society and the environment. Students from all backgrounds are welcome.