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Nondiscrimination Policy

Stanford University admits qualified students of any race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, and gender identity to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the University. Consistent with its obligations under the law, Stanford prohibits unlawful discrimination on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin, sex, age, disability, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by applicable law in the administration of the University's programs and activities; Stanford also prohibits unlawful harassment including sexual harassment and sexual violence. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding this nondiscrimination policy: Director of the Diversity and Access Office, Mariposa House, 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8230; (650) 723-0755 (voice), (650) 723-1791 (fax), equal.opportunity@stanford.edu (email). Stanford’s Title IX Coordinator, Cathy Glaze, has been designated to handle inquiries regarding sexual harassment and sexual violence: Mariposa House (2nd floor), 585 Capistrano Way, Stanford, CA 94305, (650) 497-4955 (voice), (650) 497-9257 (fax), titleix@stanford.edu (email).

Visas

In order to register as students, Stanford University requires that all those who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. registered permanent residents obtain and maintain an appropriate visa status for their stay in the United States. The types of student visas sponsored by Stanford include the following:

  1. Student Visa (F-1), obtained with an I-20 Certificate of Eligibility issued by Stanford University. The graduate student on an F-1 visa must enroll in a full course of study. The accompanying spouse or child enters on an F-2 visa. F-2 visa holders may not hold employment or engage in business under any circumstances. The F-2 spouse of an F-1 student may not engage in full-time study, and the F-2 child may only engage if the study is in an elementary or secondary school (kindergarten through twelfth grade). The F-2 spouse and child may engage in study that is avocational or recreational in nature.
  2. Exchange Visitor Visa (J-1), obtained with a DS-2019 Certificate of Eligibility issued by Stanford University or a sponsoring agency. This visa is required for graduate students sponsored by certain agencies, foundations, and governments. In some cases, exchange visitors must leave the United States at the conclusion of their programs, may not change to non-student visa status, and may not apply for permanent residency in the United States until they have returned to their home countries for at least two years. The accompanying spouse or child of an exchange visitor enters on a J-2 visa and may, in some cases, obtain permission to work. J-2 dependents can apply for an Employment Authorization document from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in order to be employed in the U.S. There is no regulatory restriction on study for J-2 dependents.

The Certificate of Eligibility (I-20/DS-2019) is issued to an admitted student after receipt of certification of adequate financial support. An F-1 student transferring from another U.S. school must obtain a new I-20 document from Stanford and complete a transfer process at the Bechtel International Center no later than 15 days after the effective date of the transfer. A J-1 student transferring from another U.S. school must obtain a new DS-2019 document from Stanford and complete a transfer process at the Bechtel International Center no later than 30 days after the effective date of the transfer.

For academic programs that require work authorization in the United States (such as to serve as a teaching assistant or research assistant), Stanford University reserves the right to rescind the admission and terminate the student status of any student who fails to timely obtain and maintain that work authorization status.

Rescission

By applying for admission to Stanford University academic programs, applicants certify that the information they provide in their applications is complete, accurate, and their own work. As also noted in the application materials, Stanford reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission under certain circumstances, including (but not limited to):

  1. if there is a significant drop in academic performance, a failure to graduate (in the applicant's current program), or a failure to satisfy a prerequisite or condition of admission;
  2. if there has been a misrepresentation in the application process or a breach of any of the terms of the application process; or
  3. if the University learns that an individual has engaged in behavior prior to the first day of enrolled Stanford attendance that indicates a serious lack of judgment or integrity.

Indeed (and for example), Stanford may rescind an individual's admission at any time, including after attendance and after degree conferral, if it determines, for example, that an individual has been admitted to Stanford on the basis of having provided false information; has withheld requested information; or has engaged in behavior prior to the first day of enrolled Stanford attendance that indicates a serious lack of judgment or integrity.

The University reserves the right to require individuals to provide additional information (and/or authorization for the release of information) about any such matter, and to place a hold on registration and/or the conferral of a degree during the investigation into any such matter. Stanford also reserves the right in perpetuity to investigate the authenticity, accuracy, and authorship of materials submitted, information provided, and assertions made in connection with the application.

Similarly, Stanford University awards degrees on the basis of successful completion of all program requirements in accordance with Stanford's policies and procedures, including the Honor Code, requiring academic honesty and integrity. The University reserves the right to rescind any degree or honors designation (even after conferral) if the program requirements have not been so completed, and to place a hold on issuing a degree during the investigation into any such matter.

For academic programs that require work authorization in the United States (such as to serve as a teaching assistant or research assistant), Stanford University reserves the right to rescind the admission and terminate the student status of any student who fails to timely obtain and maintain that work authorization status.

Holds

Students with unmet financial (or other University) obligations resulting in the placement of a hold on their registration cannot receive a transcript, statement of completion, degree certificate, or diploma until the hold is released; as a condition of attending Stanford, students accept this provision.

Undergraduate Admission

Stanford's undergraduate community is drawn from throughout the United States and the world. It includes students whose abilities, intellectual interests, and personal qualities allow them to benefit from and contribute to the University's wide range of teaching and research programs in the humanities, natural sciences, social sciences, and engineering. The University admits students who derive pleasure from learning for its own sake; who exhibit energy, creativity, and curiosity; and who have distinguished themselves in and out of the classroom.

Stanford welcomes a diverse community that cuts across many dimensions. The University does not use quotas of any kind in its admission process: it does not favor particular schools or types of schools, nor any geographic region, nor does it have any racial, religious, ethnic, or gender-related quotas. The University believes that a student body that is both highly qualified and diverse in terms of culture, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, work and life experiences, skills, and interests is essential to the educational process. Applications are encouraged from those who would take the initiative and responsibility for their own education and who would provide additional dimensions to the University and its programs.

In order to preserve the residential character of the University and to maintain a favorable student-faculty ratio, Stanford has a limited undergraduate enrollment. The anticipated size of the freshman class is approximately 1,600-1,700 students who are admitted for Autumn Quarter enrollment. Approximately 20-40 transfer students, entering either the sophomore or junior class, are also typically admitted for Autumn enrollment if space allows. Each year, the University receives many more applications from qualified students than there are places available.

Stanford is committed to meeting the University-computed financial need of each admitted student, and admission decisions are made without regard to the applicant's financial status, except in the case of international students who are neither U.S. citizens nor U.S. registered permanent residents.

Application procedures, requirements, and deadlines vary from year to year. See the Undergraduate Admission web site for the most recent information and to begin an application online; or call the Office of Undergraduate Admission at (650) 723-2091.

Nonmatriculated Study (Undergraduate)

Permission to enroll at Stanford as a nonmatriculated student during Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters is not routinely approved except under extenuating circumstances. Nonmatriculated students authorized to enroll at Stanford University are not admitted to any Stanford degree program and are permitted to register for a specific period, usually one, two, or three quarters. Financial assistance from Stanford University is not available. Permission to enroll as a nonmatriculated student does not imply subsequent admission as a matriculated student.

Nonmatriculated status is a privilege and not a right. The University reserves the right, at its discretion, to withhold registration from, or require withdrawal for the program by, any student or applicant. In addition, nonmatriculated status may be revoked at the University's discretion (and after consideration of such factors as the University considers relevant in the particular case) at the end of any quarter of enrollment.

Students interested in nonmatriculated status during the Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters should contact the Office of the University Registrar, not the Office of Undergraduate Admission. Note: newly admitted Stanford students (that is, those admitted to a Stanford degree program) are not eligible to enroll for nonmatriculated study for any quarter, except with the permission of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education (or his or her designee) under extenuating circumstances.

High School Nonmatriculated Students

Local high school students are eligible to be considered to attend Stanford as nonmatriculated students on a limited basis when they have exhausted all of the courses in a given discipline offered by their high school. Nonmatriculated high school students are permitted to enroll in one course per quarter and are required to pay the applicable tuition. Permission from the academic department and the University Registrar is required. The Language Center does not allow high school students to enroll in language courses during the academic year. High school students who are accepted to participate in High School Summer College may enroll in language courses as part of Summer Session, space permitting.

Summer Session

Students wishing to enroll as nonmatriculated students during Summer Quarter should contact the Summer Session Office for more information about the Summer Visitor Program. Admission to the Summer Visitor Program does not imply regular admission to Stanford for subsequent quarters or to one of Stanford's regular degree programs.

Graduate Admission

Matriculated Study (Graduate Students)

Applicants from colleges and universities of recognized standing who hold a U.S. bachelor's degree or its equivalent are eligible to be considered for admission for graduate study. Details regarding degrees offered in specific departments are given on the Graduate Admissions web site. The number of applicants who can be admitted for work in a particular field of study at any time is limited by the facilities and programs of the school or department and by the number of matriculated students who continue their work in that field.

As with its undergraduate program, Stanford believes that a graduate student body that is both highly qualified and diverse in terms of culture, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, gender, work and life experience, skills, and interests is essential to the graduate educational process. It particularly welcomes applications from African Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans, as well as from others whose backgrounds and experiences would add additional dimensions to the University's educational programs.

Honors Cooperative Program

The Honors Cooperative Program (HCP) is a part-time graduate program offered by Stanford University. It allows working professionals, who may be eligible for tuition support through their employer, an opportunity to earn a graduate degree in any of the engineering programs, applied physics, statistics, or biomedical informatics, on a part-time basis.

Prospective HCP students apply to the department in which they would like to pursue a graduate degree through the normal graduate admissions process, and compete with all other applicants for admission to the program. Once admitted, HCP students arrange their part-time status and tuition payment options through the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD). Courses are delivered online and broadcast locally. HCP students are also welcome to attend certain classes on campus, and some on-campus attendance may be required depending on the degree track.

To participate, HCP students must have the support of their employer as a participating company of the Stanford Center for Professional Development. For more information, see the Stanford Center for Professional Development (SCPD) web site, or phone (650) 725-3000.

The Coterminal Degree Program

This program permits matriculated Stanford undergraduates to study for a Master of Arts (M.A.) or Master of Science (M.S.) degree while completing their bachelor's degree(s) in the same or a different department. Application policies and procedures are established by each master's department or program. Interested Stanford undergraduates should directly contact the department or program in which they wish to pursue a master's degree and must adhere to the application deadlines. Stanford undergraduates may also choose to apply to Stanford graduate degree programs through the standard graduate admissions process as described in the Graduate Admission section of this bulletin. Such applicants are not coterminal students and coterminal policies do not apply.  For more information, see the Coterminal Degrees section of this bulletin.

Application Process

Specific information regarding test requirements, other application procedures and requirements, and closing dates for filing applications and supporting credentials for admission and financial aid are listed on the Graduate Admissions web site.

Graduate fellowship funds and assistantships are generally committed in March for the entire period comprising Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters of the next academic year. Awards are seldom made to students who enter the University in Winter, Spring, and Summer quarters; such applicants must meet the same financial aid application requirements as those entering in Autumn Quarter.

Applications are to be submitted electronically for graduate programs in the schools of Business, Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, and the Biosciences (non-M.D. programs in Medicine). Application instructions may be found at the Graduate Admissions web site.

For admission to the following programs, apply directly via the web sites below.

Business

Admission information is available for the M.B.A., MSx Program, and Ph.D. programs at the Stanford Graduate School of Business Admissions web site. All applications must be submitted electronically.

Law

Applicants for the JD degree should see the Law School Admissions web site. Applicants for LLM, JSM, JSD, and MLS degrees can find instructions at the Advanced Degree Programs web site. These applications are submitted to the Director of Admissions, School of Law, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-8610. The Law School Admissions Test is required.

M.D. Program

Applicants should see the M.D. admissions web site or, for additional information about the M.D. program, write to Stanford University School of Medicine, Office of M.D. Admissions, 251 Campus Drive, MSOB X3C01, Stanford, CA 94305-5404. The American Medical College Application Service (AMCAS) application is available at the AMCAS web site. Applications and transcripts must be received by AMCAS by October 15. The Medical College Admissions Test is required.

Rescission

By applying for admission to Stanford University academic programs, applicants certify that the information they provide in their applications is complete, accurate, and their own work. As also noted in the application materials, Stanford reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission under certain circumstances, including (but not limited to):

  1. if there is a significant drop in academic performance, a failure to graduate (in the applicant's current program), or a failure to satisfy a prerequisite or condition of admission;
  2. if there has been a misrepresentation in the application process or a breach of any of the terms of the application process; or
  3. if the University learns that an individual has engaged in behavior prior to the first day of enrolled Stanford attendance that indicates a serious lack of judgment or integrity.

Indeed (and for example), Stanford may rescind an individual's admission at any time, including after attendance and after degree conferral, if it determines, for example, that an individual has been admitted to Stanford on the basis of having provided false information; has withheld requested information; or has engaged in behavior prior to the first day of enrolled Stanford attendance that indicates a serious lack of judgment or integrity.

The University reserves the right to require individuals to provide additional information (and/or authorization for the release of information) about any such matter, and to place a hold on registration and/or the conferral of a degree during the investigation into any such matter. Stanford also reserves the right in perpetuity to investigate the authenticity, accuracy, and authorship of materials submitted, information provided, and assertions made in connection with the application.

Similarly, Stanford University awards degrees on the basis of successful completion of all program requirements in accordance with Stanford's policies and procedures, including the Honor Code, requiring academic honesty and integrity. The University reserves the right to rescind any degree or honors designation (even after conferral) if the program requirements have not been so completed, and to place a hold on issuing a degree during the investigation into any such matter.

For academic programs that require work authorization in the United States (such as to serve as a teaching assistant or research assistant), Stanford University reserves the right to rescind the admission and terminate the student status of any student who fails to timely obtain and maintain that work authorization status.

Holds

Students with unmet financial (or other University) obligations resulting in the placement of a hold on their registration cannot receive a transcript, statement of completion, degree certificate, or diploma until the hold is released; as a condition of attending Stanford, students accept this provision.

Nonmatriculated Study (Graduate Students)

Eligibility for consideration for nonmatriculated enrollment is restricted to two groups of applicants:

  1. Stanford alumni who wish to return to Stanford to take courses that are prerequisites for Medical School admission, such as undergraduate Biology or Chemistry courses, are eligible to apply for nonmatriculated status. An application form, application fee, statement of purpose, and three letters of recommendation are required. The decision to admit or deny is made by the Director of Graduate Admissions on the basis of relevant factors, including at least a 3.0 GPA and positive letters of recommendation.
    1. Applicants who graduated from other universities are not eligible to take the prerequisites for Medical School at Stanford.
  2. Individuals who hold a bachelor’s degree or equivalent and wish to take courses in a specific department that allows non-degree students are eligible to apply for nonmatriculated status. An application form, application fee, statement of purpose, original transcripts, and three letters of recommendation are required. The decision to admit or deny is made by the chair of the department in which they wish to take courses and conveyed in writing to the Graduate Admissions Office. Applicants are notified of the decision by Graduate Admissions in the Office of the University Registrar.

Students who are granted nonmatriculated status are charged the 8-10 unit rate for each quarter in which they are enrolled, and may enroll for a maximum of a total of one academic year. Nonmatriculated status is a privilege and not a right; the nonmatriculated status may be revoked at the University’s discretion (and after consideration of such factors as the University considers relevant in the particular case) at the end of any quarter of enrollment.

Nonmatriculated students are not permitted to enroll in certain courses, such as those in the following departments or programs: film and broadcasting courses in Art; all courses in Computer Science, Economics, Electrical Engineering, International Policy Studies, and the School of Medicine. Nonmatriculated students must limit their enrollment to classes in the department in which they have been admitted. Nonmatriculated students receive academic credit for courses satisfactorily completed and may obtain an official transcript. As a general proposition, they may use University facilities and services. In classes of limited enrollment, students in degree programs have priority. Nonmatriculated students may apply for housing but have a low priority for assignment and are not guaranteed housing. No fellowships, assistantships, or Stanford loans are available for nonmatriculated students. Nonmatriculated students are not eligible for a leave of absence.

Nonmatriculated students who later apply for admission to a degree program must meet the standard admission requirements and should not anticipate special priority because of work completed as a nonmatriculated student. Students who are admitted to a degree program may apply a maximum of 15 units of nonmatriculated study toward the residency requirement for a master’s degree and 30 units for the Engineer or Ph.D. degree, subject to the approval of the degree granting department.

Application forms for nonmatriculated status during the regular academic year are available from Graduate Admissions, Office of the University Registrar. Deadlines for applying are included with the forms and are generally required two months before the start of the quarter.

Applicants interested in nonmatriculated student status for the Summer Quarter only should explore the Summer Session website.

Non-Degree-Granting Programs

Stanford University has established a limited number of formal non-degree-granting programs within individual departments. These include the Knight Fellowship Program for mid-career journalists (Communication Department), and the Stegner Fellows Program for selected authors (Creative Writing Program, within the English Department).

Individuals may apply to these programs directly. Application requirements, admissions decisions, tuition requirements and financial support are all handled by the specific program. Individuals who are admitted to these programs will be registered at Stanford as nonmatriculated graduate students in the appropriate program. Upon completion of their program, they will receive a transcript and certificate of program completion.

Individuals who commit violations of University policy, the Honor Code, or the Fundamental Standard are subject to termination. Individuals in non-degree granting programs are subject to removal or discipline according to the program's policies or practices, not through the Office of Community Standards.

Stanford Center for Professional Development

Qualified individuals may pursue graduate and professional certificates or take individual graduate and professional courses through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. Nonmatriculated students taking individual graduate courses for credit, or towards earning a graduate certificate, are charged tuition on a per-unit basis. For more information on available courses, applications, and deadlines visit http://scpd.stanford.edu or phone (650) 725-3000.

Postdoctoral Scholars

Postdoctoral scholars are trainees in residence at Stanford University pursuing advanced studies beyond the doctoral level in preparation for an independent career. Postdoctoral scholars are appointed for a limited period of time and may participate in Stanford research projects and/or may be supported by external awards or fellowships. In all cases, their appointment at Stanford is for the purpose of advanced studies and training under the sponsorship of a Stanford faculty member.

Postdoctoral appointments require initial full-time engagement in the designated research or study and are generally restricted to those who have earned a terminal degree such as Ph.D. or J.D. within the last three years or a medical degree such as M.D., M.B.B.S., or D.D.S. within the last six years. Requests for exceptions for individuals who are beyond these limits, or have not been actively engaged in research as their primary effort, must include a written statement from the sponsoring faculty member indicating what additional training outside the primary area of effort the individual plans to receive, and the reasons for which the exception is requested. Postdoctoral scholars are appointed at Stanford for fixed terms, typically one year but that may eventually total up to four years, and are subject to a strict five-year rule (that is, that the total postdoctoral appointment period is not to exceed a total of five years of postdoctoral research experience at all institutions combined). In cases of combined training, only the years of active research at the postdoctoral level are counted for salary and other purposes. Postdoctoral scholars who begin a second postdoctoral appointment in a new field may have training extended to a maximum total of up to six years. Postdoctoral scholars may request temporary reductions in effort and pay due to temporary family or other conditions.

All postdoctoral scholars appointed at Stanford must be supported by Stanford grants and contracts, training grants, departmental or school fellowship funds, or external fellowships, or by a combination of these sources. Scholars may not be self-supporting. In addition, all postdoctoral scholars are eligible for a benefits package including medical, dental, life, and disability insurance. Postdoctoral scholars are normally appointed for 100% time.

Postdoctoral scholars must be registered at Stanford during every academic quarter of their appointment. Registration entails payment of a quarterly postdoctoral fee by the academic department or school appointing the scholar.

Prospective postdoctoral scholars should write directly to the department in which they wish to study or check for postdoctoral openings at http://postdocs.stanford.edu/prospects/index.html. For more information, see http://postdocs.stanford.edu.

Visiting Student Researchers

In limited instances, it is to the benefit of Stanford faculty to permit graduate students who have not yet obtained a Ph.D. (or its foreign equivalent) to engage in research on the Stanford campus. This could include students from other universities who are engaged in graduate-level research in a field of interest to the faculty member, or students doing a research rotation as part of a larger research study or grant .

These students must be registered as Visiting Student Researchers if they are in residence at Stanford for more than 30 days; they may be registered as Visiting Student Researchers if they are in residence for fewer than 30 days in order to receive the services available to Visiting Student Researchers. Visiting Student Researcher appointments are limited to one year in duration. Invited persons must be qualified to conduct research at a level comparable to that of other Stanford graduate students, and the research must be of benefit to Stanford as well as to the visitor. Forms for the appointment of Visiting Student Researchers are submitted to Graduate Admissions, Office of the University Registrar by the department issuing the invitation.

Under limited circumstances, the faculty sponsor may request an extension of the Visiting Student Researcher's appointment beyond one year. Such extensions require the concurrence of the student's home institution. Extensions beyond the second year are extremely rare, and require approval in advance from the office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education

Visiting Student Researchers are charged a monthly Visiting Student Researcher fee for each month in which they hold this appointment at Stanford, including partial months. They may waive the University’s student medical insurance plan only if they have comparable coverage with another carrier and submit proof of the comparable coverage prior to the term start date. Visiting Student Researchers are not entitled to any financial support from Stanford University. They may not be appointed to any assistantship positions nor hold any named Stanford fellowships. Funds intended for the support of matriculated Stanford students may not be used to support Visiting Student Researchers. Stanford cannot certify visiting researchers for deferment of U.S. educational loans.

Visiting Student Researchers are not permitted to enroll in or audit any courses, but in quarters in which they are registered as Visiting Student Researchers, they are eligible for the usual student benefits of nonmatriculated student status. Students in this status are eligible for graduate on-campus housing on a space-available basis. They are also eligible for participation in the programs offered by the Graduate Life Office.

Visiting Student Researchers are subject to the rules and regulations of Stanford University. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Intellectual Property—Visiting Student Researchers are required to sign an SU-18 Stanford Patent and Copyright Agreement.
  • The Honor Code and Fundamental Standard—Visiting Student Researchers who commit violations of these behavioral standards as reasonably determined by the sponsoring department are subject to termination of their Stanford appointment; these cases do not proceed through the Office of Community Standards.
  • Required Training—The faculty member who invited the Visiting Student Researcher is responsible to assure that they receive any required training in order to be able to carry out their research at Stanford, including appropriate privacy and data security training for the protection of personally identifying information and Stanford data, health and safety training, instruction in the protection of human subjects, or any other instruction required by the work that the student will do here.

Citizens of other countries who enter the United States to be Visiting Student Researchers at Stanford must have a DS-2019 Certificate (to apply for a J-1 visa) issued by the Bechtel International Center and must be registered each quarter, including Summer Quarter, to maintain their visa status.

See also the Graduate Academic Policies and Procedures Handbook, Activating Nonmatriculated Graduate Students (GAP 2.3) and the Research Policy Handbook, Section10.7.

Undergraduate Visiting Researcher Interns (Nonmatriculated Study)

During the summer term, students from other universities who have not yet obtained a bachelor’s degree (or its foreign equivalent) may be invited by Stanford faculty to conduct research on the Stanford campus. Participants must be a degree-seeking student for at least two years at the bachelor’s level in a U.S. college or university accredited by a regional accrediting association or international college or university of recognized standing. Participation is contingent upon the approval of Graduate Admissions, Office of the University Registrar.

These students are registered as Undergraduate Visiting Research Interns. Appointments are limited to the Summer term. Invited persons must be qualified to conduct research at a level comparable to that of other Stanford undergraduates, and the research must be of benefit to Stanford as well as to the visitor. Forms for the appointment of Undergraduate Visiting Research Interns are submitted to Graduate Admissions, Office of the University Registrar by the department issuing the invitation.

Undergraduate Visiting Researcher Interns are charged a quarterly fee. They may waive the University’s student medical insurance plan only if they have comparable coverage with another carrier and submit proof of the comparable coverage prior to the term start date. Visiting Research Interns are not entitled to any financial support from Stanford University. Funds intended for the support of matriculated Stanford students may not be used to support Visiting Researcher Interns. Stanford cannot certify visiting researchers for deferment of U.S. educational loans.

Students of New Faculty

Faculty who are being hired by Stanford University, and who are currently advising doctoral students in advanced stages of degree completion at their home university, may appoint one or more of these students as Students of New Faculty, a nonmatriculated graduate status, for the purpose of facilitating the completion of the student's doctoral research with their faculty adviser. To be eligible for this status, the student must:

  • have completed at their home institution all degree requirements equivalent to those required for Stanford’s TGR status (i.e., completed all curricular requirements, candidacy, and residency), and
  • be in good academic standing at their home institution, and remain so while at Stanford, and
  • demonstrate agreement to the terms and conditions for this appointment by signing the Students of New Faculty Representations.

Appointment of these students into nonmatriculated Stanford graduate status requires the approval of the incoming faculty member, that faculty member’s Stanford department chair and school dean, and Stanford’s office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education, as well as of the appropriate office at the student’s home institution.

Approval for these appointments is documented by means of an Affiliation Agreement between Stanford and the student's home institution, identifying the student(s) and describing the arrangements for their appointment at Stanford. Attachments to this agreement specify the timing of the appointment and the sources of financial support, if any, for each student.

Students are appointed into this status for one year at a time, up to a limit of three years. The Stanford department may request extensions beyond the third year. Approval for extensions requires the concurrence of the Stanford school dean’s office and the Vice Provost for Graduate Education, along with the appropriate office(s) at the student’s home institution.

Students of New Faculty must enroll in the appropriate TGR course during each quarter of the academic year while they are at Stanford, and will be charged TGR tuition during each enrolled quarter. Summer enrollment is optional subject to the relevant policies of Stanford and of the home institution. Students of New Faculty may be appointed and paid as Research Assistants. For more information, see GAP 2.4 .

Undergraduate Financial Aid

The University has a comprehensive need-based financial aid program for its undergraduates. Stanford is committed to meeting the University-computed financial need of each admitted student, and admission decisions are made without regard to the applicant's financial status, except in the case of international students who are neither U.S. citizens nor U.S. registered permanent residents.

Before awarding institutional funds, the University assumes that students and their parents accept the first and primary responsibility for meeting educational costs. Stanford's policy generally is to exclude undergraduates from being considered financially independent of their parents for University-administered scholarship aid unless a student is an orphan, a ward of the court, or at least 25 years of age. Spouses of married undergraduate students share in the responsibility to meet educational costs.

Stanford expects financial aid applicants to apply for and use resources from state, federal, and private funding sources, contribute from their earnings during nonenrollment periods (for example, summer), and use earnings from part-time employment during the academic year to meet educational expenses. If Stanford determines that an applicant and his or her family cannot meet standard educational expenses remaining after these resources are applied, the University offers scholarship funds to help meet remaining costs.

The amount of scholarship or grant funds offered to students is determined by the difference between the comprehensive cost of attendance (including tuition, fees, room, board and allowances for books, supplies, personal expenses, and travel) and the amount the student and parents can reasonably be expected to contribute toward educational costs based on family financial circumstances. Scholarships from outside sources may change the University's financial aid award. When a student receives outside scholarships, these funds reduce or eliminate the student's responsibility to contribute from job earnings. If the total in outside scholarships exceeds the student's responsibility, the University then reduces institutional scholarship, dollar for dollar, by any additional amount.

Students are considered for University scholarship eligibility during their first four years of undergraduate enrollment. The Financial Aid Office (FAO) considers applicants for University scholarship eligibility beyond the twelfth quarter only if enrollment is essential in order to complete the minimum requirements for the first baccalaureate degree or major. Students who enroll for a fifth year in pursuit of a coterminal program, a minor, a second major, a second degree, or the B.A.S. degree are not eligible for University scholarship consideration but may apply for student loans and federal grants. Eligibility for federal student aid is limited to the equivalent of 18 quarters of full-time undergraduate enrollment, including course work taken at other colleges and universities. Students must also maintain satisfactory academic progress to retain financial aid eligibility.

For additional detailed information, refer to the FAO web site.

Graduate Financial Aid

Graduate students at Stanford receive funding from a variety of sources. University fellowships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships are offered primarily to doctoral students. In some cases, master's students also may receive fellowships and assistantships. In addition, outside agencies provide fellowships to many graduate students at Stanford. Students without fellowships or assistantships, and those whose funding does not cover all of their costs, may need to use student loans, savings, other personal assets, a spouse's earnings, or parental support to meet their educational expenses.

Veterans' Educational Benefits

The Office of the University Registrar serves as the liaison between the University, its students, and the various federal, state, and local agencies concerned with veterans' benefits. Stanford certifies enrollment for students in degree seeking programs and students in one of 24 VA approved certificate programs offered through the Stanford Center for Professional Development. Other non-matriculated and certificate programs are not eligible. All students eligible to receive veterans' benefits while attending the University are urged to complete arrangements with the appropriate agency in advance of enrollment.

Stanford University is required to certify only those courses that meet minimum graduation requirements. Courses not directly related to a student's degree program or courses beyond those required for a specific degree program are not certified. Undergraduates should meet with an advisor to develop a course enrollment plan. Graduate students should have their departments approve their study lists as meeting graduation requirements on a quarterly basis.

To comply with federal regulations concerning credit for previous training (38 CFR 21.4253), Stanford University is required to evaluate all previous education and training completed elsewhere to determine what credit, if any, should be granted to students eligible to receive Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits. Stanford is required to complete an evaluation; credit is granted when appropriate. Credit is evaluated toward the degree program registered with Veterans Affairs as determined by the Office of the University Registrar in conjunction with the relevant academic department(s) or program(s). All relevant policies regarding transfer credit apply. In addition, this evaluation occurs each time a student's degree program is changed.

Subject to current federal and University guidelines, students eligible for receipt of VA educational benefits have their prior education and training evaluated up to the credit limits outlined in the "Residency Policy for Graduate Students" section of this bulletin. As an exception to that policy, students in master's programs in the schools of Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Humanities and Sciences, Law, Medicine, and Graduate Business are allowed a maximum of 6 transfer (quarter) units. Students should consult with the Office for Military Affiliated Communities (OMAC) for consideration of optimal use of educational benefits.

Stanford participates in the Yellow Ribbon provision of the Post 9/11 GI Bill (Ch. 33). If a matriculated student qualifies for Chapter 33 benefits at the 100% level, the student may be eligible to receive additional funding through the Yellow Ribbon Program. Under this program, Stanford provides an annual award of $3,000 to undergraduate students to supplement the Chapter 33 base tuition benefit. The VA matches Stanford's Yellow Ribbon contribution, so the student receives a combined total of $6,000 in additional funds. Certain matriculated graduate students may be eligible for the Yellow Ribbon provision, and the amount of institutional contribution varies by school and program at the graduate level.

See the Office for Military Affiliated Communities (OMAC) web site for additional information about veterans' educational benefits.